19 Burst results for "Morgan Neville"

"morgan neville" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

Collider Movie Talk

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Collider Movie Talk

"It's far away. Trust me. It's not it's going to be here before you know, it so far this year. We've been doing a great show figure consideration we've been talking about great categories. Great conversations, great guests like Adam driver. But this week we have a very special guest, we'll cut to in a second. But first to announce we are talking about best documentary and this year, we've had quite a few. This has been a great year kind of a breakthrough year for documentaries critically and commercially. Joining me as always to weigh in to have that great conversation, those great conversations, those great talks, the one the only she is the amazing. The astounding the fantastic the sensational Perry never off. It never gets old. Never gets a little. It's always a law fence with you Perry also test, the invincible, the amazing fantastic the legend. He is a legend Geoff Snider, thank you very much want to wind up. I got a lot to live up to well this show, especially it's going to be great because a very very excited to announce very very special guest. He is the director of this year's highest grossing documentary. He is also an Academy Award winner for twenty feet from star. Please welcome Morgan Neville. Thanks for having me. It's great. You're like the Fred blasts heave awards coverage. Can I quote you? Absolutely awesome. Well, first of all, congratulations. Because because you be my neighbor is is not only the highest grossing documentary of two thousand eighteen with almost twenty three million dollars domestically. But it is also just recently at one best documentary at the critics choice documentary awards, so congratulations. Thank you like what is your take on the the critical and commercial success of what you be my neighbor. I mean, it's. I wish I could say I knew it was going to happen. All the time. I don't you know, there's so many things under control we can't control the timing of when we're making films because it takes us heaters to make films. But I don't know like a year ago. It seemed like you couldn't pay people to go into theaters to see documentaries and something happened this year, and we can talk about that. So many things have happened. But there was a cultural moment that happened this year, not only with my film vote with so many great films. And if I knew what it was I'd bottle it in so well, that's very true. What's been the reaction to the movie that you've heard from people who are not familiar with Mr. Rogers because we're actually just before we started taping. We were having the conversation outside in our office because someone did not grow up in the states where he is just so well known to anybody who grew up in a in a certain time, he's really strange because everybody in America knows them and virtually nobody outside of America knows him. So he got zero coverage outside so I just I was in England a few weeks ago, and we screened it for a number of English audiences. And it's really interesting because the first ten minutes of the film plays differently. Because there's no kind of rush of nostalgia. Because and also in England. They have a very. You know, long history of Todd dri history of till children's TV presenters, so they're expecting something really bad to happen. But basically after fifteen or twenty minutes the film plays exactly the same. So by the end of the film there. It's just interesting. So I feel like the film works, and I think that's because it films not really nostalgic film. It's a film about current ideas. But I had no idea what that was going to be until I screened it. I'm curious like what kids reactions are to this movie? If they end up, you know, seeing this film, and I don't even know is is the show Mr..

Geoff Snider director England Morgan Neville Mr. Rogers Adam America Todd dri twenty three million dollars twenty minutes ten minutes twenty feet
HBO still dark on Dish

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:48 min | 2 years ago

HBO still dark on Dish

"KCRW sponsors include net. Flicks presenting the love me when I'm dead chronicling the last years of Orson Welles life that genius behind citizen. Kane. It's wildly entertaining while full of nuance and depth directed by Morgan Neville now streaming only on Netflix as the holidays approach supporting KCRW might slip off your to do list. So try this picture the white sand beaches of Los Cabos, Mexico. Explore majestic coral reefs in a glittering see dine out in the historic colonial district and ring in the new year from the beachfront luxury of the viceroy. It's KCRW's viceroy Los calbos ultimate New Year's Eve getaway. Sweeps. Donate today to the automatic we entered to win your ticket to paradise sweeps. Ends November thirteenth. So do it. Now at KCRW dot com slash join. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Matt Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter and Matt this week as you know, I'm in Lisbon Portugal this week and starting November. I actually the dish network no longer is carrying HBO. And this is the. First time that this has happened with HBO at anyone that carries HBO that they're at these fights are quite commonplace. Among the broadcast networks or cable networks, they want more money from places that carrot that distribute their content for the privilege of of carrying their content. But this is the first time that HBO has been in a fight that got to this level and significantly the first time that this kind of fight has come to this point since AT and T acquired the Time Warner assets, which includes HBO, and this is a sort of thing that you know, when you look at a big acquisition AT and T buying Time Warner with Warner Brothers and HBO this that and the other an HBO was the crown jewel there. Of course, was a fear that you know, they would strangle the competition or crush the people who have to do business with them. And I guess an argument could be made here. They're doing it. Yeah. I mean dish network competes with direct TV in the satellite business. Direct TV is owned by eighteen. Tea, and now AT and T has this asset HBO that lo and behold, it has been yanked off of dish, which conceivably could make people switch from dish to direct TV. Now, I think it's a little bit more complicated than that in. What you saw from Richard player the of HBO he put out a statement today. Saying no dish took this off dish HBO was ready to do a deal and dish essentially balked and caused them to go dark and the economics. Here are interesting because dish is a lower cost provider. Their whole marketing campaign is we cost less than the big boys like direct TV. So it is possible that they tried to extract some kind of a price concession and HBO emboldened by this new AT and T relationships said, no, you gotta you gotta pay up, but even the specter of AT and T. Acting improperly may impact this appeal which is going on right now. The Justice department is asking a pellet panel to revisit this merger. And the fact that this carriage dispute is going on is probably not good for eighteen in that merger appeal. I mean, it's not technically legal issue. That was addressed when the Justice department tried to block AT and T from buying Time Warner this was not the basis of the argument, they made maybe it should have been. But but notwithstanding the fact that that is not what is at issue that the superior court panel is reviewing it would still get into the heads of someone who reads a business page of a newspaper. A look what's happening AT and T is being a big bad owner of this property. There is a general skepticism. I think towards these companies, and we all kind of assume they're doing the worst thing they could possibly do for the market in their customers that they could get away with. But you know, there are two sides to this and dish has. Long history of getting into carriage fights with various channel companies networks, they are cheap and they're famously cheap. Charlie Ergen who runs dish has been a very controversial si yo, and he's not afraid to pull content. He pulled the Univision channel from dish. When they couldn't reach a deal, and that still is not on the dish network. So there's a lot of players here. That's Mandela knee aditorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status has nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. Thanks.

HBO Dish Network Kcrw AT Time Warner Hollywood Kim Masters Orson Welles Justice Department Charlie Ergen Reporter Los Cabos Netflix Morgan Neville Kane Mexico Matt Bellamy
Netflix cracks a window

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:52 min | 2 years ago

Netflix cracks a window

"KCRW sponsors include net. Flicks presenting the love me when I'm dead chronicling the last years of Orson Welles life the genius behind citizen. Kane. It's wildly entertaining while full of nuance and depth directed by Morgan Neville, only on net. Flicks. November second I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me as Bellamy of the Hollywood reporter, and Matt Finally I mean, we sort of expected this for a while but net flicks finally finally is cracking after trying to get into the awards race in a real way for a while. Now, they really want this, and they have in a very I think serious contender in quirones Roma, which is a black and white film very much in art house film. I would save as having seen it very much a film, ironically that you would wanna see on a big screen. You cannot make a movie with Cuaron if you don't bend or an artist like Koran if you don't somewhat bend to his will. So netflix. Has said they will let this movie run exclusively in theaters some theaters for awhile, it's a concession and their couple of other films in this category. But let's focus on the big one for now couple of other films in this category. They're going to allow this with it's a concession. I'm not sure that it's a really fabulous concession. Well. It is a big deal that Netflix, which has steadfastly stuck to this party line that we are releasing movies on Netflix worldwide the same day that we're putting them in a few theaters. That's the key here. They're moving three movies from the exclusive day and date on Netflix to invaders for about two or three weeks in advance and a few theaters. And the message here is that Netflix wants to play ball with elite talent and get into that Oscar race, which they have been unable to do. And is this going to make a difference? I don't know. But it is a big concession from. Netflix to go away from what they? I have said is their model all on net flicks to giving this the window which will allow those audiences to see it in theaters. I'll tell you what I think I think that net. Flicks made such a fetish of this. And I understand they were launching something, but movies are movies, in some cases. It really does matter as I said Romans one of them, I think that they made such a stink about this that certain theaters don't want anything to do with running their movies. They still don't want that relationship. And I also think this is a small number of theaters fifty around the world, I think is the number, and I'm just guessing you've got an otter like Koran and he's not the only one that is going to seem like not enough. Now, you could say, you know, this will be was made without Netflix money and net flicks, then acquired it in in a way made it possible for the world to see it. And you could say many people do it's better to be seen on screens. You know, more people will see it this way. However, I suspect that not only will the theater is still largely shunned it, but an artist like. Warren will say, you know, this really is not enough. And next time. I'm not doing it. Well, not if he wins best picture, which is gonna pour millions of dollars into campaign to win him best picture, and they believe that by putting it in theaters in New York and Los Angeles and couple of other big cities. They will have a better shot at winning best picture for this guy. And you know, it's it's the push pull it's a huge global audience that Netflix can provide. But they don't give you that theatrical push that many filmmakers want, and to me, the most interesting thing here is Netflix is drawing a line. They're saying these three movies are worthy of the releases. But if I'm a filmmaker that has a movie at Netflix, I say to my agent, where's my theatrical release where why am I not getting what L fonds Roan or the Coen brothers or the Sandra Bullock movie? They're putting in theaters why why am I not getting that? So you're going to see I think people like Guillermo del Toro who has a movie project. Net flicks. Michael bay whose movies are gigantic transam erred. But but Michael bay is used to getting his transformers movies in four thousand riders on opening weekend in the US, and he's gonna make net looks movies. You know, you don't think Michael Bay's going to ask for the window, and yeah, I do actually. And I think that if it does win. Yes. Maybe he will be satisfied, but it may not win because net flicks. Thank you, Matt. Thank you. That's not felony aditorial director of the Hollywood reporter. He joins me this Monday at two o'clock on the business. I'm Kim masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Netflix Kcrw Hollywood Kim Masters Michael Bay Orson Welles Matt Reporter Warren Morgan Neville Kane Romans Guillermo Del Toro Quirones Roma Cuaron Sandra Bullock Oscar Bellamy United States Director
"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The battles or burning of the war hadn't paid off if the tactics in warfare hadn't worked they would be put in charge of this Stellenbosch camp. So they couldn't complete because all voices were immensely important. So they couldn't complain that they've been moved backwards, but it wasn't frontline GD to be Stellenbosch this to kind of be kind of strategically sideline. It's put out of harm's way. And I love the fact that there's even a word for that. I love the fact that someone seen this gap in the language and the wood is being provided for it. And it's also it's just a bonus that it's this brilliant story hidden behind it, so surveys, definitely one of my favorites. That's right up there. I'm determined to put that into effect. I may have to Stellenbosch a few colleagues just to just in order to get away to exposure to pull it. We'll speak. Celebrate. She's also a beautiful wine country. I know for fact course around there. South africa. And I rather enjoyed Dockery. Cuba, tell us about the the decorate cocktail, and yet, no one's entirely show almost where it comes from a docu is is an invitation e puts on I think it's on the south coast of Cuba or something like that. And there's all kinds of stories about where this cocktail comes from who made it what it originally contained. There's lots of stories that it was made by local mining engineers who had wanted to make their own drink. It was a bother at run out of, gene. And so this which to Rome, and nobody noticed there's all kinds of different stories as to why it's named after this tiny little port. But yeah, it's this little Cuban destination. Simply become very well known for for giving us, this cocktail. And if we just sweep across into Latin America, there's another one that which which I found interesting because you sort of pose the chicken and egg question in the book, and that's Brazil as in you know, where the nuts come from. Do they what is this chicken and egg? What's the kind of the mystery? Pick it for us Paul the route couple of these. Ideas in the Turkey, which have already mentioned is another one of them. But Brazil, no is probably the toughest one because we have Brazil notes, we have the country Brazil. We have a mythical island that was known as Brazil, which was on kind of medieval maps, just to the west of Ireland the Republic violent, which doesn't exist. But is it a reference to South America? We don't really know. And there's the Brazil nut tree. And so you're left with these kind of four avenues to look down. And you look back in back in back through all kinds of evidence to find out which one came first, it seems that what happens is the island that we thought layoff, the Republic violence is the very first mention of Brazil, and when things began to be imported to Europe from these far flung colonies on the other side of the world that we're only just being discovered that we presume they came from Brazil. Whether it was the nuts. Whether it was the timber that Kim, I don't know. So we kinda have to draw bit of a question Mark there. But yes, it's one of these ones where it's kind of. Easier on paper is in to explain certainly justified. Then Paul, I guess one thing that must be quite fun to sort of myth bust anticipative explodes. Pre preconceptions you talked about all that already. You can't go so far as to tell me that the great Dane is in Danish Kenya. Unfortunately, it isn't it comes from Germany, and it's one of these things that fell foul of kind of all the anti German sentiment around the first and second world was so whereas we had to the gym and measles became liberty, measles and sauerkraut became liberty cabbage and things the grit day in which was originally a German Doug, morphed to slightly north of the border and ended up in Denmark pool. Ansi Jones says speaking to Tom it woods and pulls book around the world. In eighty words is out now from Elliot and Thompson..

Brazil Stellenbosch Stellenbosch camp Paul Cuba South africa South America Rome Dockery Turkey Kenya Germany Latin America Denmark Ansi Jones Elliot Kim Europe Doug Mark
"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"I mean, there was so much intelligence and thought and things that was willing to do that other filmmakers hadn't because Orson came out of theater not out of FM. Kane is a great film. But it was the only time in his career. He actually was able to make a film at studio with full control, and he was never able to ever again, so films like his next Magnusson Emerson's that was kind of butchered by the studio famously and then every foam after that came with compromise. So I wonder what would have happened Orson been able to had that those kinds of resources and had that much controls. He did on that first film. I don't know. I don't think Orson was looking to go back either. Or some was looking to go ahead. And certainly by the time we get to the other side of the wind. He's doing something. That's so of on guard in a way, it's miles away from citizen Kane, but it's also kind of a book into what came was about. It's an interesting seventies of guard. Take on what happens to great American figures, like wells himself in your view. Wait. What is the greatest film of all time? Oh god. I don't know. You know, I've got some Goto films. I mean, I'll say to films one because I started as a journalist. All the president's men is a film. I just can't stop watching. So that's maybe personally one of my one of my all time favorite films, but also of wells films. My favorite film is effort fake, which was this documentary. He made in the middle of making the other side of the wind and that release seventies. He makes this kind of off on guard essay documentary. Which is about an art forger and about the biographer of this art forger who himself is a forger and about wells, the filmmaker who himself is a forger because of war of the worlds and other hoaxes. So it's a film about a hoax ter- by hoaxer by hoax ter-, which is so Orson wells. So that film was one of the films that got me into wanting to be a documentary filmmaker and was really kind of my north star and thinking about making this film because I felt like Orson had more ideas in that film that have never been followed up on than virtually any documentary of seen. I have been watching documentaries recently..

Orson wells Kane Magnusson Emerson president
"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"So of says to me that you're kind of interested in everything that's going on in the picture, and and try to find the the devil in the detail almost awesome. Well, sensibilities speak to your filmmaking, or is it more. Like, you just appreciate it from afar, I think on the very different type of maker from Orson because Orson Orson says in the documentary, and he said it many times that to him. The director's job was to preside over accidents. And what that meant for Orson was that if things were going smoothly, the director's job was to create accidents. And then preside over them. So Orson was the first person to throw angered into a situation of it was moving too smoothly. So I think something about that chaos. Created frictions that created unexpected consequences, and he'd love that. I don't work the way I'm been making documentaries for a long time. But I come out of journalism, and I love observing and writing and understand deadlines in a way that were never understood deadlines. So I think I'm very different in that way. But there's something so we're about how Orson approached his art because it was so pure I mean for better or worse in terms of his career, but just in terms of his approach to films. He was so pure about things that he wouldn't compromise one inch on anything. He wanted to do. And consequently a lot of projects he made not just other side of the wind, but at least a handful of other films. He was making for years never got finished. Because he couldn't finish them. Exactly as he wanted even though people offered him money and other opportunities always came. Strings, and he wasn't willing to have strings attached. You're an Oscar winner, which is an incredible, which even and it self. But I mean, you'll you'll films have repeatedly been successful and repeatedly been loved whereas awesome. Wells, did not cheap that it's a widely held view the citizen. Kane for example, is the greatest film ever made many people say this. But I always enjoy just asking. Well, what if it isn't? Is there any of precedents to may be saying that early on in his career? It was a bit of a fluke, and he he did not deliver time and time again as a as a great filmmaker would. Well. Citizen. Kane. Some film has to be the greatest film of all time just because people like to put together this so Cain became this. Kind of go to film, and it is an amazing film. And there were many things that happen. Just because it was the right time at the right place with the right script. However, it wasn't an accident..

Orson Orson Kane director Cain Oscar Wells one inch
"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"But as a director, I remain virginal so to him he would take these acting jobs because he thought of acting as kind of a base art form it came so naturally to him. He didn't think of it as anything special. He thought that filmmaking was the pinnacle of artistic achievement. So he was making these films mainly decided to wind, but never number of other films throughout this period. And none of them ever saw the light of day. So the public never got to see what are some was doing with the money. He was making an all all those efforts. So in a way, this film's trying to trying to show that Orson actually was. More vibrant, and scrappy are the most of independent filmmaker you could imagine late in his career. Do you think he was dismissive purely of his own acting as in, you know, it's not my primary concern, and I'll do it if I have to or do you think he was dismissive of all actors because that's a funny thing for a director to be saying for the people who ate even if you don't personally think that performance is something that moves you. It's gotta move your audience to be that dismissive of the off form of acting is a very strange thing for today, isn't it? It is. And I think he was more dismissive is of his own acting though, he could be critical by their actors. However, the actors the worked with Orson he adored Orson was the consummate actors director, and those people had many people that work with them on many films over many years, they adored him and he adored them. So he would treat them with kid gloves and just give them everything they needed then he would turn to the crew, and he was the most difficult task master when it came to the crew. So it was very night and day how he treated the two, but he he'd loved actors in that way. He just didn't think of his own acting ability is anything special. He thought of it is something that was easily monetize -able. And I mean, he's his this author who is a head of his time. And as you say kind of worked in any way, he wanted just to get it done. Also anyway was possible to get it done. If the conditions were so adverse when I look at that sort of way of working seems to me quite a contemporary thing as well as you have all these today like YouTube stars or whatever and kinda just Instagram celebrities and stuff working on their interns. I don't mean to quite the greatness wells with that so faddish trendy kind of out note. But do you think the perhaps if he started his career today, he would have had more avenues to get things done without a doubt? I mean, so many people the new worsen said some version of if or someone around today with the technology, we have he would have loved it. I mean, the fact that you could shoot a movie on a phone and edited on the laptop would have been dream because I think the machinery in the Canucks exp. Pensive making movies was those were the handcuffs that were had his whole career. It was so difficult to be able to make a feature film at that time. And now, I think I think he would have loved it. I mean, I think he'd be making movies every day and posting them, and he was not precious about things like cinema and just the idea of being able to tell stories and iterative and experiment was exactly what he wanted. He just couldn't do it in the old modes of filmmaking that he was coming up in. I mean, it's absolutely obvious from the film itself and just talking to you. I mean, I'm going to take an assumption hit you are fan. I wonder what's in your own films. The the impression I get your is your quite meticulous filmmaker, and you and you really enjoy reveling in the details. I mean, the fact that you made a film about backing zingers rather than the singers the the main stage stars..

Orson director Canucks YouTube Instagram
"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The monocle weekly. Music. Rob. Why? No, how do we music? We've got something actually scarier role even the net. But catchy as hell. This is rookie Erickson from nine hundred ninety one with I think of demon. rookie Ericsson there with. I think if demons you are listening to the on weekly on monocle twenty four we'll be hearing from the filmmaker Morgan Neville right after this. Filmmaker Morgan Neville has turned his documentary lens to figures both court in the spotlight and hidden away from it. He won an Oscar and a Grammy in two thousand fourteen for his film twenty feet from stardom which look to the careers of backing singers. Well, twenty sixteen best of enemies, covered the fevered political an ethical debates between go Fidel, William F, Buckley. His latest film is they'll love me when I'm dead looking at the life of one of a kind filmmaker Wilson wells in the making his final foam the other side of the wind. The Lhasa film language in production. Hell for decades shooting wrapped in the mid nineteen seventies. But now a finished version will shortly be hitting screens along with Morgan Nevels documentary via Netflix mortar goes to a whole meant Morgan never recently to discuss it all, but I his clip of they'll love me when I'm dead. The other side of the wind is the Gracie picture, it's not a work of fiction. It's a little of everything that's kind of a departure in movie making. Worsened wells was the ultimate independent film make somewhere between seven master. And God, no other director has been held up to such an impossible standard citizen, the greatest picture. Do you agree? No, certainly. That's my next one is could you give us the title? I am decided what it is you. Oh. Usually is awesome. Wells last movie. Everything else I've ever done has been controlled. But I want to go further. It's the story of the last day of the director's life the dialing of Hollywood who favor. Wait a minute. That's worsen. Is it Orson? Is that you everybody thinks autobiographical, but it's not bullshit. So the other side of the wind was Orson Welles last completed scripted film, though, never edited, but he shot the whole thing. And so the film is about a film director at the end of his life who comes back to America after years of living abroad to make an art film, and he can't finish the film because of lack of funds, and that film Orson was making was a film within a film. And then I was lucky enough to get all of horses raw footage one hundred hours of dailies and make film about that. So it's a film within a film within a film about Vilma. Grew can't finish a film, which makes it a very wealthy and kind of film he felt shunned by Hollywood he was shunned by certain organizations and towards the end of his career. He was having to working quite unusual ways just to get films made there's that great of tale where he shot punched in the face for a fellow and then had to shoot the reaction. Shen of the guy base that you just punching back two years later in a location at thousand miles away. What were the conditions the defined Wells' career made him work in the ways that he did? I mean, somebody says in the documentary that well started his professional and became an amateur. And I think they mean that as a compliment, you know, well started his career is the vulgar kin, you know, working at ARCO studios with citizen Kane and having the machinery of big studios. Great DP's crews, and as his career went on, and frankly as he continued to make films lost money. He ended up going to Europe and learning different technique filmmaking, which was much more about editing a much much scrappy or kind of filmmaking which he grew to love. But it was something that was not polished in that way. And so at the end of his life, which is what my film covers last fifteen years abortions life. He was doing to. He was acting often in not the greatest movies. He was on talk shows. He was doing bad wine commercials in America, but commercials everywhere. And I think he was seeing culturally as a punchline is like has been and the reality was he did all those things. So he could be making his own movies. His quote was as an actor. I'm a prostitute..

Wilson wells Orson Welles Kane Morgan Neville director Hollywood America Morgan Morgan Nevels Ericsson ARCO studios Erickson Buckley Vilma Fidel Grammy Shen Netflix Oscar
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"They'd be better off with him one they'd be better off with him you know junctions to this divorce having objection to it after court the newly divorced wanda doesn't shout yippee embrace her newfound freedom no instead she roams around town killing time until she pops into a bar to use the bathroom there she spills her guts to the man behind the bar and goes home with him only wanda so naive that she doesn't even know he was robbing the place or that she's become an accomplice to the crime here's loden is wanda she's reading the next day's paper to the thief mr dennis realizing what's actually happened roberts that up forty mr with a female wasn't able lying on loden wrote the film from personal experience believing that if she hadn't left rural north carolina to make it in movies in the theater that she would have ended up like wanda divorced with two kids drunk when she could afford it but that wasn't loadins life she began her career acting alongside the likes of bengals ara and robert redford on the stage but she became well known for her nineteen sixty one role in ille kazan's splendor in the grass she played the sister to warn beattie's character the guy is jenny but guys a bootlegger is he here jimmy did you need is murdered argument on how to unesco much about sweetie pie you're not going on with them is that so i'd like to see you try and you're gonna start right here under you don't even bother get him in life and after a few collaborations with kazan she married him sometime between nineteen sixty six and sixty eight depending on the source it was kazan who would encourage loden not just to write and star in her own film but to direct it as well in wanda loading delivers such a brilliant performance as the title character even though the script has no high points of action it's just a simple joy to watch her embody this woman kazan said that loadins acting style was remarkably similar to that of marlon brando's both would surprise kazan with improvisation which kazan thought always felt alive because even they wouldn't know what they were going to say until it came out of their mouth wanda is full of these surprising moments here's loadin improvising a scene in diner where her character is eating spaghetti and bread with mr dennis played by michael higgins loadins goal in this exchange is simply to annoy mr dennis until he must down some pills for a headache did you use bread that's the best part i like then she liked that that pot stop it up i did it's my gotta headache loadins said she didn't want her film about a couple on the lam to be funny but one does awkward charm often lightens the mood right exactly when the story needs a breather loden was also careful about how she portrayed life for poor people in podunk town's growing up she said she always kind of hated movies because of how perfect everyone appeared on the screen which is one reason why loaded and higgins are the only trained actors in the film everyone else was a non actor with an interesting face someone who is a local from nearby and while load and found that many wanted to compare her film to bonnie and clyde she made clear that her film would be more honest about the types of people who resort to a life of crime lodin was deeply sympathetic to those who have very little she didn't enjoy the romanticized versions of poverty and crime in hollywood movies the reception to wanda was overwhelmingly positive the film premiered at cannes an even if critics like pauline gaels struggled to fully understand the character of a woman who nonchalantly sleeps around and let's life blow her wherever it will press still agreed that loden had a future behind the camera loadin wrote and directed this film her self but it did seem that that success made some folks question whether this gem of a movie had more than a little of her husband's hand in it here's a clip of loaded on the mike douglas show where she appeared alongside john lennon and yoko ono you're by the way barbara's film has been chosen by tunein from critics is one of the ten best pictures of nineteen seventyone that's a lot thing pretty well that's all right goodness does your husband have anything to.

wanda
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You could bite when the whole wide world seems oso wrong and nothing you do seems very right it's great to be able to stop when you planned the thing that's wrong and be able to do something else instead and think this song i can stop when i want to can stop when i wish can stop stop stop anytime know that there's something deep inside that helps us become what we can i think it's wonderful i think it's wonderful you just end the twenty million dollars well congratulations it happened i started it's amazing you what you hear in that is that here's you know a tough knows senator john story of rhode island who is about to read the riot act fred rogers and fred doesn't change he's as he always is i think how rare that is that somebody in the face of that could be as vulnerable as he was to read those lyrics to be as available as he was there and the the reaction he gets is incredible but it's shows that he was willing to put himself out there in this way that you just don't see and that i find so inspiring i mean it's so incredible to see anyone who is able to be that kind of leader without making their work about themselves man it's like overwhelming to watch and listen to that's not a question well thought a lot about this lately i keep coming back to the idea of grace because fred talked about grace all the time in grace he had assignment his office that was the greek word for grace which has chari which is the root of the word charity and grace is the idea in the biblical term that it's the undeserved goodness bestowed upon you by god so in other words it's the goodness you put out there even if it's not deserved it's not because you're getting something back it's not even because it's a nice thing to do it's or that the person is deserving even if they don't deserve it you are kind to them and that sense that of selflessness of pudding that much good out there with no sense of what do i get out of it is so rare in this day and age i don't see it in our politics i don't see it in our economics it's rare to see in our media you know we live in a culture that is so that that feels so alien in that that it's just tough i we live in disgraceful times you know how do we how do we remind ourselves that that to be graceful is not it's not a virtue it's a duty that it's something that we have to try and live up to because that's how we're going to be able to move forward because otherwise it feels like we're getting pretty stuck i mean it's really hard not to be judgmental in the world and fred often quoted the bible quotes jesus in the bible saying the one thing that evil cannot tolerate is forgiveness and even in the psa we have in the film in the wake of nine eleven he says the three most important things we have to keep mind a moment like that are did he is a faith pardon and love not many people were immediately talking about pardon in the wake of nine eleven but i feel like the sense of forgiveness and pardon and understanding is really difficult to do but that's what i think fred would be doing today i think that was in his bones flight it's what i try and think about in terms of had a process the world would today you know how do we understand it not how do we condemn it because if you don't understand that we're not gonna fix it morgan neville thank you for coming on both i think for your beautiful film and i'm sorry that instead of asking you questions i just said stuff and tried not to cry it's great talking to you it's a beautiful day in this neighborhood beautiful dave would you be mine good the neighborly day in this t would then from the thorn talking with morgan neville morgan's movie won't you be my neighbor is in theaters now i have always wanted to have a neighbor just like i've always wanted to live in neighborhoods with you so let's make the most of this youthful day since we're together well say would you be mine mine you be my neighbor three lease won't you be my.

twenty million dollars
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"And there must be ten when you do feel blue i'm not feeling blue right now though and so glad that you came today but jefferies family his parents and his sister who i just met in seattle screening who came and it was like this amazing she brought her whole family and jeffries nieces nephews she said when they first met fred hit actually come to mock easy which was near their home in in wisconsin and this long before jeff went on the show because jeff had written a letter and fred was touring and see major that breakfast together and so fred came and as he met jeff and jeff sister without anybody asking without asking permission he as he was talking to jeff cut jeff's pancakes and started feeding jeff as they were talking and that's something they're family had done for him their whole lives and no outsider had ever done that before for jeff and without even having to ask fred knew what that would mean and then jeff sister said and then fred went out of his way to talk to me because he knew having a sibling with who needed that much attention could be very hard on on her and so he made sure to really give her focusing attention and this will happen kind of invisibly and it speaks volumes to how in tune fred west with what every child needed out of every situation and it's something he did again and again i mean i just i'm getting chills just thinking about it it also speaks to how deeply and sincerely committed he was to engaging human beings on an individual human level the way that he relates to a kid with a serious physical disability neither ignores that defining factor of that kid's life nor allows it to be the sole defining fact of that kid's life right absolutely in the same way that you know you you talk with francois clemens who's played officer clemens on the show and he is both black and gay and you can see the way how deeply grateful he was to have had a person in his life especially coming from the context of fred rogers fred rogers whoa square white guy yeah and he was a minister from minister from latrobe pennsylvania and francois was a very poor kid who grew up in a broken house in youngstown ohio who happened to be an amazing singer and ended up studying opera pittsburgh which is how he met fred and fred recruited him to come onto the show shortly after martin luther king's assassination and to say we need an integrated neighborhood and that person of color should be the policeman in the neighborhood which was all i mean there was nothing accidental about these decisions that fred made but francois you know france while said we'll fred was a good listener and i was a really good talker and france while said you know i didn't understand about being poor or about being black and i really talked to him about those things to help him understand what those meant and fred was dying to learn those things i mean he really wanted to understand what does things meant and then address them in the show and i think that was part of what he was doing always was trying to understand a broader world i mean he was a seeker without a doubt he was trying to learn everything and understand different points of view and then bring those to bear in the neighborhood and it wasn't easy and he you know he made mistakes and he was riddled with doubt i mean there's an aspect of fred that's like a tortured artist but i think that understanding the human struggle the went into what he was doing makes you appreciate even more what it was that he did do what was fred rogers relationship with the fact that francois clemens was gay he was heads hired show that like at the end of the nineteen sixties yeah so the summer sixty eight francois started and fred knew pretty early on the francois was gay and francois was married for a short time unsuccessfully of course as he says in the film and fred didn't know how to handle it he knew francois was gay i think fred didn't yet understand really what that meant and when france while wanted to come out in the early seventies fred told him he couldn't and i think that's it decision he he regretted i think he would have made a different decision later and he ended up being a huge advocate for homosexual sexual rights and in the church and out.

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"To won't you be my neighbor is an honest portrait of one of the kindest most sincere people to have ever lived he talked with jesse thorn about the movie and how fred rogers lessons can make us better people today but before we get into that let's take a listen to a little bit from the movie in this clip we'll hear from margie whitmer who served as producer for mister rogers neighborhood she worked on more than two hundred and fifty episodes between nineteen eighty two in two thousand one we had a directed at once said to me you take all of the elements that make good television and do the exact opposite you have mister rogers neighborhood low production values simple set unlikely star yet it worked because he was saying something really important love is the root of every all learning all parenting all relationships love or the lack of what we see an ear on the screen is part of a week become morgan neville welcome to both sites great heavy on the show thanks for having me he made a lot of documentaries about rock and roll guys for a guy making a documentary about mister rogers kind of rock and roll though really yes how's that he had such it's funny as they by mr rogers such swagger it's amazing that he was so consistently who he was in every situation he was ever in and he had this attitude that he was going to try and change the world you know and it was radical in that way radical in the way that he was trying to get to the root of the thing back to the basics of things and i think that's how i thought of them you know that he was he was a rockstar it's almost scary to me the extent to which he appears to have been the man in his life who appeared to be on television i think maybe just because it makes me question the way that i the choices that i make in the world well it's funny i mean i think something that i'd say the majority of people expect is to be disappointed that i had many people when i told him i was making this film say to me please don't destroy my childhood basically please don't tell me there's something that's gonna make mr rogers fall from the alter like everybody else's phone from the altar and you know i didn't go into it with an agenda one way or the other but and it wasn't about that in the first place but you know the big secret about mister rogers is he's one of these rare characters who actually is not only as good as his television character but actually is more impressive than his television character but i think it says a lot about us that we have come to view people like that with suspicion because how could somebody be that good you know there must be some other shoe to drop on that and that in a way is kind of a lot of what the film's about which is how do we think about goodness you didn't call goodness him called kindness i think roger's would grace but those are the kinds of things that people kind of laugh at you know like being kind as like believing in rainbows and unicorns you know it's not it feels naive and quaint in a way and i feel like that is not how we should think about those things i feel like fred was a warrior for kind you you know know as he says in the film not pollyannaish stuff you know but honest to goodness pines that that's something that you have to fight for because we all take for granted that we're going to live in the neighborhood together and we can trade against that in how we behave every day but i don't think we should get on it there's a moment in the film a bit of archival footage of him being interviewed where he says you may think that.

jesse thorn
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Other kid was eating a bell pepper like an apple so like my job really was like how do you get these kids into this movie unprocessed the way they are is so much better than anything i could ever come up with so so there's references and things the kids show the movies i don't even understand i don't get but i recognize as as true i think we all recognize like one an inside joke sounds like even when we don't understand it yes we need to bring up that pool party scene because the way that you shoot it to we see kayla she's invited to a pool party not by the the girl but by the girl's mother which is an extra layer of embarrassment the parents are trying to fix you up to the mother though sweden ever happened to you or like someone's mother invited you to something sh yeah yeah definitely i can't totally remember but i absolutely remember being things when i was like this is i am unwelcomed or just feel like the hovering parents trying to make you friends with someone else remember like my my someone someone's mom trying to get me in this boy together like over a bag of craisins and that was not having i was less interested in him than even the craisins which was a low bar for me because i was not crazy about craisins cranberry raisins of anyone entering u2 youtube boys enjoy craisins is that right the way that you shoot that that pool scene too is it's pretty incredible in kayla l c fisher's face portrays such incredible anxiety she doesn't have to say anything we just know that she's so anxious did you have to you know what kind of direction did you give to her to tell her what to feel in that moment she gets it you know like like truly she she gets it and she's still with anxiety and we talked a lot about we talked so much more about anxiety than like my eighth grade experience we wouldn't talk about eight grade we would talk about what it felt like to be anxious in the world and how you deal with it so she got that and her joke was always like i'm really good at being sad because she would she would snap out of that scene be running around the pool having fun like she was not i was the one that was like being a psycho method person staying the most she was able to snap in and out of it like she was not miserable that day i i was so worried that i was going to have to do that i was really worried i was like i don't want to have to manipulate a kid into feeling these awful emotions and i didn't have to elsie just knows it she she knows what it's like to be in those situations and feel that way and she just able to just kind of turn it on magically i have no idea how and the writing that you give them to i'm assuming you know you're telling me all these you know adlib that these kids have were you changing the script is you went no really the ad libs literally are just like when the kids like lebron james enemy like little but the script itself to the actress credit to credit is very scripted you know her monologues are written like um yeah so the thing about being yourself is a wait i'm reading this piece of paper sorry it was it was written to be articulate now they didn't have to be word perfect wasn't about like oh you missed an but it was about the script was hopefully giving them permission to fail to speak correctly which is to me the story of being young and the problem with most teen movies for me is that there little poet laureates where it's like the the whole point of being young is that you're you're beginning to learn how to think you're beginning to learn how to speak and your speech is an imitation of all the other ways you hear people speak so that that was important to just capture that but you can read it as much you want to write a script has to be authored by the kids and every moment you know in terms of looking like they are genuinely trying to speak.

apple
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"The the internet has an answer for everything has a specific thing for every thing you can think of but it's just like below the surface of the people like who i was i mean i was someone on the internet got attention we tend to kind of only talk about the internet in terms of the people that are being watched but the majority of the internet is people not being watched and people expressing themselves to very small audiences or no audiences at all and i find them just as if probably more compelling than than what is trending or what's usually going viral at someone that went viral it's incredibly interesting yes you know from experience and you actually you have next netflix special and we wanna play a clip from that netflix special it's called make happy and especially as a live standup routine that was performed between two thousand fifteen in two thousand sixteen i believe and bow in this special deconstruct various types of performances and then also the blurred line between the audience and the performer in the social media age okay i had a privileged life and i got lucky and i'm unhappy they say the me generation it's not it's on the air against is taught or it was cultivated it's it's self conscious that's where it it's conscious of self what social media it's just the markets answer to a generation that demanded to perform so the market said here perform everything to each other all the time for no reason it's prison it's a horrific it is performer and audience melded together what do we want more than to lie in our bed at the end of the day and just watch our life as a satisfied audience member i know very little about anything but what i do know is that if you can live your life without an audience you should do it and now you're thinking how can the dick the show out of this weird hole you want me to be funny and make a point nine on china batman so how do we do.

netflix china
"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"In in in a thirteen year old girls feelings and it's almost like she lives my feelings in my life more purely than i do it feels almost watching it like it's an extra system of sorts like i have to get this out yeah yeah that's that's a great way to put it i love that that that's very very nice yeah i there's just something so visceral about that time you know for all thirteen year olds just just the feeling of that time and then you know in in investigating the story in look kids online there was just a certain type of kid that was that was really deeply asking sort of deep personal existential questions of of herself and that sort of very became i guess i i'd like to go a little bit more into these people that you looking at online i i know that you had done research watching these youtube videos and finding young people who were trying to express themselves you know looking into a camera and i was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about some of the more profound things that you learned about these kids when you're watching these videos something that you you really felt like you had to express through this movie yeah it just the profound thing for me is is how just raw and honest and human the internet can be in the way people express themselves on it it's usually seen as the exact opposite and the internet usually self selects for maybe the least raw or honest or most performed raw fake you know you know confessional is in that maybe not maybe isn't actually true but if you can search the internet in the right way you know i would search for videos in and it by upload date instead of view count you know so you're actually seeing kids that posted a video thirty minutes ago you know to their twelve subscribers and no one seeing it and it's a video about something like how to be popular how to be cool how to dress correctly and the way they present themselves as just very beautiful and they're lying but it's transparent and that's refreshing and i it's sort of like the mechanisms that we all sort of us as adults to hide ourselves and lie to each other it's just completely transparent at that time you know it's just like you can see into the machine and you can see how it's working and like i don't know i saw myself in them i found myself like forgiving myself in them by you know just by seeing we tend to talk about the internet in terms of you know just just narcissistic people who want attention and trust me i look at my friends in their late twenties and thirties on the internet and i just hate all of us i think we're so so embarrassing but when i can see that same thing in a young person when when you see where it starts which is just you know wanting to be loved wanting to connect wanting to think yourself into being or or just be out loud in order to prove yourself maybe to yourself you know those are those are beautiful human vulnerable things and i think we forget that that's that's where all this stuff is starting do you when you're searching you said that you you look for the upload date but do you have any key words that you're looking for it it's truly like you just just searched the most obvious thing you can ever think of like middle school advice video cool and you'll get a you know advice telling me how to be cool or how to have a best friend or hotdog dinner how to and you'll find like a sad video some guy making hot dogs in his house like that's the beautiful thing about.

thirteen year thirty minutes
"morgan neville" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And if you don't recognize that music or at least recognize the composer of that music i you're probably very very very young or may be very very very old but for those of us who are in between those ages of oh i don't know about a ninety nine months everybody knows that's the mr rogers theme you may not know that mr rogers wrote all the music and he was trained as a musician he was an ordain minister and he was one of those people who is just the right personality for america to embrace right now which is why i'm so pleased to be speaking with morgan neville morgan neville his brought back fred rogers and mister rogers of mister rogers neighborhood at a moment when it seems like america has a great great hunger for lots of reasons for kindness and decency and niceness and concern his new movie won't you be my neighbor is now opening up wide all across the country so those of you have been hearing about but haven't yet been able to see it have a good chance to do so morgan with that long winded introduction let me welcome you to the show and congratulations again on a wonder fulfilled thank you so much for having me did d do you buy the idea which i think is very much part of our national conversation right now that one of the reasons your film has gotten such an amazingly enthusiastic response is because in an era of meanness and bullying and nastiness in on all sides in in every sphere of activity there's something incredibly refreshing indifferent about fred rogers and your film without a doubt it's the context with which i made the film and then thinking about it i wanna make the film just as an exercise into stall you know and of course for those of us who grew up watching the show to spend time with fred rogers is instantly nostalgic but there was something about his voice when we connected with it as an adult and as a parent that struck me that this is the kind of voice i don't hear our cultural conversation today you know it's somebody who's advocating for four neighborliness and civility in such a genuine and sincere way that i just felt like i needed more fred rogers at my life and we as a country needed more pride rogers in our society and i think there's there's almost unanimity about that one of the things that's been interesting because i talked to people about the film all the time one of the most common questions i get is there anything good out there in movies and then i mentioned your film and people will say if they happen to be a liberal they'll say oh we have fred rogers he was really a progressive guy he was a great guy is on the left and people are conservative ceo dane minister if they know that he was conservative conservative family values the truth of the matter is this transcends politics does it it does i mean her so few things that our culture that transcend politics and part of it is that that those of us who watch the show our connection to fred rogers began before our memories begin if we started watching what we are one or two or three years old that he was part of our life before we had any sense of self and and we probably moved on from fred rogers before we had any sense of self so we don't associate him with any kind of cultural baggage so there's that that he's so ingrained in our earliest places in our own identity but also his message you know he even though he was an ordained presbyterian minister he resisted ever saying god on the show or ever making the show you know religious or secular you know willful way or partisan in a in a way he wanted he wanted the neighborhood to be as inclusive as possible and he wanted every child to feel that they were welcome regardless of whatever the background might be and there just aren't a lot of other neighborhoods like that these days and that is such a.

ninety nine months three years
"morgan neville" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And if you don't recognize that music or at least recognize the composer of that music i you're probably very very very young or maybe very very very old but for those of us who are in between those ages of oh i don't know about ninety and nine months everybody knows that steve mr rogers theme you may not know that mr rogers wrote all the music and he was trained as a musician he was an ordain minister and he was one of those people who is just the right personality for america to embrace right now which is why so pleased to be speaking with morgan neville morgan neville has brought back fred rogers and mister rogers of mister rogers neighborhood at a moment when it seems like america has a great great hunger for lots of reasons for kindness and decency and niceness and concern his new movie won't you be my neighbor is now opening up wide all across the country so those of you have been hearing about having yet been able to see it have a good chance to do so morgan with that long winded introduction let me welcome you to the show and congratulations again on a wonder fulfill thank you so much for having me d d you buy the idea which i think is very much part of our national conversation right now that one of the reasons your film has gotten such an amazingly enthusiastic response is because in an era of meanness and bullying and nastiness in an all sides in in every sphere of activity there's something incredibly refreshing indifferent about fred rogers and your film without a doubt it's the context with which i made the film and then thinking about it i wanna make the film just as an exercise in the stall and of course for those of us grew up watching the show to spend time with fred rogers is instantly nostalgic but there was something about his voice when i reconnected with it as an adult and as a parent that struck me that this is the kind of voice i don't here in our cultural conversation today you know it somebody who's advocating for four neighborliness and civility in such a genuine and sincere way that i just felt like i needed more fred rogers of my life and that we as a country needed more fred rogers in our in our society and i think there's there's almost unanimity about that one of the things that's been interesting because i talked to people about the film all the time one of the most common questions i get is there anything good out there to see in movies and then i mentioned your film and people will say if they happen to be a liberal they'll say oh we have fred rogers he was really a progressive guy he was a great guy is on the left and people are conservative ceo he was an ordained minister if they know that he was conservative at conservative family values the truth of the matter is this transcends politics doesn't it does i mean her so few things that our culture that transcend politics and part of it is that that those who watch the show our connection to fred rogers began before our memories began you know if we started watching what we are one or two or three years old that he was part of our life before we had any sense of self and and we probably moved on from fred rogers before we had any sense of self so we don't associated with any kind of cultural baggage so there's that that he's so ingrained in our earliest places in our own identity but but also his message you know he even though he was an ordained presbyterian minister he resisted ever saying god on the show or ever making the show you know religious or secular you know willful way or partisan in a in a way he wanted he wanted the neighborhood to be as inclusive as possible he wanted every child to feel that they were welcome with our list of whatever the background might be and there just aren't a lot of other neighborhoods like that these days and that it's such a healthy model for thinking about how we should live together because that's essentially what he's explaining the young children is here's how we live together in the neighborhood how we should treat each other and and as important how we should treat ourselves did you ever meet fred rogers when he was alive no i never did i never did but in a strange.

nine months three years
"morgan neville" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on Channel 33

"So delighted to be joined by one of the nicest guys in the world morgan neville talking about one of the nicest guys in the history of time mr rogers morgan thanks for joining us thanks ravin me you made a film about mister rogers i just said to you i have not spoken to a single person who's seen this movie that hasn't felt differently about how they want to treat the world and see the world it's been a common reaction is that and why did you make the movie well i made the movie because of that reaction a lot of people were saying things to me about mister rogers i knew a couple of people that knew him and they're all these little clues have been going on for years that were making me feel like maybe there's a re evaluation of mister rogers out there you know like i everything people told me about him surprise me and one night i somehow ended up on a youtube deductive of mister rogers speeches it was like one of these epiphanies moments where i was like i want more of that voice you know i don't hear that voice anywhere in our culture right now and it wasn't that i wanted to go back and kind of revisit the nostalgia of mr rogers was like i need mr rogers and twenty eighteen who's the grownup in our society so part of it was me just wanting to spend time with that message which you know i thought a lot about what it is and then we're many things to what he was saying but when i kind of digested everything down it was an idea of radical kindness that's how i describe it and if there's anything we need more of right now it's it's some kindness yeah did you grow up with mr rogers were you a vast consumer of his show i was was born in nineteen sixty seven and he went on in nineteen sixty eight so i was like jen one mr rogers fanatic you know i'd loved it as a kid and a lot of my memories of it are really more like images.

mister rogers morgan neville mr rogers morgan jen
"morgan neville" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"morgan neville" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You be my neighbor a documentary film that examines the life and legacy of fred rogers the beloved host and creator of mister rogers neighborhood directed by morgan neville only in theaters this friday from npr news it's all things considered i'm mary louise kelley and i'm ari shapiro democrats are breathing a big sigh of relief today about the midterm elections this is only the first half of the election calendar but thanks to you the halftime score is looking very promising that's democrat gavin newsom who will be on the ballot this november running for governor of california also in the state democrats were worried about spoiling their chances of competing and some of the key districts that they're going to need if they hope to take back control of the house of representatives they did not get shut out of those districts republicans had some good news last night to npr national political correspondent mara liasson joins us now to talk through what these new results mean for the rest of the midterm election campaign mara ira but start with democrats because they had the most at stake last night what happened what happened is the democrats as you said we're in danger of being shut out because california uses a top two primary system the top two vote getters go onto the general election could be to democrats to republicans but because democrats had so many candidates running they were worried that they would split the democratic vote and two republicans would get through and go onto the general election that didn't happen there are seven competitive districts held by republicans in california the democrats think they have a chance to flip the democratic congressional campaign committee intervened they spent a tremendous amount of money and they managed to get a democrat on the general election ballot in every one of these racists and those seven seats would go a long way towards the twenty three the democrats need to regain control of the house that's right and if you're gonna if there's gonna be a wave in the fall these democratic candidates want to be in the surf with their surfboards ready to catch him so they got on the ballot republicans also had some good news in california in the governor's race they got somebody into the race in november and that wasn't a certain thing how they were in danger of being shut out in the in the.

mister rogers morgan neville mary louise kelley gavin newsom california mara liasson mara ira npr ari shapiro national political corresponde