3 Burst results for "Morgan St. Morehouse"

"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is David hall. He is a partner at rise of the rest seed funds of division. Nicole the division of revolution fund funds within revolution. I previously had one of the partners in your firm Steve Murray on and I discussed ever so briefly rise of the rest with him. And he said, hey, I got a guy you should speak to about. This name's David. I love this concept, and I have to just give a really brief explanation and then let you dive into this. So most of the venture capital money spent in the United States. It's San Francisco it's Boston. It's New York. They're a handful of other places. But there are these huge stretches of entrepreneurs and innovators and technologists that it's a venture capital desert. What led to the development of rise to the recede funds and tell us how it came about? And how it actually operates? Yeah. Sure. It's it's it's actually stems from a very simple premise, we believe that great entrepreneurs can start great businesses anywhere and for so long. In our country's history. Or at least in the in the recent history in the digital history digital era that that that belief was episode to the coastal hubs of as you said, San Francisco, New York and Boston and one of the things that we've been doing it revolution working with Steve we started in twenty fourteen these these bus tours, which became themed rise of the rest bus tours. And let's put a little flesh on that half a million dollars a bunch of people pilot to a bus you go to a specific city. What happens there, it's it's it's we started we kicked it off in Detroit. And we start in the morning we convene the leadership. I like to call it, the the soups and the t shirts getting together for the first time. We'll bring the politicians the mayor's the governor's the state and federal officers will bring the heads of economic development, the university presidents or business school deans will bring the head of the tent pole companies those big success companies that have broken out and made a name for themselves. But we'll also bring the startups the t shirt. The guys who are guys and girls guys and ladies who are cranking every day on building the next app or the next B2._B's SAS business and bring them together to say what's going on in Detroit and Nashville in Pittsburgh, what's happening in this city. What industries are flaring up? What are you? What are you noticing about? The flow of talent the flow of capital, the flow of ideas into an even out of your city. We follow that with visiting going out and seeing that talking to these companies and and going being in their physical spaces and meeting as many companies as possible in that venue, and then and then we end the day with a celebration. We do a pitch competition where the winner has historically received one hundred thousand dollar investment, but it's a way for the community to show the best of the future, and in a handful of ideas, how that's evolved over time. We've done it now in thirty eight different cities on really seven different tours. So we've we've literally been you know, from from places like York. Pennsylvania down to New Orleans, which is near my hometown. And seen seen this play out in so many different cities. And it's what you walk away from is both like the how different cities take entrepreneurship differently and how they've had to deal with it differently. Which is not not on different from how in different from how they've had to historically deal with economic ebbs and flows. I mean, one of the things that's really interesting to me is we see a lot of robotics in Pittsburgh, for example. Because of the focus of Carnegie Mellon read, also the history of steel there, which kind of makes sense if you draw narrow line between steel to robotics. Right. You see a lot of advanced manufacturing in Detroit, which obviously makes a lot of sense. But interesting you'll see some some really interesting things like Ed tech in New Orleans why because Katrina forced new orleanians to rethink their entire education system. And you saw a lot of teach for America alums coming there to be helpful. But then being entrepreneurial about how do they how do they solve these problems? And these these these. Teach for America alums, mostly started businesses in New Orleans focusing on education and education reform. So you see this this the legacy of the great industries of American steel and manufacturing take place. But also, you see the resurgence because of current situations in in places like New Orleans that launched these burgeoning industries in things like education technology, so what are some of the advantages of not being in these coastal urban centers when you roll into a Detroit or a Pittsburgh. I have to imagine the costs of everything are a fraction of what San Francisco is. It's so funny. I was on a call just the other day with a company that relocated from Boston to Wisconsin. And they were able to extend their burn by over six months, just by re domicile in the company. Right. So I think I think that there are a couple of things I think that obviously the cost of living differences is a really different, and and and you can grow a company a lot farther on on the same amount of funding. But I. Think you're also seeing the flow of talent. I think you're seeing people graduate from the university of Michigan or graduated from Georgia state or Georgia Tech and say, you know, what I don't necessarily feel like I want to go to these these these coastal Hobbs. I wanna I wanna stay here. I want to become an entrepreneur, and it's easier because my network is here, it's it's it's a more livable more, affordable, definitely more affordable environment. But the jobs are now starting to happen. It's it's part of the flywheel the the receiving this flow of talent boomerang back home. Because that's where they want to be. And I think that, you know, the combination of those two factors with the flattening of the w-, you know, never been cheaper to start a business because of things like a laptop and an internet connection, an Amazon cloud, and you pretty much ready to get ready to go. And that wasn't always the case a decade twenty years ago, just to say, the least there is a giant demand for stem jobs. Even in the highest paying Silicon Valley and biotech in in Boston. And a little bit of everything in New York. Do you run into an issue of shortage of skilled labor in in those towns that may not be known for their their tech workers? So I would you know. That's a that's a common issue. We hear a lot. And I think that the real the real focus is for a lot of the early stage jobs. A lot of the junior folks the entry level jobs. They're coming right out of the university. So I it's it's no different from leaving Morgan St. Morehouse and coming up to New York to work Morgan Stanley, these folks graduated from Vanderbilt and then go work directly into one of the the Nashville startup Nashville startups. I think what about coders and statistical analysts and design, I guess designers. You could pretty much find you can find a lot of these folks anywhere. And I think you're you're starting to see the recruiting of them away from the hubs one of the big challenges for for for developers, particularly in coastal hubs is there's such a high opportunity cost talent. Right. If you have a bad quarter as startup or miss a couple of year, milestones half a year development. Staff is looking for another job because they recognize that unless they work for their out. Yeah. Coming up. We continue our conversation with.

Detroit New York New Orleans Boston San Francisco Pittsburgh Nashville Steve Murray partner United States David hall America Pennsylvania York Carnegie Mellon Georgia Tech t Morgan St. Morehouse
"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:35 min | 2 years ago

"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"David hall. He is a partner at rise of the recede funds of division. Nicole the division of revolution fund fund a funds within revolution. I previously had a one of the partners in your firm Steve Murray on and I discussed ever so briefly rise of the rest with him. And he said, hey, I got a guy you should speak to about. This name's David. I love this concept. And I and I have to just give a really brief explanation and then let you dive into this. So most of the venture capital money spent in the United States it San Francisco Boston. It's New York. They're a handful of other places. But there are these huge stretches of entrepreneurs and innovators and technologists that it's a venture capital desert. What led to the development of rise of the recede funds and tell us how it came about? And how it actually operates? Yeah. Sure. It's it's it's actually stems from a very simple premise, we believe that great entrepreneurs can start great businesses anywhere and for so long. In our country's history. Or at least in the in the recent history in the digital history digital era that that that belief was episode Shrek to the coastal hubs of as you said, San Francisco, New York and Boston and one of the things that we've been doing it revolution. When working with Steve we started in two thousand fourteen these these bus tours, which became themed rise of the rest bus tours. And let's put a little flesh on that half a million dollars a bunch of people pile into a bus you go to a specific city. What happens there, it's it's it's we started we kicked it off in Detroit. And we start in the morning, we we convene the leadership. I like to call it the the suits and the t shirts getting together for the first time. We'll bring the politicians the mayor's the governor's the state and federal officers will bring the heads of economic development, the university presidents or business school deans will bring the head of the tech companies those big success companies that have kind of broken out and made a name for themselves. But we'll also bring the startups the t shirt. The guys who are guys and girls is the ladies who are cranking every day on building the next app or the next SAS business and bring them together to say what's going on in Detroit and Nashville in Pittsburgh, what's happening in the city. What industries are flaring up? What are you? What are you noticing about? The flow of talent the flow of capital, the flow of ideas into an even out of your city. We follow that with visiting going out and seeing that talking to these companies and and going into being in their physical spaces and meeting as many companies as possible in that venue, and then and then we end the day with a celebration. We do a pitch competition where the winner has historically received one hundred thousand dollar investment, but it's a way for the community to show the best of the future in a handful of ideas. How that's evolved over time. We've done it now in thirty eight different cities on really seven different tours. So we've we've literally been you know, from from places like York. Pennsylvania down to New Orleans, which is near my hometown. And seen seen this play out in so many different cities. And it's what you walk away from is both like the how different cities take entrepreneurship differently and how they've had to deal with it differently. Which is not not on different from how are in different from how they've had to historically deal with economic ebbs and flows. I mean, one of the things that's really interesting to me is we see a lot of robotics in Pittsburgh, for example. Because of the focus of Carnegie Mellon read, also the history of steel there, which kind of makes sense if you draw narrow line between steel to robotics. Right. You see a lot of advanced manufacturing in Detroit, which obviously makes a lot of sense. But interesting you'll see some some really interesting things like Ed tech in New Orleans why because Katrina forced new orleanians to rethink their entire education system. And you saw a lot of teach for America alums coming there to be helpful. But then being entrepreneurial about how do they how do they solve these problems? And these these. These teach for America lumps. Mostly started businesses in New Orleans focusing on education and education reform. So you see this this the legacy of the great industries of American steel and manufacturing take place. But also, you see the resurgence because of current situations in in places like New Orleans that launched these burgeoning industries and things like educational technology. So what are some of the advantages of not being in these coastal urban centers when you roll into a Detroit or a Pittsburgh? I have to imagine the costs of everything are a fraction of what San Francisco is. It's so funny. I was on a call just the other day with a company that relocated from Boston to Wisconsin. And they were able to extend their burn by over six months. Just by re domicile in the company. Right. So I think I think that there are a couple of things I think that obviously the cost of living differences is a really different in. And you can grow a company a lot farther on on the same amount of funding. But I think you're also seeing the flow of talent. I think you're seeing people graduate from the university of Michigan or graduated from Georgia state or attack and say, you know, what I don't I don't necessarily feel like I want to go to these these these coastal Hobbs. I wanna I wanna stay here. I want to become an entrepreneur, and it's easier because my network is here, it's it's it's a more livable more, affordable, definitely more affordable environment. But the jobs are now starting to happen. It's it's part of the flywheel the receiving this flow of talent boomerang back home. Because that's where they want to be. And I think that, you know, the combination of those two factors with the flattening of the you. It's never been cheaper to start a business because of things like a laptop and an internet connection and Amazon cloud, and you pretty much ready to get ready to go. And that wasn't always the case a decade twenty years ago, just to say the least. There is a giant demand for stem jobs, even in the highest paying Silicon Valley and and biotech in in Boston and a little bit of everything in New York. Do you run into an issue of shortage of skilled labor in in those towns that may not be known for their tech workers? So I would you know. That's a that's a common issue. We hear a lot. And I think that the real the real focus is for a lot of the early stage jobs. A lot of the junior folks the entry level jobs. They're coming right out of the university. So I it's it's no different from leaving Morgan St. Morehouse and coming up to New York to work at Morgan Stanley. These folks graduate from Vanderbilt and then go work directly into one of the the Nashville startup Nashville startups, I think what about coders and statistical analysts and design, I guess designers. You could pretty much find you can find a lot of these folks anywhere. And I think you're you're starting to see the recruiting of them away from the hubs one of the big challenges for for for developers. Particularly in coastal hubs is there's such a high opportunity cost them their talent. Right. If you have a bad quarter as a startup or miss a couple of year, milestones half a year development staff is looking for another job because they recognize that unless they work for exit. They're out. Yeah. Coming up. We continue our conversation with.

Detroit New Orleans New York San Francisco Boston Pittsburgh Nashville Steve Murray America partner David hall United States Vanderbilt Pennsylvania York Carnegie Mellon t
"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"morgan st. morehouse" Discussed on Masters in Business

"It's so funny. I was on a call just the other day with a company that relocated from Boston to Wisconsin. And they were able to extend their burn by over six months, just by redeem asylum, the company, right? So I think that I think that they're a couple of things I think that obviously the cost of living differences is a really different. And and and and you can grow a company a lot farther on on the same amount of funding. But I think you're also seeing the flow of talent. I think you're seeing people graduate from the university of Michigan or graduated from Georgia state or Georgia Tech and say, you know, what I don't I don't necessarily feel like I wanna go to these these these coastal Hobbs. I wanna I wanna stay here. I wanna become an. Entrepreneur and it's easier because my network is here. It's it's it's it's a more livable more, affordable, definitely more affordable environment. But the jobs are now starting to happen. It's it's part of the flywheel the the receiving this flow of talent boomerang back home. Because that's where they wanna be. And I think that, you know, the combination of those two factors with the flattening of the, you know, it's never been cheaper to start a business because of, you know, things like a laptop and an internet connection and Amazon cloud, and you pretty much ready to get ready to go. And that wasn't always the case, you know, a decade twenty years ago, just to say, the least there is a giant demand for stem jobs, even in the highest paying Silicon Valley and and a biotech in in Boston and a little bit everything in New York. Do you run into an issue of shortage of skilled labor in in those towns that may not be known for their their tech works? Offers. So I would you know, that's a that's a common issue. We hear a lot. And I think that the real the real focus is for a lot of the early stage jobs. A lot of the junior folks the entry level jobs. They're coming right out of the university. So I it's it's no different from leaving Morgan St. Morehouse than coming up to New York to work at Morgan Stanley, these folks graduated from you know, Vanderbilt and then go work directly into one of the the Nashville startup Nashville startups. I think what about coders and pro statistical analysts and design, I guess designers. You could pretty much find you can find a lot of these folks anywhere. And I think you're starting to see the recruiting of them away from the hubs one of the big challenges for for for developers. Particularly in in the coastal hubs is there's such a high opera to be cost on their talent. Right. If you have a bad quarter as a startup or miss a couple of year, milestones, half year development staff is looking for another job because they recognize that, you know, unless they work for. They're out. Yeah. And and so, but but in Madison or in Detroit, like you've got a stickier employees. And we're seeing that those folks end up staying around longer being more productive. You know, they're able to get a backyard and start a family. I mean, I've I I saw deck one time where we're a we the question was asked what about recruiting how hard is it to recruit, and the the the entrepreneurs showed a slide of a birthday party. And he says it's easy for me to recruit because I can promise this. I can't promise a backyard birthday party in San Francisco, New York, and I have to point out and ask you about the board of advisors for rise of the rest. This is just an astonishing list. Gyms Barksdale of of Netscape Jeff Bezos, Tory Burch Ray dally. Oh, Steve case John door. I'm just I'm gonna stop there. But that's just an unbelievable list of investors that goes on and on and on what's it like working with a group that August, then esteem? We are beyond privileged that that those those notable entrepreneurs investors business leaders among the best of our era have decided to join us on this mission. And you know, we think that the things that they saw an us, and and sort of the implicit mission of what we were doing of democratising this flow of capital was really important. But we also think that they're they're, you know, they're investors. The these folks understand business, and they understand that there's something going on in the heartland..

New York Boston Nashville Wisconsin Georgia Tech university of Michigan Morgan St. Morehouse Morgan Stanley Silicon Valley Amazon Hobbs Georgia Jeff Bezos San Francisco Tory Burch Ray dally Netscape Barksdale Vanderbilt Detroit Madison