23 Burst results for "Montague"

"montague" Discussed on The Garden Question

The Garden Question

01:46 min | Last month

"montague" Discussed on The Garden Question

"Tools like Zoom and social media and even podcasts that we're doing right now also provide that service. A future spectrum of professionals that just hasn't been realized yet. Let's say, for example, a garden coach, somebody who can be paid to go from institution institution house to house to provide excellent advice on why the landscape is behaving the way it does and what might be ways to quell problems. Those people are trapped clicking on AutoCAD in landscape architecture firms because it's the only opportunity they have to do any sort of planting design at a large scale and I have a livable wage. I just kind of feel like the new world is trapped in the old world right now. We're bumping into big problems with climate with social issues. I think we're also beginning to see it for the first time because of social media and the Internet, of course, but I think we also do legitimately have some big problems that I wasn't facing when I was young. Hasn't the earth's population doubled since I was a youngster, I think? How can this not have an impact on the earth in some way? Or at least in the way you want to design in a way to like crowd out some of your neighbors and create your own bubble, which seems to be really the biggest ask I get from homeowners. How do I solve this stormwater problem? How do I also create a bubble for myself where I can come home and be separate from the outside world? Exactly. Yeah, unplugging. The pandemic was so good about introducing me to this kind of common human problem in that when you're forced to use your landscape. A lot of people realized, oh my gosh. I'm spending too much money on it. I'm taking care of something. I don't even like. And I'm trapped with a handful of problems, and I don't know who to call, to help me think through that resolution.

"montague" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:44 min | Last month

"montague" Discussed on WJR 760

"In montague. So it's a great opportunity to enjoy more small town feel while you're up in montague. You know, one of the horrible things that happened because of the pandemic is that we've lost so many small businesses, a lot of restaurants as well. So for the people who are going from depot to depot, are there still some restaurants to visit as well? Oh, definitely. One of our most popular mosquito county restaurants is actually called hobos. It's white along right along Whitehall road. And you'll always get good food, good service there. There's also the BLT and that the oldest restaurant in Muskegon and you have water views there of Muskegon Lake. And they're known for their perch So definitely a good dinner. Yeah, the BLT to locals, the bear Lake tavern is a really cool little place and right along the water there. I know people will really love that. So just one of the many places that you're going to want to stop along that route between the various depots, the Muskegon depot and the Whitehall train depot really is a lot of fun. People should check it out. The website to learn more is visit Muskegon dot org, and you'll find out not only about that depot to depot tour, but all the other attractions, all the other interesting things happening in the area, so happy to see what's happening in Muskegon county today. So many cool things to see and do. On your next trip to the area. Another really cool area that you're going to want to enjoy before those fall colors are gone

montague Muskegon Lake bear Lake tavern Muskegon depot Muskegon Whitehall train depot Muskegon county
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"Wild that you don't even realize what we've written off for ourselves because of whatever paths we choose or wherever we find ourselves. And I think that especially for myself, there was a lot that I didn't think was achievable. And it's like, oh, wow, like actually this is. And I think that a lot of a lot more black artists, especially need to realize that because I think that especially the eat sleep grind culture, as someone who lived it, burned me out so quick, I was like, I'm never going to draw again. I hate this. You can hear to come out of that. Now, even with these books that you are working on and everything, do you have a dream project that you'd love to do one day? You know what? Speaking into existence now, I would love to work with Disney, hit me up, you know, a huge princess in the frog fan. Beyond that, I don't really know. I think I'd like to teach somewhere down the line, or even now I used to teach really fun community art classes when I was in D.C., but then the pandemic kind of put an end to that. I think I'd like to teach who knows. I swear every other week I'm talking myself out of going to medical school or something. I'm like, you're becoming like a pastry chef. It could be anything at this point. I would definitely love to do something sent to her on black mental health for sure. And like diving into that and different ways of just like connecting people love to say like, you know, hold space and, you know, whatever that means, but I think that beyond just face to face talk therapy, which, you know, in a perfect world would be accessible to everyone and they would be able to have black therapists who could understand where they're coming from. We need to deal with the world that we're in right now, where there need to be more accessible ways of connecting beyond just this one way that is very not accessible for most people, you know? And I feel like there's some kind of world where there's an art based solution to that. Or at least in the world that I want to exist in. Where do you see yourself in the next 5 years? Like, what do you want this next chapter of your story to be? I hope in the next 5 years are not, I hope. I know. In the next 5 years, I'm going to be spearheading a lot more projects. I feel like up until this point, I really just people have approached me and I've said yes, whereas with especially with the series of scholastic, that was the first thing that I pitched myself. I came up with myself and that was fooling my idea that I'm going to be taking to fruition. So more of that, more of me gained execute my ideas instead of executing other people's ideas. I hope a lot more of that. Well, just to wrap things up here, Liz, where can our audience find out more information about you and about your.

Disney D.C. Liz
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:57 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"And it's just like, I don't know. Weird to think about the longevity, the sustainability of this, of just such a fast pace world where we're consuming so much so quickly, you know. I'll tell you the way to not burn out from that is to focus on focus on the audience and the community that you have. Like, the thing with a lot of social media, you know, and I know this from one just from being old, being around on the Internet forever, but there's so much about modern social media that is about trying to attract an audience that you don't have, and I think what can end up happening with that is you end up exhausting all of these efforts and jumping through all these hoops to try to impress people that don't know you don't know your work, et cetera the reality is if the work is good, the people that already support you will kind of do some of that legwork for you. They'll tell people they'll tell friends. They'll mention you in rooms that you're not in. So you don't have to be on all the things all the time. Like, I think probably for a visual media or a visual artist like you are, you know, being an illustrator and a cartoonist like being on Instagram does make sense because it is a visual medium. TikTok is like the wild wild west. It really is. And I mean, aside from just the ever changing and shifting algorithm of the platform, it's also like super toxic and I know art. I've seen artists on TikTok that I've had on the show. So I know that it is helpful to kind of get the word out to people, but then it also exposes you to so many just like idiots that don't get it. And they spend their free time trying to instill the seeds of doubt into you so you don't do the work that people love you for. You know what I mean? So you don't have to be on all the things because it just spreads like you spread yourself too thin. Like focus on the audience that you have and like on the platforms that you feel you can at least control and have some semblance of yourself on there where you don't have to change who you are or what you do to kind of get your work out there. So like that's like been the hardest part lately is just being like, okay, who I am right now right this moment not me ten years from now or me three years ago like who I am right now is like capable of doing this work and like is enough, you know? Everyone's kind of dealing with that. I feel like now we're in like a stable enough place as a country and as well I mean, you know, a stable America ever is. We're for people to reflect on like in the thick of it for like two years and what happened to me during those two years. You know, what did I lose? What did I gain? Am I proud of what came out on the other side of it? I think a lot of people are dealing with that. I think I'm especially dealing with that..

Instagram America
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"When I tell you that presentation didn't pick up traction until 5 years later, during the summer of unrest when we heard about what happened with George Floyd at the Minneapolis police department. Then it started to pick up steam and people are like, oh, well, this is so great. This is a wonderful we're trying to center black voices. We want to know about this presentation. And in my mind, I'm like, this is 5 years old. But the way that people are perceiving and now has changed because the culture has changed. Like I said, there is this layer of activism that gets added to the work that I didn't necessarily put it there, but you're attaching it onto it based on your societal values or what's happening in the world and how you think you should feel about it because it exists. You just said a word. But it's a lot. And I mean, I can imagine, you know, I think I was going to ask this question a little bit later, but that whole thing about representation, you know, we've seen this influx of black artists and talent with cartoons and animation and fine art and such like one like you see all these new black shows and stuff. A lot of those black shows also have fine art in there from black fine artists. Now, you never hear about those artists, that's a whole other conversation. But it's so interesting how all of these things and all these shows and movies and such and they're in these different genres, but they all kind of have this layer slash burden of having to represent for the community, like, do you feel like you have to do that through your work now? When I first started, I definitely did. I definitely felt like a lot of pressure. I mean, especially based on where I'm from, so I'm from rural south Jersey. There is a soybean farm behind my childhood house. So very, very rural, very white. And I just remember like, what we would be told was like, you know, the few black people in town was like, you know, every person's every white person's opinion of a black person is going to be foreign based on how you act. So you better act right or else, you know, you're damning every other black person they're going to meet. And so that was kind of the framework that I had. And I think that I just kept feeling like, I don't want to mess this up for anybody else. In the cartooning world at The New Yorker, in the spaces that I.

George Floyd Minneapolis police department south Jersey The New Yorker
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"I know the feeling. I totally know that feeling prior to doing this podcast. When I was, when did I start the blackboard? I was 20, I think I was 24, 23 at 24. I started this event online called the black weblog awards. And this was back in 2004, 2005. Really kind of pre social media. Definitely pre Twitter. But like pre social media, Facebook, I think was just starting to transition out of being only for college students and opening it up to everyone in the world essentially. And what I wanted to do because I was an active blogger at the time myself when I wanted to do was make this event that would celebrate black bloggers that I knew of that were doing great things because I saw that there were other blog awards out there. There was there were two that were both called the web log awards, although one kind of shortened their name to the bloggies or whatever. And what I saw with the winners is like, well, all the winners are white. And I know that there is people of color that are out here blogging, particularly black people. And what got me was one of the awards had a category that was like best African or Middle Eastern blog. And all of the nominees were white and the winner was white, and I'm like, you mean to tell me out of the entire huge continent of Africa and the probably similarly huge section of the Middle East. Only white people, I find that very hard to believe. And so I started the black weblog awards sort of in opposition, but also to celebrate the community that I knew about that I was kind of a part of. And when I sort of talked about that layer of activism that gets added onto there, I call just calling it the black weblog awards, invited so much criticism and unnecessary hates and I mean, and this is, again, this is pre Obama. So this is at the top of the world, you know, it's like post 9 11 pre Obama where black and brown people really not really favored that well in terms of the media and such. But I did that for 7 years, ended up selling it to a friend of mine, and I mean, even as the years went on with it, it was amazing how the reception to the event changed as society changed. So like around 2007, 2008, Obama's running for president and such. Comments, I kept getting back about the black weblog awards is, well, I mean, we're post racial now. Why does it have to be the black weblog awards? Why can't it just be the weblog awards? I'm like, well, two of those already exist. And I'm only doing this for black people. So it is the black weblog awards. But like as society changed in the way that people perceive the work that I did, changed. I even experienced that with revision path when I did, in 2015, I did a talk at south by Southwest and Austin called, where are the black designers? And I was about two years into doing revision path, managed to land this south by Southwest with a speaker proposal, did a speech to a room of maybe about the room sat close to 500 people, there may have been 15 or 20 people in there. Cool. Nobody was there. People were charging their phones. People were asleep in the back, like nobody was really paying attention. And I gave this talk and there were like a handful of folks there, you know, like good job, that sort of thing..

Obama Middle Eastern Twitter Facebook Middle East Africa Southwest Austin
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"Just kinda like, okay. At University of Richmond just happened to be where I got my athletic scholarship. Okay. There's actually a no, I was gonna say this actually a pretty strong Hampton university to pipeline. I wanna say, probably at about, I know I've had at least three guests on the show where that's been the case. Yeah, it's a pretty strong pipeline. I don't know if a lot of people know that, that it's like from HBCU to design school in that way. Tell me about your time at University of Richmond. How was that experience? I flipped around majors a lot. I went into college knowing that I liked to draw, but not really, even with parents who went to prat and were in the arts. I had no intention whatsoever of even studying art, minoring it, anything. I was like, I'm going to get a business degree. And that's totally didn't work out. I hated it so much. I tried to do computer science and anthropology, English, and none of it. None of it worked, and then it was like towards the end of my sophomore year and my academic adviser was like, listen, you need to pick a major or you might not graduate on time. And my scholarship was for four years, and I was determined to graduate in four years. And then I was like, okay, I just put down studio art. And that's how it happened. But it's the truth. So how was the program there? It was really intimate, which I think I needed, especially at that time. There were more faculty than students in the major. It's a very, very small school. I think university has 3000 students, which was smaller than my high school. I went to like a really huge rural New Jersey high school that had thousands of kids. And our senior year, my senior year, there were 5 majors. We were all women, and we had like 6 professors, so we were like out and fire professors. And it just allowed you to have a really one on one experience. There was room to just try things and figure things out and we were given a lot of freedom, which I really appreciated. It helped to really just kind of like be self motivated and not rely on, okay, well, here's a syllabus. Do this, this and this. You're really able to kind of carve your own path, if that makes sense. No, it does. I was going to say I imagine that's really like super empowering to have not only that kind of intimate class kind of setting and makeup, but then you're being able to kind of work closer with your professors with people like that because I've had folks on the show before that I went to larger schools or went to art schools and stuff and that kind of one to one relationship is tough to get. Yeah, and I knew I knew that it was definitely like I kind of lucked out. Now something, you know, pretty cool happened and you've kind of alluded to it a bit earlier in the interview, but something pretty cool happened around your senior year with The New Yorker magazine. Tell me about that. Yeah, it was like a super brand new 22 felt very old and mature. Had just heard back my graphic design job was super pumped. It was like I'm moving in D.C.. I'm about to be such a grown-up..

University of Richmond Hampton university New Jersey high school The New Yorker magazine D.C.
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:52 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"Was just like wild to realize that this is like empirically researched information and that the impact of it is everywhere where it is, well, why are there so many white leads in these cartoon shows why are there so many white leaves of these regular movies and books, et cetera and the idea that it's harder for white audiences to connect with, I don't know, different skin tones, different genders. I mean, I think that's more on the forefront now with people talking about the recent movie turning red and about how people felt like they couldn't not people. There was one white man in particular who did an interview. Said that he couldn't connect with it and it was just I can't connect with this. And it was like because it was about girl going through puberty who didn't look like him and it's like, okay, but we all watched a bug's life and ratatouille and like, I'm not a rat and I was able to connect with ratatouille, but I just totally went on a whole tangent there. I'm sorry. No, I think I'm glad you mentioned the turning red thing 'cause I was thinking about that as you were saying that. That sort of like empathy gap because as people of color, we are forced to kind of make that gap when we see so much media that doesn't involve us. And so when you have this one thing, particularly in animated thing, geared towards children, and then some grown ass white man is like, well, this doesn't represent me. Well, it probably doesn't because it's not geared towards you. It's not about you. But look how many other things out there in the world are geared towards you and about you. You know what I mean? It's so weird. It's the weirdest thing, but there's like literal evidence on it and how much can a single panel or even like, you know, whatever other cartoons in the world, how much impact can they really have?.

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:42 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"To sort out my own mind to myself. And I just kind of started drawing these cartoons where my dog, my childhood dog Timmy, would give me advice. And it just started as like a super casual thing that I would post on Instagram and my teammates because I was on the track and field team in college would be like, oh my God, I love that cartoon, where's the next one? And they would really kind of just like hold me accountable to just keep doing it. And I just really just stuck with it. And then eventually after I was out of college, I was working as a graphic designer. I was already working for The New Yorker at the time. I was able to make it into a single panel cartoon into the Washington city paper, which was a lot of fun. But then it's a different ball game once you have deadlines and you need to worry about well house it's going to print and the kind of evergreen nature that it needed to be because when the deadline is versus when it would print it was like two weeks apart. So it's really kind of grown and shifted with me, which is kind of cool to have that to look back on and know like where I was mentally when I made it. So yeah. Yeah, I was going to ask like, have there been new changes in things that you have have introduced to the comic as your life has gone on? I stylistically it's changed a bit where I think it got a little bit more fluid as time went on. I think when I look at the old versions of it, old cartoons of it, it feels very rigid. Like I was really afraid of messing up. And then as time went on, I think it got a little bit looser. I think I was willing to kind of play around with environments more. And then it changed even more once it was in the Washington city paper because then it's like, okay, there's a deadline. Okay, like there's an audience that's actually going to see this as opposed to the Internet is kind of like a black hole. You're kind of sort of thinking of an audience that you're not really thinking about like, oh wow, someone's going to tangibly hold this in their hand. And that tangibility kind of made me a bit more nervous. And then I think that the content of it kind of had to zoom out a lot more. Again, because it's like there was that two week period versus when it was due and when it would print for a daily local newspaper, you don't know what could be going on in the world at that time. And then what ended up going on in the world at that time was the Trump presidency and eventually COVID and we were in the middle of Washington, D.C.. So it was big news there..

Washington city The New Yorker Washington, D.C.
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

04:50 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"Their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host, Maurice cherry. Hello everybody and welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host Maurice cherry. This week I'm talking with Liz montague. Liz is an author and illustrator located in New Jersey, and the creator of the comic Liz at large. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. Hi, my name is Liz montague, and I'm an author illustrator and cartoonist. Now, before we get more into learning about your work and about your journey as an author illustrator cartoonist, like tell me how has this year been going for you so far? This is actually been a really good year. I think personally it's been a really good year. I just got married. I just bought a house. Congratulations. Thank you. In a personal material way, I guess it's been super good. I need professionally. It's been really good too with my first year working on book projects, which is very new for me, having come from the news media world. It was a very tumultuous past few years for everybody and being on the new side of that was really exhausting. So I think this has been a really calm year, I'd say. Nice. I mean, I guess it's calm as getting married and also moving into a new house. I'd imagine it's probably been some stress around that, even just with the pandemic and everything. I mean, it's less stressful than like covering the Trump presidency and 2020 COVID all of that. And trying to do it in record time with deadlines and everything. That was way more stressful than this. A 100%. Fair. I get that. Totally. I totally do. What lessons did you learn over this past year? How would you say you've grown and improved? I would say that I prioritized just like my mental health. I feel like everyone's saying that and that it's kind of, people say it so much, it starts to not mean anything. This is like the first year I really started saying no to things. And that's been kind of scary, but empowering, but also terrifying. I don't know. I'm still learning. Well, I mean, I think that's something that a lot of people are still learning is to say no. I think the pandemic, of course, forced everyone to not just slow down, but in many cases, to just stop. And now that we're at this point, though we're not completely out of the pandemic, we're at this point where restrictions are being lifted and rates have gone down to a point where we now have to try to come out of this period with some new normal and what this time is forced to everyone to do is just sort of reevaluate their commitment to work, their commitment to being busy and all that sort of stuff. Yeah, and like the pandemic and the pause that it cause happened at such like a weird time in my life where I was 24 and I had already been working at The New Yorker for like two years and had been doing this work for about two years and now where we're at now I'm 26 and I'm trying to really figure out like holy.

Maurice cherry Liz montague Liz New Jersey The New Yorker
"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:48 min | 8 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Revision Path

"Are you looking for a new job? Are you hiring but can't find diverse talented candidates? Then we have something that can help our job board. Head on over to revision path dot com slash jobs to browse listings or to place your own. This week on the job board. Vox media is looking for a senior designer. This is a remote position. Workday is looking for two roles, a senior UX product designer, and a UX product design manager. For the senior UX product designer, they're looking for candidates in the following cities. Seattle, Beaverton, Atlanta, boulder, San Francisco, pleasonton, and in Victoria British Columbia. And for the UX product design manager position, they are looking for candidates in the following cities. Seattle, Beaverton, boulder, pleasonton, and Vancouver, British Columbia. For just $99, we will feature your listing on our job board for 30 days and help spread the word about it to our audience of listeners. We also offer an annual job board subscription for companies and organizations. Make sure to head over to revision path dot com slash jobs for more information on these listings and others. Apply today and tell them you heard about the job through revision path. Get started with us and expand your job search today. Revision path dot com slash jobs. You're listening to the revision path podcast. A weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers and web developers through in depth interviews you'll learn about their.

"montague" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

Veteran on the Move

07:00 min | 10 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

"From people living overseas? I think people get, well, one thing that I don't understand why people get so hung up on as whether they can use the commissary or the exchange on a military base overseas. Because for example, in Spain, where it wrote a naval station. Retirees are not allowed to shop at the commissary or the main exchange. We can just go to the mini Mart, but we can use all of the MWR facilities, the gym, the library, the golf course, all that stuff. But we really don't need to stop at the geometry because of things that are cheaper and really fresher. On the economy. And so I see that complaint a lot. Coming up, it's similar like in Germany, if you're a resident, you can eventually shop at the connoisseur, but you have to pay 17% tax, but just if you're traveling through there, you can't shop anywhere on the base. So I'm always curious to me because for the most part, when you travel anywhere else, you don't expect to be able to use there to be like a grocery store at your hotel or you don't do all your shopping at a store necessarily buying electronics and whatnot. So I don't always surprises me that people are so concerned about that. Yeah. And so if there is somebody that's either getting out or looking for retirement when to do a lot of overseas travel and possibly even a little bit overseas, what are some of the first things for steps they should start doing in things they should get in line? If you actually want to live overseas to choose a location, I think the first place to start is the embassy website of that country to understand what Visa options there are. However, before you go through all that effort, I would just say go to whatever you think you might want to live and rent an apartment for a few weeks a few months because your impression when you visited for a vacation is going to be totally different than if you live there for a few weeks and then again, even longer than that. So I wouldn't recommend taking any major steps like that like applying for a Visa until you're pretty sure it's a place that you want to be. Yeah, I never would have thought of that. But I guess it makes sense. Does each country vary dramatically like if you wanted to go over and live? What's the maximum you could expect to get on your Visa the first time around? The visas that I've seen typically are good for a year and then if you don't commit any crimes or anything, you can renew it, like just the one that we have for Spain. And that's how it works. And so you renew it for two years. You can renew for two years again, and then if we wanted it 5 years, we could apply for permanent residents. But before you even get an American passport, you can go to Europe and stay for 90 days, which is plenty of time to understand to figure out if you actually want to live there. You could go to the UK for 6 months on an American passport. So that's what to me, that's a much better starting point. And you know, I'm not even sure what we will do long-term. I don't know if we'll stick with having a residence Visa or we'll just kind of hop around more so that we're not exceeding the tourist Visa at any point because part of the reason that we're we've been in one place for so long is due to COVID, but if things were with all the borders were open, we might be moving around more. Yeah. Did you say that if you have an American passport, you can pretty much go most places in Europe for 90 days without any visas? Yes. Okay. That's good to know. I didn't realize that. And then decide where you want to stay for a while, decide where you want to land within the 90 days and then apply for a Visa from there. Yes. So one point of clarification on that, there's something called the Schengen zone, which is includes many, but not all of the countries in the EU. So your 90 days is good for any for the whole zone. So 90 days total if you go to one country or you go to ten different countries. But you can't spend 90 days in Spain and then 90 days in France and so on. Okay. Is that kind of. Have to do with has it always been that way or does it go back to when they came out with a Euro in the European community combined on a lot of things? Is that where it comes from? I think so, yeah, because now there's no passport control. So I'm guessing yeah, okay. I think that your stay in each country was separate, which would have been nice. It would certainly be easier to stay in Europe for longer. But you can always leave the Schengen zones like some of the Easter the countries in Eastern Europe like I think Croatia is still not in the zone. So you can kind of go out and come back. But the 90 day limit is 90 days within any 180 day period. So you can't spend 90 days go for a weekend somewhere else and then come back. You'd have to wait another 90 days before you could reenter. Okay. All right. Well, we are getting closer to our time, Stephanie. I'm going to turn your video back on it. Actually I had Stephanie Turner video off because we were getting some compression, buffering issues there. But with the video. So thanks for sharing all that information. Anything else you want to say about pop and smoke and some of the information that's on there before we before we head out, do want to give you the last word and final tidbits of advice for anybody that's looking to travel long term or live overseas. Sure, a distant term, I would just say, take a look at the site, look around and there's a lot of, it's not just our experiences. We have experiences of dozens of other retirees who've done some really cool things. So think about what else you could do like after you retirement besides go back and work a 9 to 5 or anything like that, there's so many interesting things you can do because you have all your benefits. Yeah. Absolutely. All right, Stephanie, well, everybody check out pop and smoke dot com in the couple of Facebook sites, pop and smoke and the military veterans overseas, a lot of good info on both of those and thanks for sharing your info and it's awesome what you guys have been doing. I mean, it's been 7 years now traveling in living for the last two or three years overseas. So a lot of people are envious that you guys have been able to pull that off. Yeah. Yeah, come join us. We'll do. All right, for now we are Oscar Mike. Thank you for listening to vetted on the move. Your pathfinder to freedom. If you like to show, leave us a review on iTunes. Reviews are always greatly appreciated. So until next time, this veteran is screw Mike..

Spain Europe Germany golf Stephanie Turner UK EU Stephanie Eastern Europe Croatia France Oscar Mike Facebook Mike
"montague" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

Veteran on the Move

05:08 min | 10 months ago

"montague" Discussed on Veteran on the Move

"Having to worry about insurance wherever we go and so on. Right. What are some of the other big ticket items that you typically see somebody who's still in the U.S. and head and traveled overseas very much, but they want to, what are some of their main concerns, some of their big items that they're always willing to get answers on? I think what people worry about the language barrier that's, I think it's a non issue. We figured it out in Japan. We landed there. We didn't speak. A word could read anything. Somehow we made it through. I think they think of travel as very expensive and again, it just doesn't have to be. So obviously if you take a military space flight, the flight was free, but even if you don't because that's not going to be the right option for many situations, there's so many ways to travel cheaply. I think when people are vacationing for a week or two a year and it's a big deal and they're splurging, you know, they're saying it a nice hotel resort or something like that. Sure, it's really expensive, but when you want to do it for a longer period, you rent an apartment so you can cook some of your own meals. And you're not eating in restaurants all the time, you can get a weekly or a monthly rate and it's significantly cheaper. Like I said, traveling full time, our budget was way below our monthly budget living in D.C.. Wow, that's awesome. And you guys have been living overseas for actually you've been traveling overseas for like 7 years now and living overseas for two, three years. So what were some of the things at what point did it become obvious to you guys that you're traveling that you didn't really want to go back? Or you wanted to really dig in and stay long term? That's an interesting question. I would say that evolved or maybe we just keep kicking the can down the road. I think I would say that after the first year we figured out that we weren't ready to come back in part, we hadn't picked a place in the United States that we wanted to live. Right. And so for now, we're really enjoying living overseas having our household goods stored was extremely convenient. And we were paying for it after the first year, and it wasn't like pocket change, but at the same time it was sort of like the price of freedom as I like to call it. But we knew that we needed to get that, get rid of that, because that's another thing we realized after a year, we can't even remember what's in those household goods. So we kind of figured we'd probably don't need most of those things. And so we didn't want to deal with it. And so we spent years racking our brain trying to figure out how we're going to do this. And so what we had planned to do was try to find a short term rental, but those are a little bit hard to come by like not too many people who have an empty house that they would want to rent for only 6 months. But it needed to be large enough to receive all of our household goods. And ultimately, my husband actually found the solution we connected with a state sale place. And they were willing to receive all of our household goods to their warehouse and then sell most of it. We were able to take what we wanted. So we did that in 2020. So now we have a very small storage unit, but we're pretty light on our feet right now. So we can go where we want. But that of course that was right during COVID. So we haven't had the chance to take full take full advantage of that. So the estate sale place took delivery of all your goods pretty much sold all of it and then they picked through some of it and sent the rest of it to you or put it in a storage somewhere. You pretty much just sold all your stuff and everything came back for it. No, we, after they received it, we went to the warehouse. We got to go through it ourselves and see what we wanted. And then they sold the bottom line is when you're selling used furniture and kitchen stuff. You don't get a lot for it. It's not like we made a lot of money off that or anything, but we kind of figured, even if so if we rented a place, paid rent on it for those months, then tried to coordinate selling stuff in the middle of COVID no less. I don't think that we would have come out ahead on that one. Plus, I think we would have kind of become reattached to some of our stuff. When you haven't seen your things and four or 5 years, it's pretty easy just to say, you know, I haven't seen that in years. I don't even need it. Yeah, we've recently moved from the Midwest down to Florida and gotten rid of a lot of stuff and it is interesting how you can carry all this stuff around with you from PCS to PCS and a lot of my stuff stayed in boxes and never even got unpacked from house to house and station to station and at some point you start going through it and you're like, why haven't you been dragging this stuff around with me all this time? But sometimes you cut the cord and get rid of it all. So what are some of the other things that some of the other.

United States Japan D.C. Midwest Florida
"montague" Discussed on Youth Ministry Maverick: Mold-Breaking NextGen Investment

Youth Ministry Maverick: Mold-Breaking NextGen Investment

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"montague" Discussed on Youth Ministry Maverick: Mold-Breaking NextGen Investment

"I think it really emphasized for me. Maybe some of the struggles. That i didn't deal with when i was you know in my singleness and so Yeah i after. I figured all. I remember being I don't know how old i was that. I had three kids in my van. And i'm in the in the drive thru line of chick-fil-a and i remember looking at my reflection in the mirror going. This is everything that i dreamed i would have and yet. I'm still struggling. I'm still it's still hard. I'm still and so Anyways when i kind of through some different resources and some different I had a life coach. That i got to experience kind of helped me with what was going on with my thoughts after all of that and then i got certified life coach. I heard someone say be who you needed. Ten years ago in man. the woman. The woman that i was that twenty eight twenty nine that was people pleasing that was finding her identity in hanging out with the junior high and high school kids and the woman that was really struggling to love who she was. That's who i needed. And so i want to be that for the single women now who find themselves in that place in her struggling and her struggling to understand why they're still single right but also what to do with that season singleness That they find themselves then. So great and yeah what that i love that quote and i think that isn't that what matthew mcconaughey hey said. When he accepted his his oscar for best actor something like who like his his goal and he looks up to himself in ten years and mike and then who he needed. And when i was at a youth conference years ago brad montague think it's last name l. per kid president. Got a quote that just sticks with me and he basically said the same thing he said. Be who you needed to be. Be who you needed when you were younger. And you think about that. And i mean that's a huge reason why i'm in ministry while why you're in coaching. I probably of us in any kind of feel but we're investing in pouring into others whether it's in the classroom whether it's as a medical professional as hands on worker is because we realize this is a neat. That people have. When i was younger i could have benefited from someone like this very important. Yeah yeah and to take what we've learned and to go back into teach those skills you know hoping to help you know those teenager. Those teenage years be less painful right. I think i think that's what we want for. You know when. I was spending time with the junior high and high school kids. It's i want them to know who they are. I want them to feel confident. That the lord has something bore them right you know but really helping them understand those kind of things that we struggled with. So that maybe they don't have to go through it right. Yes absolutely absolutely so something. I heard growing up speaking of in the past something. I heard growing up more than once and from people and from pulpits that i respected. Was that those who are single are basically incomplete and not in accordance with god's will until they get married and i'm not talking about christ in the church which is what paul says specifically five. I'm not sure how you can miss that. When they're talking about is being married to an earthly spouse in that interpretation of scripture or point a basis for any kind of theology is not only inaccurate but harmful. How do you think that made single people feel who desired marriage. How do you think that made single parents like my mom feel when they heard that single people who felt secure in the lord and happy..

brad montague matthew mcconaughey oscar mike paul
"montague" Discussed on This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"montague" Discussed on This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

"Is this philosophical movement that it's like okay. Well if you can survive on like just water and you don't need anything then you can be happier or what around the cats. That doesn't sound like vaughn. At all that that was not my and i looked into like the the buddhist virtual of like. Oh maybe i need to get centered. And i do love mindfulness and meditation and stuff but i figured that that just gets me back to zero right that if i've been stressing myself the heck out trying to optimize my life and every possible way. If a couple times a day i get back to the center and get back to zero. That's great that's really helpful. Helps me kind of recenter and and think about things that are important. But that's not enough either. Getting getting back to zero is not really the goal of where i wanna do. I wanna follow like joy and passion. Play and i wanna like remember what it feels like to be a kid and be that geeked up about stuff that you're like me and i can't wait to get out of bed today and i. I kinda found that no amount of pushing is going to make that happen. You can't force fun. You can't plan and strategize and optimized and schedule play in a way that that's interesting and so i just sort of got to the place rose like i need to give all this up and then i found the play philosophy All kinds of cool people but I just read a ton of books over the last year around Play and enjoyment and enjoy and that really seems to resume of me with somebody who had a really fun playful childhood. I remember riding our bikes out with my brother and our two friends and just spending from sunup to sundown goofing around and playing and having fun or doing wiffle ball or Soccer or Anything whatever this word of mouth was trying to learn how to juggle or ride a unicycle or or something really loving the majority of my life right and when i ran out of something to do we came up with something else. If we got tired we rested and if we were hungry than we found something to eat and we didn't try to schedule those things tried to to live at his and that to me that philosophy made. Yeah i think for me. There's an element of spontaneity. Which you know if you if you try to plan everything in your calendar you know a blank space then you get lost in overwhelm of trying to get it all done right as if you're ever gonna get it all done with just allusion that we've sold ourselves and then you get to feel the guilt and the shame when you're done bad press. I didn't get it all done right. Okay where can you step back. I'm gonna create some. I'm gonna play it both ways. I need to have space for play free.

mike montague mike Mike
"montague" Discussed on This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"montague" Discussed on This Humean Life with The Philosophical Coach

"To go beyond who you know yourself to be really if that intrigues or sites you that you will definitely in the right place. The ideas drawn from neuroscience philosophy. My coaching practice working with latest and experience. You can expect candida human vulnerability and ideas which run familiar to you and some. You may just plain disagreement. You'll also get the opportunity to hear from inspiring coaches elitist now. Let's get ready to question. We know and go beyond limitations so welcome back to this human lives. I'm really thrilled to have. My next guest is mike montague and mike is pseudo. F- guy on. I just got the opportunity to connect with him today. And we just gelled straightaway. So why mike. Mike is somebody really brings play to what it looks like any area of life. He has a podcast called playful humans. He was recently interviewing art bell. Who's the founder of companies central and beyond that he he brings play to corporate events..

mike montague mike Mike
"montague" Discussed on The Email Marketing Show

The Email Marketing Show

08:00 min | 2 years ago

"montague" Discussed on The Email Marketing Show

"Of the big reasons that a lot of people i'm going to say resort to discounting and we have absolutely been guilty of this like no qualms about it. We've definitely used that. We do discounting as a method but one of the reasons that is popular is. It's a really easy way off creating a sense of urgency. A reason to act. Now there's a discount. It's twenty percent fifty percent off if you do it before midday on tuesday. So how on earth. Mike with all your experience. How do we get people to make decisions if there's no if there is no scary countdown timer. Where the page is gonna self destruct. You hit it with the scary. So the word. I like to think of is scarcity. Scarcity makes things more valuable legitimate reason of why you would want to take action now again. We could pick any example. But let's say there's ten autographed. Footballs from your favorite forever footballer. And they're on auction and they're really going to go away he's not gonna sign anymore or whatever is retired. The value is going up on these. Your opportunity to buy it at its lowest. Point is now and you wanna take action. Now there's a sense of urgency without discounting the price of that. There's no reason in that situation why we would say. Oh we're taking these ten ltd's items and we're lowering the price to get you to buy today. That wouldn't wouldn't make sense to be counter to the value. I'm curious to know this is. I'm curious to do. What's your view on this cash. Generally should we never really do a discount. Does that help the situation. If we never do it or do you think there is a time. And a place where discounts work. And they don't just make people sit and say well. I'll just wait until the discount. I kind of skipped one of the forwards. I gave you the beginning. We didn't talk a lot about trust. But that's the am. I answer to that question. Rob is if it builds trust with your audience than a discount make sense. Most of the time discounts though destroy trust. Because you're saying. I was trying to screw you a couple of minutes ago for now. I have a discount. Zella lower right. That's what really you're thinking with the discount. So if there is a legitimate reason for a lower price in their best interests then i think maybe it does other than that. I almost say never so. I'm trying to think of a really good reason. Maybe it's a charity or you have a legitimate reason like there was a stock of books and were coming out with a new version of the books that we want to get rid of our inventory. Would've damaged show some damaged ones. We had dempsey fussell physical books we produce. That was a bunch of them just because of the mailing system in the big box. There were damaged a couple of discount. Those maybe it has a real legitimate reason. Yeah or i'm also thinking when it would be in the best interest of the buyer like maybe there are people that have wanted to buy your course truly kuban afford it and we're doing a special thing you know during cova for out of work people or returning military or something like that. There's a legitimate reason why you would want these people to have a lower price than other people that you've charged full price for the idea of playing qualification on a discount and this is not that's talked about before so this is it gets talked about a lot in the offline world. It very ready gets talked about online where this is a discount for like you said like returning military or nurses and doctors or like somebody who falls into a particular category. I think that's an interesting idea that actually more online businesses could start to apply to their store if they're in a particular if their business serves like some sort of <hes>. mission the mission behind that businesses. Pick on while. I saw my causes because i wanna selma causes and make money like if they have a bigger purpose and a mission there on that. I think that's a that's a really really cool idea. So we've talked about trust. We've talked about unique positioning. Let's dive into the other. Two little bit so i think that's where it gets interesting is around the permission. How do we get people to take action. Then so. I found to loopholes here to help you get permission and get people to take action. Where're we're not necessarily discounting one of them you can argue probably still is but the first one is an invitation so if i'm a salesperson or if i'm a marketer and i offer somebody an invitation. They have the ability to decline the invitation. No harm no foul right. But most people don't get defended our. Don't push back on an invitation. They don't want so. If i you guys over to the states to party it up and have some fun this winter. You've probably decline at the moment. But you're also not going to be offended. You're not going to go. Mike pushy by by doing that it's nice to be invited nice to be included in things so i think a lot of time we wanna create an atmosphere environments around. What we're doing that. We're inviting people to a web and are we're inviting people to join the course now because there's a lot of other people at this time and it's gonna make sense for them to start all on the same page. Invitations are not the same as offers in my world. I see those a little bit differently. The second thing i would say is gifts so even if you get a gift for your birthday or christmas or something that you don't like it's still nice to get a gift right. Nobody's back exotic jerk for sending me a gift. I can't believe you did that. So that is my way of maybe saying. Hey we have a special offer this something in our interest we want you to enjoy this part of it complementary if you buy the course now and so sometimes that can get a little tricky. It can fall into the discount area. That's where i said that was borderline for me. But i like gifts early to make sure that we're getting the right people and we're getting their permission to continue to market to them if the gift then. We know that they want to use what we have the gift. Because i think for a lot of us we've often seen as we call it like a bonus is that it's basically adding value to rather than devaluing the product. I think that's a really interesting thing. I think it actually because a lot of both those things and actually now you think about it and the co like of just this conversation that we're having gone. Yeah so we'll discount by one hundred and will give them more stuff and then you look at it and go. Why the bloody. How would i do that. Devaluing the pilot and given away more stuff. And i think there's i mean there's there's so many avenues down with on the on the on the psychology of this. It's making me. Think of robert dini at in his in. His book influenced psychology persuasion. He talks about the power of the the word because and he talks a basically this strength of having a reason. Why is that something you guys. That sound talk about lot. Absolutely i think that ties back to the to the unique value and stuff of why orchard urging this stunning to justify our price. But look we shouldn't be that close <hes>. In their minds so when you get one hundred bucks. Hopefully i'm giving them a thousand dollar or thousand pound return on their investment so this hundred dollars is not going to matter right. You invest a thousand dollars. If i'm gonna give you ten thousand dollars back so really. What we need to do is build our case of the unique value but also a return on investment. The dwarfs three five ten times what. They're investing if they believe in. Trust you that that's true. Price shouldn't be an issue

facebook chrome safari today fire fox rob
Suspect Arrested in Attempted Rape on Virginia's Silver Line Metro Train

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Suspect Arrested in Attempted Rape on Virginia's Silver Line Metro Train

"The man accused of trying to rape a woman Tuesday morning on Metro Silver Line in northern Virginia, is now facing additional charges. Fairfax County police say Kendry Roberts. Montague also tried sexually assaulting another woman Wednesday at arrested apartment complex. She was working inside a building around 8 A.m. when police say he grabbed her and tried assaulting her. Police say she fought him off before he ran off. The 21 year old was arrested yesterday in the metro attack and is being held at the Fairfax County

Fairfax County Montague Metro Silver Line Kendry Roberts Rape Virginia
Man facing 27 charges after viral video shows him doing burnouts and doughnuts on Maryland bridge, Washington DC-area

Home and Appliance Show

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Man facing 27 charges after viral video shows him doing burnouts and doughnuts on Maryland bridge, Washington DC-area

"Ah viral video leads to more than two dozen charges against a driver in Maryland, Virginia man facing 27 criminal charges and traffic violations for allegedly doing burnouts and doughnuts on Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Bridge, Fellow driver capturing footage of a Nissan sports cars. And kicking up smoke the clip going viral Maryland Transportation Authority officers identifying 22 year old Gary Ray Montague Jr of Dumb Freeze Virginia. As the driver. Officials say he's facing four counts of disorderly conduct and 23 traffic violations, which include reckless driving and willfully damaging a highway. Kristen Goodwin Fox

Maryland Transportation Author Maryland Gary Ray Montague Jr Kristen Goodwin Fox Chesapeake Bay Bridge Virginia Nissan
Becoming Better Grownups with Brad Montague

The Chalene Show

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Becoming Better Grownups with Brad Montague

"So Brad thank you so much for joining me today I'm really excited to talk about so many things that have. Like the way I had planned on us having this discussion, bring you to the audience has really changed because the world has changed I guess my first question I would ask is, what is it that you solve for the world? You start with the biggest of the big. I guess. So I mean, that's the hope always that somehow were all being views and to realize that you already are being views in some way. That you don't think is remarkable because you've been doing it all along at least that was what it was for me. I didn't realize that encouraging people and telling stories and loving people around me was such a big deal, but it's the biggest deal. So the problem I'm trying to solve is to constantly. Love better in invite other people to love better to. The thing I've learned the most I think in listening to so many interviews with you reading your book is I never hear you mentioned? Money I. Never Hear you mentioned how is this going to turn into a business and that's something I want to learn to do better I believe I follow my passion and my purpose, but I do also always think to myself. Okay. But is this going to be worth it financially like is it GonNa be worth my time financially and I just never hear that. From any of the endeavors I know you've pursued in, we're going to get into some of those. But for example, when I hear you say something like that and our listeners are hearing you say something like that. They think that's great but. I just lost my job and I don't know if this industry is gonNA come back a while love and I want to show up in that way but I also have to focus on keeping a roof over my head. How do you balance those two in? Do you think about it or is it just an abundance mindset? I think it starts with wherever you are so whatever job you have Becomes, a space to love people better wherever that is I've worked plenty of jobs where the lesson I learned was I'm not good at that like I'm not supposed to be doing this right now. But in that space, it wasn't a wasted time I learned how to communicate. I learned how to work with people who've greatly different from. You pick up things along the way. And the moment for us. All is the moment that we're in. It's the moment that we're in and how can I bring my best self to this moment or what do I have to learn this moment would have to share in this moment. When you shift to that, you start to realize you always have something to offer. And to the world around you has something to offer as well. That's a constant opportunity to love and it ignites something in you where I'm definitely have been finding in myself when people that are in my immediate orbit that the more that you kind of focused on how you can. Operate from a mindset of not I'm going to do this for Love I want people to love me engine I. Want Them Ause we operate sometimes Wanting. To be loved when the best work comes when you operate from love like we do things, we do work for satisfaction sometimes like do this, it's GonNa make me happy. Yeah. When you're with somebody who works from satisfaction, they already are at peace and are so grateful to be where they are. There's just a freedom. It's dazzling like I've experienced that with the woman who worked I live in a really small town. Willing to work at the post office and is like watching Michael Jordan play basketball like seeing her just love people taking packages and mail and their long lines. But she knew my kids names, she knew. Everything about people in the community where packages were going where they might be headed where we've had problems. And when we through a parade for her. Was My way of showing. Well, we got a bunch of kids to line up and just surprise the post office one day and he was at her birthday or juice. The parade. And I'm in a marching band outfit. ill-fitting marching band outfit. We go in and I say Okay Dana come on out it's time for your parade. Everybody's here to celebrate you and she was very grateful what she said I have worked to do. I love her. And I just thought that was so great like yet thank you I'm so honored you would do this but I'm already. Happy this towner. Love and the people that

Dana Brad Michael Jordan Basketball
The Watch - Reviewing 'The Bodyguard'

The Watch

03:38 min | 4 years ago

The Watch - Reviewing 'The Bodyguard'

"Now I am joined by Juliet Littman to have a shot about bodyguard. Okay. Julia. I've watched on episode five I have not watched episode five, but I'm on episode five. And so this will be a spoiler inclusive episode taking in the first four episodes finished bodyguard. Yes has finished bodyguard. Cayenne, I on the money team with her eyes on Monday when I sit she said, did you watch bodyguard? And I was like watching episode about how about you. She's like watch all I detest around that is nothing wrong with it. In fact, it just makes me feel ashamed as a television podcast her. I wish I had more. I'm like, what do I do? Now. That's a great way to start it off. Yeah. What an incredibly paced show such an amazing like return on investment. You know, does it remind you of homeland. They reminds me of how I felt I season homeland me tale. It's like a feeling I have a TV feeling. I haven't felt in a while, which is exhilarating siding. So I think they I I'm curious about. This. I came to you this morning, and you know, in the third episode of the end of the third episode of bodyguard, they're huge spoiler. Warning. We're spoiling force even sow just one more warning. Here you go. There's an explosion at a speech that the home secretary. Julia Montague extra secretary secretary. How did I sit home state, which is call her mom? There's an explosion at a species giving a college and she passes away from her injuries. She dies from her. She blows. Yeah. It's not funny. No. But I found myself immediately just kind of being like that's not why I was watching the show. I was watching the show because of the central tension between David and Julia, and this idea that they could be so politically and sort of philosophically apart. But so close together in other ways till you're saying you're like shocked bummed that she I was very very ended a romance. And I was very into the tension that they had on screen, and you're saying that you obviously the show's pivoting towards unraveling this conspiracy around Julia's death, Cheryl, but were you disappointed to see that the way it was happening that she died. Yeah. No. I wasn't at all. I didn't really care what their romance. And I'm a big romance person. Obviously, I love melodrama, and I love a soap opera, but I didn't find it that believable. And that's because I really like the show. I find Richard Madden's character a little confused. Ding has so. I can't tell what his true motivation is like is it to be a patriot. Is it choose to avenge the deaths of his friends and Afghantistan? Yeah. Is it is it to pursue a political agenda? I've finished the season as discussed completely know. And to me, that's a failure of writing not acting. Whereas with his counterpart on game of thrones can Harrington. I'd be like, yeah. That guy's the worst actor. So this is the first British television show that has been sort of presented initially is somewhat limited series and turned into a juggernaut. And they've done another series of it's a broad church is not unlike this where if you watch broad church, you're not like what's going to happen in season two broad church. Love Brocher broad church students so popular they were like, well, we have to do something. The fall is lost like that. Would Jamie Dornan Gillian Anderson where they were just like it was pretty much like a who done it like cat and mouse thriller, and then they teased it out for another three or four seasons. Now, you can kind of get away with that England 'cause you can just do a four episode show like. They do Sherlock. Sometimes just three. Yeah. But I do think that this was something where the popularity of bodyguard might have actually changed the way because there's going to be a second season of this show. So it might have changed the perception of

Julia Montague Secretary Juliet Littman Cayenne Jamie Dornan Gillian Anderson Richard Madden Cheryl England Ding Afghantistan Harrington David
Pennsylvania, Flood and San Francisco discussed on Michael Savage

Michael Savage

01:52 min | 4 years ago

Pennsylvania, Flood and San Francisco discussed on Michael Savage

"Super easy to talk to just hit. Star star eight four eight that star star eight four eight star star eight four a record. Setting rainfall over the past few weeks is, causing havoc in parts of the country elsewhere. People are trying to deal with devastating heat three people live in apartments. Above American Legion post three eighty four intrigue months Pennsylvania but the. Building has been deemed unsafe the floods, knock the wall There are plenty of people in the area or now on cleanup duty after the, flooding, last time this happened two thousand seven I lost. My health sidewalk Lucky this time but the, sellers a mess and with more rain on the way the problems could get worse not just for Pennsylvania but. For much of. The east coast this morning the national weather service had flash. Flood watches and warnings in effect from parts of South. Carolina to New York I'm Andrew Spencer the. European Union is reducing rules to. Tighten assessments of. Pilots mental health follows the Germanwings crash of two thousand. Fifteen the rules compel airlines to perform psychological assessments I'm Mike moss network capital traffic I'm. James Stanley this traffic report sponsored by the ticket clinic through danville we're still seeing a. Little bit of a delay northbound six eighty from, sycamore valley road we had a crash that had at least one lane taken out for a little. While crash itself now is over on the right shoulder just waiting on the record, show up at a little, bit of, a delay in a backup though. So that is unwinding just stick. With that northbound one zero one through San Francisco, right at the night street. Civic Center exit of a lane taken out that's a minor Fender bender work now getting. That pushed, over to the shoulder accident. Just cleared through Santa Claus Era northbound one. To one right around the Montague expressway in there the central Moscow press way area by. With that comes together that crash has gone looks much better through there nearly moving at. Posted speeds also San Francisco one zero one northbound, right around the Protrero avenue shove as exit crash gone looks much better through that.

Pennsylvania Flood San Francisco Santa Claus Era Montague Expressway American Legion European Union Mike Moss James Stanley Carolina Andrew Spencer Civic Center New York Moscow Danville
Idaho mass stabbing: Suspect accused of targeting 3-year-old's birthday party

WBZ Afternoon News

01:44 min | 4 years ago

Idaho mass stabbing: Suspect accused of targeting 3-year-old's birthday party

"2016 us election but bolton also notes that's different from saying there was no meddling that all two men shot dead in brighton are now identified police say twentysix year old wilford peters of brighton and year old jeffrey montague of cambridge died at the scene they were shot in the area of faneuil bracket streets shortly before one am saturday boston police are investigating and ask anyone with information to give them a call a fire on a hot summer night displaces nearly a dozen people in dorchester flames broke out around three a m at a triple decker on armagh dean street causing about three hundred thousand dollars in damage the red cross is assisting one fire firefighter was hospitalized but expected to be okay in boise idaho a man is in custody accused of stabbing nine people at an apartment complex housing refugees where he had been staying all the victims were taken to hospital some with life threatening injuries boise police chief bill bones says a thirty year old man was taken into custody at gun point after after discarding the knife while trying to run away we're following up on his history you get come from out of state but i don't know how long it's been in the city police say the suspect had been asked to leave the complex wbz news time at three twenty fire officials say they believe a fire that has completely destroyed a rhode island home was arson the flames broke out just after midnight at warwick in a house officials say had been vacant for at least a month a reward is being offered for information on who might be responsible well like a scene out of the movies there was a dramatic prison break outside paris today the daring escape a helicopter with a team of heavily armed men on board landed.

Bolton Brighton Wilford Peters Jeffrey Montague Cambridge Idaho Warwick Paris Faneuil Bracket Boston Dorchester Boise Boise Police Bill Bones Rhode Island Arson Three Hundred Thousand Dollars Twentysix Year Thirty Year