18 Burst results for "Morris Wilkins"

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

11:03 min | 2 d ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"Production of photograph. Fifty one with. Miriam margolis starring. Miriam moss of course once at cambridge. And that's where we go now for challenging view of dr franklin from patricia farah at clare college woman's story is often told as part of a man's during many of her santini celebrations last year. Rosalind franklin was commemorated not for her personal achievements but as a victim of male injustice notably. James watson's she's buried in the united jewish cemetry in williston surrounded by members of her extended family. Her immediate neighbour is jane. Joseph a talented musician from the previous generation. Who like franklin died in her thirty snatch by incurable illness in the midst of a flourishing professional career once a well known composer and performer. Joseph has sunk into obscurity remembered if a tool for her close collaboration with gustav holst franklin is now world famous but instead of being acclaimed for her expertise. She's held up to view as an emblematic female scientist who was unfairly excluded. The anniversary year of twenty twenty provided an unexpectedly apt occasion for re writing franklin significance inscription on her grave reads. Scientists who work on viruses was of lost benefit to mankind a- present reminder of her during contributions the world was a newly gripped by a viral pandemic and success in the quest for cures vaccinations and tests depended on the solid laboratory research. The to stop it. How viruses can invade other cells and spread so rapidly. When she died frankly was a world leader in the field. A brief foray into dna left behind her like all historical narrative scientific developments a repeatedly rewritten. In retrospect in april nineteen fifty-three. James watson and francis crick published a short article in nature describing a possible model for the dna molecule. And they're low key announcement is now hiked up as a transformational moment. That launched an international icon. The double helix yet that summer nobody took much notice. British newspapers were obsessed with edmund hillary's. Climb up mount everest. Roth like franklin tenzing norgay was marginalized at the time only insiders knew about the cambridge pairs bid to scale a scientific summit. Many of those skeptical even creek seemed uncertain consulting. Franklin about possible problems they remained friends and franklin died not realizing that she would provide the focus for bissett controversies about scientific ethics gender discrimination. Franklin's ascalon dna was published in the same issue but by then to her great relief. She already abandoned the prickly misogynistic environment of king's college london welcomed into john testament banal group at college. She headed a small team investigating the tobacco mosaic. Virus or t. Mvp so named for modeling leaves with green and yellow patches over the next few years her renounced steadily increased as she published a stream of papers and was invited to speak at international conferences regarding herself first and foremost scientists rather than a woman franklin refrained from climbing the well trodden stats to bananas bedroom. But she was also determined to protect her rights. Firing off letters to grant awarding bodies in attempts to secure the same salary and promotions as her male colleagues. Tm v might sound. I can trust scientific backwater but this tiny bundle of molecules had been amazed of virality since the new disciplines inception at the end of the nineteenth century staple easily available and highly infectious t v. was an ideal laboratory organism for research and it's the first forest be crystallized an obvious candidate for expert x ray crystallography such as franklin because tm v was destroying crops. Decoding structure carry commercial value and she was awarded funding from the agricultural research council with whom she engaged in several bouts of bureaucratic wrangling about that. Petty economy measures for franklin the fascination of tm v. lay not in it's devastating impact on the tobacco industry but in the opportunity offered to uncover the ruthless trojan horse techniques that viruses of info for inserting themselves into host cells and taking over their reproductive mechanisms. From the beginning she knew deciphering. This organism presented trickier challenges than dna. Each virus contained several sub units of proteins. But the key component is all a a nucleic acid closely related to dna which lethally replicates itself after being smuggled inside a living cell the man who later became her major detractor watson had recently detected a helix structure but franklin was a fall more proficient experimenter correcting his work. She took it further to reveal how the viruses are. Na strand spirals among proteins wrapped around central cylinder creatively adapted bicycle handle grips. She constructed a model that was initially contested but later proved right in every respect once. She had resolved the puzzle of tm v. Franklin moved on to consider other vegetable viruses and then embarked on her final project before she died analyzing the poliomyelitis virus was ruining so many lives in the nineteen fifties. It's spherical structure resembles less of a turn. It virus. She had recently studied but she became too ill. To complete the project heroics lita was taken by. Aaron clue who had specifically requested placement in her group in one thousand nine hundred eighty two. He was awarded the nobel prize for the research. They started together so it seems extremely likely that she would have been similarly on it had she lived in his nature of bigotry. Banal accorded her high praise as a scientist. Miss franklin was distinguished by extreme clarity and perfection in everything she undertook. The photographs are among the most beautiful x ray. Photographs of any substance ever taken although he clearly respected her enormously that jarring miss is a reminder that franklin was automatically treated differently from her male colleagues although she had provided the x ray photograph. Crucial for lucid icing. Dna the nobel prize was awarded in nineteen hundred. Sixty two to three men francis. Crick james watson and morris wilkins. The committee justified her mission on the grounds that she already died. Low an international bestseller watson's romanticized account in the double helix was deplored by crick wilkins and many other eminent. Scientists after pre publication protests mounted. What's and grudgingly tacked on ingratiating apponaug but it did little to mitigate the repugnance aroused by his denigration of franklin after her death apparently revelling in the hostile reviews. Two years later watson cracked a supposedly not joke. I daydream to the yorker might printed onto the rubric. I'm also crime. Because there were those who thought francis. And i have no right to think about other people's data and had in fact stolen the double helix franklin's mother muriel the mental the. I would rather she with a goal than remembered in that way but who wish has been ignored. What since grasp verdicts. On franklin's appearance and behaviour proved a gift early feminist movements condemning male oppression by the end of the twentieth century. She had elevated to her current iconic status yet. This caricaturist victim now seems curiously old-fashioned inappropriate role model for encouraging young women to pursue scientific careers a more suitable female Head would be dorothy hodgkin. Although surprisingly few people have heard of her still the only british woman to have won a nobel science price she possess many of the positive characteristics of female. Scientists aspire towards as well as being a brilliant researcher and much-loved colleague. She supported younger. Women campaign for maternity leave and brought up. Four children seems that her mistake was too nice to quietly successful. The anti-terror mythology of franklin's persecution during life followed by disparagement eventual rebirth. After death evidently more appealing politically engaged in resistance to fascism franklin was a scientist with a conscience whose wartime career was dedicated to studying coal and graphite appropriate enough the spin offs included success mosques. The ppv of the period by twenty one twenty when viral pandemics will probably have increased in frequency and severity. Franklin should have been rebranded as a major pioneer in the global fight for survival watson boasted brashly about uncovering the secret of life..

morris wilkins Miriam margolis Joseph Rosalind franklin James watson Sixty Franklin watson april nineteen fifty last year edmund hillary Four children crick wilkins francis crick muriel thirty nineteen hundred cambridge Miriam franklin
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:38 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"Just playing with her but is no teacher isn't a game boys. Little boys boys not a little boy game plan. Wow that's a woman. That's a sherman. Tank watson retreated and he went into c- wilkins. We'll said she may say it's not a helix. Look at this picture. It's a helix. Look at this on roses. Best without is a helix. There's no two ways about it. How long have you had a few does mars. You have to get moving. I have been patients so far. I could be patient for longer but more so she'll be gone soon. Benefits what happens to the pub the phd student. Raymond gosling was no innocent bystander. He made the photo available. Morris wilkins so how does he feel about it now. It's a source of great. Regret me at the time and ever since that here with these very nice people both established scientist and yet they couldn't get along. I used to run between them Hoping to patch up that differences die if he couldn't talk to roslin. Ah by the picture. It was inevitable. I saying that he should end up in cambridge with his personal friend. Craig whom he'd known from when those students and talk about it there so you might say it wasn't appropriate to that. But it was very understandable. It is true that it took a while. I mean in his book. The double helix warns dozen knowledge. The fact that they built one model which was completely wrong had false vs on the inside and it was only when they knew the diamond was they could go back and false fears on the outside and it was illegal. I've always felt that that after all was why wilkins was joining them. On the podium in getting his noble laureate to acknowledge that a lot of experimental diffraction work on the structure was down at king's now something was done. That ought not to have been done. I think first place in all these papers were published in nature. Roslyn hadn gosling head. One wilkins and our herbert wilson had another. And then there's the famous watson and crick. Paper all came out in nature through some kind of orchestration of publication. Never knows what went on. A nature's own written archive is destroyed. So we just guess. Anyway they had the three papers at once and watson crick crikcet. It is known as much unpublished experimental work from kings. Will actually. They hit us. Roslyn unpublished experimental results. It was not made clear in their publication. Then and to me. The most shocking thing was that they never told her afterward and the three of them quite contrary to what you read in the double helix watson crick and franklin were close collaborators on aren a on virus tobacco mosaic virus research during the last five years of her life she died of ovarian cancer ninety fifty eight and during those years of friendly cooperation. They helped her get to the states. They commented on her paper. Never told her roslyn..

Tank watson wilkins Raymond gosling Morris wilkins roslin Roslyn hadn gosling watson crick herbert wilson cambridge Craig crick watson Roslyn franklin ovarian cancer
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:22 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"A helix structure number fifty one. Very good good. That's the best we've yet one thing at a time. Raymond the form gives us far the most details. I did you the person on the athol. We'll get the before moving. Meanwhile james watson and francis creek at the cavendish laboratory in cambridge were in a hurry. In fact james watson sort as a race and he was determined that he and creek would win. But the data contained in roslyn franklin's masterpiece illustration number fifty one was crucial to the discovery visit. Tiny baker from the university of technology describes the different approaches to finding out about dna between jt randall's lab in london and the cavs schlab at cambridge. Their approach was model building just to build the model that made sense in terms of all the chemical and structural data that was known tonight and i suppose there inspiration for that model building was actually alana's pulling who fairly recently had solved the structure of the alpha helix in proteins and hate essentially done that through model building. So it's physical model building with walls and sticks to represent. Atoms will not as an as sophisticated as balls and sticks. It was more like plights of brass. I think cut to the right dimensions and rods of cut to the right lengths and so forth by the workshops of the kevin dish laboratory at cambridge and one of the critical elements of understanding. How the two strands of the helix fit together. The hydrogen bonding between the base pairs. And they were working with the wrong form of the bases says. I didn't see the hydrogen bonding. But when visiting chemists told jerry donahue visited them in the laboratory and pointed out that they had the tortuous as their non wrong like corrected at an immediately saw the possibilities for hydrogen bonding which really was a very key issue in the final model. They came up with so. It's very interesting that this model building approach depended a lot on picking up tidbits of information from all sorts of people not the least of which of course was the very famous. Viewing of rosalind. Franklin's extraction photographs. Which when watson soared he climbs in the double helix. He's had started racing and immediately knew that they were looking at a double helix. Structure as professor tiny baker says james watson got to see rosalind franklin illustration of the double helix courtesy of morris wilkins but without roslyn knowledge. Little on who permission was this a case of appropriation of rosen's work some say it was underhand and completely out of line but biographer brenda. Maddox doesn't think so no. I don't agree with that. I totally disagree with that. Let's just talk dates on january. Nineteen fifty watson and crick thought. Linus pauling working at caltech in california. It was actually going to come up with the structure of dna so they felt there in a race and the time was moving against them and roslyn so fed up with the whole atmosphere at king's she'd got herself a transfer of a fellowship to birkbeck college. And she said i may be moving from palace to a slump. But i'm sure i shall be happier. I am leaving much work on don in order to get out of kings as fast as possible so in february and march she was ryan. Gosling were writing up their work about what they'd found about. Dna having to change all of that have been sent off to act christopher graphic but then she was clearing out no question so she was leaving these photographs. Behind raymond gosling was a phd student. This was his work to weed. Helped take those. Photographs and wilkins was his superiors. It was it seems to me. Perfectly sensible rate would have shown these photographs. Roslyn wasn't taking them with what's more randall. Rather crudely said don't take dna with you. Think about something else. It belongs to our lab. So one day. Jim watson and this is the central scene on the double helix where he interrupted rosalyn one day and she flared at him date and you. This is a playground. And i've got the ball..

james watson cambridge francis creek roslyn franklin Tiny baker jt randall cavendish laboratory jerry donahue university of technology cavs Raymond alana morris wilkins roslyn biographer brenda watson rosalind franklin rosalind birkbeck college london
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:41 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"The way she sees she's being taken on the set him. An x ray. Diffraction and to work on diana as far as that goes. She's in charge. Is that randall. Total octo no ask sorted out man-to-man scene from the bbc. Fill life story. Depicting morris wilkins anxiety about. Rosalind franklin's arrival kings. Wilkins was away when she arrived so he wasn't the initial meeting in which they sort of things out so it took three or four months actually before they realized that they were in clash a clash of subject and also of personalities and somehow he could never quite get on the same wavelength and she corrected him about some details of the work. She was doing and she felt he was interfering on her own worker. Which is she didn't realise. Randall should have straightened out but didn't and they will also temperamental office. She was very abrupt and clear and spoke fast and liked argument. He was slow evasive and took a long time to say anything tended to turn his head away from people when he was talking to them. There's a clash of opposite isn't what they did was withdraw from each other biographer. Brenda matic's so raymond gosling the self-confessed hd slave boy found. He was also the meeting. The sandwich between franklin and wilkins even so he in roseland spent many painstaking hours in the lab with a precious deny sample collecting data using x ray crystallography and eventually producing the pace to resistance. Photograph number fifty. One raymond gosling describes how this type of the images night. It isn't a photograph. like you. Put your hand in an x ray beam and you get an x ray photograph of the bones in your hand. Wasn't that do you put a crystalline specimen. In the way of a very narrow beam of x rays and what happens is not photography diffraction. The x ray beam is scattered at discrete angles due to the molecular structure in the crystals that sitting in the bean and what you do is to surround the crystal with a film and then you are able to observe discrete reflected beams both in intensity and position and then you have to work out how to get from this cyberspace back to real space which you do. Mathematically that was what we were trying to do i. She was remarkable painstaking in her experimental. Work is entirely due to that. We were able to show that there were really two forms of dna the form and the beef form and what attended work previously was the a. You couldn't get a high molecular weight. Dna sample which we now had of course but also if you didn't control the humidity of the fiber then you will get a mixture of the nba forms being chemist. She knew that you could get various souls. Which if you bubble. Joe hydrogens through the salts to displace the air in the camera. You have to leave the thing in the x ray beam for a long time as it was roslyn and i were able to control the humidity of the hydrogen and showed clearly that you could get entirely a. And then take it all the way through and getting tully be and one of those entirely was the illustration fifty one in my thesis which was so beautifully the transform of.

raymond gosling morris wilkins Brenda matic Rosalind franklin Wilkins randall diana Randall bbc roseland wilkins franklin Joe hydrogens nba roslyn tully
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:14 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"Wrong before awesome prenton began. Dna work at king's college in london. She worked in a government lab in paris. And this is where she picked up her skills in crystallography. Brenda maddox a french. Connection of women. Scientists called out drian whom she met at cambridge put roslin and touch with some people who actually offered her job in a french. Bora try and for her. It was a dream come true so she moved to paris in nineteen forty seven families very apprehensive that she was lowering her standard of living among worried about the immorality of the french and the the usual they had all the english prejudices about the french and Anyway but they were in many ways the happiest years of her life she had a she shared a room and then she had a flat and they all colleagues they all get out at at cafes everyday at lunchtime and she went swimming and riding pillion on motorcycles and going dancing and she was very very happy to come back to london filled her with my have a long letter from her from that moment in which she said she spent the next few regretting she'd ever made the change so it was such an unpromising mood in which she came to learn that i think that anyway we should see us the starting. Point rosen. franklin's brother colin so roseland ambition and love for her work dragged her away from her parisi and dream to king's college london in january. Nineteen fifty one here. Morris wilkins and phd student raymond. Gosling were already working on dna in a lab run by jt. Randall the dna sample. They were working on was given to them by a swiss biochemist and it was a purified high molecular weight. Dna taken from ramsbotham his raymond gosling remembering his days in the lab at king's morris spun fibers out of little blob of gel of the sodium dna and i wound round a paper clip and carry it off in triumph to the chemistry department. And i took diffraction patents. We were fortunate enough to discover that. The fibers of this pure dna were crystalline. All lined up along the fiber axis. So you've got a rotation diffraction baton. Randall then decided that he'd have to head hunt. Somebody with x ray crystal graphic experience because the lots of separate spots in this diffraction pattern and what essentially you have to do is to measure the intensity and position of those spots then use the appropriate mathematics to get from the diffraction pattern transform back to the real molecular structure. And he and wilkins everyone. The lab were very excited because nobody had ever had such a spotty diffraction pattern to work with before he therefore realized we had a good chance of solving the structure and roslyn came to the lab in fifty fifty one to develop the mathematics and try to get back to the structure. Raymond gosling and in his ironic english manor. He described himself the time as the phd slave boy handed over in chains. He enrolls them work closely and got very well. She was not all but a reasonable heightened striking looks she had wonderfully lustrous dark is i found her very attractive. As did i think everyone who worked with her is she was at that time. You see about thirty thirty one. And i was cindy twenty three twenty four so i was somewhat in or of her because she had a very strong personality and she was an assured scientist who'd already established her ability from her work on the gravitons ation of carbon for the cobol. That's how jt randall. New abide hug pas of concentration. We'll fight this and she could get done in a day. What other pupil fights taken several. Raymond gosling describes the lab at king's as a wonderfully stimulating place to work. But he says the department head jt. Randall created some confusion with the arrival of rosalind franklin and that set the scene for the conflict to follow. Now what he did was he headhunted roslyn and told her that she be working with me on solving the structure. What he didn't tell her and this really is the key to the tension throughout malaysia. Rose in the lab between morrison roslyn. He didn't tell. The wilkins was his right hand. Man and was working on the dna problem already. She got the impression you see from the head of the department that it was her problem. What he should have said was the crystalline diffraction pattern. That's your problem. But the overarching problem of trying to get to the structure of this important molecule is really being led by wilkins..

Raymond gosling king's college Brenda maddox Point rosen london Morris wilkins paris Randall ramsbotham roslin Bora parisi cambridge Gosling roslyn colin raymond franklin swimming wilkins
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"Cheeky was recited by james watson and francis creek at a symposium in june nine hundred fifty three to celebrate the discovery of the double helix in nineteen sixty two. They received the nobel prize for this work. Along with morris wilkins. They've been basking in the glory of his saints but there was another crucial contribution to solving the puzzle of deny that of the dock lady of dna roslyn franklin. He's francis creek acknowledging homework on bbc radio in nineteen ninety nine. It was fairly fast. But you know we were lucky. You must remember. It was based off the x ray. Were done here in london. Started off by. Murray's wilkins and carried on by rosen in franklin and we wouldn't have got to the stage of least having a molecular model if it hadn't been for their work will the story is very bleak. She was naps. Brilliant x ray photographer and this was how the physical reality of the double helix model was first. Seen because wont watson and crick quarrel remodelers that that is they were abstract scientists. They were thera- titians so they were making the model as it were in their heads out of those bubbles and sticks that we all know so well which made the double helix model. What roslyn franklin's incredible achievement walls that she was a technically quite brilliant with this new and difficult apparatus of x ray photography and she showed this first image. Hilary rose from city university london. She's been a sociologist. of science. Since the mid seventy s and the image is referring to is the x ray picture taken by rosalind franklin niners photograph number fifty one. It displays a doc. Black spotty cross shape which confirmed for watson and creek. They hypothesise that. The structure of dna is in fact. A double helix. Hilary rose is passionate about rosine. Franklin's contribution and believed her story is one of appropriation and rasiah without her consent. These pictures were taken by the third noble prize winner. Wilkins and they were shown to watson and crick in cambridge and this is appropriation. I mean there are harder woods for it. A ratio of course was dramatic in the nobel prize acceptance speeches. Roslyn is by then dead. So little people forget those no question hoping for price. 'cause they not give them to the dead they given to the living so the three man. None of them acknowledged her work public. What she gets is a footnote in morris wilkin so that's the asia and you would have thought on the occasion art a such a thing as the nobel prize. The woman is dead that there would have been case for little generosity. Not a hint of a three man. Just carry on as if she hadn't existed as she hadn't done the pioneering extra work. It wasn't a pool in shabby story. And there's plenty in the history of science strong views from sociologist. Hilary rose no matter which way you look at it though. The mystery of this dark lady is intriguing author. Brinda medics was so fascinated by rosalind franklin. That she's recently completed a comprehensive biography. He she is with robin williams. Rosen franklin's family very well off for intellectual whether or not they're very wealthy anglo jewish bankers they also had a publishing firm for the sons in the family who actually were inclined to banking rutledge and keegan. Paul you're very distinguished people very proud of their heritage and they trace their ancestry back to king david the founder of jerusalem. So i mean this is a family takes its ancestry seriously and so one of the problems i think was not so much her gender but class. She sounded aristocratic to them. She spoke terribly well very clipped and some people just hated that. And it's one of the many ingredients which actually made her disoriented and not as happy as she might have made a very clever little girl. And i mean as she was growing up quite small. She wasn't very clever. Little girl and i discovered family letter from her aunt mamie. Anyway she noticed rosalyn has a six year old and she rosalind is alarmingly clever. She does her sums for pleasure and invariably gets them right and i thought that alarmingly was very significant because roseland had three brothers but the fact that the girls should be the cleverest really did unnerve. The family and the small way she went to cambridge went to newnham college. Was it an easy path industry just glide in well as much as girls did that era. This is nineteen thirty eight. She went there and only one tenth of the undergraduate body. They didn't actually want to change. The character of the university allowing females in and they weren't even allowed to be full members of the university. they didn't get a degree they got a decree and was called the decree ticha that of course too many jokes about the decree. Tit and you can see what it was like to be a woman at cane ridge but they were there and they. They didn't mind. They were glad to be there because they did get a good education. She got the training for the profession in which she became superb. And when did crystallography come into the picture. It was one of the things that she studied at cambridge. You could see her notebook. She's got want you know it's the starts off. What is crystal and notes and diagrams. Follow all of which are very.

Hilary rose roslyn franklin francis creek morris wilkins watson crick rosalind franklin rosine james watson morris wilkin london Brinda wilkins rosen Rosen franklin niners Murray franklin bbc
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:32 min | 2 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Show

"It's the centenary of rosen. franklin's birth. This year she who made watson crick's revelation of the structure of dna possible. Her photograph of dna made all the difference and was featured in western. Play called photograph. fifty one with nicole. Kidman who else is franklin. But it was after dna. According to patricia farrer of clare college cambridge that her work on viruses and irony made work like this year's fast production of covid vaccine possible all that worth two nobel prices so far. Thank you think just portrait by malcolm. I'm watson i'm creek. Let us show. You are trick. We have found the seed of life sprang from. We believe we're stew of molecular goo with a period of thirty four angstrom. So just think this means to our respective genes that sakes did not be disgusting or you girls. Try that trick of watson and crick and achieved. Double helix lusting cheeky was recited by james watson and francis creek at a symposium in june nine hundred fifty three to celebrate the discovery of the double helix in nineteen sixty two. They received the nobel prize for this work. Along with morris wilkins. They've been basking in the glory of his saints but there was another crucial contribution to solving the puzzle of deny that of the dock lady of dna roslyn franklin. He's francis creek acknowledging homework on bbc radio in nineteen ninety nine. It was fairly fast. But you know we were lucky. You must remember. It was based off the x ray. Were done here in london. Started off by. Murray's wilkins and carried on by rosen in franklin and we wouldn't have got to the stage of least having a molecular model if it hadn't been for their work will the story is very bleak. She was naps. Brilliant x ray photographer and this was how the physical reality of the double helix model was first. Seen because wont watson and crick quarrel remodelers that that is they were abstract scientists. They were thera- titians so they were making the model as it were in their heads out of those bubbles and sticks that we all know so well which made the double helix model. What roslyn franklin's incredible achievement walls that she was a technically quite brilliant with this new and difficult apparatus of x ray photography and she showed this first image. Hilary rose from city university london. She's been a sociologist. of science. Since the mid seventy s and the image is referring to is the x ray picture taken by rosalind franklin niners photograph number fifty one. It displays a doc. Black spotty cross shape which confirmed for watson and creek. They hypothesise that. The structure of dna is in fact. A double helix. Hilary rose is passionate about rosine. Franklin's contribution and believed her story is one of appropriation and rasiah without her consent. These pictures were taken by the third noble prize winner. Wilkins and they were shown to watson and crick in cambridge and this is appropriation. I mean there are harder woods for it. A ratio of course was dramatic in the nobel prize acceptance speeches. Roslyn is by then dead. So little people forget those no question hoping for price. 'cause they not give them to the dead they given to the living so the three man. None of them acknowledged her work public. What she gets is a footnote in morris wilkin so that's the asia and you would have thought on the occasion art a such a thing as the nobel prize. The woman is dead that there would have been case for little generosity. Not a hint of a three man. Just carry on as if she hadn't existed as she hadn't done the pioneering extra work. It wasn't a pool in shabby story. And there's plenty in the history of science strong views from sociologist. Hilary rose no matter which way you look at it though. The mystery of this dark lady is intriguing author. Brinda medics was so fascinated by rosalind franklin. That she's recently completed a comprehensive biography. He she is with robin williams. Rosen franklin's family very well off for intellectual whether or not they're very wealthy anglo jewish bankers they also had a publishing firm for the sons in the family who actually were inclined to banking rutledge and keegan. Paul you're very distinguished people very proud of their heritage and they trace their ancestry back to king david the founder of jerusalem. So i mean this is a family takes its ancestry seriously and so one of the problems i think was not so much her gender but class. She sounded aristocratic to them. She spoke terribly well very clipped and some people just hated that. And it's one of the many ingredients which actually made her disoriented and not as happy as she might have made a very clever little girl. And i mean as she was growing up quite small. She wasn't very clever. Little girl and i discovered family letter from her aunt mamie. Anyway she noticed rosalyn has a six year old and she rosalind is alarmingly clever. She does her sums for pleasure and invariably gets them right and i thought that alarmingly was very significant because roseland had three brothers but the fact that the girls should be the cleverest really did

Hilary rose roslyn franklin francis creek morris wilkins watson crick rosalind franklin rosine james watson morris wilkin london Brinda wilkins rosen Rosen franklin niners Murray franklin bbc
No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

The Science Show

05:32 min | 2 months ago

No acknowledgement, no thanks for Rosalind Franklin who made the discovery of DNA structure possible

"It's the centenary of rosen. franklin's birth. This year she who made watson crick's revelation of the structure of dna possible. Her photograph of dna made all the difference and was featured in western. Play called photograph. fifty one with nicole. Kidman who else is franklin. But it was after dna. According to patricia farrer of clare college cambridge that her work on viruses and irony made work like this year's fast production of covid vaccine possible all that worth two nobel prices so far. Thank you think just portrait by malcolm. I'm watson i'm creek. Let us show. You are trick. We have found the seed of life sprang from. We believe we're stew of molecular goo with a period of thirty four angstrom. So just think this means to our respective genes that sakes did not be disgusting or you girls. Try that trick of watson and crick and achieved. Double helix lusting cheeky was recited by james watson and francis creek at a symposium in june nine hundred fifty three to celebrate the discovery of the double helix in nineteen sixty two. They received the nobel prize for this work. Along with morris wilkins. They've been basking in the glory of his saints but there was another crucial contribution to solving the puzzle of deny that of the dock lady of dna roslyn franklin. He's francis creek acknowledging homework on bbc radio in nineteen ninety nine. It was fairly fast. But you know we were lucky. You must remember. It was based off the x ray. Were done here in london. Started off by. Murray's wilkins and carried on by rosen in franklin and we wouldn't have got to the stage of least having a molecular model if it hadn't been for their work will the story is very bleak. She was naps. Brilliant x ray photographer and this was how the physical reality of the double helix model was first. Seen because wont watson and crick quarrel remodelers that that is they were abstract scientists. They were thera- titians so they were making the model as it were in their heads out of those bubbles and sticks that we all know so well which made the double helix model. What roslyn franklin's incredible achievement walls that she was a technically quite brilliant with this new and difficult apparatus of x ray photography and she showed this first image. Hilary rose from city university london. She's been a sociologist. of science. Since the mid seventy s and the image is referring to is the x ray picture taken by rosalind franklin niners photograph number fifty one. It displays a doc. Black spotty cross shape which confirmed for watson and creek. They hypothesise that. The structure of dna is in fact. A double helix. Hilary rose is passionate about rosine. Franklin's contribution and believed her story is one of appropriation and rasiah without her consent. These pictures were taken by the third noble prize winner. Wilkins and they were shown to watson and crick in cambridge and this is appropriation. I mean there are harder woods for it. A ratio of course was dramatic in the nobel prize acceptance speeches. Roslyn is by then dead. So little people forget those no question hoping for price. 'cause they not give them to the dead they given to the living so the three man. None of them acknowledged her work public. What she gets is a footnote in morris wilkin so that's the asia and you would have thought on the occasion art a such a thing as the nobel prize. The woman is dead that there would have been case for little generosity. Not a hint of a three man. Just carry on as if she hadn't existed as she hadn't done the pioneering extra work. It wasn't a pool in shabby story. And there's plenty in the history of science strong views from sociologist. Hilary rose no matter which way you look at it though. The mystery of this dark lady is intriguing author. Brinda medics was so fascinated by rosalind franklin. That she's recently completed a comprehensive biography. He she is with robin williams. Rosen franklin's family very well off for intellectual whether or not they're very wealthy anglo jewish bankers they also had a publishing firm for the sons in the family who actually were inclined to banking rutledge and keegan. Paul you're very distinguished people very proud of their heritage and they trace their ancestry back to king david the founder of jerusalem. So i mean this is a family takes its ancestry seriously and so one of the problems i think was not so much her gender but class. She sounded aristocratic to them. She spoke terribly well very clipped and some people just hated that. And it's one of the many ingredients which actually made her disoriented and not as happy as she might have made a very clever little girl. And i mean as she was growing up quite small. She wasn't very clever. Little girl and i discovered family letter from her aunt mamie. Anyway she noticed rosalyn has a six year old and she rosalind is alarmingly clever. She does her sums for pleasure and invariably gets them right and i thought that alarmingly was very significant because roseland had three brothers but the fact that the girls should be the cleverest really did

Watson Roslyn Franklin Hilary Rose Crick Franklin Watson Crick Patricia Farrer Clare College Cambridge Rosen Francis Creek Morris Wilkins James Watson Rosalind Franklin Kidman Rosine Malcolm Nicole London
"morris wilkins" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

Surprisingly Brilliant

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

"She dies. which leaves us with the big question today. Which is how is rosalind. Franklin remembered. I think there are two aspects to this. Firstly cowher work is formally recognized okay. I'm talking nobel. Prizes is here. And secondly how is she remembered as a person. What's the story that's told about her. And is that fair. Definitely i mean. I'm feeling very frustrated that she's gotten relegated in the annals of history that i've consumed so far in my life to being the person who missed out on the nobel prize and didn't get to dina's fastest watson and crick. Did that's how i remember her. That's how she's been taught to me in my education so there was a reason. Said nobel prizes Earlier the super quick version of this. Is that the nine hundred. Sixty two nobel prize for physiology or medicine is awarded jointly to francis. Crick james watson and morris wilkins for an accounting for the prize website here their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material. Many people say rosalind franklin missed out on this nobel price. Okay as as you've said that's that's the story of heard but sadly she died so she wasn't eligibles for it you can't give a prize posthumously. The only conditions on the which you can do that if someone is wooded the prize but dies before they actually go to the price ceremony. There's also a rule. I don't know when this rule came in the only three people can win the nobel prize. So i imagine. I mean the way putting morris wilkinson was rather insulting way of recognizing her contribution. Perhaps they could awarded as a bit earlier. Especially when you that. She was dying which must have been common knowledge. I think perhaps they could be awarded to them. I think including morris wilkins was actually a religion salt interesting so they basically say like Morris is close enough like he'll he'll do as a stand in because it really matter that we actually recognize. Rosalind and patricia. Fairly i think is like it's even worse to include. It was that third person. And the reason i said. Nobel prizes is because her work on the poliovirus also contributed to a second fracking. The nine hundred eighty two nobel prize in chemistry awarded to aaron klug four quote his development of cristella graphic electron microscopy crikey and his stroke. Show and lucid important. Nucleic acid protein complexes. Yeah that's not a mouthful at all. Dude i cannot believe this. my rage has only grown. She did not only miss out on one. Incredibly important of a patel. Okay hang on. Hang on hang on his stephen. Some of the people that she worked with erin clue and don casper went on and carried on the work and went on to make very important contributions to understanding virus assembly virus architecture..

nobel prize rosalind franklin morris wilkins james watson Nobel dina morris wilkinson Morris cowher aaron klug erin clue crick don casper patricia
"morris wilkins" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

Surprisingly Brilliant

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

"He describes himself that way. Come on man may nine hundred fifty one naples. Morris wilkins shows that photo of the crystalline. Dna jim watson was sitting in the audience and it was one of the things amid jim watson. Sit up and take notice that actually there maybe within touching distance of being able to solve the structure of dna so he got very excited about that as he says. He's a very ambitious person. I'm sure he can smell a go. Unity discovery on the horizon short. Let's bring francis crick into this story. Then now that happens. A complements later at another conference winning in cambridge that morrison rosalind travel up to july nineteen fifty one now. I said francis described as toll fair and very english carrying he has the look. The english look apparently very explosive. Love that can pinpoint his location in any building like that. I really do exactly where they are in a crowd. That's great interesting francis. Crick had already met maurice wilkins few years in the spring of nineteen forty seven. Franz had come to king's about a job but john randall. The head of the department said that francis was quite two boisterous and talked too much all. Ease do social. His tail outgoing ended up going to the cavendish laboratory in cambridge. Says the other location alongside king's college. London is key for this story. But i mentioned this backstory. As morris and france's friendship grew after their meeting A few years earlier and that's going to grow through the story at this nine hundred fifty one cambridge meeting morris again presents that crystalline. Dna photo and like advocate. Jim it also inspires francis to try to figure out it structure. Okay so everybody's on the hunt. So rosalyn ray finally start. Photographing fibers of dna and they get the same pattern. Produce that morrison ray had got before. Okay so they're replicating it and at this point they do know that it's dna and it's called dna because we know that this is a genetic material but we don't know what it structure is exactly what they do realize though is that when dna fibers are made wetter they get a different image..

francis crick jim watson Morris wilkins cambridge morrison ray rosalyn ray king maurice wilkins cavendish laboratory naples john randall france London Franz
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

05:58 min | 6 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Franken's love of France wasn't just in the map she enjoyed spending time in the Alps to get away from Utah. Was Passionate Bouncing Klima and interested in anything outdoors and if the opportunity I think they've go. Weekends into the countryside enjoyed mountain some shit after visit the views from the talk. And she was pity careless climate but she never rock climate for the sake of climbing. It was always for the sake of getting to the mountains. In early one, thousand, nine, fifty, one, she moved back to England. She missed her family and friends. At King's College London she started to work on the structure of biological. Molecules. She used his skills and x Ray crystallography to look at the most fascinating molecule of the mall. DNA. She had some fibers of DNA which was supplied by a Swiss collaborator and they crystallized well. So that's an wooded piece of matter at Crystal Aspect Backgammon is a professor of molecular physics at the University of Oxford and she's shown the xrays on these fibers but she very especially especially controlled the hydration of the fibers. And in that way, she saw a form and B.. Form. Dna a form is a dehydrated form and be form is the hydrated form. How did she manage to photograph the structure of the crystallized DNA all the molecules aligned up like synchronized swimmers in a swimming pool so that they're facing the same direction they might not all be identical. Some might have bigger noses than others, for instance, but their basic structure is the same and from the interference pattern that we get when we shine xrays onto these very very small molecules we can get back to the three dimensional shape of the swimmer if you like or of the molecule. In the lab at King's Rosen in Franklin and her PhD student. Raymond. Gosling. Working on photographing the a form of DNA. While Morris Wilkins was walking home the beef all. Franklin's most famous work was an image called photograph fifty one. which was of the B form of. DNA. They ended up with this beautiful beautiful. The best picture of DNA be ever taken. because. We weren't supposed to be working on it and put it in a draw and they didn't say anything about it until in January nineteen fifty-three goes Ling Monte to write his thesis up his officials thesis supervisor with Actually Morris Wilkins. So he took this photograph long and said Okay I put this in my thesis. Should I put this in my thesis a Maurice Wilkins immediately realized it was fantastic. And he then showed it to James Watson who was visiting from Cambridge Without Rosalind Franklin knowing? Watson and Crick were trying to build a model and Watson had realised straightaway that this cross pattern on photograph fifty one meant the DNA must be a helix Francis Crick realized that the symmetry that Rosalind Franklin had decided these crystals had meant that the must be an even number of DNA strands because it must look the same way as if you turned it through hundred and eighty degrees to the other way up. His a cylinder and it doesn't matter which way you put it because you go to spiral staircase running down into twining one in one direction one in the other direction. The work of Rosalind Franklin James Watson Francis Crick allowed the world to finally see what the structure of DNA applying. It was one of the most important scientific discoveries of the twentieth century. Many described Franklin as the UNSUNG hero of DNA. It was almost a decade later when Watson Crick and Wilkins Franken's colleague let Kings won a Nobel Prize for this book..

Wilkins Franken Rosalind Franklin Morris Wilkins Rosalind Franklin James Watson Franklin James Watson Francis Crick Maurice Wilkins Watson Crick King Alps Ray crystallography University of Oxford France Crystal Aspect Backgammon England Utah Nobel Prize Crick Gosling
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

08:30 min | 8 months ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Yellow Green. Although the Path was created in two thousand seven, the metaphorical foundations for this path were laid back in nineteen, fifty, three through the work of somebody whose birthday it is on the twenty fifth of July. Who would have been a hundred years old Rosalind Franklin. You see this is the DNA cycle way and Rosalind Franklin research was part of what set us on the path to really understanding DNA. DNA is the material unique to each of us that lives in ourselves, and contains all the instructions for not just what that sell has to do, but for how to build your entire body. Now DNA stores. This incredible amount of information very elegantly in the form of a long sequence of different molecules, called nuclear tied basis, and there are four types. A denizen thiamine, wanting and sight, seeing a T G and C, and just like the path where the base is represented by the different colors, they are in a long sequence one after the other in what appears at first glance to be random order, yellow, green, yellow, green, red, yellow, yellow, blue, green, green, but actually not random at all, because it's the order of these as ts, GS and CS that makes up specific genes, which in turn codes for the specific proteins and other products which make up ourselves. In fact if I kept going south, I would come to the Sanger Institute, a research institute named after Fred. Sanger, who invented the first method to figure out the order of basis in a piece of DNA in a process called sequencing. The pop I walked on on for over ten thousand yellow, green red and blue basis, and represents the genetic sequence of the Brca two gene mutations in which can cause breast cancer. It's also a rather busy path and right next to the railway tracks. Ford. Rosalynn Franklin sadly died at only thirty seven of ovarian cancer, but it's partly down to her research into the structure of DNA that we know that not only DNA bases, but is actually made of two long strands of molecules called phosphates with the basis stuck in between. Those two strands stick together because the basis like to pair up with each other. As bind with teas and Jeeze bind with sees. You can think of it like a ladder where the horizontal rungs of the basis and the vertical bit to the phosphate backbone. Apart from DNA is more like if you twisted the ladder to form a sort of corkscrew in other words a helix. The reason. We know DNA is a helix is thanks to Rosalind Franklin's experiments? Using technique called X. Ray crystallography, but the story of that discovery isn't exactly straightforward. So as my walked on DNA, cycle way came to a close. Let's walk back in time to find out more about Roslyn life and work. And what better place to start than here in Cambridge where she got her start as a scientist? So, you're walking along the Yellow Blue Green and red brick road almost like the wizard of Oz all nice, not quite. Well here to do that. Walk back in time with this is near scientists because awesome is also making a documentary about Rosalind Franklin's live on her role in the DNA story so bikita if you could set the scene for us back in about nineteen, fifty to nineteen, fifty three when Rosalind. Franklin was working. What did we know about DNA? How how much did we understand already? The DNA in itself will not. Not much of interest to biochemist. It was mostly protein, but Jim Wilson and Francis Crank were very keen to understand the genetic basis for heredity that is what is information that's passed onto the progeny on Bloomberg on being a geneticist had very little understanding about chemistry, but in terms of chemistry, the structure of DNA so the actual chemical structure of the DNA had been known since a number of years so. It was also postulated that the DNA was in fact, the genetic material that's post on into the offspring, and that was done in a set of elegant experiments. Where am bacteria will infected by virus much like the corona that we talk about a lot these days, and the virus consists of a protein structure and the DNA and by selectively labeling the protein structure versus the DNA. They could show in these experiments that only the DNA that's taken up. By the infected sales, and then passed on in the progeny of the virus. So they knew the DNA was critical to heritage ability, but they didn't necessarily know how and they didn't know how. The molecule is organized, and that's really the break through the early nineteen fifties was working out. The actually was a structure there. That could carry heritable information. Yes, so it was generally believed that DNA was too simple molecule to be of this importance because Indiana, there is only four letter so to speak the at and a c. and the G. meanwhile in a protein, a protein can be built off of twenty amino acids, so the complexity in the proteins favored, but proteins were in some combination with the genetic carrier, so it wasn't uniformly. That DNA was indeed the genetic carrier, and what was the thinking the time there must have been rival groups. It wasn't Justa. Watson and Crick's game this was it though there were presumably many of the scientists were all trying to understand this all at the same time, and they must've had rival theories absolutely, so if the inner was race, the race was not between Rosalind Franklin and Morris Wilkins Than Kings in London and Cross Creek in Jim Watson up in Cambridge in-cabin dish. It was actually between lines polling, approaching chemist in the US and the group at. At the Kevin dish, it was postulated by both liners, pulling and Francis. Crick and Watson, that DNA could be a three strain molecule where the DNA basis where facing the outside and the false facing the inside, and that would not be chemically insisted logically possible. Why though will solving the structure so critical to all of this? Well by knowing the structure, you could immediately understand how the DNA could be replicated that is that one DNA strand. Makes to new demands drowns in in the progeny. Within did Roslyn Franklin into the equation. Why is she so important tool this so russell and Franken came to kings in nineteen, fifty one, and she was on her own fellowship, so she was not a an assistant to Moore's Wilkins. Who was there already working on DNA, but she was really an excellent chemist physical chemist than she knew how to treat specimens so she. She was able to see that. The previous that excite crystallography photographs that had been made was really a mixture of two forms of DNA and she was able to separate out these forms so then you can study these to form separately, and we know that one of those forms is the physiologically relevant that one that is in ourselves, and that's called the B., form. So, she separated the DNA into a form that could then produce very nice pictures, and those pictures that with the insight into the structure, attractive from those diffraction patterns own these pictures. You could see that it was a helix structure repetitive you notes, and you can also see how many base pairs per turn in the unit and the diameter of the Helix, but it was really a Francis, Crick Jim Watson..

Rosalind Franklin scientist Jim Watson Roslyn Franklin Francis Crank Crick breast cancer Cambridge Sanger Institute thiamine Morris Wilkins Ford Sanger Indiana Roslyn US Jim Wilson Jeeze Fred Bloomberg
"morris wilkins" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The name of Noah. Eighteen sixty seven United States formal possession of Alaska from Russia. That was called Seward's folly how much did it cost us? Ten million, you know, somewhere it was less than ten minutes seven point two million two cents an acre, but we had a little bit of a blender or faux pas. And that's the reason why they call it Seward's folly ninety percent of its ice we forgot and they called it. You know, the polar bear garden at the time. They made all sorts of fun begin the Russians were eager downloaded, but two cents a maker. We didn't get a receipt was the blender. There's no paper that exchange hands with Frank come on, you know, that. That's what I'm saying nineteen sixty two. James Watson of the United States. Dr Francis Crick and Dr Morris Wilkins are Britain named winners of the Nobel prize for medicine and physiology for their work in one neck pain. No, no. -nificant discovering. What year wasn't nineteen sixty two. Something about genes or DNA. Double helix molecular structure of DNA, which ladder now leads to the gene mapping if you will twisted ladder is that what you're drinking this morning. I'm working on. I don't know what's in his heart or some twisted ladder right now. Laterano rome. He's on the the eight step program this morning. Jacob hold this thing. Meetings. He got his. Nineteen sixty two the US Olympic Committee suspense, Tommie Smith and John Carlos for their fish. Yeah. The black power salute during the victory ceremony in Mexico City and today is national chocolate cupcake day. Good. So you say me everybody else doesn't like I like chocolate chocolate cupcakes. I just want to remind you because I know that you'll probably be trolling for some soon. Well, any bakeries open this morning. Sean is trolling right now. Sure. Yeah. Yeah. Cool. Well, which makes a better. Here's the age old question who has better chocolate cupcakes. Homemade kind find your hostess or tasty cake. Yeah. I think everybody's a tasty cake. Fail. I go there. I mean, the butterscotch butterscotch shrimp the peanut butter. Oh, they're they're really really good ball together. Yeah. My brother. Years ago was working for tasty cake. And remember Joe used to bring in samples boxes. Remember that never got past me. Bob, Russell may he rest in peace. We got we hit them before came in by the way, mega millions is now nine hundred million dollars billion dollars before the day. Probably Powerball is four hundred and thirty million dollars. So you've got a one point three billion dollars in prizes up for grabs. Mega millions Friday. Next drawing Powerball is Saturday and now darn it. It's going to force me to play. Yeah. I don't know what the the staff at the Baltimore democrat party newsletter editorial board smoking. Maybe they went to Canada Kennedy yesterday were applying became legal because there's suggesting that mayor Pugh go out and plunk two dollars down on a mega millions ticket. And then she could use the nine hundred million that you would win on fixing Baltimore. Work. View. You'll know. That's right. You got about as much chance of that is getting a gift card out of Sheila Dixon's hands. Oh, true. It is. I. Yes,.

Russia United States Seward mayor Pugh Alaska US Olympic Committee Dr Francis Crick Noah Sheila Dixon Joe Nobel prize Jacob rome Mexico City Baltimore democrat party James Watson Tommie Smith Frank neck pain Sean
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Documentary Podcast

The Documentary Podcast

11:37 min | 2 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Documentary Podcast

"Finished. Severe the print editions of DNB and the DNB the dictionary of national fog Raphy before it and is Ingram another of the research editors standing before wall of extremely well, some dictionaries. One of the things that's interesting about this particular copy of sixty six volumes is that it has the hundred and annotations then Editara Sydney, Lee making corrections for what was to become the next edition appeared. And so if you pluck volume off, the shows you'll see some of them are absolutely covered in his rather spidery. That'll handwriting. And these editions were printed on stereotype, which is a steel plate which you take an impression off, so see quite difficult to change. And so that was one of the things that shapes the early history of the dictionary which appeared more or less on altered for hundred years or so while it's now obviously doesn't take quite that long to make a correction. It certainly true that although the original DNB was the product of private enterprise, two of the big. Guest categories that weren't. There were certainly women. It was a champs enterprise in terms of who was writing for it on the whole in who was in it. But although the product of private enterprise, there were very few business people and entrepreneurs in it among the major changes in terms of who is in the dictionary, the Odeon be as distinct from the DNB has got many, many more women and men. Many business people. My name is Mary token Ogi and I'm a senior. The poem at trail, vice marries another contributor who's been helping to rebalance the dictionaries content and standing close to a new statue of the suffrage is campaign medicine force it on London's parliament square on this. The hundred hundred verse Ray of the first voting rights for women in the UK was as good a place as any to talk about the life story. She felt needed telling since two thousand fourteen. I've been working in parliament's vote, one hundred mocking a hundred years. The vote in two thousand eighteen, but one of the other things that we did along the way we had to look to see if all the women were in the Oxford dictionary of national biography that ought to be and I'll starting point was the MP's with their significant women and piece missing. And we found indeed somewhere and then we found there were also significant female life his missing. So we approached the DNB though very sip tooth and not only made me advisory editor recommend women in parliament who weren't there and also ask for any other suggestions, Lucas. Nice done. Alice Theresa eighteen fifty three to nineteen twenty four parliamentary candidate. Alice Lucas came from Jewish family. Her father was a banker from Frankfurt and family rushing liberals. But when she got married, she pissed of her husband's conservative and unionist principles, and he was an MP in the twentieth century. So she was an MP's wife for awhile. And then he stood for parliament again in two thousand eighteen, but he died on the eve of poll. This was the time of the influenza epidemic. He was suffering from influenza and then he died at home just a few days full polling and his widow stepped into the breach despite the initial headline Mrs Lucas polls. Well, the time's third of January nineteen nineteen. She came second of three candidates. This was the last hope for a woman MP at Westminster from the nineteen eighteen general election. One of the things about being historian, a parliament is you realize how important individuals are. Of course, grand suites, important, political parties, important parliament as an institution. Important, but ultimately it's individuals often the pop-up in changing, get things done time time. Again, you find significant people have made a difference. And in some cases, this difference hasn't been recognized wonder Haywood of a married name. Hook. Florence may nineteen. Oh nine to two thousand six parliamentary reporter. One of the most interesting things when looking into women in parliament for this recent release was the first woman Hansel reporter. It was the only significant its first women hands on, but as women who fought really early equal pay in parliament. So today we associate equal pay with the nineteen seventies equal pay at Barbara Castle, the Deccan enfold workers, but way back in the second World War hand side in the house comments was employing women reported for the first time and paying her a half that of the men was getting. When she reached took a pay scale. She ruled a claim in and it went on for years as a huge correspondence about this at the national archives and was taken up by the speaker and prominent women MP's and the treasury would not back down because it would seem that they would lose face at the end of his and. Eventually they did back down without appearing toback down agreeing that the go to be raised that same as but after she retired in nineteen sixty. I didn't employ win for another eight years threesome too badly. Gene winder Alice Lucas slowly, the balance shifts, but gender hasn't been the only blocked to inclusion as another contributor historian. William White pointed out to me as we stood outside the dignified grandeur of the Oxford University press building. One of the things that the odium MBA has been able to do is to go back in the past and find people who were significant, but not significant there. Death. This building in some ways is memorial to at least one of those people to Daniel Robertson who was an architect of reliability, real skill. He was responsible for building the west, India docks in London's don't cleanse. He was responsible for this extraordinary building who's responsible for a whole series of Irish country houses and Oxford colleges, and so on and so forth. But by the time of his death in eighteen forty nine, he had been bankrupted multiple times. He'd been imprisoned multiple times hit become convinced alcoholic by the lady. Eighteen forty's. He had to be wheeled around the building site in a wheelbarrow with a bottle of Sherry in one hand, and so long as it was still Sherry. He was capable of giving instructions to the builders the soon as the Sherry dried up. He would be wheeled off to go back to sleep. He doesn't make it into the dictionary because in eighteen forty nine, he looked at tragic, tragic pathetic creature. And he has been rehabilitated in the sense that he is in the Odeon is yes. I mean, my wrote the entry on a couple of years ago. Let's even famously said, I think when giving instructions to contributors to the original DNB he said no flowers by which he meant that this was not meant to be a kind of eulogised account appropriate for funeral memorial service, and even in the original DNB I think it's fair to say there were some criminals and some villains was the the Rouge poisoner from the mid nineteenth century. And in one of the early supplements to the original DNB dot Crippen got in. And people that got in, not because they were thought to be admirable, but because they were thought to be of historic significance Birch, William seventeen eighty six to eighteen forty nine barrister Burge was a man who had a glittering glittering career, so he began his life relatively all, but made it through a scholarship to Oxford and then became a lawyer and then headed out to Jamaica where he had a really impressive legal career way married into the elite of the island then comes back in eighteen twenty nine and becomes a an MP QC. He becomes the head of the temple becomes a fellow of the Royal Society fellow, the society of antichrist and his whole career is based around the defense of slavery. He defended slave ownership as a form of property and contended that enforced freedom was nothing short of theft. So if we look at the sixty six Williams of the original diction. With no room for him. But if we come to this volume here, which called to Williams volume sixty one, we will find so William Wickham and then we come past Samuel Wilberforce his son and Bishop of Oxford. We come to William Wilberforce philanthropist who gets paid after page after page here, celebrating him as a philanthropist as Christian gentleman as the real opponent of slavery and the slave trade. There's room for him here because he tells a story that they were very happy with in the nineteenth century, which was the story of England's manifest destiny almost oppose the slave trade Burge doesn't fit into that story and it's really only now that we're able to see that actually it's a much more complicated one, much much darker one in some respects in which the British continue to campaign, at least some of the rich continued to campaign for slavery blight up to the very last minute. I would argue that the Oxford. Dictionary of national biography has a crucial role to play in clarifying how Britain sees itself in a global context, and it always has done. The davir differs from that of a century ago is both good and necessary. Alex may the crucial ingredient is this the end, which really tries to place someone in context and way really how significant they were. For instance, we are familiar with the role of Francis Crick and James Watson and Morris Wilkins in the discovery of DNA. But we've just published this entry on Frederick Griffith, who in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight was the first person to isolate DNA. He wasn't sure what hit found. He wasn't sure with purpose of it, but he didn't know that it could revitalize old cells when he died in a Boeing rate in London. In the second World War, the significance of that was not understood. It was only maybe twenty five years after his death that people realize that he had discovered something really important. And without which none of that further work on the NA could have been done. The Dixie was in a building oxyde. The dictionary was written by as it turned out about ten thousand people around the world. Robert Faber was a vital call in the great digitization process of the nineteen nineties and early two thousands, and we'll hear more from him in the internationalism of this stencil in national enterprise in the next program. But in the meantime, let's celebrate another of the lives of expanding dictionary the life that alongside Aaliyah's Lucas g winder Frederick Griffey's Daniel Robertson and Amy weiner's insures that it really is an eight is it of characters who explain history and combination rather than a singular figures. She's the choice of Robert Faber. She's an example of how history and therefore the dictionary. Our focuses on new kinds of subjects and people involved in might now voluntary work to change society Pomeroy neyla Florence Wallis. Viscount test Hobbiton eighteen forty three or four to nineteen. Eleven dress reform. Campaigner recalls identified matter to women of all kinds in the nineteenth century who Parisians of motor strean decor. We're expected to dressing close, actually prevented them from doing all sorts of practical worth while things such as exercise phone set out to change that by leading the society for rational dress, she summed up her basic belief which he put forward with great force and Viggo wherever she went in the rational dress gazette June eighteen ninety eight j. concluded. No one is free who is unable at least to have the unrestricted use of her own limbs and women's present appearance is the perpetual expression of this fact, and of abject acquiescence in a humiliating position.

Oxford MP Alice Lucas London influenza Daniel Robertson Burge Sherry Robert Faber reporter parliament square Ingram William Wilberforce Editara Sydney Oxford University Williams William White Alice Theresa Mrs Lucas
"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on The Science Hour

"To to that sort of practical future faster indeed you can actually follow my quest for sure his cat by heading to the discovery pages at bbc world service dot com and there's a link there to earlier report also on condom computing which was just talking about finally we've had a bunch of genetic anniversaries this month it's sixty years since the death of rosalind franklin whose x ray stories unravelled the structure of dna it's actually sixty five years since that discovery was made james watson who with francis crick reveal the structure has just turned ninety and his fifty years since his popular and somewhat tabloid account of the discovery and the rivalries behind it was published full of gossip about rosalind franklin who had since died her collaborator morris wilkins and many of the players plus a lot of it's about nineteen fifties cambridge academic life the double helix has become a classic at brotherhood spoke to science right to angeles saney author of inferior how science got women wrong and to biologist matthew cobb author of life's greatest secret the race to crack the genetic code who said that despite his flaws that double helix is still book to reckon with i think it indeed is a revolution book because what was so striking about is the way that it focuses on the individuals and recounts in an apparently completely truthful and transparent way the scientific process as seen through the mind all a very brilliant very driven young american of about twenty five years old so you'll grown into how it felt to be a scientist at this particular moment and he's not different from any other popular science writing memoirs or just descriptions of discovery that had come before sixty eight i can't think of any document before an interview honest not very many after that a like this if you compare the double helix with francis crick's.

rosalind franklin james watson angeles scientist francis crick morris wilkins cambridge matthew cobb twenty five years sixty five years fifty years sixty years
"morris wilkins" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on In Our Time

"That's a chemist belief one of those who are working on it aware of how dramatic and how very important this was going to be if discovered i think so i think the when discover new i think everybody under i mean it was the great challenge of its age to understand how you a chance transfer information from parent to child how does dini copy itself it was such an important question that people understood shut them you're just gonna come back to women and chris long quite few moon went into chris love it was it that it had a particular month ticker allure for the mall an accidental marone think it certainly wasn't an accident i mean in the early days of the subject in this was a new subject even at the time muslims working wasn't that old i mean after will break had done the seminal work 1912 but there were could i say enlightened men in the field in the early days who didn't try and keep the women scientists who wants to join them they would didn't want to keep them out think courage them to come in there were several in the early days feigned notable women roslyn would have been one of them she was already but she didn't live long enough to be a become a household name that say what she is differently drowsy hodgkin kathy lonsdale and now a p not only the brags banal max proves that the great names that we know in the subject were encouraging to the women to join them atrush appear barra she wasn't let's get she's got to kings on this morris wilkins on the seems to be a misunderstanding from the start between the two of them what was that and how did it if it did resolve itself uh was she was originally employed to investigate proteins because at that stage show some confusion and whether it was the protein all the dna that was responsible for heredity and then the they've decided to focus on dna and she was told by letter that she was going to be switched from proteins she was told by letter that she was going to be working with a phd student cool drako sling morris wilkins was told that she was arriving but he had the impression.

kathy lonsdale morris wilkins chris
"morris wilkins" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on In Our Time

"This is the bbc thanks for downloading this episode in our time the reading this to go with it on our website and you can get news about our programmes if you follow us on twitter bbc in our time i hope you enjoy the programmes hello in 1950 to reverend franklin was at king's college london investigating the structure of dna creating images for analysis one of the images match blood work put agrout fifty one has become famous it provided information needed to reduce the structure of dna one of the great achievements of twentieth century science which france's creek james watson and morris wilkins later received the nobel prize but not cranston who moved on from dna structure to do pioneering research into cohen barshefsky and since her death when she was only thirty seven many of argued that you deserve greater recognition both for her role in the understanding of dna and as a scientists more generally with me to discuss rolling franken's life and work are virtue clara president and the british society over the history of science ends jim naismith interim leader of the roslin franklin institute director of the research complex at how and professor at the university of oxford and you did howard professor of chemistry at durham university patricia power what was roslyn fragments upbringing her up rigging the i think it was very important for the rest of her life for two main reasons firstly she was very very close to her family and we know a lot about her childhood about to relationships with her family because whenever she was away from home she wrote in very long very eloquent very intimate letters which absolutely marvellous to read nowadays so she had three brothers one sister she was brought up in a very affluent not wealthy but ferry affluent family in london and notting hill kate there were lots of other family members dotted around quite nearby so it was a very very large closeknit family she loved them a lot the only thing she ever resented all the main thing she ever resented against her parents because everybody resent said.

cranston london roslyn fragments durham university professor of chemistry howard university of oxford professor roslin franklin institute jim naismith france morris wilkins king reverend franklin bbc director president franken cohen barshefsky nobel prize
"morris wilkins" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

KALW 91.7 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"morris wilkins" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

"Until james watson's book and watson's book came out and 19 sixty eight and of course by then feminism had gotta underway and people subtle has started to say where the women scientists why has the were it not being recognised but she just died almost two early before people began expect that women even did science did any of her former collaborators come forward to set the record straight as it were about her true contributions well i think after watson's book came out in sixty eight sheet item fifty eight and as her family said i'm glad she never lived to see the book because she probably wouldn't have written so frankly and yes don kasper has uneven morris wilkins various people have acknowledged and of course the feminists have taken up the cause and really try to restore her or reinvigorate her reputation what sort of a model or influence as she served for young women scientists working in the field today she's an inspiration for young women that women can go into science and they can even now they're learning go into physics i think today's young women can't imagine what it was like all those decades ago when even a women weren't taken seriously luckily because if they are interested in science they will do it and without thinking i can't do this because i am a woman brenda matic's thank you for speaking with us today this was very interesting thank you i've been speaking with brenda matic's.

don kasper brenda matic james watson