2 Burst results for "Morris Fabrics"

"morris fabrics" Discussed on National Trust Podcast

National Trust Podcast

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

"morris fabrics" Discussed on National Trust Podcast

"I'm headed towards the home of one of the most famous. Most photographed and most quoted men in the world man whose hard to categorize philosopher and most notably a playwright ranked second only to shakespeare which is a real indicator an index of his contribution and here are set in the tranquil greenery of hartford scher sits the old rectory where he spent the last forty years of his life. In this episode. We'll be exploring this beautiful arts and crafts home and learning about the man and his masterpieces through the spaces. Books and objects that he surrounded himself with walking down this lane towards shores corn. I'm not at all surprised. Dot the shores chose this place as their escape from london inches tranquil and beautiful. It's a sensational place with a wartime game with the words shores. Goerner enlarge letter before moving. Here sure was living busy life in london. He established himself as one of the most celebrated writers a man we wrote more sixty plus plays two hundred and fifty thousand letters or something originated a lot of them within this place. You to james grasp. Helsmman as you hear. I'm very pleased to meet you into the kitchen. Which is a little bit of time travel to color schema cream under sort of warm earthy brown with a fire going coal burning great with a great big allen of water boiler hot hot-plates on top was george bernard shaw hands on with a pan and served ball with the george cake. Because it didn't call himself. George bernard shaw gordon. South bernard shaw. So you'll see. In his signature g. is dropped obviously. This is the kitchen where his vegetarian food was impressed. Vegetarian he was indeed a very early vegetarian. You felt as though you know. The energy from eating life food from the garden was much more nourishing than eaten dead corpse as his words so wondered short. Choose this house this village in particular. Well he'd been living in hartford show renting a house and found this area particularly convenient for getting out of london because of course he's still kept a flat in theater land london and why. This house will really amused him. The tim renowned atheist was going to move into the rectory so neither of them were very enamored of the house. But that's not what they were looking for. They were looking for just somewhere where they could have tranquility for him to write and just generally get on with their lines issue commend. Perhaps you didn't see this. Wonderful piece of william morris fabric william morris who was the writer craftsman developer of all the beautiful designs that many of us still surround ourselves with sure said that it was through william morris that he got started so he'd been writing novels but they haven't been published but he managed to get one called an unsocial socialist published in serial. For and william morris read it and got in touch with him and invited him to join in the hammersmith socialist league and the pre-raphaelite to the arts and crafts movement. That was meeting there so show immediately as launched into this amazing group of writers artists craftspeople so this curtain here really symbolizes ashore in his. Start with william morris and the piano was designed by walter cave whose sector of the arts and crafts workers union and short was self taught on the piano was a real source of nourishment throughout his life and several visitors would comment on the fact that he would sing the ring cycle from one end to the other singing all the parts playing along and what a merry sort.

london james grasp william morris hartford George bernard shaw gordon South bernard shaw scher shakespeare george bernard shaw hammersmith socialist league tim walter cave arts and crafts workers union
"morris fabrics" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"morris fabrics" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Almost fifteen years ago in my hometown of cuts in beautiful Syria in Horak is mainly associated with a traditional line. Applic- called Lena ho-shik Credit Joan. Although the dental is only account for less than ten percent of sales but she says traditional dresses where she gets her inspiration. Do you like to be associated with the traditional? Of course I don't mind it because I'm proud of my roots. I like what I do. I love the fabrics. We have a very beautiful heritage of textile art more or less. It's also one of my main. Inspirations when I looked to other countries and then the Australian Line for me it's my roots. Come from it's what I learned at my grandma. She taught me how to saw in by hand when I was like thirteen. Fourteen think of main reason why my collections really successful is that we put a lot of attention to detail in the craftmanship in the combination of different fabrics. And also the lining. The Wade's made is always tailor-made and not MS product. Do you do a lot of work yourself embroidering anymore. Unfortunately I used to be mainly creative one touch fabric and start cutting it and putting it together and sewing but I was not the most professional to be honest I would like just cut into it. Start sewing and then make alterations. I'm the same in the kitchen. I never followed recipes. Does it apply to as well? No because I have my staff and they love working very professionally so I can be unprofessional as a designer which amazing I suppose there's still lots of traditional tailors in the countryside making the accounts and traditional dress. So why should people come to you? That's a good question. Actually you have to have people. From the quality perspective one of the analysts probably top notch. We use only pure silk whereas most companies use have silk polyester these days. But I couldn't I simply couldn't and then purely in them. Pure cotton sold equality of the fabrics is definitely up across a dishonored to save on fabric. Is it usually the Austrians Austrian women by dentals not only because it's become a bit of a trend recently to get married in Australia and for that we saw a lot of handcrafted? Can you talk a little bit about the history of the dental? The dental the classically as you describe it consists of four parts percival skirt second Abram third bodice to call it and then under the bodies would be a blouse so it was the typical combination of pieces of clothing. Worn in the borking. Classes are in the country for farmers. This type of dress is also basically the same in all countries in all cultures. Which for me makes amazing to compare maybe Bohemian dress. Also Turkish and Greece. National addresses are so similar. They all make regional. Differences visible by applying different. Handcraft Australian. Today is stillborn in daily life. Because it's not very stiff. It's wearable if it's a cotton one not a silk one. You can definitely work to office in Syria where I'm from. It's become actually quite common if you have appointments with dinners and you don't want to put on like a cocktail dress. You take deadline. And then yeah then came the Nazis in the thirteenth. So let's just skip like from all these hundreds of years dental mainly existed in the same shape in one thousand nine hundred. Thirteen Nazi's decided that there is going to be very strict rules about how a din looks in a different freedom because they were very clever to instrumentalise something that is very common and very rural and very down to Earth also and speaks to people and if you still stick to those rules I mean. It doesn't say that you're any kind of right wing thinker when I grew up at never wasted a single thought about if my national dresses. I'm right being person. And I thought it was very unfair to the item of clothing to instrumentalise it and everyone who were lead. Horton and be proud of their Australian roots to put them in the certain box and I was always fighting against it and the trend towards a dental and lederhosen and Austrian national dress came back very very slowly but then almost exploded. Because I think Australians as well as Germans they had to be ashamed of their heritage after Second World War for such a long time whereas English or French. All of those countries committed war crimes and still do. But nobody's pointing at Italians and say like you're like a fascist because you're proud of your country and you wave your flag but the Austrians and Germans. They had like a huge complex about it. All the people still put it in the same box because there were forced to read. They'll when they were young and the parents would be not with the regime so it's still stained from my point of view. I hope that came across K. A. C. strongly about it I was I was Gonna ask you about it. I mean I'm glad you talked about you. So do you recreate the original the traditional pattern? So you add anything. I love sticking to bury traditional rules of how constructed in little and how to finish it how to work your hands through the fabric. Basically but of course don't stick to the regional color combination roles because I think that's totally up to the regions to reproduce their own regional deals so for me. It's a fashion Indian Lonzo to new color combinations or I would use Morris Fabrics with beautiful founder Sierra club Prince and combine it with a Silk Apron on I love English rose prince to use for the animals. So that's a combination you know what's English fabric doing on a dental. But it's just my the predation and we've been selling those really successfully leinna harsh chack. Speaking.

Syria Applic Horak Morris Fabrics Wade Abram Greece Australia founder Horton K. A. C.