36 Burst results for "Morning Edition"

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | Last month

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"45. This is morning edition. You'll be easy. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. Martinez. Farmland is a limited resource. And over the past year, there has been a sharp climb in the cost of buying it. The high prices make it harder for young farmers to build their businesses on land, they can call their own. And as Katy pike is reports from Iowa public radio, that's especially true as demand from investors grows. Here we go. We have an online bid of 7000 asking 8000. At this farmland auction in jessup Iowa, there's more than two dozen people attending in person and lots of others are online and on the phone. Just a couple years ago, the final sale would have been near 7 or $8000 an acre. But now it's a lot different. 18,900 out of the 9 now 19,000, 19,000. The winning bids topped more than 17 and $19,000 an acre. I was astounded. Jessop farmer Ben Ricci came to check out the prices. He didn't bid this time around, but recently at another auction, he bought 40 acres for $15,000 an acre. It was way more than I ever hoped to pay, but we'll find out in a decade whether I was too high or too soon. Farmland prices have rocketed, especially in the Midwest and the high plains. Recently in Iowa, some farmland sold for no lower than $25,000 an acre. Andy helgason says it's just too much. You go there and you just get, I mean, basically it's all muscle. That's what I call it. Helgason farms corn and soybeans in north central Iowa, he says he hasn't had any success at recent auctions. Reed Thompson in central Illinois firms largely on leased farmland, but bought his first farm 7 years ago for about $10,000 an acre. He says while beginning farmers get loans to help them, they have less cash in equity than those who have been farming longer. The last cash you have, the more debt you're going to have to incur staying with less equity, but more debt, you're going to have to incur. And so it's just going to limit when you can purchase and how much you can afford to pay. So why is farmland costing so much now? Economists say things like good crop prices, a global food shortage, inflation, and record high government payments largely from the pandemic. Randy dick hoot is the vice president of real estate operations with farmers national company. The company manages farms and conducts real estate sales and farmland auctions, including the one in jessup. My last year, farmers had better yields than they thought, higher commodity prices. So they had some good income. They hadn't maybe bought anything for a while. And so when it came on the market, they were pretty aggressive buying it. There's also lots of competition from investors, people like Bill Gates, America's biggest private owner of farmland. Are you a state university economist when dong John says investors see farmland as a way to diversify their portfolio, and there's more momentum from investors than in years past. During uncertain times, when their stocks value could go down by 30%, their farmland could hold on to the value. It's unclear whether farmland prices will stabilize or continue to rise. But the Federal Reserve recently raised interest rates again. Some experts say that could help drag the value of farmland down, which could help those young farmers looking to buy land. For NPR news, I'm Katie picus

Iowa NPR news Rachel Martin Katy pike Ben Ricci jessup Andy helgason Reed Thompson Jessop Martinez Randy dick hoot Midwest Illinois dong John
Fresh "Morning Edition" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:35 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Morning Edition" from Morning Edition

". Not a sustainer yet, become one today by calling 8 8 8 three 7 6 WNYC or visit WNYC dot org and click on donate. 55 with showers out there in some places this morning look forward to afternoon showers and a thunderstorm very likely this afternoon and cloudy in a hive 61 gusty still, a slim chance of showers by 8 o'clock tonight down to the mid 50s for lows and then tomorrow we break this site. We go back to sunny days with a high near 72 on Thursday, same thing on Friday even the weekend, sunshine and near 60 both Saturday Sunday. It's a 21 you're listening to morning edition on WNYC. Thank you for tuning in. Support for

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Flash Floods From Ida Swamp NYC, Shut Down Subways

Morning Edition

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Flash Floods From Ida Swamp NYC, Shut Down Subways

Texas Abortion Ban: What It Means and What Happens Next

Morning Edition

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Texas Abortion Ban: What It Means and What Happens Next

Hurricane Ida Slams Louisiana, Downgraded to Tropical Storm

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Hurricane Ida Slams Louisiana, Downgraded to Tropical Storm

"IDA has been downgraded to a tropical storm with winds down to about 45 MPH this after slamming into the Gulf Coast yesterday with winds of up to 150 MPH. Selena chat Lonnie with member station W, W and over reports, the storm knocked out power to all of New Orleans and inundated coastal Louisiana communities that includes the town of Jean Lafitte, just south of New Orleans. Sergeant Jason Laura Wall with the Jean Lafitte Police Department is out currently on search and rescue missions, he says hundreds of people for financial or physical reasons. We're not able to heed the mandatory evacuation and are asking for help as they get stuck in several feet of the storm water surge that scared because they've never seen that they've never faced the storm before. So, you know, we had a mandatory evacuation has been in order for a few days now, but our resident the resilient our residents have gone through just their whole lives, and they didn't think that this would happen. Lord Wald says they are trying to rescue as many people as possible

Sergeant Jason Laura Wall Jean Lafitte Police Department New Orleans Jean Lafitte Lonnie Gulf Coast Selena Louisiana Lord Wald
Blast Reported Outside Airport in Kabul

Morning Edition

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Blast Reported Outside Airport in Kabul

The Secret Bias Hidden in Mortgage-Approval Algorithms

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Secret Bias Hidden in Mortgage-Approval Algorithms

"Likely to deny mortgages to people of color than to white people with comparable financial profiles, according to a report released this morning from the investigative news outlet, the markup. The team there analyzed about two million conventional mortgage applications from 2019. These are separate from the one subsidized by the government for people with lower credit scores. The new analysis finds that nationwide lenders were 40% more likely to reject Latina X applicants and 80% more likely to reject black applicants. Key suspect here, Bias built into the algorithms software used to guide the loan approval process. I spoke to Emanuel Martinez, Data reporter at the Markup who worked on this story, along with his colleague, Lauren Kershner. I found that people of color are more likely to be denied than their white counterparts even when they look financially the same, and those include factors at the lending industry said would explain them away. So for context, David, I've been looking at this topic for the last four years. I've been working with this data extensively in the first time around. I published this analysis found the same thing. Lenders told me that they weren't denying people of color because of their race. They were denying them because of things like debt to income ratio combined loan to value racial And now with this analysis, I have those two ratios. And I still find that people of color are denied at higher rates even when including those two important financial characteristics now I saw and you cited the American Bankers Association. He said. The data that you could get still had limitations, and they don't believe you've made the case that the system discriminates right there. Updated statement is that it's still about credit score and credit histories. But when the C F P B when the government looked at that particular metric, they found that when they hold credit score, constant people of color still are denied at higher rates than their white counterparts.

Emanuel Martinez Lauren Kershner David American Bankers Association Government
Maersk Makes $1.4 Billion Green Bet on Methanol-Fueled Ships

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Maersk Makes $1.4 Billion Green Bet on Methanol-Fueled Ships

Study Links Climate Change to Deadly Flooding in Germany and Belgium

Morning Edition

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Study Links Climate Change to Deadly Flooding in Germany and Belgium

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

Morning Edition

01:43 min | 1 year ago

The Sacklers Want Immunity From the Opioid Crisis

"Trials underway in New York for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin. Members of Sackler family who owned the drug company have testified they bear no responsibility for the nation's deadly opioid epidemic. As part of the bankruptcy deal, the Sackler czar demanding immunity from lawsuits for themselves and for a network of companies and organizations. NPR addiction correspondent Brian Mann has been following this Brian you've reported before the Sackler want to clean slate for themselves, no more opioid lawsuits. But this deal in particular would also shelter a bunch of other people and companies from liability. How would that work? This has been a major flashpoint in this trial A and it was again yesterday as part of produce farmers bankruptcy settlement The sack Lear's who say they've done nothing wrong, have agreed to pay $4.3 billion to fund addiction treatment programs, but the Sackler want something really big. In return, their attorneys have drawn up this single spaced list of individuals, organizations and companies. This list runs for 12 full pages. If this deal is finalized, everyone on the list would be sheltered permanently from lawsuits linked to opioids and oxy cotton and from a wide range of of other lawsuits. And why does that matter? So this is interesting. Critics say the Sackler is in their empire are at the center of one of the biggest man made public health disasters in US history. Hundreds of thousands of people have died in this epidemic. Their company has pleaded guilty to federal crimes linked to the OxyContin business. First in 2000, and seven and again last year again, the Sackler is deny wrongdoing and have never been charged. But there are still big unanswered questions about how this prescription opioid crisis happened and who in the sack Lear's network might be liable. For some of the harm and let me give you

Sackler Sackler Czar Brian Mann Purdue Pharma Oxycontin NPR Lear New York Brian United States
Biden Nominates First Native American to Lead National Parks Service

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Biden Nominates First Native American to Lead National Parks Service

"Park Service could be led by a native American. NPR's Nathan Rott reports. The Biden administration has nominated Charles Sam's a member of the Confederated Tribes of the U. Mattila Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. The National Park Service hasn't had a full time director since the Obama administration. Biden's nomination of Charles Sam's who's worked on conservation issues for decades could soon change that. The nomination comes at a crucial time for the park service. Despite some recent injections of funding, the park system is running a massive deferred maintenance deficit. At the same time, it's struggling with overcrowding and some of its most popular parks. A rapidly changing climate and long standing criticism for a lack of diversity within its ranks. The nomination of Sam's is subject to Senate confirmation. Nathan

Charles Sam Park Service Nathan Rott Biden Administration U. Mattila Indian Reservation Obama Administration NPR National Park Service Pacific Northwest Biden SAM Senate Nathan
California Wildfires Affect Air Quality and Health of Nevada Residents

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 1 year ago

California Wildfires Affect Air Quality and Health of Nevada Residents

"Multiple large wildfires are continuing to burn in California, and smoke and ash from these blazes are blanketing communities in northern Nevada, A U. S senator from Nevada is calling for research into the health effects of these deposits. From member station K U N. R Lucia Starbuck has more Reno residents haven't seen a blue sky in awhile. Air quality has measured unhealthy for eight days this month, meaning members of sensitive groups may experience serious health effects in firefighters face special challenges. Local fire chief says his crews will face 20 years of smoke exposure over the course of their careers. Senator Catherine Court has Masto thinks more information is needed. We need to study the impact long term impacts that this air quality is having on our health for for our firefighters, and for so many others, Cortez Masto says some of the funding in the Senate passed infrastructure bill should be used for the

Lucia Starbuck Nevada U. Senator Catherine Court Reno Masto California Cortez Masto Senate
Biden Defends Decision to Pull out of Afghanistan

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 1 year ago

Biden Defends Decision to Pull out of Afghanistan

"Biden says he stands by his decision to withdraw U. S troops from Afghanistan. That's despite the Taliban now controlling the country and the capital. With thousands of US civilians still needing to be evacuated as NPR's Asma Khalid reports, Biden says, there's really nothing that could have been done differently. Asked by ABC is George Stephanopoulos. If the exit could have been handled better, Biden defended his actions. The idea that somehow there is a way to have gotten out without chaos ensuing. I don't know how that happens. I don't know how that happened. So for you that was always priced into the decision. Yes, that was not the impression the president gave in remarks about Afghanistan last month. In recent days, there have been reports of thousands of Americans and Afghans unable to leave the country. When asked if this was a failure of intelligence planning or judgment, Biden did not seem to accept the premise of the question. Instead reiterating that he had a simple choice. Leave or put a lot more troops on the ground

Biden Asma Khalid Afghanistan George Stephanopoulos U. Taliban NPR ABC United States
In the Midst of Turmoil, Houston Set to Welcome Afghan Refugees

Morning Edition

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

In the Midst of Turmoil, Houston Set to Welcome Afghan Refugees

Arizona Governor Blocks Cash From Schools Mandating Masks

Morning Edition

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Arizona Governor Blocks Cash From Schools Mandating Masks

"State that enact coronavirus mask mandates and other requirements. Rocio Hernandez with member station Cage's in Phoenix, says school funding is now at issue. Arizona governor Doug Ducey has announced a school funding program only available to certain schools without mass mandates or remote classes. He's also essentially offering vouchers to some families at schools with these covered mitigation practices. As he said in a statement. He wants to protect students from what he considers to be excessive and overbearing measures. Mass mandates of public schools are banned under in you Arizona law, but that policy is not yet in effect. For NPR News. I'm Rocio Hernandez in Phoenix.

Rocio Hernandez Doug Ducey Arizona Phoenix Npr News
The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

Morning Edition

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Show-Stopping Perseid Meteor Shower Is Here

"For space enthusiasts and skywatchers. That means one thing you can step outside, look up at the nighttime sky and see some fireballs. Those fireballs come from the Perseid meteor shower. Even NASA says it's the best meteor shower of the year. And Jackie Parity who's an astrophysicist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, does not disagree. Yeah, This is my favorite of all the meteor showers. She's been a fan for years. You never know when one of these fireballs is going to shake you to your core. So if you can spare the time late at night, head for a rooftop or open space and just look up, I can tell you that you maybe you'll get one a minute like the average or maybe you're going to get a really bright one or a really nice, colorful one. Depending on the chemistry of the dust, Faraday says. Sometimes you get really lucky. The unexpected thing is what you should be hoping that you're going to get which is a nice big Bright one that's going to outshine all the stars that's going to look like It's gonna scare you. Although it's a rare spectacle that's completely safe. All of the things that are burning up in the upper upper atmosphere like higher than planes fly. Are flecks of dust, which can burn up so bright that it causes you to react with excitement and joy because it looks like fireworks. But there's nothing large coming down at you were not getting hit with a bunch of big rocks. Fair T is a pro. So what's her best advice? The one thing that I always recommend that everybody bring with them when you watch a meteor shower. Is patience and of quiet contemplation isn't really your thing. Charity suggest bringing your friends or family. It's not going to be like home. Sorry. I was so engaged in our conversation. I didn't notice that gigantic fireball that just streaked across my face, you'll catch it. And she says, you will not regret it. Mhm.

Jackie Parity American Museum Of Natural His Nasa Faraday New York
The Dixie Fire Continues to Rage

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 1 year ago

The Dixie Fire Continues to Rage

"The Dixie Fire continues to rage. It's now the largest single wildfire in California history and has burned more than 505,000 acres. Is still threatening at least a dozen small communities. It's destroyed 1000 buildings, many of them homes, Cal Fire chief Tom Porter says almost a month after the fire broke out, there are new challenges on the horizon. The concern we have going into the next few days is another bout of monsoonal moisture coming up through Southern California. Turning into dry lightning potentially through this area and all the way to the north coast of California and then into Oregon, Washington as well, Porter says. The conditions are so dry that a single blade of grass can be a mission point. After 29 days, battling the Dixie Fire Containment stands at just 30%. With thousands of firefighters fighting blazes in California officials have decided to close down the Trinity Alps Wilderness area until November. That's a popular vacation spot with more than half a million acres of granite peaks lakes and trails. In a statement, Forestry officials say they can't spare the aircraft and personnel needed to track down lost or endangered hikers. They also hope the move will help prevent new fires from igniting in

Dixie Fire Cal Fire Tom Porter California North Coast Trinity Alps Wilderness Southern California Porter Oregon Washington
Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

Morning Edition

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Black Church's 'Street Team' Encourages Connecticut Residents to Get Vaccinated

"Connecticut, a historically black churches, sending teenagers door to door over the summer to encourage residents to get the covid vaccine. Connecticut has one of the highest vaccination rates in the country. But it is a very different story in the town of Waterbury. Here's Ali Oshinsky from Connecticut Public radio. Police. Taylor is hitting 10,000 steps a day. A lot of them on hills and up to front doors to ask crime, ma'am, Are you interested in taking the Covid 19 vaccine? This person already got hurt. Oh, great. So I think we left the information Flyer. Yeah, right at your door. So if you do know anyone who's not vaccinated you can share with them. Thank you. Taylor is 15 and she's part of the Grace Baptist Church Street team. Every weekday morning, she and seven other teens pair up and walk around Waterbury, knocking on doors to have conversations like that one. I'll try to do you know my little bit what we do have people back at the church that will, you know, walk them through. There were ease. The process starts with the street team. Residents get a knock and a flyer. The teens were trained to ask a few questions and take down a phone number. If there's interest someone from a phone bank can call later to arrange an in home shot or transportation to a vaccine clinic. Grace Baptist pays the teens $15 an hour with funds from a state vaccine equity program. The pastor Christopher Reese, says this church is trying to make it as easy as possible for Waterbury residents to get their shot. Especially in black communities. My church, I think, is maybe 90% vaccinated. Why? Because their leader, their pastor has been pushing it now races trying to be that leader beyond his congregation. Connecticut ranks near the top for the percentage of residents that are fully vaccinated. But Waterbury lags behind the numbers are especially low among the city's black residents. Just around a third are fully immunized.

Connecticut Waterbury Ali Oshinsky Taylor Christopher Reese Grace Baptist
When Parents Can Expect Their Next Child Tax Credit Payment

Morning Edition

00:11 sec | 1 year ago

When Parents Can Expect Their Next Child Tax Credit Payment

"Round of advanced child tax credits to more than 30 million qualifying households across the country. His case here. W. Tara A tree in reports L. A County wants to make sure that local parents,

W. Tara
Afghanistan Government Reaches out to Former Warlords to Defend the North

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Afghanistan Government Reaches out to Former Warlords to Defend the North

"President, Ashraf Ghani landed in Mazar e Sharif in the country's north to rally troops attempting to beat back out Taliban offensive. Ghani has been meeting with local leaders and former warlords during his visit. The BBC's on bar Asan at Ruth and John has more As the Taliban continue their advance. The Afghan president is reaching out to former warlords to defend the not previously a stronghold of anti Taliban militia 40 years, Mr Ghani tried to sideline the warlords in an attempt to boost the Afghan National Army now is turning to them in this hour of need. Earlier this week, he also agreed to armed pro government militia. The loss of Missouri Sharif would be a significant blow for Kabul in yet another blow for the government reports that several soldiers were drawn from Kunduz city to the airport outside have surrendered to the militants following a sustained onslaught.

Ashraf Ghani Taliban Sharif Mazar Ghani Mr Ghani Asan Ruth BBC Afghan National Army John Kunduz City Kabul Missouri
"morning edition" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Noel King. Good morning, the Boy Scouts of America have agreed to an $850 million settlement with thousands of alleged victims of sexual abuse. The organization filed for Chapter 11 protection in February of 2000 and 20 after being overwhelmed by sexual abuse claims more than 80,000 of them. That's more than 80,000 men who filed claims. With me now is reporter Andrew SKorea who covers bankruptcy for the Wall Street Journal. Good Morning, Andrew. Good morning. Tell me about the terms of this settlement. Steele says the Boy Scouts will contribute $850 million to compensate the men who stepped forward to file claims over childhood sexual abuse They suffered. That'll come from cash property, other assets the organization feels that can do without and in return, the Boy Scouts would settle their liability to abuse survivors get clear of the threat of more litigation over past sexual abuse. Safeguard the balance of the organization's wealth and keep some youth protection measures in place. So it marks a major step forward for the Boy Scouts efforts to leave Chapter 11 behind, although it still needs to be approved in court and could face some challenges along the way, so more than 80,000 men have filed claims. Let's say over the next five years, another 2000 men come forward. Will the Boy Scouts have to pay them as well? Or does this settle everything, including cases, their claims that might come forward in the future? Well, the bankruptcy court put in place a bar order that said that victims of past abuse had to step forward or forever be barred from seeking compensation. Although there is a way for those with repressed memories, who have made not yet recall the abuse they suffered to get compensation in the future, which is a documented phenomena among sexual victor. Okay. This organization the boy Scouts are 111 years old. When did these abuse claims start coming into the public? The Boy Scouts have been dogged by sex these claims for years, and they kept internal files on ineligible volunteers who were suspected of abuse going back about a century but only filed for bankruptcy after some big states New York, California, New Jersey suspended the statutes of limitations on sex abuse lawsuits, which exposed the scouts to growing amount of litigation alleging they failed. Mostly decades ago in the sixties seventies eighties but also more recently to properly screen out predators from the volunteer ranks. The South say that things have gotten a lot better since then. So Andrew what happens next for the abuse victims and and also for the Boy Scouts, survivors this morning are wondering what this deal means for them, And we know how much the Boy Scouts have agreed to contribute for compensation. But what's not in this deal is any firm commitment from or settlement with the Boy Scouts insurance companies. These insurers sold liability coverage to the scouts over the years and victims lawyers say that there could be a lot of money in accessing that insurance. But the insurers are not on board with what the Boy Scouts have proposed, so that aspect of the case will still have to play out. And then if the plan is approved, which the Boy Scouts hope happens in the fall. Survivors. Claims will be evaluated, scrutinized, valued and eventually paid, And that means they will have to make a showing that their claim is legitimate. Can they remember names, dates, places? Other details?.

Rachel Martin Noel King Andrew SKorea February of 2000 $850 million Steele Boy Scouts of America Andrew 20 NPR News more than 80,000 men Boy Scouts Chapter 11 2000 men decades ago 111 years old New York, California, New Jers sixties seventies this morning more than 80,000 of them
"morning edition" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning edition on KQED. I'm Brian What? Later this month, Joe Biden will be inaugurated as the 46th, president of the United States. He takes office facing several severe crises, among them the one surrounding us long before the pandemic. Changing climate. Biden has put together a climate team with the goal of redirecting economic development toward reducing greenhouse gasses and to do so he'll be navigating pressure not only from traditional anti environment groups but from a powerful environmental left. KQED science reporter Kevin Starke has been following the rising strength of the environmental coalition on the left. And he joins us. Welcome, Kevin. Hi, Brian. So who's in this coalition on the environmental left? And what do they care about? These are small advocate groups there often organizing in their own neighborhoods, And they're animated by what they see as systemic racism with communities of color, disproportionately living around industry and in neighborhoods with pollution and smog. Many of these groups argue that environmental policy should be combined with social justice measures, and they supported Joe Biden's candidacy because he promised to fight for environmental justice. And they've promised to hold him to account on that front in these aren't the mainstream groups that we hear about the 10 to shape environmental policy. Like the natural resource is defense Counsel or the Sierra Club. I mean, if these air small groups and they don't have a lot of money, how do they have so much power right now? Yeah, that's right. I mean, although they have sometimes worked with those mainstream environmental groups. These groups have been empowered by two of the biggest events of 2020, the anti racism movement and the national Reckoning about race in the wake of the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd and I assume the other is the coronavirus. That's exactly right. First of all, the same people who are suffering from pollution in their neighborhoods are essential workers and we know from contact tracing are getting cove in 19 at higher rates than other populations. Also studies show that breathing more polluted air over many years. May itself worsened the effects of cove in 19, so they're two crises that because of structures of racism are impacting the same people and leaders from these communities are heading up these environmental groups empowered by the anti racism movement. So looking at California first What will these groups be looking to do in this year? From the very beginning. The state's environmental justice groups were ideologically opposed to California's cap and trade program because they argue, it allows industry to pollute and they say it exacerbates the environmental racism that we were talking about. There is some new research that supports this argument. These groups prefer traditional industrial regulations and increasingly outright bans for oil and gas drilling, and the use of fossil fuels will be pushing for these policies as the state Legislature considers a fracking ban this year Now, for many years, Mary Nichols has been the state's top climate official and an incredibly powerful figure here. And she's just retired. So what impact will that have on cap and trade with the naming of nickels, successor to the head of the California air Resource is bored. The governor has a chance to put his stamp on the state's climate policies and potentially shift away from a reliance on cap in trade. Now Nickel's oversaw the implementation of the program. It was supported by two governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jerry Brown. The States Air Board under Nichols leadership has aggressively defended the program, but the Newsome administration has already agreed to re examine it this year. So then returning to the national picture. A lot of people thought Mary Nichols would be the next head of the Environmental Protection Agency in these small environmental groups fought that right That's right. Nichols was reportedly Biden's top choice to lead the EPA. But the group spoke out against her, in large part because of her support for cap in trade. So these groups got their wish. What do they want now? From President Biden, these groups will be looking for a green new deal style policy, You know, legislation and executive actions that both reduce emissions and fight pollution and communities of color, and they'll also be pushing for a national fracking ban. And other strict regulations on industry. KQED science reporter Kevin Starke. Thank you. Thank you, Brian. In California's current cove in 19 Surge disparities persist with Latinos disproportionately testing positive and dying from the virus in San Francisco. Community activists and health care workers are not only responding with free testing, but follow up assistance for people who test positive cake. You ladies, Laura Cliven has more Consider this scenario. You're the breadwinner for your household of five. You're undocumented and don't have sick pay or unemployment insurance. You've been exposed to cope in 19, but show no symptoms. Should get tested because if you test positive you'll have to quarantine and miss work. That was a decision Hugo, a resident of San Francisco's Mission District, faced just weeks ago. It weighed heavily on him. His father died of covert 19, members of San Francisco's Latino community created a task force to address situations just like Hugo's. Along with UCSF doctors and nurses. The Latino task force offers Free Cove in 19 testing. Their aim is to serve the people hit hardest by the virus. John Jacoby Oh heads the Latino Task Force's Health Committee. It is not enough for us to just test community..

Joe Biden Mary Nichols KQED San Francisco Kevin Starke California Environmental Protection Agenc Brian Latino Task Force president reporter Hugo United States California air Resource Free Cove UCSF Minneapolis George Floyd
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene. And I'm Noel King. Good morning. The wild days of bringing an emotional support cat or pig or miniature horse on a plane are coming to an end. The federal government has a new rule on Lee Dogs that meet specific training criteria will be allowed. Here's NPR's David Schaper. Remember a couple of years ago when a woman tried to bring an emotional support Peacock on board a flight or the backlash when Delta Airlines actually allowed a passenger to bring a comfort turkey hunter plane It got really out of control. Paul Heart shorn is a flight attendant for American Airlines and spokesman for the flight attendants union there For the most part, I will say it's dogs that are not properly trained, but we've seen everything from pigs. Two Monkeys, two hamsters, you name it. We We've seen it in heart. Short says it's not just the flight crews who are increasingly annoyed. This has made many passengers incredibly uncomfortable. You know, it's the incessant barking. It's the possible defecation in the cabin, which is happening more times than I care to tell you hard, Jordan says Some crew members and passengers have even been bitten by these animals that were allowed on planes because of travelers exploiting a loophole in federal law to avoid paying for their pets to fly with them. Most airlines charge passengers a fee to fly with their small pets inside the cabin. But federal law allowed people with disabilities to have service animals free of charge, including emotional support and comfort animals without clearly defining what those are. Harry Left, writes, the airline industry blogged the view from the wing. Anybody who simply mentioned emotional support animal was giving themselves a blank check to bring on any animal that they wanted, at least onto a domestic flight. Now a new federal rule defines a service animal strictly as a dog. At his individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a qualified individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability, and the passenger must provide thorough documentation. Again. Airline industry blogger Gary left, So it's going from one extreme to another extreme airlines and their employees union support the new rule. But some advocates for people with disabilities argue that it goes too far. For Decker heads the National Disability Rights Network and says there are legitimate emotional support animals like cats and rabbits. That may not have service animal training or perform specific tasks, but may in fact, lower the anxiety level of someone with an intellectual disability watches, um or other kind of mental health issue where applying is very stressful and would be calmed by having Legitimate emotional support animal with them. Decker acknowledges there were widespread abuses. But he says the one size fits all narrow. New rule will hurt a wide range of travelers, including those with anxiety disorders or PTSD. Now, people you know who do feel they need this kind of support and can't afford it will now be eliminated from flying. Ecker and other advocates say the lobby the incoming bide administration to reverse or revise the new rule. Airlines can decide to continue to allow emotional support animals on flights. Otherwise, passengers will have to pay the pet fee of up to $175 to bring their small support or comfort animals on the plane with.

Decker Delta Airlines NPR News American Airlines federal government Noel King David Greene NPR PTSD David Schaper National Disability Rights Net Harry Left Paul Heart Ecker Peacock Gary left Short Jordan
"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a morning edition on W when my C I'm David first Bird Migration is usually predictable, but occasionally some birds mix it up. Nice sees, Kate Hein says that it's happening right now. With one species in New York City. Here's your word of the day eruption. It's spelled with the letter I, and it basically means northern birds invading the south in search of food. This is the case with pine sis skins. Thes finches tend to stay in boreal forests in Canada. But recently, burgers in the states began noticing flocks of them in this weekend in Central Park. I not only saw my first ever Siskind but my 2nd and 3rd and well, I lost count. Andreu Del Kali is thie editor of Audubon dot or GE. This happens to be a huge eruption year. We're seeing numbers across the US like we've never seen before, And it's not just Siskind is who are on the move. Other birds not normally seen here in large numbers, like evening grow speaks have also been spotted. But it's the Siskind is who are the big standouts with their little brown stripey bodies with flashes of yellow on the wing and tail? Nudging sparrows aside it feeders and leading the bird ist to note on Twitter. Weird How every bird on earth now is a pine Siskind Andreu del Kali. Hopefully, they decided leave peacefully because they're taken over enjoy the systems while they last especially their song, which is often described as a horse goldfinch. Because once the winter passes and they've stripped our pine cones and our feeders bear, it'll be back to springtime in Canada for them. Kate Heinz WNEW news The Trump Administration has made it increasingly difficult for immigrants to win asylum, and with New York's immigration courts still closed. To most cases, the pandemic has forced them to wait even longer for a decision. Everyone sees. Beth Fertig has the story of one asylum seeker who has been told she has an especially strong case. She asked us to withhold her real name because she's afraid for her life. For 38 year old Carmela, The clattering of the seven train is the unlikely sound of home here in Queens, 3000 Miles away from her native El Salvador..

Siskind Andreu Andreu Del Kali Kate Hein Canada Beth Fertig New York City Central Park Kate Heinz David Twitter US El Salvador Queens Audubon dot editor New York GE
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"To K C. R w This is morning edition. I'm Kim Masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown. Joining me is my banter Buddy. Matt Bellamy and Matt Thie Emmys are coming up on Sunday, but something's different This year. You know Jimmy Kimmel God, Blessem ABC. Disney has twisted his arm into hosting this thing, Hey, is setting the bar low. He said He expects it to be a disaster. I don't know whether it will be a disaster, but it is definitely going to be something to watch to figure out whether it could be executed as they would like to execute. Did it? Yeah. I mean, this is really high Wire act for ABC and the TV academy because, unlike most of the award shows that have taken place in this new cove in reality, most of the shows have done mostly pretaped things and the performances. The Obamas were all pre taped, and even the Country Music awards recently did a mix of pre taped and live presentations. But this of the TV academy does not reveal the winners in advance. So the Emmy's really have to kind of fly by the seat of their pants and what we're told, you know, they're still scrambling to see if they can set up a remote feed. They're going to try to get out about 130 different remote feeds to be able to cut two winners when they win their award, whether they're at home or in their back yard or wherever they're going to be. Or whether they're going to have to do some kind of pre taped segment where they air something or whether they're going to be able to physically get thie Emmy to somebody and knock on their door and give it to them. That's going to be something to watch. And honestly, it seems like it's going to be at least a little bit more interesting than what we're used to. With the Emmys. You Well, I guess I mean, may it may market may not my colleague, The Hollywood reporter Scott Feinberg says that they are pre taping acceptance speeches. But the question is, will they be nimble enough to air the correct one? In the moment when this is revealed? I mean, I wonder whether There isn't some deal between Disney doesn't say to the academy. Look, you know, I know you want it to be secret, and we'll keep with, you know, a little group has to know, but at least so far as we're told, That's not how it's going down, you know, bring some kind of surprise and chaos to the show may not be a bad thing mean the ratings for the Emmys have really been down in recent years. Last year plummeted 30%. And it doesn't help them that it rotates amongst the different broadcast networks, and no one really has a vested interest in this show. But this year, they really have an opportunity to do some new things. And, you know a few screwups and a few mistakes might not be the worst thing. Yeah, although you don't want to relive the moonlight vocal at the Oscars, where you know in this crushing moment where you think you win, But you're not. You didn't in the case of LA LA land in terms of the Emmy contenders this year, Netflix is got the bragging rights with the most nominations, a record setting 160. However, whether Netflix walks home as the winner wide open question, Yeah. I mean, despite all the money that Netflix spends the fact they produce way more content than anyone else. We're looking at the least the favorites to win the top categories. Are not. Netflix shows watchmen in the limited. Siri's category from HBO seems to be the odds on favorite in that category really is kind of the program of the year is topical. It's amazing performances of genre, so that seems to be a cz close to a lock as they've got this year and then in the drama Siri's and comedy Siri's categories. You've got really tough competition and succession in the drama category seems to be the favorite is sort of an Hollywood industry adjacent show. People in the industry Lovett It's HBO and in the comedy category. Most people believe that Shit's Creek, the Canadian show that has sort of become a phenomenon over the past couple of years there there last season this year, and as kind of a culmination of that show, most people think that it will be the victor. Yes, We have to give Netflix partial credit for that because it was on pop TV, which most people don't even know that they if they have it, they don't know. So it became a thing just like breaking bad when it started running on Netflix. However, that doesn't mean that Flix officially gets the bragging rights if Shit's Creek winds and I'd say it's a pretty strong contender. Thank you. Thank you s Matt Belloni, a former an editorial director of the Hollywood Reporter. He joins me this Monday at 1 30 on the business. I'm Kim Masters. And this's the Hollywood breakdown and you are listening to K C..

Emmy Netflix Hollywood Kim Masters ABC Obamas Disney HBO Matt Bellamy Hollywood Reporter Jimmy Kimmel Matt Belloni Shit Matt Thie Siri LA LA reporter Scott Feinberg editorial director
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. Attorney General William Barr did not speak at this week's Republican National Convention. But that doesn't mean he's sitting silently on the sidelines during the campaign. Instead, bar has been a very public face and voice as the nation gears up to vote. NPR Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas has this story. Traditionally, attorneys general try to steer clear of talking partisan politics, especially during the presidential campaign. The idea is to avoid even the perception of trying to tip the scales of the election. This summer, However, Attorney General William Barr has charted a different course He's done at least seven sit down interviews with national broadcaster since early June, in which he has tackled politically charged issues head on. He's echoed the president's unfounded view of mail in voting. It absolutely opens the floodgates to fraud and the media's coverage of recent racial justice protests. The American people are being told a lie by the media. But perhaps most notable are the political attacks bar has made against Democrats. In an interview on Fox News, He accused them of shredding the country's norms to try to drive Trump from office. He's accused them of being hell bent on total victory, tearing down the system and running people's lives. Are also had this to say on Fox about racism in the middle of an election campaign in which that very topic has become a hot button issue. The racism in this country look no further than our public education system. That's a racist, says thumb. Maintained by the Democratic Party and the teachers, union. Legal experts and Justice Department veterans say it is not the attorney general's job to engage in partisan politics. And they say that with these sorts of statements, bar is doing exactly that he has been operating as a political operative and a campaign aide. To the president, rather than as attorney general of the United States. That's Fred Wertheimer, the founder of the left leaning watchdog group Democracy 21, he says Bar has publicly gone after Democrats pushed his own conservative ideological views. And echoed Trump's partisan talking points on topics front and center in the presidential race Bar is Frito have any views he wants, but he's not free did to exercise Those views as attorney general of the United States. The reason for that, Wertheimer says, is because the attorney general's job and the Justice Department's mission is to ensure the fair and impartial administration of justice. How are those Americans who he attacks on ideological grounds supposed to conclude That he is going to ensure a fair and impartial administration of justice for them. You can't possibly conclude that Democrats and some DOJ veterans also have mounting concerns about bars handling of the department's investigation into the Russia probe. R has made repeated suggestions that investigators have dug up surprising and troubling information that could benefit the president bars. Critics accuse him of violating department policy by discussing an ongoing criminal investigation. Generally, we do not comment on the existence of investigations, and we never comment on the substance of what we are finding That's Donald Air. He served as deputy attorney general in the George H. W. Bush administration, so he's been violating that rule itself categorically. It is also department policy to avoid taking any action that could possibly influence an election. On Capitol Hill last month. Bar refused to commit to not releasing a report from the investigation of the Russia probe before the November vote. But he has said he's committed to a free and fair election and has promised that the department won't take any action to interfere in that. Ryan Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington.

Attorney Democrats Ryan Lucas Justice Department Trump William Barr president Fred Wertheimer NPR News Bar Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin deputy attorney general United States NPR Donald Air Fox News fraud
"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tomorrow morning edition. Pandas, Grizzlies and Gorillas are about to get re acquainted with humans how zoos are planning to reopen, stay connected by asking your smart speaker to play NPR. Or your station by name. This is NPR news. And this is morning Edition, not W. N. Y. C. I'm David first today on the Brian Lehrer show. The anecdotal Census Series continues with calls from people who have left the city during the pandemic. And how these relocations may affect the census count That's coming up this morning, starting at 10 o'clock on the Brian Lehrer show and coming up at noon on all of it. Alison Stewart speaks with the Mayor Michael Tubbs, who became First African American mayor of Stockton, California and the youngest mayor of a major American city in 2016 that starts at noon. And right now, here is John Shaffer with today's music note. Bass player and composer. Pedro's Dorado grew up in Argentina with classical music. His dad was a conductor. But since coming to New York in 1996 Dorado has become known for his fusion of jazz and tango. He leads several different ensembles from a trio to a Big Tango orchestra. And he's bringing his tango quartet to Brooklyn's club bar Bez this evening. Here they are playing a song called Rita. That's the Pedro's.

Brian Lehrer Pedro Big Tango orchestra NPR Census Series Alison Stewart Grizzlies John Shaffer Michael Tubbs Brooklyn Dorado New York California Argentina Stockton David W. N. Y. C.
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning edition I'm Kim masters and this is the Hollywood break down joining me is my banter buddy on the business Matt Bellamy and Matt we are seeing governors of states particularly southern states notably Georgia saying that they are ready to re open theaters now the question and it's a really big one is another couple of questions first of all do people want to go to the theaters do theater owners want people coming to their theaters there is resistance to this so and there's a question even with with movies being pushed big movies what exactly are they planning to show in the theater so there's resistance to this and it's really a you know with a lack of leadership which we've talked about many times coming from the federal government the stuff is all over the map and we we have no idea how this is going to work or when it's going to work yeah I mean this is a perplexing one because it doesn't really matter if the governors of some of the southern states say that movie theaters can open if there's no product for these theaters to show there's not much demand among consumers and there's not going to be much desire for these theater owners to spend the money to reopen when nobody's gonna come so then we saw the national association of theatre owners issued a statement saying that they're not going to advise their members to open theaters in kill many of these larger market states like they didn't say it but New York California Texas some of these bigger markets they give the go ahead for people to go back and the studios start saying okay to present their movies in the theaters because no studio is going to point out a hundred million two hundred million dollar movie when only a few markets are open that's just spoils the entire release strategy the reason these movies have been moved for the most part is because the studios need a mass amount of people to see these movies in order for them to make financial sense and without a bunch of leaders open it doesn't make sense to put the movies in the theaters yeah I need to run ad campaigns like they when these things will go well in advance now the one movie that is sort of a big one sitting there right now is Christopher Nolan's tenet and that is scheduled for July and at as we're led to understand that he feels that by then it will be okay he is among the A. list final cut directors who is passionately committed to having his movies in theaters and will not see things any other way and everybody's watching to see whether Warner brothers can actually do this or whether you know it could undermine the movie if they go too soon so that is the one I think where people's attention in the industry right now is focused yeah I'm from what I have heard the conversations between Warner brothers and Christopher Nolan has centered on him wanting to be first out he is such a proponent of the theatrical experience that he sees his movie as potentially being a galvanizing point for movie goers to say we if we are invited back in it's deemed safe by the governments we are going to rally around this movie and and it will send a signal to the rest of the industry that it's okay to release these big movies and you see everyone else lining up behind him because a week later Disney has flooded mu lan which was pushed from its March day into late July after the Chris Nolan movie and then there's Wonder Woman that's slated for August and then we get into a more regular blockbuster release schedule that's a big if but if it does look like the fears can reopen in July Chris Nolan will gladly be the first one out of the gate yeah that would be a queasy proposition for me but the young Chris Nolan is a man with nerves of steel well so we'll see what happens thank you ma'am thank you that's Matt Bellamy former editorial director of The Hollywood Reporter he joins me this Monday at one thirty on the business I'm Kim masters and this is the Hollywood break down and you are listening to KCRW LA county stayed home order has been extended to may fifteenth please stay away from county beaches the beach bike path ocean front walk and palisades park in Santa Monica for the duration of the order.

Kim masters Hollywood Matt Bellamy
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"On morning edition most in person a a meetings aren't happening because of covert nineteen but virtual gatherings are taking place I sit inside these group chats and I see somebody that's saying you know like I have thirty days sober and I want to drink and like that's where I can chime in and talk to this person more on another aspect of the crisis that has people struggling to adapt that's coming up on morning edition this is Casey R. W. your source for music discovery subscribe to five songs to hear this week our most popular email newsletter and get five fresh tunes delivered every Friday go to KCRW dot com slash newsletters good morning I am less I'm very much looking forward to the start of a new week with you joining me today on morning becomes eclectic I'll have new music from albums released this past Friday of the first new album from Fiona apple in years a scallion musician he's English and the debut from P. O. B. that's Radiohead's ed o'brien plus classics from the flying burrito brothers and big star and a whole lot more morning becomes eclectic starts at nine right here on K. C. R. W..

Fiona apple Radiohead Casey R. P. O. ed o'brien
"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition on WNYC I'm Richard Hey good morning ten years ago today the deepwater horizon offshore drilling rig caught fire spilling into the Gulf of Mexico it was the largest oil spill in the country now a decade later the industry says it's much better prepared to respond we'll have that story coming up fifty three degrees there's guys right now in New York City we do expect a cloudy day today with gradual clearing we should see some sun via later on this afternoon with a high near fifty nine mostly clear tonight and then showers are likely tomorrow support for NPR comes from member stations and from the Argus foundation dedicated to the idea that people can live in harmony with one another in the natural world learn more.

Mexico New York City NPR Argus foundation
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:53 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no well king good morning Michael Bloomberg is suspending his presidential campaign he made he made the announcement a little while ago he had a disappointing finish in last night's super Tuesday primaries he announced that he is endorsing Joe Biden and here's Susan Davis has been covering the Bloomberg campaign in Florida she's with us now good morning to you know well so why is Bloomberg ending his campaign what do you say well I maybe think of former democratic candidate Andrew Yang it's just math he was yeah in a statement Michael Bloomberg talked about delegate Matthew walked away from super Tuesday with very few delegates I think at latest count is forty four is simply just not enough to make any case that he has a claim to the nomination if you consider the money he spent over five hundred million dollars on a national ad campaign that breaks down to just over eleven million dollars per delegate that's extraordinary five hundred million dollars is sort of an unheard of amount of for an individual to spend on the campaign what happens to this huge campaign apparatus and he built all those people that he hired that we've been talking about this whole time thousands and thousands right it's not just the admin right he has over two thousand people on his campaign staff one thing that Bloomberg has said and continues to say and again hinted at and his statement this morning is he intends to keep some element of this apparatus in place he is committed to spending he hasn't put a dollar figure on it but he has unlimited resources to helping elect the next president which he believes will be Joe Biden now what does that look like it could look like ad spending it could look like money that sent to state parties to help get out the vote efforts to help with canvassing to help identify voters I mean essentially if Joe Biden needs resources Mike Bloomberg is out here saying I'm willing to give you whatever you need to win that's extra day I'm out of the race but my money is still in S. and someone with the kind of money at that no one else has ever been able to inject into the political system in one of the things that I think is interesting about this is this is in theory on paper or something that the Democratic Party is against its again their party platform house Democrats have put forward legislation for campaign finance reform allowing one wealthy individual to input untold sums of money into the political system is not something Democrats tend to say that they support but now the Bloomberg is saying that he's willing to do it to defeat Donald Trump you're not hearing as much protest within the Democratic Party not certainly there are voices in the party who do not believe that Michael Bloomberg should be able to do this Bernie Sanders has been credit eleven Elizabeth Warren has been critical of them but will Joe Biden beep that's a good that's a good question going forward and will Joe Biden welcome not just his endorsement but his money yes Michael Bloomberg's endorsement important for Joe Biden at this point you know I think it I don't know into itself if the Bloomberg endorsement is the same equivalent of like the Jim Clyburn endorsement before north of before South Carolina that helped propel until big victory there but it does help Joe Biden's argument that they've nomination is consolidating behind him that the party is consolidating behind him and it further continues the momentum we had in South Carolina he comes out of super Tuesday in the delegate lead he comes out with largely positive press more and more endorsements it's creating a reality where Bernie Sanders case against Joe Biden at this moment seems hard we've seen a lot of twists and turns in this race one other candidate to think about Noel Elizabeth Warren yeah did you not have a good night last night similar to Michael Bloomberg questions about how much longer she can stay in this race her campaign has confirmed to our colleague awesome holiday that she too is taking time to assess where her campaign is that so it looks like we could have Elizabeth Warren out of this race making it a much clearer two man race for the nomination NPR's Susan Davis sue thanks so much for your reporting you're welcome the effort to combat the corona virus in this country was complicated by faulty test kits the centers for disease control and prevention developed a replacement but only a limited number of labs can use it with the help of private companies federal authorities are hoping to ramp up access to those new to us but as NPR's Greg Allen reports infectious disease experts say doctors are still not testing many people who might be infected for discovered its first cases of covert nineteen the disease caused by the corona virus this week one was a man in his sixties hospitalized with pneumonia despite having symptoms associated with corona virus Florida's Surgeon General Scott Ricky says the patient wasn't tested for five days there was a delay in testing on Thursday the center for disease control actually sent out new protocols for the kids they had sat and tell them the CDC's protocols only authorized testing for people with symptoms who travel to China or been in contact with someone who'd recently been there risky says now health care workers are trying to find out how this man may have contracted the disease and how many others may have been exposed even under the new guidelines many people who may have the disease are not being tested leaving Italy on Wednesday morning this woman interviewed by CBS four in Miami wants to remain anonymous to protect her privacy read your sore throat Hey the mall called already called over the next couple of days at Jackson memorial one of Miami's leading hospitals she tested positive for different strain of the coronavirus but because she was not considered high risk and didn't require hospitalization her doctor said under federal guidelines she couldn't be tested for the current strain Dr Eileen Marty an infectious disease expert at Florida International University in Miami review the woman's case and agrees that she likely has covert nineteen it was very clear from her travel history from her symptoms from everything about her presentation and all the negative results for every other respiratory pathogens that she was a covered nineteen patients we were not allowed to get testing for her similar stories are popping up across the.

Rachel Martin Michael Bloomberg NPR
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition on KCRW it's four thirty news headlines are next live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly president trump is in India today were a short time ago the president and First Lady melania visited the Taj Mahal earlier trump spoke to more than one hundred thousand people at the world's largest cricket stadium in the home state of India's prime minister Narendra Modi and P. R. Shush me to pop talk has more prime minister narendramodi began with a chant NDL USA brand said long live long live the crowd replied moody said the partnership between the US and India had evolved into a far greater and closer one when he invited the US president to speak movie introduced him as a friend of India in response to president trump's showered with praise from this day on India will always hold a very special place in our hearts trump also spoke about growing the economic relationship between the two countries leaders will talk about treating New Delhi tomorrow for NPR news I'm socially that partake in them the bad India the founder of wikileaks is in court today in London chilling in the sun she is fighting extradition to the U. S. where he's wanted on eighteen criminal counts including espionage over the publication of classified documents prosecutors say assigns conspired with then US army intelligence analyst Chelsea manning Dow futures are down more than seven hundred points this morning this is NPR news China's president xi jin ping says efforts to contain the corona virus in that country are at a critical stage as NPR's Emily Feng reports she gave a televised address last night where he declared the outbreak of the virus the greatest public health crisis in China since its founding this is a crisis for us and a major test site cheating paying China is now announcing a host of economic and monetary policies intended to cushion the considerable economic impact of the virus outbreak hundreds of millions of people have still been unable to return to work the outbreak exposed quote obvious shortcomings she told the one hundred and seventy thousand officials listening into a televised speech but she also said the rapid national level response to effectively quarantine hundreds of millions of people a demonstration of the quote significant advantages of the leadership of the Communist Party of China Emily Feng and PR news Beijing thousands of people are expected today at staples center in Los Angeles for a public memorial service honoring former NBA star Kobe Bryant the Lakers legend and his teenage daughter were among nine people killed in last month's HELOC helicopter crash in southern California the arena is sold out for the event police in Orland say a second person in less than a week has been struck and killed by a Mardi Gras float the latest death occurred during a weekend street parade Mardi Gras officially kicks off tomorrow I'm Dave Mattingly NPR news in Washington you're listening to morning edition on KCRW I'm around all day on to the point the unintended consequences of charter schools in the privatization of public education what we've seen instead is almost twenty years of stagnant test scores we've seen teachers demoralized teachers fired principles fired schools close what we seen as twenty years of disruption this is not reform Diane Ravitch blames billionaires like Michael Bloomberg who she says don't know what they're doing on our to.

NPR
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green in Culver city California and I'm a working in Washington DC good morning Russian military hackers targeted the company at the center of president trump's impeachment charisma where is my you will remember is a Ukrainian conglomerate hunter Biden served on it's board president trump later pushed Ukraine to investigate hunter Biden and his father Joe Biden now a California based security firm called area one says this fall Russian hackers succeeded in getting into Burris miss email system or in Fargo which is the co founder of area one he worked for the National Security Agency from two thousand six to two thousand and thirteen is online now good morning Sir good morning what did you find evidence of exactly we found that since early November cyber actors working for the Russian government have been sending phishing attacks to employees at the subsidiaries of grease my holdings these hackers are not unknown to the United States government or to most Americans if at this point they are the G. R. U. and they were responsible for hacks on the Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee right yes that's correct what were the Russian hackers looking for when they broke into the email accounts of prison employees it's unknown what the Russians were looking for but we do know they're successful in conducting their phishing attacks okay how come we don't know what they were looking for well it's hard to understand what the goal of the cyber actor is a suit take for instance once you have the user names and passwords to someone's email account as you saw in the two thousand sixteen election you could just only observe the data and that could be helpful for intelligence purposes or you could take that they didn't release it publicly for to become embarrassing you can also take that data to create more sophisticated fishing campaigns and increase the level of authenticity so it's a to be determined okay and how did you how did this catch the attention of your from how did you figure it out basically well one of our researchers was working on new year's eve and he noticed that a new Russian campaign had started it wasn't told few days later that we were able to kind of take a step back and noticed that all the targets were Ukrainian oil gas companies and they were all subsidiaries of charisma that's interesting okay Russian officials we should note haven't commented can you say with one hundred percent certainty that these were Russian hackers yes okay why can you say that how do you know well our team are expert so we've been out for years tracking and learning about how the specific Russian government group convicts conducts its cyber operations and there are patterns within the campaign that match other cyber attacks that we've been observing that are ongoing as well okay so you've seen them do it before in this matches the pattern that's great I wonder at companies we know at this point are repelling phishing attacks all of the time we get warnings about it here at NPR charisma is a major player in the energy sector could this just be a random a random attempt to attack a very obvious target well you know nor L. nine and ten times yeah when their damages in cyber security it says it says the result of fishing and so there's still a lot more to do to make sure that companies and organizations around the world are protected from these types of attacks for the past four years we've been worrying about what might happen in there but a lot of warnings about cyber security and elections and I think we provide an early warning in insights with a very specific use case in light of your expertise I wonder can you give the twenty twenty presidential campaigns some specific advice on what to do to guard against this type of intrusion make sure you get the first make sure you can't be fish it's as simple as that huh that's correct or in Fargo it's of the security firm area one thank you so much thank you and I should note that last night NPR asked for comment from bear is my holdings and we are waiting on them for a response so at a time when TV and movies are focusing on the existence of two popes inside the Vatican the Roman Catholic Church is again roiled by controversy in what appears to be a case of life imitating art NPR Sylvia but Julie reports the many church scholars are criticizing former pope Benedict for trying to influence the thinking of his successor in a sign of the times a building off Saint Peter's square is covered with a gigantic poster for the Netflix movie two popes of fictional account of pope Benedict and Francis.

California NPR David green Culver Washington
"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm David green and I'm Rachel Martin the trump administration is expected to announce sweeping changes to one of the country's most consequential environmental laws today under the proposal federal agencies wouldn't have to consider climate change when approving major new projects like oil pipelines are highways we've got and here's Jeff Brady with us to explain hi Jeff Hey good morning tells more about this change what it is expected to do yeah this the lies call the national environmental policy act it said better known by its acronym nepa and it's been around for fifty years it requires federal agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before approving and it doesn't say that the agency has to choose the least polluting option is just as they have to think about the environmental consequences and that gives the public the opportunity to see what the government is doing and how it arrives at its decisions and neat but it also gives the public a chance to comment on those decisions and it also gives environmental groups a chance to comment over the years through a series of court decisions and as some of these issues have become more complicated the need to process has gotten long up to six years that's because some of these big projects you know like a gas pipeline big highway they have a lot of the Newbern mental consequences to consider okay so that's what the law is and what it has done previously what's the change about why is it happening now but since these industries have long complained about the time it takes to get through the nepa process that's expensive they want these regulations streamlined and that's what the trump administration is proposing to do here at some of those groups led by the US chamber of commerce have long been working with the administration to re write the regulations we haven't seen all the details yet but they're going to come out later this morning and there are some early indications of what they've come up with one big issue is whether an agency has to consider the cumulative environmental effects of a project and think about an oil pipeline under these changes the agency would count only the environmental effects of building that pipeline environmentalists agencies should also have to count all the oil is flowing through that pipeline they argue that not doing that makes it very difficult to plan the plan for climate change so anytime you lift regulations I mean fair to say the industry is can we please with this change yeah from early indications he can definitely say they're very pleased with this that they don't like the direction that that need to cases have been heading in courts they've there been some recent decisions about oil and gas drilling on public land and about pipeline construction where judges have said that agencies must consider climate change during the nepa process that adds all that complication and there's another big change that we're going to see here companies would be allowed to conduct their own environmental reviews at Christy gold fast she's with the center for American progress and she was an environmental officials in the Obama administration here's what she had to say about that this is clearly a conflict of interest to just say to the company go ahead and tell us what the environmental impacts are going to be does anyone believe that's actually going to result in information that the public contrast or that we can use in the future to make wise decisions right self regulation is always sort of problematic soon one sees changes are announced what happens then what president trump he's expected to make this announcement himself at the White House later this morning and there's gonna be a public comment period but there's a question about whether the civil every even take place because there's going to be court challenges and then we don't know if it's gonna become.

David green Rachel Martin NPR
"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition on KCRW news headlines are next live from NPR news in Washington I'm David Mattingly a report is due out today on the origins of the F. B. I. investigation into president trump and Russia here's NPR's Greg Miley Michael Horowitz who is the inspector general with the justice department has been spending a lot of the last two years looking into whether the FBI had legitimate reasons to go to the foreign intelligence surveillance court in October of twenty sixteen and get a warrant to surveil Carter page who was a foreign policy adviser during the trump campaign pages only one part of the bigger picture but president trump in many supporters often point to the Carter page case and say this was part of what they're calling the politically motivated which aren't also today the house Judiciary Committee holds its second impeachment hearing focusing on president trump in Ukraine the president's legal counsel is declining to take part police in New Zealand say conditions on white island remain too dangerous to search for those missing after a volcanic eruption at least five people were killed many of the injured suffered burns from steam and ash hears prime minister just send a turn we know that there were a number of tourists on or around the island at the time both New Zealanders and visitors from overseas royal Caribbean says some of those on the island at the time of the eruption were from its cruise ship ovation of the seas this is NPR news from Washington authorities in India say a factory fire that killed forty three people in New Delhi early yesterday was sparked by an electrical short circuit judge me to Pontotoc reports most of the victims were pool migrant workers who was sleeping in the factory when the fire started doctors say most of them died from suffocation due to smoke from the blaze the factories located in a cramped market in dailies or quarter the narrow alley vis made it difficult for authorities to reach the fire the plastic items people another combustible materials inside the factory aggravated the place which bone for ours the factory's owner and the building manager had been detained delis five she says there was no fire safety equipment in the building such fires are common in India their safety rules are often ignored for NPR news I'm search me the partake in Mumbai an unmanned Russian cargo ship is now docked at the international space station it arrived earlier today with about three tons of supplies including food and fuel it lifted off from Kazakhstan aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket three days ago yesterday a SpaceX dragon cargo ship arrived at the station with tons of gear including hardware and research materials six astronauts are currently aboard the space station including three from NASA stock markets in Asia ended the day mostly higher following Friday's sharp gains on Wall Street the Dow added three hundred thirty seven points or more than one percent I'm David Mattingly in Washington this week on the business on a studio executive suggested that Greta girl way could change the ending she devised for her version of little women.

one percent three days three tons two years
"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:03 min | 3 years ago

"morning edition" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC and I'm David green in Culver city California well if the stakes were not so high if the environment was not so partisan yesterday's impeachment hearing may have felt more like a class in law school for scholars laid out the constitutional standards for impeachable offenses in among them George Washington University law professor Jonathan Turley he was invited to the house Judiciary Committee yesterday by Republicans we then interviewed him this morning and Turley said Democrats need to build out their case further this is not a fully developed record and all I'm saying is that before you give that record to the Senate you should deal with some of those conflicts and some of those gaps and this is an example of one of those that I think the president could very well be impeached and removed for obstruction based on on these acts as a member of the house got Perry would have to vote on any articles of impeachment he's a Republican from the state of Pennsylvania joins me this morning comes to welcome David good morning so what do you make of of what we just heard from Jonathan Turley there I mean do you do you agree that Democrats could have a case to impeach or remove the president they just haven't they haven't built the record yet to do it well I'm I'm not sure I'm not an attorney by trade but that I would think that we'd want to go through every single part of this to be absolutely sure I mean from my perspective impeachment is the second most important thing a member of Congress or you know them a member of the legislature will ever ever deal with of the first being declaring whoring and war and sending America's the best and brightest you know to fight somewhere so so this is really really important and we have to get this right and so and and and Mister Turley is a well respected individual around Capitol Hill is Republican witness and probably your audience knows that he's a he's a he's a Democrat and and not a fan of the president but yesterday I don't know that we we learned a lot of we've changed a lot of mines in that comes from the view point that most of the Democrats on the committee the majority of them have voted for impeachment if it least once if not more than that before hearing any of this motion say many many of your colleagues have come out basically saying that the impeachment process is a sham even before hearing anything so it's under oath parties of sort of dug in in a way well I mean what you say the process as a sham we have talked about the process because the process is so important around here from the view point that if the bar is going to be lowered to what many people believe is a policy dispute I get that you know some people like the president some people really don't like the president but we have a lectures for that so the question is is is is this it I think you know about impeachment should this be about impeachment and what does this say about future policy to dispute because we're sure they're gonna we're gonna have them whether it's you know there's a Democrat in the White House a Republican really a policy dispute I mean this is looking at some acts of of the president and I just like to focus of I can on some of the the gaps the Jonathan Turley that the Republican when it might have been talking about I mean there has there been these witnesses who have talked about you know the things we've heard about military aid whether or not it was was held up you know to to start investigation into into the bidens it does seem like the burden is on Democrats to prove what the president's intent was or not shouldn't they be able to hear from people closer to the president like acting chief is that Mick Mulvaney to figure out what his intent was and and I think everybody's fine with that too to a point but that all has to be adjudicated so there are both houses have you might both houses both branches have have their own that their own propriety to make sure that their co equal branches and and that that is protected so that so that the tension remains between the two and we don't do things that inadvertently that we don't want to the president has asserted his and the and the and and the legislature has predictably disagreed and that's fine but that's where it should go to a court and and and if you say that well every time that the executive branch disagrees they're they're in violation of obstruction and and then they should be impeached again that then becomes a policy question which is not a judicata but there there are even some legal analyst on the fox news legal analyst and an appalled Tano has said that you know if there's a subpoena the comes from Congress to people like Mick Mulvaney Mike Pompeii on it and they're thrown into a drawer and not complied with that is an act of obstruction so so how long can this executive privilege claim last before the president is is obstructing in it and what we comes a legitimate article impeachment yeah what we don't we don't know because it hasn't gone to the courts and we're moving ahead he might have a legitimate claim is the point but but he might not end and there's a process to determine that and we eve I guess in the house to a certain extent just said just because he's not playing ball so to speak we're going to impeach him for it and and so and even when you get down to the finer points of not the process but more the substance regarding military aid in white was without we withhold military aid and aid in general all the time and I think that was born out even even yesterday but understand as well you know we're look we look at this and we usually think as Americans that court proceeding trials are based on facts and are generally dispassionate and I think it was pretty clear yesterday that like I said that the majority Democrats have already voted for impeachment that any hearing any of this and and and every member of the panel that voted against the president but then they even went as far as to the one member of the panel said that within two weeks of the president's election he should be impeached for a tweet that he made in and so we only with a second left on Friday yeah you're still open minded you're still open to sing with this process goes into selling out of a you have to be I think you have to be but it does concern me you know the one fact that we have is that the president said he wanted investigation into twenty sixteen and we keep on hearing it being conflated into twenty twenty and I think that okay I guess you can make that assessment but I don't think there's one fact there's not one fact that bears that out an impeachment is really really important it has huge implications for the present and the future we have to get it right alright congressman Scott Perry of Pennsylvania Republican thanks so much thank you Sir I'm gonna bring in Lee political editor and fiercely political editor Dominican Montanaro to medical I'm I'm struck he is not just attacking the process if we've heard as we've heard from other Republicans I mean he he is saying at least to us that he's that he's going to see how this plays out and and think about and reflect yeah you know Republicans are pretty locked in as our Democrats for the most part on this I don't think many minds were changed based on yesterday and you know Perry has in the past blamed the deep state for coming out against president trump having people of being against the president from the beginning I don't think you're gonna count him as somebody who's going to vote for impeachment or is really open to it so I think that some of what he said there conflated a couple things himself I mean he said that people are conflating the president one investigation into twenty sixteen completing that with twenty twenty while the president on that phone call did ask for both he asked for an investigation into whether you crane interfered in the twenty sixteen election and wanted to have the vice president Biden and his son investigated as well which would benefit him for twenty twenty I'm just a minus and interviews I guess what happens next in the process well next we're gonna see whether the Judiciary Committee does right up those articles of impeachment which is expected and we're probably gonna house vote by Christmas with a Senate trial that begins and continues through January and early political editor dominical months and our thanks to medical you're welcome three years three mayors and a cascade of missed deadlines in Nashville police officers in Tennessee's Capitol still are not wearing body cameras despite promises to do just that in the meantime there been to high profile police shootings Samantha Max of member station W. P. L. N. reports this story unofficially begins on October thirtieth twenty sixteen then mayor Meghan berry stood at the pulpit of temple church in Nashville and made a promise what we will do chief Anderson a nine we will be in a position to recommend full funding for all police officers to have body cameras when we present next year's budget to the metro council from that moment on berries administration seem to move full steam ahead she can be the task force to research body camera programs across the country and draft policy but even at the group's first meeting activist climbing Greenlee wondered whether the city was really ready for body cameras I want to make sure that we be assured that we won't be seeing here this time next year tell them about the same one object the body camera flash Florida three years and two mayors later the police department still hasn't bought a single body camera.

Rachel Martin California Jonathan Turley NPR Washington David green Culver George Washington University professor three years two weeks