17 Burst results for "Mony Chesterton"

"mony chesterton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On the media coming up next at midnight it's eleven thirty BBC world service continues this week on crowd science we getting all maths brains in gear as we tackle a whole bunch of fantastic questions from high school students under lockdown in Spain you have one very proud maths teacher they work so hard they think really carefully about the perfect place to go and they were really curious we can't wait to listen to the program how do you teach maths when the schools shops and cannot experts help out that's crowd science with me Monique Justin off to the needs BBC news with David how it's really is easing its coronavirus restrictions today but the prime minister just happy come tie has said the country is still in the midst of the pandemic and urged the public to act responsibly parks are re opening outdoor exercise is permitted and people can visit relatives within that region many other European countries are taking that first step towards lifting Matlock dance they include Portugal Spain Croatia and Greece with some small shops and hairdressers can reopen some of the measures have been announced in the number of countries in Africa and the Middle East in June is the Hoff of the public administration and industry sectors are returning to work hello facemasks must be warm president trump has accused China of a botched cover up in its handling of the coronavirus and break in a televised town hall meeting intended to re launch his presidential campaign Mr trump said China had failed to cooperate with international requests to help one of the disease was spreading in Wuhan Mr trump also said he was confident that would be a vaccine for coronavirus by the end of the year he rejected criticism that his administration had acted too slowly insisting his decision to impose restrictions and save lives the prospect of more trade tensions between the US and China has spooked the markets the price of oil fell the value of the dollar rose and futures markets in the US and Europe with Dan New Zealand has recorded note new coronavirus cases in its daily figures for the first time since the middle of March the country and the district locked down nearly a week ago although a number of social distancing restrictions remain in force heavy traffic is again filling the streets of the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur as the government eased curbs on movements and businesses for the first time in six weeks however many shops in Colin Powell have stayed closed the country has had more infections and deaths and most of its neighbors that's the latest BBC news hello and welcome to throwing pencils on the floor from the BBC world service with me mony Chesterton don't worry this isn't the desperate consequences of being confined to my house this is actually an experiment was measured the width of my floorboards I'm throwing this pencil on the floor one hundred times and often noting how many times it hits a crack between the boards I should have everything I need for calculation that will give me pause the mathematical constant not a pastry close the loan this edition of crowds science teaches literature maths homework as a bunch of high school students currently stuck at home have sent us questions don't get more interesting than pencil drops as I'm joined by doctor Katie speckles the mathematician with all the know how and we'll be getting to pie later but first let's hear from Andrea who has a question about nothing hello my name is Andrea I'm sixteen years old I'm from Spain and my question is what's the importance of zero how was it discovered thank you thank you agian and hello Kitty stickers how are you good thank you right so you like millions of kids.

BBC
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This week on crowd science we getting all maths brains in gear as we tackle a whole bunch of fantastic questions from high school students under lockdown in Spain you have one very proud maths teacher they work so hard they think really carefully about the perfect question they were really curious we can't wait to listen to the program how do you teach maths when the schools a shots and cannot experts help out that's crowd science with me Monique Justin off to the needs BBC news with David Hoffa it's really is easing its coronavirus restrictions today but the prime minister just happy come tie has said the country is still in the midst of the pandemic and urged the public to act responsibly parks are re opening out to exercise is permitted and people can visit relatives within that region many other European countries are taking their first steps towards lifting Matlock dance they include Portugal Spain Croatia and Greece with some small shops and headdresses can reopen some of the measures have been announced in the number of countries in Africa and the Middle East in June Izzy Hoff of the public administration and industry sectors are returning to work hello facemasks must be warm president trump has accused China of a botched cover up in its handling of the coronavirus and break in a televised town hall meeting intended to re launch his presidential campaign Mr trump said China had failed to cooperate with international requests to help while the disease was spreading in Wuhan Mr trump also said he was confident that would be a vaccine for coronavirus by the end of the year he rejected criticism that his administration had acted too slowly insisting his decision to impose restrictions and save lives the prospect of more trade tensions between the US and China has spooked the markets the price of oil fell the value of the dollar rose and futures markets in the US and Europe with Dan New Zealand has recorded note new coronavirus cases in its daily figures for the first time since the middle of March the country and the district locked down nearly a week ago although a number of social distancing restrictions remain in force heavy traffic is again filling the streets of the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur as the government eased curbs on movements and businesses for the first time in six weeks however many shops in Colombia have stayed closed the country has had more infections and deaths and most of its neighbors that's the latest BBC news hello and welcome to throwing pencils on the floor from the BBC world service with me mony Chesterton don't worry this isn't the desperate consequences of being confined to my house this is actually an experiment I've measured the width of my floorboards I'm throwing this pencil on the floor one hundred times and often noting how many times it hits a crack between the boards I should have everything I need for calculation that will give me party the mathematical constant not a pastry posted this edition of crowds science features let true maths homework as a bunch of high school students currently stuck at home have.

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Armpits forget six months silver linings on mony Chesterton and that was a conversation with my producer Louisa lost summa in the chemotherapy waiting room of the cancer hospital I was midway through a year of various treatments for breast cancer I hadn't plans to turn my treatment into an episode of crowd science this is a show that on says you'll science questions and we've had this question in from Jill in Scotland I was thinking about why we call cancer cancer and held this could really be one single disease I've had friends and family who have been diagnosed with cancers as vadias ana's skin cancer bell cancer breast cancer there must be no point in history when people realize the scientists and doctors realized that these could be connected in the facts and the symptoms could all be one I created this term cancer still will say thanks to listen to don and others he sent a similar questions about cancer there's a lot on his own to Jill we need to look back thousands of years to ancient Egypt the earliest surviving diagnosis brother of blood friend of pulse father of the smelly jackal and it's used in a context you know seems like it's a descriptor of breast cancer more on the street to come as we try and find the point where doctors realized these were all one disease but I'm getting ahead of myself let's start at the top it's probably one of the most dreaded words in any language there are over a hundred diseases we call cancer Hodgkin's lymphoma melanoma bowel cancer leukemia so cancer but what really is cancer for non so I tend to resuscitate it the largest hospital in Copenhagen and more specifically to Julie camps a cancer research of the cancer does not have a conscience it's not evil it's not good it just exist in this world and it happens but how does it happen let's see things from a sales point of view imagine a cell in the long this still needs to divide to make two daughter cells in order to replace dead or damage still nearby the sun his divided thousand times before but this time something goes wrong instead of dividing the wind to exact sell copies it mutates the sounds of it science fiction it just means a mistake happens in the way the DNA.

mony Chesterton producer Louisa Jill Scotland cancer Egypt Hodgkin Copenhagen don Julie
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:35 min | 1 year ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mice people join a gym but on this show I waited to challenge your mind only mony Chesterton and when I say we I mean mainly this panel of highly intelligent experts in the studio with me I'll introduce them in just a moment let's dive into the sort of thing they'll be talking about the biggest question ever coming out from corn Carlos hiker in science I am from god was telling us Maurice from Peru I may have some questions about the infinity is he the number are some feet is bigger than others and why does that minor in reality thank you find call us I just want to mention that as a show that takes on your questions crown science often becomes a dialogue inspiring more questions and Quinn coalesce was one of several listeners he got in touch last year off we made a show about the relationship between maths and reality you can find it in a pot costs back catalog but his reminder of the effect it had on us the time I do everything with you I do ads with people with the city she so the blood if you live that is about to make that was doctor Ellen knocks philosopher of physics at king's college London and I'm very happy to say that she's back with us now ready to blow our minds again welcome Elena thank your cuts Elena off to the side I have to say that loads of listeners certainly want put off in fact they also a whole load more impossible sounding questions about maths physics and reality and also here to help us on to them is doctor Allday Faisal and you're a scientist and engineer who leads the brain and behavior lab at imperial college London he's actually joining us from a studio in Germany hi elderly hello now that you were previously on a crowd science where we were asking about brains and whether they were better than computers we've got a question on brains coming up so we're very pleased to have you on board and last but by no means least we have doctor Katie Stickles here in the studio Casey is a mathematician Royce and lecturer from Manchester welcome Katie hello and we have plenty of coffee and snacks and orange is essential for working on difficult problems on a dreary January often name site let's start with you Katie can you help us with one Kallis's question about infinity just to recap he wanted to know whether infinity is a number if some infinities a bigger than other infinities and whether any of this action is in reality so to go to the first space I think I'm happier with the idea of infinity is a concept from the number yeah it's definitely not a number and I think mathematicians a very cautious not to call it a number mainly because it doesn't behave like one if you take any normal number and add another number to it something happens to it where is if you've got infinity and you whatever this might mean aft one to it you would still have infinity so it kind of doesn't behave the way you'd expect to number two okay so that's nice definitive answer the first part of one Kallis's question streets on to his next question all some infinity is bigger than others yes No there are different types of infinity which is interesting because I guess people quite used to dealing with the one kind of infinity that you can get your head around which is what we call countable infinity so you use the counting numbers starting with one two three going up towards on that goes on forever so there are infinitely many of them but it's accountable infinity because you can put them in order and count them starting from one going up puts and what's interesting is that sought same council infinity for not just all of the numbers one two three four five but even if you just said say for instance the old numbers all the even numbers they're still infinitely many of them and thus also cancel infinity okay so I talked to Elena knocks can I bring you in here it sort of seems like infinity that you get from counting in whole numbers might be bigger than the infinite see that you get if you counted two four six eight so you it's complete understand we might think that but actually the same kind of intimacy accountable infinity is countable infinity this all goes back to this business of infinity not being a number I'm behaving not like numbers as such so maybe to get a handle on what about infinity it's helpful to think about Hilbert's hotel this was a sort of xterra proposed by mathematician and what he thought is that suppose you have an infinite hotel with an infinite number of rooms and money much near the receptionist and catches up okay this is five star infinite hotel right you're gonna do your best okay we don't tell it's full useful okay anybody not rooms okay can you accommodate unicast will not because I'm full but what if you take every single gas and you bump them up from seven guess among a server number two I such exception got room one free okay affinity is strange so you don't have to go to the ends to find the lost free room and the reason you spend the first few rooms that that relates this fact that if you had one to infinity to still get sick but now suppose you have an infinite number of guests show up in infinite limousine right right really stretch let my liver and they all want to be accommodated at once yeah what can you do no because I can get my head around one person turning off and I just ask everyone who's in the just move out one written that's fine but an infinity of people turning up is where I probably put the back in ten minutes sign on the reception and given a call I can curl it but if you think about your question about the even number for the space you do the following things guest room one and you put it into into the custom in two and you put her in for and so on and so on all the way up the chain so you even though you have her second frontier guest user it doesn't double the number of cast you still just got the same affinity so if you add infinity to infinity you still get in Finnessey for Katie you were saying there's different kinds of infinity yes of the infinity that you think about with the hotel is accountable infinity because you can count the rooms in the hotel you can count the people getting off the infinite limousine but if you have things that you can't count so you can't put them in order line them up against the numbers one two three four five then you end up with an uncountably infinite set of things and the the classic example of this is what we call the real numbers you imagine a number line so whole numbers within that fractions are in there as well but if you take not just fractions but also numbers that can't be written as a fraction as the things like poly which is number that people will have heard of and and it's a number which I think most people are what has an infinite string of decimals going on after it three point one four one five nine two six five three five eight nine seven nine etcetera right talking I'll check out I know more than that but not infinitely many digits which I guess no one knows and you could do that with any sequence of numbers and if you take all of the numbers that you can make by putting an infinite string of digits after something then you get the real numbers and this is an uncountably infinite sets I guess if you think about it there's no way you could even start to list all those numbers because even if you're starting with zero what's after that is it no point one is at no point no one is at no point not not one like that whatever number you think of the something in between so if you've got accountable infinity and an uncountable infinity let's go back to crime Kallis's question is one bigger than the other yeah I think uncountable infinities definitely bigger than countable infinity Elena and the things front of items yeah I mean his way of thinking about it every single number in the council infinity is there in the uncomfortable infinity uncountable infinity is not the biggest infinity yeah so for the first two infinity I have no recollection of a seminal someone that unit and they were like this council that's on council and then there was like a whole slide what foods just continued with all these different infinities we were like what it's ridiculous at this point I'd like to bring in the last bit of crime Kallis's question why does all of this actually Massa in reality and I'll tell you can I ask you about this because I think you work at the Brandon behavior lab is quite practical it involves engineering in solving real life problems do you need to understand different kinds of infinity for that so for many problems and signs pulls in engineering you need to have some form of mathematics that you can apply in very often if you want to solve mathematical problem used to simplify it in the only way off into simplified is to take things to the limit of infinity very often the mathematical models that underlie technology that we're using today like your mobile phones require us to operate in limits of infinity however I've never encountered to the situation where we need to work with and I'm comfortable infinity but what I find very fascinating is that our brains that are made out of countable many molecules and cells and so forth can even thinking conceive such a thing as I'm comfortable infirmity so well done our brains I'm we don't have an infinite amount of time to discuss infinity so I'm going to leave it that because we need to get on to our next question which is about quantum mechanics and the nature of thought hold on to your hats hikers science my name is we fail Flores from or Louis my question these are my targets affected by quantum uncertainty because there is uncertainty at the atomic level I'm because our brains are made of atoms does this affect the decisions we.

mony Chesterton
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up on crowd. Science ninety six percent of all universe is made up of stuff. We can't see or explain given that the so much of it one listener autumn in. India want us, whether it might be inhabited within this material could dot life have evolved, Mony Chesterton, and this week, we return to the matter dark matter with a global panel of astrophysicists strap in for the limits of testable physics that's crowd science on the BBC World Service after the news. BBC news with David Austin, President Trump has declared his stance on abortion, after a number of US states paused, Heidi restrictive laws on the subject on Twitter. He described himself as pro life, but with three exceptions rape, incest, and protecting the life of the mother, the comments put him in opposition to Obama, which earlier this week, move to battle most all early terminations, even when report incest, involved, the people of Switzerland voting in a referendum to decide whether to tighten the country's gun laws to conform with EU regulations, the government is urging voters to support the changes. The Austrian chancellor Sebastian Coe's will discuss a timetable for snap election with the country's president later on Saturday. He ended his coalition with the far-right Freedom Party corruption allegations against its leader, Heinz, Christiane straw. Votes being cast in the seventh and final phase of India's elections. The prime minister Narendra Modi has urged people to turn out at record numbers. Saudi Arabia has called for our states to meet in mecca later this month to discuss heightened tensions in the Gulf. Its foreign minister told a news conference that Riyadh to north want war, but stood ready to respond if what he called the other side chose conflict. The British Prime Minister Theresa may says she intends to make a bolt offer to members of parliament in a final effort to get them to approve have Brexit plan next month. But some hard line Brexit is from her conservative party have already warned the plan is doomed in football. Vincent commpany, the captain of the English Premier League champions, Manchester City has announced that he's leaving the club in a statement on Facebook. He said the time had come his departure of, to what he described as an incredible season. Those stories from BBC news..

BBC President Trump Sebastian Coe prime minister Narendra Modi India far-right Freedom Party Mony Chesterton US Saudi Arabia Twitter English Premier League Facebook Vincent commpany Obama Theresa Gulf Riyadh chancellor
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Lecturer at the university of Newcastle stray. Leah. She's been studying cramps for the better part of ten years. Vienna describes a cramp as a huge musk. Contraction, and since they occur when the nerves that send messages to our muscles undisrupted. So it is different for each type of cramp. The two most common cramps on not time cramps and cramps associated with exercise in not time cramps. It's hypothesized that these abnormal hyper excitability at the terminal between where the nerve attached to the muscle in exercise cramps, it's a slightly different picture when a muscle is fatigued and overloaded. There's an imbalance in the excited Trie in inhibitory drive that occurs between the muscles and tendons. And the overall effect is that we have more exciting to the muscle which can cause cramp importantly, cramps in exercise on not due to dehydration or electrolyte deficiency, which is something that's very commonly out there. So you're saying that cramps during exercise aunt down today, hydration or electrolyte depletion? That's right. At least for the majority of people who experience cramps in exercise. According to fear now, muscle fatigue and overlord of the biggest causes of crampy. But what about magnesium deficiency? A lot of fitness types believe taking magazine supplements help trait that crams he's you have a hot by and lots of my knees Eum gay fluids up and also sleep. Let's up magnesium supplements footballs. About stretching a push toward or stretch? Depends on how bad the cramp is actually funicello. Lots of high quality studies suggest most people. Magnesium isn't effective in treating cramps, but some people they might experience a benefit chases stretching. Well, that's an excellent way to help both nocturnal and exercising juice cramps is some evidence for not time muscle cramps that a combination of cough and hamstring stretching throughout the day before bid is affected. So because that has an evidence base, I would strongly recommend people try that. So if you on getting a lot of not time cramps, it's a really good idea to stretch before bed. Yes. So a stretch that combines a cough and hamstring stretches ideal. And for most people, if they sitting on their bed and they have a bath towel or a tail and they sit straight up the legs stretched out in front of them. If you imagine the opposite of pointing your toes. So you want to bring the toes back towards your face. If you a holding the tail in your hands and you loop at Oviedo toes and then pull it on the foot so that it stretches the foot back towards yourself and then slowly lift the leg up into the air. Now you might be more comfortable if you do this while laying down or from the state had position, it's up to the person. And as you lift the leg high, you'll feel the stretch in the cough muscle end in the hamstring and it's likely stretching the sciatic nerve to and then hold that for at least thirty seconds and then repaid on the other leg and repeat that three times and Kosov. The sports physiotherapist agrees stretching is vital to prevent cramping. He says, taking a look at your posture is also a good idea. If you imagine someone being a slouched, pulse general, you know having inadequate posture and you're asking the body to conduct movement in a proper way because the alignment is. Right, right. Those muscles have to work extra hard and a very simple test on that is eve. If you're slash, then you try and take a deep breath. It's actually very hard. So all the organs, all the muscles have to work a lot harder to help a come into the system. And if you apply that to skeletal muscle. So something like the cough poor posture can lead to poor alignment that then means the system has to work a lot harder and then yes, that can cause cramping. Sign with a better pasta, a good hamstring in con- stretch and looking at ways to reduce your stress levels. Well, you might be on your way to fuel cramps and maybe even a better not slip. Casandra Steve reporting, and I feel the to stretch in the studio. I listened to that. Thank you to my studio guests, Jason Palmer and to produce a Katy ticket Saiki. I've been Mony Chesterton thanks very much for listening to the science from the BBC goodbye.

cramps magnesium deficiency cough Leah Oviedo toes lecturer university of Newcastle Vienna Jason Palmer Mony Chesterton Eum Kosov Steve BBC thirty seconds ten years
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Three quarters of patients with brain hemorrhage worldwide are in load middle income countries where these four simple predict has could have the greatest impact professor restore al-shar. He Salman you are listening to the science after the BBC with me, Mony Chesterton still to come and new effort to catalog landslides the. Factors around every event that's taken at least one human life, the extinction crisis that's hitting the rural rivers of Britain. Plus if you've ever had criminal photo leg, you'll probably have your own ideas about solutions. He's have a hot bath and lots of my Mazembe gave fluids up and also sleep hop out stretching, either push through it or stretch, depends on how bad the cramped it's actually which of these remedies have science behind them. My studio guest today is Jason Palmer, an editor the economist magazine and former BBC science reporter with news of what happens when you give unofficial intelligence, the very human emotion of curiosity, it watches a lot of television. Well, who wouldn't first landslides triggered in many ways by volcanoes earthquakes by erosion. Often human mistakes, sometimes storms, just this week in Hawaii, hurricane lane is still causing landslides and in July. At least one hundred seventy nine people died after the worst weather in decades triggered landslides and floods in western areas of Japan and yet landslides are neglected disaster. When we think of natural disasters natural perils, we think of the quake's of tropical storms and we have a good idea of how many earthquakes happen around the world. So how many storm events they may be ongoing any time because we have a good network of monitoring equipment, safe breath quakes we have a global network of seismometers, but landslides.

Salman BBC Jason Palmer Mony Chesterton professor economist magazine Britain Japan Hawaii reporter editor Three quarters
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"There's a, there's a line at the end that says, given given what's out there in various exit planets, picking a blueberry is actually a fairly reasonable sort of thing to cheese. I, I'd like to see the calculation on. Okay. Well, I'm sure he'll come out with another paper. It sounds like this blueberry earth work to be done. Thanks, Jason. You're listening to the science side from the BBC with Mony Chesterton still to come. We ask, what's the point of curiosity? We uncover the alarming rise in unregulated and downright dangerous cosmetic surgery in Columbia, it another what they say, they will be killed, but us also get that was several bottles full of a greasy liquid. I didn't know what it was. She just started to inject me. It was painful, really painful. A started to call uncontrollably and the next day I lost consciousness and funding. I've done it. If you've got a smartphone, odds are you've done it to a new research, looks at the impact of the people. We've fob joining me to explain what funding is, is science our guest, Jason Palmer from the economist. Hello. Oh, sorry. I was. I was funding high, right? We're going to leave you. Guessing what funding is for now, because I which traveling across the world to Central America and back in time who doesn't love a story of lost civilizations. What were they like? How did they live and why did they disappear? The Maya civilization thrived the two thousand years in Central America and then collapsed in a relatively short period of time just before Spanish colonists arrived in the middle ages, the collapse is often held up as an example of the dangers of climate change the crisis being blamed for the prolonged drought, a thousand or so years ago. But the truth is harder to pin down paleo climatologist. NNcholas Evans, from the university of Cambridge has been revisiting the evidence because as he explains to roll impedes, we can learn from it today. So I think draws offense of major relevance today. So although the Maya civilization and today have no direct parallels. Of course, today we have GM crops. We have drought resistant plants and the distribution of water today is very. Different as it was in the my times and my were dependent on local water resources, local groundwater thera-, indirect lessons that we can learn about water, scarcity, and society. It's fundamental to our way of living and without water. I feel that all society would be really at risk. The problem with water is it runs away in evaporates. So how do you tell in the two thousand eighteen what was happening to water a thousand years ago, we've developed a new method to assess the changes in rainfall and relative administering at the time of the mind decline. And the way we did this was by analyzing sediment core taken from a lake in the Yucatan peninsula southern Mexico. This sediment core contains mud's, but importantly, also contains a mineral known as gypsum now gypsum forms during periods of drought when the lake level was lowered, and these gypsum layers have been correlated to the same time as the my decline. Now we've developed a new method that examines the war. Water that gets trapped within the chemical structure of gypsum when it forms. So all the water is actually disappeared. You have these little traces. Absolutely. So the lake level is only lowered. It doesn't dedicate and say the water gets trapped within the structure almost acting like fossil water of the past, and we can compare that water to the late today and you medically model the differences in climate conditions. How do you actually correlate the amounts of rainfall though a thousand years ago from just finding droplets of water in these gypsum crystals. So gypsum contains twenty point, nine percent water by weight and water itself is composed of oxygen and hydrogen and the oxygen and hydrogen isotopes tell us about the climate conditions of the past. So these are the sort of nuclear variances. It were of the atom, absolutely. Say hydrogen is composed of two isotopes h one and h two. An oxygen is composed of three isotopes oxygen, sixteen seventeen, and eighteen different masses mean that when the water evaporates, the lighter mass is preferentially lost from the lake basin. So jarring. Of drought, but lake water becomes residually enriched in the heavier isotope, do your results bear out the idea that there was a prolonged drought that really not the civilized sation for six absolutely say. We find that rainfall amount decreased by around fifty percent or half competitive today over multi Cadle droughts..

Jason Palmer NNcholas Evans Central America lake basin university of Cambridge Columbia BBC Mexico Yucatan Mony Chesterton thousand years two thousand years fifty percent nine percent
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Service with knee Mony Chesterton this, week we're coming to you from Westminster in London home of, British politics with an audience of opinion formers and professional decision makers. Which is fitting because coming up we have a question about making decisions and. Giving and taking advice I'm here with a very, knowledgeable panel and we'll be picking their brains shortly but. For those who are new to crowd science where the show that takes your question about anything life The contents of your kitchen cabinets anything that science related and, turns them into mostly sensible answers and this week we're tackling a. Question from our listener hands in Antwerp Belgium crowd science and Hello there London. From Belgium and my question is why is it, so hard for humans to take advice from previous generations Thank you hands why is it so hard for humans to accept good advice from previous generations now he. Told us he started wondering this because he wants. To know, if it's pointless giving advice to his teenage kids, and when when I thought this, I immediately thought of my father who is ex military and. A man of few words and has literally only ever given me one piece, of advice, in his life, and it stuck. With me because it, seems absurd he said never pitch your tent in a war de now Nice of you know a what? He is a dry? Riverbed usually found. In deserts and despite the current wave not really a feature of the UK? Landscape, so I consider this advice comically irrelevant and many years later at a festival after pitching my tent at the lowest. Point in a grassy valley guess, what it rains and my tenth flooded so dad you were right now at this point I'm going to introduce our guests or get them to introduce themselves and can. You tell me if there's any good advice that. You've either, ignored or he did Chris all start with you Hi, I'm Chris, Chris I'm a psychologist and I research social cognition which means something like how do we, interact with each other which includes giving and. Taking advice now when I was a student I started studying medicine physics and then my second year I discovered that for the first time it, would be possible to study psychology so I. Went to my tutor who is a physicist and, I said I have discovered that you can now study psychology he. Said yes I knew that but I didn't think any of my students would be cross enough to, want to do it So having looked up in the, dictionary what cross, meant I decided that I would study psychology and. I have, been, quite successful and. I know even a role society mixing with physicists who probably is still bit worried about this Corinna Corinna vault I'm at. The university of Cambridge and I suppose I have two one in faculty of. Philosophy and one, at the lever Hume center for the future of intelligence and my, piece of advice so. I'll take this down a notch infestation, partner very wisely, reminded me not to keep my glasses too close to the toilet and, of course I heard this advice and how to learn the lesson of him knocking them in accident Stephanie I'm Stephanie Bennett, Hayes and I study adolescent social cognition at university of. Birmingham my dad didn't used to give me too much direct advice because I don't really respond well to it being a very stubborn. Person but he's telling me stories of his youth and decisions that he. Regretted and he told me about how he wanted to switch from law to geography, university and then his treatise talked him out of it because geography was one of these press. Subjects but I did differently and I switched from medicine to psychology and I haven't regretted that all thank you very much and round of applause to the. Panel Now when you were introducing yourself I couldn't help. Notice the word cognition came up, in your titles and so Corina could you give us a quick definition and why is that relevant to hands, this question about ignoring advice so in contemporary cognitive science. The mind is seen as a cognitive system which is an information processing system and one popular view this sort of two information processing, systems that are parading together in every human mind one is a conscious. System sort of slow and deliberative and it thinks things over and it's responsive to, reason and the other is very fast automatic it operates without your awareness and it's responsible for. Probably most of your decision making so when we give children advice I think we're trying to peel to their slow and deliberative and rational system which might Not be fully developed a lot of young adolescent minds so might be possible then for us to influence. Their decision makings by appealing to this other fast automatic, information processing system I'd say that teenagers have a bit of a reputation going way back and. I've got this lovely quite a hot take from Socrates from four hundred BC you. Says the children now have bad, manners contempt for authority they showed disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise Stephanie, that disrespect for elders not. Listening is that fair I mean I would have thought that children need to learn so much from parents who've clearly made some excellent choices because they've survived long. Enough to reproduce yes yes children do learn very well from, direct advice, and also by observing others. Adolescence, also there is evidence that they mimic their parents for example they might. Mimic their, parents eating behaviors but teenagers are also really interested in what their peers are, doing what their friends are doing it's been described as a process of social reorientation from seeking approval, from parents to being. Very interested in what your peers think of you and your peers advice so there's some sort of switch that goes off that says ignore parents pay attention. To my friends well parents seem to be still very important. For providing certain sorts of advice for example maybe careers advice that Peers seem to be, really important for host of. Other things their way you gain status from not so much your parents anymore and we should probably say that the concept of kids ignoring that parents and parents. Giving advice isn't necessarily a universal one so we reached out, to the, World Service audience and ask. Them, about children listening to their parents where they live and these are some. Of the, comments that we got My.

Chris I physicist university of Cambridge Mony Chesterton Antwerp Belgium London lever Hume center UK Belgium Birmingham Socrates Stephanie Corina Stephanie Bennett Stephanie I partner Hayes
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Healthy microbiome eric's lawrence's a mind all different but once becoming clear is that a rich diverse microbiome made up of many species is the clearest marker of good health and diet is key that makes sense the microbes in our intestines feed of the food we put in the fiber in particular seems to act as fertilizer personally i want to improve microbiome so i asked tim spector where i should begin doubling five most people in the uk and you have hof modify but they should be having because a lot of these beneficial microbes they feed off the fiber and convert that into other chemicals short chain fatty acids which generally good for systems and keeping our appetite suppressed then it's also the diversity of fiber beans lentils and these things are all really good each of them will give you a different slightly different species so the variety on the plate is massively important professor tim spector of the british project ending that report by james gallagher fascinating stuff it is i never thought i'd want someone to look at my job but now i do have guessed it i should probably say i've had someone yes tim to has also tested my got microbiome off the i i it it was for a different program and i'm ridiculously pleased with this but i have a couple of levels a high levels of beneficial bacteria so i have you know if if you need a fecal transplant at any point i am the women's goat what was it about these microbes though say special well there are a couple of bacteria and they the research isn't it a stage yet where they can point to an individual species and say this one equals good but what they do notice is that generally in population of people the people who tend to be healthy have a high level of a certain type of bacteria so the inference from that is that it's beneficial to have a high level of of that bacteria and all i've got a high level of that bacteria but again it comes down to advice about eating that we've sort of off known in its eat a wide variety of things make sure that you've got lots of different colors on your plate eat more fiber as get in touch with tim you're going to have to give me his number yeah he see he can work his way through the science unit yet testing all of them and then come and see for trump on that disgusting nights you're listening to the science our from the bbc with me mony chesterton still to come why amounts testosterone levels depend on where in the world he grows up not in just a moment how oughta fischel intelligence is changing the way we get from a to b we hear about the plunge the hailing a ride in the skies launching aerial ride sherry which is flying cars to bring people in and out of very busy cities by twenty twenty in la and dallas and by twenty twenty three as.

lawrence
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The globe the bbc world service's here at wnyc a am and fm new york htc this initiative crowdscience has it all aliens the origins of existence and a salad dressing robots and obamas' listeners ostos can life exist without carbon it's commonly accepted that we and all other organisms on earth allcarbon based but what's actually mean we meet the scientists trying to recreate the origins of life on us all this hype intimate noncarbon life in the lab and yet more who hunting alien life that's coming up on crowdscience with me mony chesterton bbc news were jerry semate german media are reporting that members of the social democrat party have voted in favour of joining a grand coalition government for the christian democrats of chancellor angela merkel if confirmed the move will end months of political deadlock following elections in september though ting is underway in italy's general election prime minister paulo gentlemen his centreleft coalition is facing a strong challenge both from the populists fivestar movement and from a rightwing coalition which says it would deport illegal immigrants a highlevel south korean delegation led by the country's spy chief will travel to the north on monday for talks they'll travelled soon afterwards to washington as south korea's seeks to broker a meeting between pyongyang and the united states the syrian observatory for human rights says president assad's forces have recaptured a tenth of the rebelheld enclave of eastern goo tap a russian plan for a daily pause in the government has sold has done nothing to improve the humanitarian situation police in bangladesh are investigating a young man who stabbed an academic in sylhet on saturday the victim zalfa echo is a popular fiction writer and professor who spoken out in support of secularism and free speech president trump has certain to place tariffs on cars imported from the eu in addition to steel and aluminium that some of his own advisers are urging caution on the issue china has said it would take necessary measures if the us harmed its economic contrasts the organization of american states has called on venezuela to say what's happened to a former opposition congressman who's disappeared from the prison where he was being held at in switzerland people are voting today on whether to get rid of the compulsory licence fee for the public broadcaster it runs television channels and radio.

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Locating to light of colored sand beaches even unit using watering cans but i think at this stage that's not really mandated i think what we need to do is ensure we have resilient see populations so for instance the beaches in this study in australia the ones that are more temperate in the southern great barrier reef they actually start to have increased conservation importance not just for the number of females the are breeding dead on the hutchins center produced but also for the male proportion that their contributing to to the population dicle smelter totals could step forwards and just book bit han couldn't yes although some populations have been shown to have multiple fathers of each clutches undoubtedly the meals they are competing many meals will be able to sire the progeny and many clutches brandon godly from exeter university's ecology and conservation research grape ulis linked to the science half from the bbc with me mony chesterton still to come how dna is helping to solve the mystery of an epidemic that devastated mexico's native population in the 16th century that in just a moment and staying with dna the bitcoin jigsaw puzzle encrypted in it on the race to crack hits to win the cryptocurrency i'll explain a lighter and whether looking at pictures of nature could affect your body image eager for will get major you are using award and you're thinking about and bunk general times by euros a given this space to remove yourself from why this is huge tells you have to look assessing way my guest in the studio today is bbc's science correspondent jonathan amos and you'll be bringing us news of the disco bullets being put into space yet what's the funky this thing that you can put in orbit of amman boring communication satellites d i s ceo excellence bonds with starting the second half in the 16th century the.

hutchins center exeter university bbc mexico ceo australia jonathan amos amman
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Hello this is mony chesterton and welcome to the science are from the bbc this is the podcast where we offer you the highlights in science health and technology on today's show the a dili home of some of our earliest homo sapiens ancestors will hear about a stony cave overlooking the sea and filled with relics in just a moment there's also a new blood test for detecting eight types of cancer they ju just over thousands of patients with one of the eight different kinds of cancers addressed the should already being diagnosed they showed those across all thousands this test would have detected seventy percent of those cancelled tajol is it as exciting as it sounds or is it still too early to tell and one conservationists accounting turtles not the title number but a number of miles and the number of females and joining me in the studio to champ through all this and more bbc science correspondent jonathan amos who has a story about counting another endangered sea creature wales yes i'll be counting right whales in the south atlantic they'll call right wiles of course because they were the right whale to kill more on that later thinks jonathan but first us and some new evidence the adds to the picture of us and where we came from out of africa is the standard theory for the origin of all species that homo sapiens evolved somewhere in africa sat around for a few thousand or tens of thousands of years until a handful of pioneers headed north across the red sea and then spread via the middleeast across the world not only many sofians but also early species of hominids too but for the last wave of us modern humans i'd understood that the story started around two hundred thousand years ago in ethiopia kenya and that the travels only began eighty thousand so years later they were in no hurry and then today from the middle east and corridor comes evidence that the first travelers had started moving.

mony chesterton bbc homo sapiens kenya dili jonathan amos africa ethiopia two hundred thousand years seventy percent
"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on The Science Hour

"Fully so you the on it we've got jimmy hick can we use him for something can we experiment to show what kind of human keys he's senstive to yeah one very easy way to demonstrate that if he allows us to is to simply basically point at a certain point in the room a case i'm just gonna produce appointing gesture and i'm going to also look in a certain direction and then he will respond to that by following my pointing gesture jimmy look at me lick me oh clever boy so you liana disappointed at pointed in a certain direction and he will now follow that cue and sort of such in that area that i pointed to why is that unusual for animals dogs seemed to stand out in their ability to do that so we've tried this with many other animals including chimpanzees our closest living relative said chimpanzees do not attend to these kinds of community canvas gestures coming from humans they ignore them they're just not relevant for them but for talks their relevant so dogs as a result of domestication have really adapted to reading these kinds of communicative queues coming from humans there's definitely something about them said of we've changed them in some sense though they have freely evolved adapted to respond to our communication to lead us to understand us juliana kamensky ending at report by mony chesterton now to restore that entertained many people when the news of this research broke earlier in the year what are these two people having common science holds the king tour survival was planet and our security and prosperity is a nation while i think it's about today's society you know this is not disturb pean future that's a long way off this is a story that could be happening now so that was the actor emma watson amd before her mother former us president barack obama well vittori go can explain what do they have in common vic where without trying to get away rejects about barak obama airmont they can be recognised iron i'm sorry i am they can be recognised by sheep so this is a test carried out by research is in the uk looking at to see if sheep could recognize celebrity faces oh essentially distinguish between two different human faces from a photograph and it turns out they coun.

jimmy hick mony chesterton barack obama uk juliana kamensky emma watson us president
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Events from around the globe the bbc world service's here at wnyc am and fm york htc hello you on money chesterton and off to the news i'll be here with crowdscience tackling your queries about life earth and the universe this week we revisits an early a topic what is the oldest living tree or other organism on our planet and from oldest two strongest as listening james in the uk sent us to find the strongest animal alive today i'll give you a clue it's not an elephant that's crowdscience with me mony chesterton after the news these in use twentytwo arab nations have demanded the united states retract his decision to recognize jerusalem as israel's capital the arab league said that the american move would only increase violence throughout the middle east it urged the international community to recognize the state of palestine with east jerusalem as its capital the controversial us move will be high on the agenda today as the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu meets president micron in paris on monday mr netanyahu will hold talks with eu foreign ministers britain's foreign minister boris johnson is due to meet the iranian president in tehran where he will continue to press for the release of british iranian nationals one high profile detainee nothing enza agadi ratcliffe faces the possibility of a further court appearance venezuelans are going to the polls later to choose mayors for more than three hundred towns and cities as the country's economic crisis continues major opposition parties are boycotting the vote iraqi forces are holding a victory parade to mark the end of the campaign against the islamic state group the government said on saturday it had regained full control over the last territories held by us south korea has announced new unilateral sanctions on twenty more north korean organizations and a dozen individuals in response to the north's ballistic and nuclear programmes most of them are in the banking and shipping sectors argentina has banned more than six sixty people from attending a world trade organization meeting that starts today in buenos aires including journal lists and ngo officials the government said it revoked their accreditation for security reasons the second and final round of regional elections takes place today in the french mediterranean island of corsica last week's first round saw a corsican nationalists take more than 45 percent of the vote.

tehran north korean south korea foreign minister britain eu prime minister buenos aires argentina economic crisis agadi ratcliffe htc president boris johnson paris benjamin netanyahu palestine arab league israel jerusalem united states uk 45 percent
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From around the globe the bbc world service's here at wnyc a am and fm new york htc on mony chesterton and off to the news i'll be hit with crowdscience on seeing the question can we resurrect the data in the process of finding out so i get to hold the mummified head of this extinct bird lose a fight with one of the data's closest living relatives and meets and chickens that might seem be able to lay the eggs of other birds we meet the scientists uncovering each step needed to bring back this iconic lost species delve into the extinction with crowdscience on the bbc bbc news with david austin president trump has suggested his former national security adviser michael flynn is the victim of a rigged system he tweeted that mr flynn's life has been destroyed by the investigation into alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election earlier mr trump indicated that he fired mr flynn in part because he lied to the fbi the remark provoked accusations that the president might have obstructed justice when he later asked the fbi to drop its inquiry into mr flynn a collision between a fuel tanker at a boat carrying passengers on a fishing trip in south korea has left at least thirteen people dead the accident happened off the western port city of inchon aid agencies a warning that the number of deaths and injuries from antipersonnel landmines all similar devices is on the rise twenty years opd they use was banned by an international convention they say some militant groups including islamic state and the taliban have made their own improvised landmines one of the world's most prestigious opera houses the mets in new york is investigating allegations that its former music director sexually abused a teenage boy in the mid 1980's police have investigated the accusations against james levine but no charges have been brought mr levine is reported to have denied wrongdoing the afghan president ashraf ghani has apologized to women for apparently offensive remarks about the traditional headscarf on saturday president gandhi defended government officials against claims that some have links to the militant group islamic state people who make such claims should pray prove them he said and if they can't they should don the scarves the cambodian prime minister hoon send joint five thousand buddhist monks for a special prayer session at the ankle watt temple complex the.

director hoon prime minister ashraf ghani afghan james levine inchon david austin gandhi mr levine htc new york taliban south korea president fbi mr trump presidential election michael flynn mony chesterton twenty years
"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 4 years ago

"mony chesterton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Took off two us corporations have ended their sponsorship of the new yorkbased production of the shakespeare play julius caesar in which the roman leader is portrayed in a way that resembles president trump one of the former sponsors delta airlines objected to the way the trump like lead character is killed those are the natives stories from pbc news twenty hello and welcome to crowd science on mony chesterton and i'm enjoying a nice cup of tea with a man nancy stuff because he grazed the staff head gardener jonathan giants good we've been and his plantation loesch green hillsides covered in means waste tiger she's which has thriving on the sunny weather infrequent chalice is this right weather for a cup of tea eating these is perfect whether you know doging showers and there's no trouble should great and grave that cannot be much demon which two couple of tea conceived by the brits love it we just coming from himalayn valley thought we not in the hills of china or dodgy ling crowd science is on a tea plantation in the south of england a country name fritz teadrinking skills rather than its teagrowing ability nice to break it is too cold to greg t plants we've come to visit the exception because this is the show that aren't says your questions that life the universe house make a cup of tea and this week listener rose has been wondering about we'd weather say sit back pop catalan what's the question rose high crowd time i limping the village endeavor in the uk down in southwest it does seem to rain more here than it down six miles in any direction from here and i are wondering why the weather from people just up the road thanks rose you've given us the perfect opportunity to fulfil the british cliches of drinking tea and talking about the weather but what is weather in one way it that will via it all masefield silly to try to describe it it's the stuff going on outside the wind day but to study its inherit changes it helps to think of weather is the atmospheres reaction to the uneven way the sun heats the earth this uneven heating forms hot and cold air masses which caused wind clouds and rain but what roles is talking about is the difference between one village in the next it's mini weather a microclimate it just so happens that the uk's.

us julius caesar president mony chesterton head gardener china fritz teadrinking uk shakespeare delta airlines pbc nancy jonathan giants himalayn valley