35 Burst results for "Monsanto"

"monsanto" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

05:51 min | 2 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on Gastropod

"New experiences. Back in the late 1800s at the time, professor Beal was burying his bottles. When it came to weeds, farmers basically had nothing. In those days, they didn't have large cultivating machinery like we do today where you can go out and cultivate between the rows of crops to remove the seeds or spraying herbicides and do herbicide treatments. Frank to luski was one of the stars of our first weed episode, he is the senior scientist at Michigan state university on the BLC weed experiment. Things were done pretty much by hand or by horse in hand. And so it took a long time. The old saying, that's a long road to hoe. Basically means no, you've got a lot of work ahead of you if you've got a long row to hoe. Getting rid of weeds meant physically pulling them out of the ground. First by hand and then with tools and machines. People experimented with adding salt to the ground or compounds like copper sulfate and arsenic, but they weren't very useful. They typically either killed everything, including the crop, or nothing. This all changed about 80 years ago, and the roots of that change go back to the dawn of the chemical era. In the late 1800s, especially along the Rhine river in Germany, scientists were playing with the leftover tar waste from the coal industry. They were synthesizing and creating new chemicals from it. Chemicals they could use for drugs or dyes or even flavors, it seemed like the opportunities were limitless. And that was kind of how these folks thought about it. Wow, this coal tar, this byproduct of the fossil fuel industry can produce all these magical things. This is Bart elmore. He's an environmental historian at Ohio State university, and the author of the new book seed money, Monsanto's past and our food future. The Giants in that moment in the early 1900s were in Germany. They were companies like buyer or Bayer, as we say in the United States. Or other German companies Swiss firms like sand dogs. These were the big giants of the chemical age at that time. All the innovation may have been happening in Europe, but there were still drug companies in America selling those European chemicals and drugs and they had salesmen and one of those salesmen was a man named John queenie. John was the eldest son of immigrant parents and when his family lost all their money in the great Chicago fire, he had to quit school at the tender age of 12 and go out to work, and the job he got was in drug sales as John grew up got married and kept working in the drug business. He decided he wanted to build a chemical company of his own, and he wanted it to be a truly American one. His goal was to liberate American firms from the stranglehold of European concerns. To be the kind of American producer of chemicals on American soil. And obviously get rich doing it. John kept his day job while he got started. He hired chemists from Europe and built a factory. It wasn't easy. His first factory burned down, but he eventually got a production process going, and he quit to run his startup full-time. Saccharin is what he decided to make first. And the reason he's interested in saccharin, which is an artificial sweetener that is some 500 times more sweet than sucrose that comes from sugarcane is because there's a booming demand for this. Because the other thing that was booming at the turn of the century was busy drinks. Pepsi and Coca-Cola and all kinds of sodas were brand new and super popular and of course they required a ton of sugar..

professor Beal luski Bart elmore Michigan state university Rhine river Germany John queenie Frank Ohio State university Monsanto United States Bayer John Giants Europe Chicago Saccharin Pepsi Coca Cola
Monsanto to plead guilty to illegal pesticide use in Hawaii

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Monsanto to plead guilty to illegal pesticide use in Hawaii

"Hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi a a reporting reporting Monsanto Monsanto will will plead plead guilty guilty to to illegal illegal pesticide pesticide use use in in Hawaii Hawaii the the agrochemical agrochemical company company Monsanto Monsanto has has agreed agreed to to plead plead guilty guilty to to illegally illegally using using and and storing storing pesticides pesticides in in Hawaii Hawaii on on Santa Santa will will pay pay twelve twelve million million dollars dollars in in fines fines in in a a court court filing filing one one sent sent to to agreed agreed to to plead plead guilty guilty to to thirty thirty environmental environmental crimes crimes workers workers were were allowed allowed to to go go to to corn corn fields fields on on a a wall wall who who last last year year after after the the glufosinate glufosinate ammonium ammonium based based product product forfeit forfeit two two eighty eighty was was sprayed sprayed on on fields fields under under federal federal law law people people cannot cannot enter enter areas areas where where the the chemical chemical is is sprayed sprayed within within six six days days of of application application on on Santa Santa will will also also plead plead guilty guilty to to two two felony felony crimes crimes related related to to the the storage storage of of a a banned banned chemical chemical on on Maui Maui hi hi Mike Mike Rossi Rossi

Monsanto Monsanto Hawaii Mike Mike Rossi Rossi Santa Santa
Lee Elder, 1st Black golfer to play Masters, dies at age 87

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 7 months ago

Lee Elder, 1st Black golfer to play Masters, dies at age 87

"The the PGA PGA tour tour says says golf golf pioneer pioneer Lee Lee elder elder has has died died at at the the age age of of eighty eighty seven seven golfer golfer Lee Lee elder elder broke broke down down racial racial barriers barriers as as the the first first black black golfer golfer to to play play in in the the masters masters paving paving the the way way for for Tiger Tiger Woods Woods and and others others to to follow follow a a native native Texan Texan who who developed developed his his game game while while being being a a caddy caddy during during segregated segregated times times elder elder made made history history in in nineteen nineteen seventy seventy five five at at Augusta Augusta national national that that had had been been in in all all white white tournament tournament until until he he received received an an invitation invitation after after winning winning the the Monsanto Monsanto opened opened the the previous previous year year elder elder who who was was forty forty at at the the time time missed missed the the cut cut his his best best masters masters finish finish was was a a tie tie for for seventeenth seventeenth in in nineteen nineteen seventy seventy nine nine he he also also won won four four PGA PGA tour tour events events I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

Lee Lee Elder Elder Lee Lee Tiger Tiger Woods Woods Texan Texan Golf Augusta Augusta National Natio PGA Monsanto Monsanto Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

03:00 min | 10 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

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"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

03:38 min | 10 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Toxic places..

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

06:42 min | 10 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Cdc work on sugar and obesity and diabetes and health. And so we're really just again trying to expose things that maybe are companies. Don't want out there. Yes sir seemed to be a range of things you guys focus on. But that is the connective tissue is. You're going after the the big companies out there. I saw stuff about bill gates investments in agriculture which you mentioned earlier the sugar lobby in artificial sweeteners. so several issues that are important to this audience. I hope they do check it out. Yeah and it's important to say that they companies that we have highlighted or the corporate interests or the organizations have really tried to shut us down. And i've worked really hard to do that. And there are again internal documents that show that so if there are people out there who want to support us we would welcome that. Yes cheers and in terms of social media links. your website future projects. What should we tell them about following up on this if they want to keep tabs on what you have going on. Yeah so well. Us are tk dot org and we're also on twitter and we have a facebook page. And then i'm on twitter myself. I love for people to follow me and engage. I tried to put breaking news documents up there as much as i can. That seems to be way to get him out. And my own website. Curriculum dot com. You can see articles that have written. I write for the gardy news outlet as well fairly regularly see can guardians in international news agency and host. A lot of information there so Lots of places to follow me your check it out and i welcome. My website has my email and phone number. And i welcome inquiries and news tips and things like that so please reach out and on the your story phone number now. That is bold of you. That's dedication but yes you also do have a high quality twitter feed rare to see these days but it is there a lot of good information i learned. Just perusing that so keep up the great work. I really enjoyed both books. You are extremely knowledgeable in your niche and we are lucky to have you fighting the good fight and thanks for stopping in to talk to us today. Best lock take care out there. Well you're very kind for having me back at you. Thank you right on. And boom goes the dynamite. What a dedicated and amazing journalist kerry is just so impressive. If you ask me. I know some people might think that when you consider the full totality that is the thc iceberg. This is not as deep as some of the more out there things we get into. But i've been looking for creative ways to poke holes through the common phrases here in these days without over focusing on it directly these almost evangelical declarations to trust the science and the steam. That no matter what unethical or criminal activity accompany has been convicted of in a crisis. We just got gotta acquiescent. Follow their advice. They're the experts. Criminals are not when we really do know it's all tainted by their own incentives and we cannot trust the compromised media to report on things accurately a lot of people acknowledged the greed and the cutthroat business practices. But i guess they have a belief that there's some magic line that doesn't get crossed and sciences science and data's data and that's neutral but another thing i wanted to remind people of obviously is how toothless arbitrary fda an epa approvals for safety can be in. Today's world. I wish it wasn't that way. Without regulation at probably be worse but we need some checks and balances to keep the corporate people out of the regulation department when these companies are willing to spend billions of dollars to capture everything. You've got to be pretty vigilant. And we're not. I think we've learned just how easy it is to control the narrative around certain things when a company is committed enough as kerry said the tobacco industry. Playbook definitely still being passed around. And you got to be pretty dense to not see all these factors in the case of monsanto and wipe assayed because it's a pretty glaringly toxic example yet people still buy it because it's at home depot so it must be okay that said all of these themes to me are very important in today's world and with today's dominant narratives and conflicts of interest. I would hope it would be a natural progression but at the same time if you're actually presented with the information on how many midwesterners the lawn or a garden or still using roundup. I'm pretty sure you'd be shocked. By how many have it in the shed right next to the lawnmower on the blow up kiddy pool so we do have a long way to go but today we talked about a template template that i hope more people start applying to other situations and industries. But hey i just lead the horse to the unchlorinated. Water can't make anybody drink. Although the sad state of everything definitely makes me want to but as journalists as an expert in her area carey is so high level. We also recorded this. Just before this recent foia document released that offers even greater evidence fao funded gain of function research on corona viruses. In the wuhan lab. But i'm sure her organization. Us right to know u. s. r. t. k. Dot org is all over it because it only further confirms the perspective she offered on that whole situation. When talking about non-life investigations that. Us right to know is currently involved in. I've heard two recent glyphosate pieces of news as well one being this emerging data that biofuels being burned and getting into the air is a huge problem because they use glyphosate soaked corn for a lot of the biofuel and you really shouldn't be burning that or breathing it in summer even saying it's a major exacerbated of cova symptoms obviously we had a lot of people trying to overlay five g. coverage areas with hotspots. And honestly i just think it's industrialization in general cities are.

twitter bill gates Cdc obesity kerry diabetes facebook epa fda monsanto fao carey Us
"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

08:11 min | 10 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Going to head off claims in the future because they don't want to stop sign it they definitely don't want to put a warning label on it saying it can cause cancer if they acknowledge it can cause cancer. You can't spread directly on food. Crops anymore the epa that should be disallowed and it could really harm sales and ballroom use around the world. So what they have said is because most of the claims that they've been facing come from people likely johnson or you know alvin albert affiliate like regular folk. That are out there not farmers. They've said they're gonna stop selling it for the lawn and garden market. Stop selling to consumers. And they'll stop doing that by twenty twenty three but they are not going to stop selling it to commercial applicators and farmers and they are not going to put anything on it that says it causes cancer. They say so how they marry that with keeping litigation at bay is enough. They haven't cracked yet. They put several proposals forward to federal court. Judge who's in charge of all the federal litigation and asked him to approve different plans. They wanted to put in place in order that nobody could many trials for four years. The judge said that was crazy. They told the judge they want to set up a science panel. That would basically mean that juries would not be involved in deciding whether or not it causes cancer anymore. It would be up to a science panel that they would help. Appoint to decide that question. The judge said no bad idea. Not gonna do it. You know lots of different problems with the plan so right. Now there's a trial going on in california here in august twenty twenty one and we'll see how that comes out bears trying very hard to get a case to be taken up by the us supreme court and they want the us supreme court to agree with them. That the fact that the epa back stem and says that it's safe and find to sell that that should preempt all of these lawsuits and should preempt all of these claims and if they can get that ruling then they think they'll be home free so that's their key strategy right now. Yeah that tactic to remove the product from retail shelves but still sell to commercial. Farmers seems like tactic to just get it out of sight out of mind. There's so many chemicals as you mentioned and somebody pesticides go on our food. We don't know the names of it. We don't know the terms. They're not as as popularized as glyphosate. So have you can just take round up off the local home depot shelf. Well who's really digging into. What big using who's really going to know you know. People are too lazy to dig beyond that surface level. So seems a pretty strategic. I would say very strategic and and aimed you know. Of course it appeasing investors investors have been very angry with bear For buying monsanto and there have been several investor lawsuits and they've tried to topple management at bear. You know the stock price has really suffered Bears lost a lot of market capitalization because of its acquisition of monsanto. And and these you know this rate train of litigation it's been threatening to run the company down The investors have been very unhappy so It's been deemed one of the worst corporate acquisitions in history. Yeah that's one of the silver linings to me of all. These multinational corporations swallowing each other up. Is that the ones that remain. Have to pay for the crimes of the ones they absorbed and it seems like a pretty heavy burden to bear in a real domino effect. That can happen so happy accidents. And i'm happy to see it. Continue if they wanna keep monopolizing everything and swallowing up more and more stuff to the. We just have one big corporation. Good luck because you're gonna have to pay out a lotta people for a lot of unrelated incidents from all the other companies that you bought up and before we really close us out. We got to save a little time to talk about. Us right to know. Tell the people what you guys are doing over there because if we're looking for solutions and we're looking for the right organizations to support. They should know a little bit about this one. Well yeah thank you for that part of this. Little tiny nonprofit were called. Us right to know us rt k. Dot org is the web site and we're not super splashy or super polished. But what we do. Is we file freedom of information act requests and state records act request and really are all about getting data getting documents and then putting them up on the website for free six. A lot of money sometimes gets these documents but putting them out there for public consumption for other journalists to us or policymakers or lawyers or advocacy groups. Anybody really who can benefit from this truthful information. That's often hard to get. And we know how to do it. I've had to sue the epa twice in the fda once my colleagues are very involved you in we get documents from universities around the country and state regulatory bodies. In cdc fda usda epa nih a lot of different organizations and groups use our documents and binding quite helpful when they're the basis stories in new york times in la ta. You know newspapers around the world actually have relied on our documents important stories so as were small. We rely on donations. We don't take any corporate money. We only take money from individuals foundations or not other nonprofits so we can use all the support can get. But i think it's good work. It's honorable work in. We're hoping it's helpful in some regard. Yes definitely and just so. People have a sense of the wider focus. What are some of the non glyphosate related issues that you guys have been covering while right now you know in addition to and it's not just glyphosate and we've looked at different pesticides. I'd do a lot of work on pesticides in every chemicals of course but right now we're looking at the covert issue you know and the origin issue and been focusing getting e mails from the different scientists who were involved in that and trying to track money flow and the different narratives that have been put out in sort of these subterfuge in the contradictions from public narrative. And then what was being discussed privately. And it's really. I mean. I think we can take some credit different news outlets of cited our work and our emails that we've obtained as you know driving the biden administration's called for an investigation into this origin. Question because it is important to understand gain of function research. That's going on that. Our government is funded that's going on in laboratories around the world to make viruses more violent and understand what that means. There have been lab leaks. That have been documented around the world. It's important to understand what we're doing what we're funding and what that means for public health and if this was a lab leak in some regard would be important to know that right so that maybe we can help. Make sure it doesn't happen again in some way. And we've done a lot of work with cdc documents and shown how cdc is unfortunately has very powerful connections to very powerful companies like coca cola and other food beverage interests that influence.

cancer epa alvin albert us supreme court monsanto johnson la ta fda california cdc biden administration new york times coca cola
"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

07:43 min | 10 months ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"These days. Wouldn't it have been nice. If at some point we had at least tried restore some faith in our corporate rate at institutions because when our politicians and media companies are reduced a pr mouthpieces for industry. Giants the inmates truly are running the asylum regulators. Today do more to protect the profits of the big multinational corporations than they do to truly investigate on behalf of the people and rarely. Do you find any major news source saying anything to conflict with those profits. Either it creates a world where you really can't trust anything from weed killer and water quality to cigarette cellphones and pharmaceuticals. Many of us. Have a feeling that there might be more risks and consequences to these things than we realize. But who's doing the real investigating who's asking the critical questions. Well they can feel few and far between but when it comes to monsanto roundup and quite say today we have one of the premier critical question asker dedicated investigative journalists carry gillam carry a spent thirty years covering corporate america at the last twenty years focused on food agriculture pesticides. She's written great books on the subject entitled whitewash the story of a weed killer cancer and the corruption of science and most recently the monsanto papers deadly secrets corporate corruption and one man's search for justice. She spent seventeen years with reuters and his now research director for us. Right to know an investigative nonprofit focused on public health issues and it is a pleasure to have her with us. The weed killer critic from kansas the big agriculture agitator and investigative journalist extraordinaire kerry gillam. Welcome to the higher side. My gosh thank you for that introduction. Thanks for having me. Of course it is a true pleasure to have you here. Thanks for doing it. Whitewash has been on my shelf for a couple of years now. And when i saw the monsanto papers coming out i thought it would be a great opportunity because you really are dedicated to this space in super knowledgeable about our corporate pesticide dependent food system and few people really dive into one thing. Like this for as long as you have. What kicked this all off and kept you engaged with it as long as you have been. Well yes thank you. That's a question. A lot of people ask me. I guess it was not by design. I was working at atlanta covering big bank holding companies and reuters the international news outlet where i spent most of my career asked me to move to kansas and start covering food and farming and these really interesting novel. Crops that monsanto had just rolled out genetically engineered crops or gmo's and this was in the late nineteen nineties. And i thought it was a really terrible idea. I didn't really want to trade my blue business suit and high heels and nice lunches with powerful business people for boots and jeans and hanging out in farm fields but made the move anyway and you know really dug in so to speak and yeah this has become my work and also my passion. I guess for more than twenty years now And i've heard you talk about that initial assignment before and it's interesting to hear how big companies like monsanto handle journalist. It seems like they love to roll out the pr machine. I give you a nice tour of the facility. All very surface level but if a journalist actually does stray from their talking points then they get very vicious. Very fast right. Yeah i mean so this is what happens when you are a journalist and particularly if you work for a very big news outlet in influential news outlet the company that you're covering and writing about or organizations or institutions or the white house. I mean want to woo. They want to teach you so to speak the way to cover them and they really want to direct the narrative. And you know that's to be expected right and so yes. Monsanto and other companies that were working in the agricultural space very big seed and chemical companies invited me in and i've spent a lot of time at dow dupont on santos headquarters in saint louis with their top executives and they really did spend a lot of time trying to teach me the ropes and i really appreciated that. Because i didn't have a very had really no background whatsoever. Uncovering crops and chemicals in agriculture in the environment so there was quite a learning curve. And it's important to understand the corporate perspective. Obviously but as a journalist you need to understand the bigger picture and so i also made it my priority to spend a lot of time with farmers and with scientists and with you know people involved in grain handling and distribution and people involved in environmental work to understand how the crops and chemicals were impacting water quality and air and soil health and biodiversity. So you really are trying to understand this from all facets perspectives. And you're right. As i learned more and came to understand that everything wasn't just completely you know rosie fabulous wonderful. As the corporations tried to tell us they became quite unhappy with my reporting and the farther i strayed from. I guess just parroting their propaganda the more they tried to discredit me. Harass me harass. My editors It you know in the late. Gosh well twenty. Twelve thirteen twenty. Fourteen really intensified. In of course. This was around the time when there was a big push to get. Gmo labeling in the united states and there was a big push to look harder at this chemical licey which is part of monsanto's roundup herbicides and actually has become or is the most widely used herbicides chemical in the world and there was so much science that had come to bear showing that there was real harm associated with this widespread use of this chemical and i had been writing a lot about that in. Yeah i came under quite a bit of attack. And i'm sure of your listeners. Google my name. They might find some pretty astonishingly awful things written about me. We've learned through litigation and discovery that monsanto had put together several strategies and plans to try to discredit me including google search engine optimization manipulation so that people who would search for my name would get directed to sites that santo controlled so very interesting journey. It's fin certainly absolutely. That is something that i think can't be overstated that it's all about narrative control and they don't actually address a lot of the science that's being presented directly. It's more about well. How can we engage in character assassination. And i have heard you mention a previous interview. I think a detractors for higher website as an example of one of those fake websites that kind of present you as like. I make my money shitting on thin. So hire me and i'll do what you need done. That's kind of how they make the perception look like you're just out to get these poor.

monsanto gillam weed killer cancer kerry gillam reuters kansas dow dupont santos headquarters Giants united states atlanta Monsanto saint louis white house rosie Google
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"But you don't hear that side illuminated you hear the side eliminated that we need to get everybody vaccinated You know that's the only way to solve this so nuance very few things. Were black and white. There's a lot of grey And that's where the truth often lies sort of maybe somewhere in the middle sometimes But when yeah when media refuses to explore that refuses to ask questions refuses to do their due diligence and do their job you. I don't know where we had. As i said it's too scary to contemplate. I know well. I'm glad you're out there. I'm glad you're continuing to just do your work and expose this and this great book the monsanto papers which i think is important to sort of see how this story plays out because i think that that's what people don't understand we just here well this product's dangerous or that products dangerous but it's really important to see how these products get to where they do. What is the process. What did they know. When did they know it said to actually sort of put that story. And and and dwayne johnson a hero that you know really stepped up and decided to use his story to try and wake up the world to what monsanto was doing. It's still in our food. It's still out there so it's such an important issue for people to wrap their heads around because this is not just you. This is your children. This is your future grandchildren. And we don't even know what some of these chemicals are doing to that sort of longevity and and you know what is the epa genetic response so many things are so important so Inclosing you know what is it. You'd like to leave with our audience you know thinking about. You've summed up well and it you know in my first book because they said it was really written. You know as a science book. This book is really written as people. Look and i hope that it resonates as a story about one man struggling trying to make a good living trying take care of his family and being stricken with cancer That you know. The evidence says it was was caused by this giant corporate actor and You know how he worked to hold him to account and how a company responded and how. He's just struggling to live. You know this is a human story and that's what it all boils down to. So i appreciate you you talking about the book and bring me on absolutely danke pre work. Everybody go check out. Us right to know that you as rt k. dot org please donate. Please help carry continue to do this. Really important work. And i wanna thank you for staying true to journalism You're a beacon of light and hope. And i hope that young journalists out there start recognizing what true heroes look like. That's what we grew up with that you know the woodward and bernstein is the one that didn't say no and didn't listen to know even when everyone else was against them That's what this game is about. That's what makes it exciting. And i'm glad you are still in it. Thank you thank you you too if you like that clip. That'd be sure to check out our live broadcast of the high wire every thursday morning at eleven. Am pacific time you can watch it on. I tunes end twitter we'll see..

monsanto dwayne johnson epa cancer woodward bernstein twitter
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Choose for your health you know. And and secondly it's it's voting. You know it's being involved in the political process and it's foreseen candidates and others to to answer questions about food. We talk about foreign policy. We hardly ever hear people talking about food policy right. We're all interested in you. Know all of these other issues which are important. Certainly but what is more fundamental to our health and our future Then food we all eat. We all have that in common and we all need our food to be healthy to be accessible. We need to protect the environment. Where food is grown right so That to me seems to be such a glaring Deficit in our world that when we are talking to candidates or being interviewed they're never asked about food policy. Where do you stand on this. Where do you stand on regenerative agriculture. Where do you stand on. you know. Heavy pervasive pesticide. Use and this pesticide. Treadmill is developing so. I think that's a really important issue. And what you've talked about here asking questions. You know this to me as become a real concern. Because we're seeing the censorship in the efforts to harass an attack in silence that we see in the corporate world where they try to silence journalists or scientists such as myself. You others New new york times pulitzer prize. Winning reporters have been harassed for trying to report on issues the run afoul of corporate profit in corporate agenda. And you're seeing. I just think we're seeing more. And more of that. With the shutdown the social media that is shutting down people's access to twitter facebook or whatever it may be because the ideas are questions being raised don't fit for a government narrative of government propaganda Agenda and the media. I angry lot of my former colleagues in reuters and others over this last year because he he didn't see mainstream media asking questions. You didn't see in of balanced reporting about you know these scientists. Tell us this you know vow chases this or the government but we have other scientists over here. Were telling us this and this lab league issue. I don't know starting in a lab you know. Obviously i think it's important that we find out. Because did you know we need to figure out why. And how and how to make sure it doesn't happen again or try to but the mere fact that journalists wouldn't consider that wouldn't ask hard questions they just took this propaganda that our government was pushing out and certain scientists who had alliances to the wuhan land. they just took all of this in regurgitated and if anybody dared to raise a hand and say hey maybe we should look harder at that. They're labeled conspiracy. Theories are taken off twitter. Or wherever and that. I mean that's a whole new level of really scary stuff if we are being told that we can't even ask questions and the journalist are not doing their jobs It's like weapons of mass destruction in iraq. You know. just just tell you. Tell your readers with the government wants you to tell him so you know i. I don't know where we go from here. But i think it's a whole new level of of scary and we need to keep asking those questions and people need to demand answers. I think you're right in the also demanded from newspapers in the places that they go for their information. Because you know one of the things. I think that's scary. Is you know in many ways. People have their waking up to this monsanto issue so you were attacked by a company for many of the things that you wrote but you also i would think as a journalist. Correct me if i'm wrong but you still felt you lived in a world where journalists did do hard hitting stories in did do investigative journalism and now that feels like. It's almost all but dead. I mean when you just see how easily every mainstream paper and every mainstream news agency will take the experts word for it. I mean i. that's what i said. I was being interviewed by the new york times. You know a couple of months ago. And i said the only difference between you and is i actually read the science. I don't think my job as a journalist is to have an expert. Tell me their opinion right. That and say there is the problem solved. Or there's your answer. I say to the expert. Will you please provide me with the studies you're talking about. I wanna read where you come up with that opinion. Let me read those studies. And i said to this journalist. I said you haven't read the studies and she said well. That's that's awfully preposterous of you to say that i said no. I'm positive because you seem like an intelligent person. And if you had read the studies i read. You would be on my side in this conversation and asking important questions. But instead you're just taking experts word for deep i mean that'd be like that's the death of journalism. Is this idea that somehow an expert is the answer. An expert is just an opinion. At least that's what. I was raised to believe in journalism. They're our backs and experts reference. To back where are the facts coming from. We seem to live in an age. Where facts don't seem to matter to anybody in journalism so is journalism all but debt and i think we talk about experts. Right you also have to add. The layer of we'll who's expert is who declared this person an expert and certainly when you have an issue as new and sort of uncertain and divisive as covert in the pandemic unique to look beyond the expert. That is sort of just handed to you on a silver platter. And there there were experts on coveted the pandemic who had a whole array of us and still do about the the one lab about this risk reward balance it. We're trying to shut down the economy to not children need to be vaccinated or adults to children. You know you saw that play out at the most recent fda meeting hearing which you probably listen to but you know there were scientists. There were saying this was the discussion about giving the vaccine running trials and giving to young children and they were saying we we think the risk outweighs the benefit for these very young children There are experts. Certainly they were brought to to speak to the fda..

New new york times twitter reuters facebook monsanto iraq the new york times government fda
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

10:06 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"From the food and the things that we're eating and taking in paraquat tell me a little bit about that. I did read this headline. You know about parkinson's What does the science behind. Is it. Pretty solid i mean. Do you think these cases are going to move forward. I mean that's scary. I don't think anyone wants to To end up with parkinson's from food that they're right so i didn't write this book but you're you're asking me about the science this is written by a couple sort of world renowned Urologists people who studied parkinson's and they make very clear case yes. Paraquat is very definitively. There's robust research that shows that it is a causal factor for parkinson's disease and You know there are numerous other studies as well out there that connect the two. So what you're seeing again is. Paraquat isn't a weed killer that was on the market even before glasses safe Was it's been used for over fifty years but it's known to be very very very toxic on an acute basis. A kid kills weeds. Great it kills people just as fast. So if you get a tiny bit of this in your tongue for some reason you're going to be dead and seven to ten days. The epa acknowledges this they have a big website one sip. Ken kill skull-and-crossbones on the label for paraquat So that is all known acknowledged but what the company denies certainly is that there is also link on a chronic exposure bases to parkinson's disease or other health problems. And so that's what this litigation is all about and You know being lawyers the plaintiff's lawyers say they have again internal documents that that show that the company was aware of the risks and the dangers and hid that risk so the company denies that you know we haven't had a trial yet. We haven't gotten all out in the open so but it's something definitely. We need to pay attention to the were paying attention to i struggle with this. I was just i interviewed ron paul recently and just was asking him about you know he's obviously sort of the godfather. I guess of the libertarian movement. I consider myself now politically marooned. I was once a democrat. Because i was an environmentalist and now i just feel like all carbon taxing in these things. Don't really lean to a cleaner environment. They don't really clean up. The earth interviewed Doctors act bush. Who i think really brings some profound focus on farming and that our global warming issue really the greatest contributor is farming and not because cows farting out in the field. But because we've actually sprayed so much of these chemicals on the earth all around the planet that all of the by on the microbiome of the earth not alive. It's not absorbing. Co two the way it's supposed to. He talks about if we went back to organic farming and could just turn these. You know the earth as you said cover crops and getting life back into the dirt on this planet the doubt absorb you know most of the the the co two. That we you know would shows to be Causing global warming. You know no no matter where anyone's add on that my issue is this is that you know as a democrat. I really i don't mean to be. We're not going to get political. Don't worry you know. I know that we all have to be careful about that. But just the idea of regulatory agencies. I mean i've always you know. I grew up thinking we really need regulatory agencies right there what keep some coal mine from dumping sludge into a river and poisoning the people you know downriver you know we we've all heard the stories of cancer and products you know nuclear plants all of this and so we thought regulatory agencies you know are so important yet. I was just thinking yesterday as i was thinking about talking to you for every river. That maybe the epa has decided to help clean up. It seems that we've approved five to ten products that are going to go on our food and in our water and everything that we're going to be putting in our bodies every single day and it's not just one town being poisoned. We're talking about everybody in this country. What what happened you know do regulatory agencies do any good for us anymore because it seems to me as we see in these emails when you can see. You can't sue on back. Sees so god knows what arm is doing to us with vaccines. But you can sue in these food products. And we see this. Sort of connection with epa we see them outwardly. The epa helping hiding issues. We've seen this with fda and i keep saying watch presidents from both parties. You know we'll go ahead and put you know x. Lawyers from monsanto is head of fda or in positions at fda epa's got exxon and mobil all over it and the cdc is filled with to nope event this and merck employees that move over. Then you know. Is there a point where we just say journalists. Let's just blow up all the regulatory agencies because it seems to me doing the opposite of what they're supposed to be doing. They're trying to outlaw. Natural food and outlaw you know vitamins and things become a way sort of hit man for the mob mentality of these industries that are poisoning us. Why can't i guess the question. Why can't the at the age of say you know what enough is enough billions of dollars in multiple cases. This stuff causes cancer. It's off the shelves. Gosh i don't know. I guess i'm not with young blown up the federal agency but i do see yes. I mean there is example. After example i just was asked to write a chapter for a textbook About the epa sort of its history regulation. And i i was shocked. You know what i found. I knew about the last decade or two sort of corruption collusion about overriding their own scientists with respect to certain pesticides but all sorts of others. The goes back to win. The pa was even for started. And what you see. Time and time again is that the scientists within epa sort of the veterans. Staffers of the folks who are really working to do the job of protecting the environment and protecting public health seemed to devoted to the mission and they seem to want to do good science and have no problem challenging corporate narrative or raising a red flag about chemical. But what happens to them in you yacht. Gone through. epa archives and talk to people and interview people there What happens is so often than they get. Shut down or their paper gets censored or it gets so heavily edited You know by people in the agency higher up the food chain that the points that they need to make don't get made you know. I have so many examples to stephen personally of scientists who i've interviewed and They've been too afraid to go on the record or one of them to. I interview years ago about this. Visit the agency. Call me the. Usda this was usda and they were going to fire this guy for talking to me. It was crazy and Just just not too long ago. I got a call from another foreign. Usda scientists to sit. He'd retired and now he could actually speak freely and could actually talk to me about things he learned. Fda is well scientists in the fda have contacted me and sent me documents But they have to do it secretly because They can't speak out in and these documents about public health. You know about an so. Yeah and i but i think the solution. Isn't you know to just get rid of these regulatory agencies. But i think the solution probably is to change the way that money you know. Play such a role in washington and that money influences you know who was appointed to these federal agencies political appointees. A certainly is. A is a bipartisan problem. That we have that comes down to power and wealth and how that plays in washington and how it affects our our regulatory agencies because we have political appointees at the top. It doesn't really matter if you have really good. Scientists inside the agency if these political appointees are going to be doing the bidding of the corporate actors. How do we change it. What is it. What is the you know people watching this that. We feel so powerless as we see our food supplies contaminated. We know. we're trying to eat. Organic what is you know what would be the message to our audience. That i think are waking up. I think that we are in an incredible time now. in the world. I think that there is real questions now. Being focused on you know whether it's because tony she is just whipped blob so many times on issues that are directly affecting our lives. I think we are starting to ask questions. You know across this country cross the world so as a society starts to wake up and starts to ask appropriate questions m. I really being protected by these. You know regulatory agencies Can i trust these industries. That are the biggest industries these giant bag and chemical companies As we're waking up what is it we can do. It'd be most effective to sort of dennis to that. Promise land that. I know you must dream. We dream of of a place where you know. Truly health like health actually matters and differences are made by regulatory agencies and that companies realized they can make just as much money by putting out good products as putting out toxic and dangerous ones. How do we get there. I think it's two fold number one voting with your pocketbook as you said making informed decisions when you buy your food or you buy other products and choose wisely..

parkinson's disease epa Ken kill fda parkinson ron paul cancer mobil monsanto exxon bush Usda merck cdc usda washington stephen Fda tony dennis
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"We need a better understanding of the risks that come with industrial agriculture and all of this is critical not just to us in our generation but to our kids and their kids and their kids and i. I don't think it's any accident. You know that we saw so many people suffer from colfax you know from this pandemic. i think we are sick. In getting sicker and sicker and our top scientists in our country and around the world tell us environmental toxins environmental contaminants pesticides and other chemical compounds that we are exposed to in our food and our water in our air are making us incredibly sick cancer and other disease infertility reproductive problems. You know we can do something about this if we care. And if we educate ourselves and take action But if we don't then we leave very sad and sorry future for our kids. A jesse jackson was reporting. On the fact that there's been multiple attempts to sort of give one large payout by bear to just sort of buy out or buy off the rest of these lawsuits so they don't have to just keep going through this and they're losing in court. The courts keeps saying no. These cases are going forward. Which is starting this conversation that there's the potential that monsanto mbare may back away from glide beside and you know eventually. Pull it from the shelves. Should we be jumping up and down for joy or should we just recognize that. There's just another probably equally as deadly product. That's going to jump right into its place or are we seeing a shift in the thinking around agriculture. Or is it just business as usual once one. You know one product goes down. Something else is going to pop up. Yeah i think. I think the ladder yes. Bear has said bear which bought one. Monsanto in two thousand eighteen has said that because of this litigation one thing it might do is remove glyphosate products from residential us not from agricultural use though so this would still be used in farming. We would still have the residues. In the food you'd still have that level of exposure But again yeah it is. The white must weigh lease site in the world. But certainly you're seeing the rise of others you seeing dot cambe into 4-d use of those crow as glyphosate becomes less effective is becoming less effective. Because we've used it so much in In the fields. So you know again. I think it's a. It's a larger picture you know. It's bigger than one chemical. It's bigger than one company Certainly glyphosate monsanto is a good poster child for this problem and we need a better understanding of the risks. The company though is still you know still after losing three out of three trials Agreed to paddle seven billion dollars to settle litigation. Just in the united states accompany still seeking new authorization in europe For glyphosate products and pushing forward and still denies that there's any link to cancer it's absolutely astounding that that that would be the case. And so you know as we move forward you say you know what i see organic food now in walmart the other day i just happened to be in a wall mortar target and i think these places you know i think. It's sort of that sort of libertarian value. Which is the market is. What really changes everything. And once there's a demand you see a change. And i do see this clearly. Demand in a much broader audience to be eating organic. Is that putting any pressure at all. on these industries. I mean i think about things. Like michelob is is ultras now in organic beer things. I never thought i'd see really feels good like wow. We do seem to be. Evolving is using those products as staying organic buying beers at organic or wines. Does that is that and does that. Have any effect on you know the overall market. I would say so. I mean i'm not an expert. Obviously in that sort of thing. But just what i see in people i talked to a you know for instance as people became more aware of the desiccation of wheat. You know that. The farmers were spraying glyphosate on which rowley before harvest. And they were worried about the residues That trickled down or up. However you wanna say it to grain handlers you know millers and they started saying north american canada. We're not gonna take your oats or when i could take your wheat If you spray it directly with glyphosate. I've talked to do grain handlers. Who have put that in their contracts with farmers because they realize and they hear the noise and they hear the calls from consumers who are buying organic or non. Gmo who are saying. We don't want this in our food. You know listen to us. Pay attention so those market dynamics and that you know vote with your pocketbook or you know making those choices does have an impact higher up. The food chain in new are seeing our. Usda a start to acknowledge a little bit. You know maybe we need more regenerative act cultural practices. We need to Support the use of cover crops and other other techniques. That sort of farmers forgot about or.

monsanto mbare Monsanto colfax jesse jackson cancer michelob walmart europe united states rowley canada Usda
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

09:26 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Know. five disease is a problem. Bring us some technology that will help us with disease. And what i saw was monsanto. Continue to tell these speakers. no no. we're not going to give you what you want. We're going to give you what we say you want and you need and that really clicked through me This is not about feeding the world. This is not about farmers this is about selling more roundup herbicide rain and selling specifically a patented unlicensed seeds and the stories that i wrote contributed to on santa's decision to to shelve around the pretty wheat to pull it back into not bring it to market But what they did instead was market roundup to be sprayed directly on wheat crops. That hadn't been genetically engineered but to spray shortly before harvest to dry it out make harvest easier more efficient for farmers and what you see with. We as well as with these other genetically engineered crops. That's that's become a real concern. Is the residues of this. Irv aside then are in the finished foods and so. I've talked to plenty of professors and academics who study for instance. You know wheat and look at flower samples. They flower samples and found high levels of glyphosate weedkiller in flour and bread and crackers and cereals and So this is as this has become more widely used. It's become More more of something that we're exposed to in our diet or water and we find it now in urine scientists minded urine blood serum Become ubiquitous and so your book the monsanto papers what are the monsanto papers some this is just fascinated so my first book whitewash which you and i talked about a few years ago. That was really all about the science and showing what the wide use of this. This is the most widely used oversight now the world because monsanto has pushed it in this way monsanto now owned by there and so white roger totally right there before i forget we've heard i've heard different numbers at eighty percent of our crops in america. Ninety percent what when we think about this herbicides being sprayed what percentage of our crops in america really are sort of being sprayed with this product. I don't know that. I would know that number because there are hundreds of different crops but if you look at the main crops that we grow here sweden's and corn it's it's upwards of ninety percent of our savings weren't that That are designed to be used with us in in heavy into cotton as well and other crops But of course we grow vegetables and fruits and all that sort of thing. It is important to note though that glyphosate is used not only with genetically engineered crops neglected stated used in fields grote in orchards and vineyards and not choose to watermelons almonds is not sprayed directly on them. But it sprayed on fields killed leads. And so you still have those residues that are apparent so the the next book the monsanto papers is really about this very first trial. that Monsanto when monsanto was brought into court by this california groundskeeper who developed non hodgkin lymphoma and was told the at eighteen months left to live. And it's a story about cancer and his struggle to survive and to deal with with this very painful type of cancer that he had and also at the same time to say. I'm going to be the first person to take monsanto to court. And the team of lawyers that used monsanto's own internal documents to show them to the world at this very first trial and to expose a lot of really deeply held secrets that monsanto tried to keep from from the world scene And that trial and how that played out and it's written more like a legal thriller sort of a dramatic story but it's all true. It's all true when you look at those papers. What are the most shocking details. And i and. I think you know this is a product. That's made it through the fda in fact the last time you were on the fda had said now that monsanto was losing these multibillion dollar lawsuits like the one in your book of dwayne johnson That they were going to sort of investigate. Our food supply and start testing for quite vegetate and then all of a sudden it was like this about face where they just flip flop and said actually. We don't really know how we'd be able to test the food products and so we're not gonna do it or we don't know what the i forget. What it was. We just don't know how to measure it. And so the fda just bailed out on actually letting america know how much of this stuff was in their food so when you look at these papers you know what was it that stood out. And do you think. The fda epa New these things or or did monsanto truly hide it from the world and even regulators. There's so many different things. And i think the answer is both i mean there. There's evidence within these internal documents that we call the monsanto papers. There were millions of pages by the way the monsanto had turnover because of the court action that they had to turn over to plaintiffs attorneys You see in many cases where they appear to be colluding with the epa or they are talking to the epa about trying to help shutdown another investigation of glyphosate another federal agency. Wanted to do wanted to look at the toxicity. And monsanto didn't want them to do that and they go to the epa some top officials and say. Can you help us. I knew see those. Epa officials jump to help monsanto uc. Monsanto talk about one epa official in particular as a friend a real friend who can help in the defense of glyphosate so you you see that closeness and perhaps collusion or collaboration with the epa but you then also see a whole array of tactics that they used that were designed to deceive three buddy regulators. Lawmakers consumers farmers Ghost writing scientific studies where they talk about it and they use the word ghost. Write ghost wrote ghost written You see that in many different examples of papers where they want to defend glyphosate they wanna say doesn't cause cancer They want but they don't want it to look like it comes from monsanto because they think people might doubt the credibility people might think that they're biased in so they wanted to look like these scientific papers or coming from independent scientists and so they set about pain. Scientists having the papers written getting them placed in prominent journals. You know all of that is revealed in their own internal discussions. And it's really shocking. And it's frightening to see how this goes on and how it does affect our understanding of science and safety With these products. When i mean as a journalist doing an investigation like this how do you eat now. I mean what is it. How is this affected you directly or are you just paranoid to touch anything. I mean i eat only organic food mostly that we buy our house but every time i eat out i think you know i'm really not paying attention. I doubt this restaurant is i mean. There's the occasional organic restaurant but most of us especially if you travel you're eating in restaurants you know how is it. How does it affect you. Are you thinking how much of this is in your body and do you do special things to get around it. What what do you tell your friends to do right. Well sure and we have to. We have to make the point. The glyphosate is only one of many agrochemicals right agricultural pesticides that are used in conjunction with food production the most recent food and drug administration. Fda report on pesticide residues shows that they fda found two hundred twelve different pesticides in the thousands of food samples that they examined. They do this every year You know neuro-toxins Insecticides or the very top of the list of the most frequently found pesticides glyphosate is right in there. Corpora foss which is known to be damaging. Children's brains is right in there So we are. If you're eating a conventional diet or probably consuming the residues of you know dozens of different pesticides on a regular basis. So yeah i mean. I try to avoid processed foods i try to avoid conventionally grown foods. I try to eat organic when possible. We have a milkman literally until livers nelken bottles to our door because we're fortunate enough to be near you know a a farm that does that sort of thing and have our aches delivered but everybody can't do that So yeah you can make a decision on your on your on a personal level of how you want to eat and feed your family. But i really think it's just critical that we look at larger food policy issues. And what are we want to support. What are the policies. Do we want to support conventional agriculture than we know. Science shows is not only damaging to our health on a long-term basis but to environmental health to pollinators to the quality of our water the.

monsanto epa fda america Irv cancer hodgkin lymphoma dwayne johnson santa roger sweden california Epa Corpora foss
"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"monsanto" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"The journalist and you're out there you have to get used to being attack well. There is another journalist out there that even before i was standing up and trying to be transparent and bring the truth. Put it all on the line. I'm talking about kerry gillam who has been deepening investigations of monsanto. She also was quoted at one time by the pharmaceutical industry to be a writer for them. She has the inside perspective. She's got a brand new book. Called the monsanto papers and it is my privilege and honor to be joined by her now. Carry. you are just such a superhero. I'm always psyched. When you call and say i've got something new to talk about. I'm just saying you're still doing it. Because with all the pressure and the attacks that i know that of come upon you. As as i've seen come on us sometimes you wonder is everyone. Got the gusts to keep on going. But you keep going you keep writing. Keep investigating so for people. My audience is probably a hundred times bigger than the last time we had you on the highway. So really quickly you know you actually were one of these journalists. That was you know. Farmer reached out and talked about like. Can we get you to write articles to explain how they wanted. Articles to to be written. Is that correct. It wasn't it didn't come down exactly like that. But what happened was monsanto and these other big companies dupont and syngenta. What they would do is really bring me into their headquarters. Sort of try to train me or educate me About their products in the practices and really try to direct the way that i wrote about them and to write positive articles about you know how they were going to feed the world and all the wonderful things that there chemicals and seeds meant for the world. Is this what they wanna do. And you know as i became More and more educated about the industry and covered this for reuters. News wire You know what. I was writing. Didn't dovetail with they wanted me right and That's when all the attacks really started on my reputation. Was it sort of. How did that ship go for you. Was it easy. We just right up front telling the truth or did you find yourself wanting to promote these companies thinking. I mean we all thought they were good right. I mean we do want to feed the world. We do want you know great products that are out there in farmers to be helped know. How did that transition happen was an immediate or did you was it accidental. What triggered you know. I so i started working for reuters in nineteen ninety eight and moved to kansas to i was assigned to cover food and farming. Big egg these cool new things that monsanto it just rolled out for farmers call genetically engineered crops right. Gmo seeds That were designed to be used with monsanto's roundup herbicide. And at the time. I didn't know much about agriculture. I was learning Learning the industry learning the beat. I spent a lot of time with farmers and certainly they loved this technology. It really made their lives a lot easier and help them control weeds in their fields. Much much better than some other Herbicides they've been using so you know as a reporter you're you're writing about him reporting on things and talking to people and learning and just doing your best to report things that that are true in meaningful in the world But as i became more knowledgeable and became more acquainted with the science and the environmental impacts as well as the human health impacts of this roundup ready system that really became pervasive in agriculture I started writing more about the the threats and the risks that came with this and it really and all of my work and i think yours and in all true journalists. You're trying to to illuminate facts. That may be harder to get at because these companies certainly are promoting their products. They're they're very loudly shouting to the world. The benefits But we also know is that they're trying often to cover up the the harm and the risk and it's really up to journalist provide that balance in that truth about the dangerous That maybe the companies don't want you to know about so just for those in my audience that are not aware of what a gmo crop and especially roundup ready crop with that means. I mean we all see the label. Now we'll see like non gmo. And try and rapper heads around. Does that mean organic. But really what is a roundup ready crop sure. So monsanto introduced these in the mid nineteen nineties and they had this wonderful irv aside. Roundup glyphosate is the active ingredient and these crops. Now we have beans and corn and cotton. Canola sugar beets alfalfa. That have all had their dna tweet. I in a way that they can be sprayed directly with this week killer and they will not die. They will tolerate it. They are glyphosate tolerant. Crops and so this is sort of the the leading form of technology When farmers talk about genetically engineered crops. We now have crops. That are also genetically engineered to tolerate being sprayed with other herbicides. Such as dead cambe or two four d and then there are crops that have been genetically altered so that they put out sort of a toxin to kill insects to replaces synthetic insecticide. That you might spray you. Make the plants themselves and insecticide of sorts. So these are really the things that we see the most when we talk about genetically engineered crops so basically you have a deadly poison. That should kill everything that grows out of the ground. They changed the dna of the plants. We want to eat so that we can pour this deadly poison over them and these plants live while everything else around them dies everything. The ground is and so. That's that's how that works. I mean it seems like for me you know logically. You would think if it kills everything. It's okay but i haven't been genetically modified to be able in this and in my body so so when When did it really get heated. So what was did you was there but you sort of pushed that really lit up monsanto or those that were sort of promoting this that they just didn't want that information out there well when they were trying to win. Monsanto was trying to roll out genetically engineered wheat roundup ready wheat. That could be against freight directly with this glyphosate herbicide. This was a real concern in farmers didn't want this. I was at meeting after meeting around the country. With these we growers who were meeting with monsanto and others and was very clear. They were worried. export markets didn't want this. They said they were going to not buy weet supplies from the united states. If there was a genetically engineered week that have been introduced to be sprayed with glyphosate farmers. Were pushing back and saying you know what round months and we don't need around the weekly weeds are not our problem. you know. five disease is a problem. Bring us some technology that will help us with disease. And what i saw was monsanto. Continue to tell these speakers. no no..

monsanto kerry gillam reuters syngenta dupont Farmer kansas united states
France Has ‘Overwhelming’ Responsibility for Rwanda Genocide

The World

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

France Has ‘Overwhelming’ Responsibility for Rwanda Genocide

"French failures, saying it was blind to the preparation of the massacres but has cleared it of complicity in the killings. Commission of experts said France poor overwhelming responsibilities in relation to the killing in 1994 off 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate who two's Monsanto. Claire is the historian who led the commission. The majority for says woman in politic it in politics. The French authorities pursued a policy that was totally disconnected from reality, a policy that bore the stigma of colonization and ultra ethicist policy that did not actually see that Rwanda could get out of it and basically accentuated the ethnic crisis aligned itself with the regime of president Habria manner. Which was a racist regime that did not succeed in extricating Habaniya manner from the extremists. United Nations says it has for the first time managed to reach to refugee camps

Commission Of Experts Monsanto Claire France President Habria Rwanda United Nations
Monster Hunter Rise on Nintendo Switch

Nintendo Power Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Monster Hunter Rise on Nintendo Switch

"First we're going to dig into the big monster. Hunter rise game for nintendo switch which launches on march twenty six. Now full disclosure. I'm just getting into the series myself with monster. Hunter is dying to learn more about the game from all of you expert. So mike and you're before we get into munster specifically. How would you describe the series. Maybe the basic gameplay to people. Who might not be as familiar with it serb so the way that i would take. This one is action. Rpg's series play it. Solo better played with friends. Go up on locally. Which you're going to be doing is taking down. Big mosser's variety weapons. Once you defeat those monsters the items of drops that you get will help you build new new weapons new armor and other items to help take on even bigger threats so a lot of battles lot of co-op and a lot of fun and i had a lot of fun playing with you guys and in the demo. Yesterday we took some time to run through a couple of the The missions and one of the things that jumps out to me right away as course you can just jump right in and start running with france and enjoying the game but there is a lot there. There's a lot of systems you know. It seems like the more you play it. The more you realize just how nuanced it is in the more there is freda to master. I guess definitely. It's a very easy to start like. Most aims swinging around a sword or shooting weapon but there's a lot of systems in there could be tricky but once you get the hang of the flow is fantastic. Yeah there's there's definitely a lot of depth to the combat in particular Yeah like mike said it's a it's an action. Rpg so equal parts of each side right so on rpg side. You're building out your character with With equipment but on the action side Yeah we're we're. We're definitely proud of the the work that our team in japan has put into this. Oh absolutely i know that. This series has a a huge kind of core following the of super fans and stepping. And i know that you've been one of them for quite a while. So what is it about this game. That air this series. That just really appeals to you. It's just one of the most rewarding games i've ever played. I typically at least you know historically really enjoy games for a story and world building an exploration and while that stuff is part of monster hunter. It really turned me onto playing games for skill in in a way that i hadn't really considered or thought i was interested in before because it really trains you to be super observant and pay attention to the monsters and really get a feel for what they're doing and how that's gonna affect your way of interacting with them and china strategize against taking them down because it really is super different with each one. It's not just how they move but they can do to you and how you can use the world to your advantage and things like that feel smart when you play yeah you know from my newbies perspective. When we tackled some of the the monsters yesterday it was a big encounter like that kind of becomes like a a prolonged boss fight right and like i came in there and i was just use pretty quickly. I was hacking slashing. And i was you know healing myself. I needed to but you know i was kind of watching you guys to give me some tips and you guys were approaching it. Especially depending on what happens. You took and what your strategies were from very different perspectives. And you guys. Were kind of thinking about a lot of things that i wasn't quite thinking about yet so But getting to monster hunter is specifically for nintendo switch. What are some of the new features that that people who have played past. Monsanto games can look forward to sure so going to that one year recovering another one but i will take the wire bug which is probably one of the bigger ones You know everyone can choose their weapon but everybody gets a wire bug. Essentially what this is going to let you do is traversed the stage a little bit easier. The element of verticality is definitely leveled. Up for muslim is experience so instead of being sort of a flat field or flat plane can run up walls. You can run up. Trees buildings really explore the environment to take in more find buffs and items so on and so forth You can also use combat too so every one of the fourteen weapons has different abilities using these Or sorry a silk fine skills as all To take down the monsters and essentially have different angles or different Yeah chances to take down the monster so you you really throw me off balance. They're thought you're going to go with the dog thing. Did you just just pund us with the balance. The dog one go for you. Yes oh so. It must rise. We have the the debut of of power. Sorry pal moods which are canine. Which now you can you can take them on On the hunt with you alongside. Previously almost games in the series. Let you take a cat. Feline companion so now the first time ever. We're bringing dogs in so doug doc. People rejoice function a little differently too. So the salom you can actually ride as sort of like a mountain get around faster. It's more offensive has a little little ninja daggers. In his mouth and weapons. That can help back while the pallet goes a little bit more supportive. It'll sort of leave. Healing wells around the map for you to help you out. Do other things too. It's really up to your choice but i really really really liked That's my favorite. It's going to be hard not to pick that.

Big Mosser Hunter Nintendo Mike Freda France Japan Monsanto China Doug Doc Salom
Woman Who Falsely Accused Black Teen of Stealing Phone at New York City Hotel Is Arrested

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

01:26 min | 1 year ago

Woman Who Falsely Accused Black Teen of Stealing Phone at New York City Hotel Is Arrested

"The woman seen on video, falsely accusing the son of a well known jazz musician of stealing her phone has now been arrested. Maya Ponsetto arrested on a fugitive warrant and held without bond in connection with this alleged assault on 14 year old Cheon Harold Jr in a New York City hotel. According to police. When Ventura County deputies attempted to pull Ponsetto over Thursday night, she refused to stop later pulling over at her home where Ventura County officials say she resisted deputies and had to be physically restrained. A day earlier, NYPD detectives flew to California to help locate the 22 year old who they've been seeking since last month when they say she falsely accused Harold of stealing her phone. Before surveillance video shows her chasing and wrestling with the team and his father, the family's attorney claims it is a case of bias. We were heard to be held accountable, so it was set a precedence. That when people falsely accused and racially profile our Children that they're accountable, Harold family says Monsanto's arrest is a good first step. But now they're asking for justice. I pray for I really do. Um, but in context All of the excuses that her attorney mate At this point, it's not even about apology anymore. It's about change. Onset of cell phone was later found by an uber driver and returned to her. The Herald family tells ABC News that Cheon Harold Jr has been in music therapy since the incident.

Maya Ponsetto Cheon Harold Jr Ventura County Ponsetto Harold Nypd New York City Wrestling California Monsanto The Herald Abc News
Simple, Online Land Transactions with Fabrica

Casual Fridays REI

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Simple, Online Land Transactions with Fabrica

"Have him. as we're getting close to christmas we have a nice little present for our guys and fabric has been on our radar for quite a while. because we i met early on with other co founder and their legal team. But they've been rolling out the project a quick glimpse into their website. I saw that our esteemed. Brian is actually a highly reviewing client of there. So it's yeah. It's nice to see that we're going to have a little tired of the family here casual fridays in but before that we we wanted to welcome to the show and thank you for joining us today. A high dustin. How thank you for having me the pleasure man so fabrica and i know the names kinda bounced around because you kind of have a new thing that you've brought to the land investing market. I want you to kind of give us a high level summary of what she'll do their absolutely so what we do is that we are essentially out to meeting. Most of the real estate transactions so we looked at how land investor war especially specifically in the land space and how we buy and sell properties and we looked at the process and so bad. It was super long fail. For sometimes it takes weeks to get the closing because of military's fingerprints record bandsaw and we have automated olivet into a simple tool that you can use a line to take care of all the transfer of title and financing as well. So hold on you just said you automated every pain point we have in the acquisition because we know how much you listen to our show. We have project one. We went out and we had multiple closings. That went ten thirteen twelve forever. Weeks seem like and you fixed all that. That's that's our goal. yes anyway are doing it. I would say that we currently out more on the south side Dan i'm a roadmap by country where focus on the south side so when you have property and you're selling it to to a buyer while like checkout solution for that process so now we just gave the high level overview. Tell us what you mean by that. So like how did you fix all of that. So let's say that you have just bought a property and you're putting it on the market. You can travel a website and out the property to your dashboard. Essentially we ask you just a couple of information like the piano but property and we set up as mole link for your like we provide you a link that you can connect all of these things out there so when you promote your property. It always has a link that allows the buyer to close the online so the buyer follows the lincoln. He connects his bank account when he pays the property gets transferred to him and that he's done without any pay for you or any other manual work. And if the buyer wants to pay using saturday financing you are able to to set up your own terms. So let's say a certain amount of monsanto sorta interest rate and we take care of servicing the whole payment plan. So you will just get them on in your bank account and at the end property will be transferred to the buyer. Well so i'm hearing. I'm hearing this and i i want to believe i really do. How do we do that without deeds and things like that. I know you've got some special sauce there. Yeah that's right justin so the system that we use is that when new other property to our system we create a small trust for that property so each property has its own trust you become the owner of its processed and appropriate his own by address so essentially you own the property through the trust and when abaya camps along and wants to buy the property. He's actually buying the trust the so the task is transferred to this person and that is a system that we use allows us to do everything digitally falling online. So that makes you the custodian so you act as the custodian of the trust for us dollar properties in a certain sense. Yes but the reality that the is fully in your name. so you are. You're the owner albatross. We are just giving you the tools to control it. Got you when you close with a trustee. You have to have notaries and all that or it's a good question so we have not the moment you are the property to the system so when when you begin and we do it online when possible in the states for dance for that so it's pretty smooth process and once the property is in the trust has no need for for notorious anymore so when that property gets transferred everything happens falling line and ninety. Two to three days relational process anymore. And then it's recorded county

Dustin Brian DAN Monsanto Lincoln Abaya Justin United States
Agriculture Industry Bets on Carbon as a New Cash Crop

WSJ What's News

05:52 min | 1 year ago

Agriculture Industry Bets on Carbon as a New Cash Crop

"The newest cash crop for farmers may be greenhouse gas some farmers who normally make their living raising crops in the soil are now getting paid to use those plans to capture carbon dioxide from the air and put it back in their fields. Big agricultural companies including bayer and cargill are jockeying startups. On these initiatives their goal is to incentivize farmers to adopt climate-friendly practices and developed markets for carbon for more on the story. We have jacob bungee who covers the agriculture industry for the wall street journal. He spoke with our charlie turner jacob. How exactly does this. Carbon capture system work. This is a system. That's based around voluntary offsets or credits. Being purchased by companies and these could be food companies. that could be an energy company. It could be tech company that says they want to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by some amount or achieve net zero emissions in one way that they're now going to be able to do. This is by effectively. Paying farmers who raise crops like corn and soybeans to manage their farms in such a way that the fields the soil captures carbon and stores it in the dirt and the reason for that is because plans grow. They withdraw carbon dioxide from the air. They use this in the process of photosynthesis to produce energy to grow In that process the plants then release carbon into the soil. there's no federal requirement for companies to offset their greenhouse gas emissions by buying credits from farmers. So why are companies interested in this over the last ten twenty years even longer you can see examples of consumer facing companies. Want be more sustainable and any number of reasons for this. I mean some of the have this. As part of their corporate mission as important to the founders in other cases it helps draw consumers to companies and and try to have more of a warm and fuzzy feeling by using their products or services. And so while there's no federal requirements for these companies to go and purchase carbon credits or or reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. There's a commercial incentive to do. So could you points with consumers it can be for all the the companies view. It could be the right thing to do. Farmers have long struggled with low crop. Prices how does this benefit them. Well the benefit for a farmer could be getting a check for doing this. This stuff that we talk about which for a lot of them is the type of thing that they're doing anyway to enrich their soil to get better crop yields for their typical crops and the end result is as we say is that farmers can potentially get paid for this. The company is a are pursuing. This we mentioned some of them. Bear the owner of the monsanto seed business a big agricultural company cargill one of the biggest traders of grain in the world. There's some startups pursuing. This and the idea here is that they can quantify how much carbon these farmers are are questioning in their fields with these practices a certain number of tons per acre they can be paid by the ton or paid by the acre for these practices. All these programs now are in their infancy. In some cases they're pilots and other cases they're meant to be long lasting things with just that the the first innings however the companies that are pursuing this as well as some of the farmers are hopeful that a demand from big companies that want to reduce their carbon footprint or be able to offset parts of their businesses. Might come into this market. Push up the prices for these credits. At the farmers are generating and then in turn produce more income for the farmers jacob. What do environmental activists say about offering credits for carbon capture. Well broadly speaking to the environmental community supports the basic idea. Here that if you manage farm in a more environmentally or climate-friendly way they can have an impact on carbon in the atmosphere and the way that these things are structured. They've got some questions. Some reservations One just in some sense being a philosophical one that if you are offering are making available to a polluting company a carbon offsets that reduces the the environmental groups fear that reduces the incentive for that polluting company to clean up its own operations can continue to function as it has been And pay farmers on the other side. And how does the incoming biden administration intend to approach these sorts of programs. Well tom vilsek. Who was an advisor to the biden campaign and now has been picked to potentially head the usda again. He led the the us department of agriculture during president obama's terms he's talked about putting federal. Usda conservation program funding behind this idea effectively using some conservation programs to incentivize farmers in the same way so the biden administration plans to to put the the federal emphasis behind this same exact idea

Charlie Turner Jacob Cargill Bayer Monsanto Seed The Wall Street Journal Jacob Biden Administration Tom Vilsek Us Department Of Agriculture Biden Barack Obama
The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:19 min | 2 years ago

The Unfortunate Casualties of an Anti-Biotech Attack

"Today is a really special podcast is an amazing guests that we have that takes us back to the time when the tenor towards genetic engineering was very different back around the turn of the Millennium I. Guess is the turn of the century two two. It was a little bit different field before the Internet really took over the defamation of scientists and career assassination, and those opposed to technology took on other means to solve their problems. At least to. Agitate and we'll talk about that today in an event from two thousand and one and we'll talk more about that in a second speaking with doctor, Toby Bradshaw A. He's a professor emeritus in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington and thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate you being toby. It's a pleasure to be here. Yeah this is really an interesting point in history and I remember when this happened. And in a kind of kind of fell into the background a little bit, but let's set the stage if we go back to two thousand and one. What kind of work were you doing in Merrill Hall at the University of Washington. Since the mid nineteen nineties, I have been working on the genetic adaptation and growth in hybrid poplars. They're fast growing tree. News all around the world, but heavily in the Pacific northwest up to produce. Hebrew products primarily so I was involved with. The early molecular genetics research, including M Gino Mapping. And ultimately identifying traits that were responsible for faster growth, which I had a basic interest in, but which of course the temp companies had a commercial innocent. And where you're working with genetic engineering, or were you really just dealing with hybrids myself? I was only producing hybrid poplars through traditional cross pollination methods that have been used for centuries in in poplars around the world I was also collaborating with Steve Strauss. At Oregon State University on some preliminary work to genetically engineered trees, four different growth form to produce more would in a smaller land area, but I myself had never still have never a genetically engineered a tree. And really the facility that you were working at. It isn't on the campus, right? It's it's the center for Urban Culture and what are the kinds of things that were being done there well. It is technically on the UW. Campuses at the very periphery separated from the main campus by the Union Bay Natural Area A place for I enjoyed bird every day on my walk to work, so that was a nice interlude. Of every day, but the other kinds of work that we're going on at the Center for Urban Horticulture included a restoration ecology primarily for wetland restoration, understanding a plant succession after the eruption of Mount Saint Helen's in nineteen eighty was conservation work for rare plants, going on so rare plants in Washington be propagated for reintroduction into the wild, and that was a particular focus of my colleague I'm single ride card who you will hear more about later and the graduate students in Undergrad who doing their own research, their work on a wide range of topics, including for example how to? Have, urban gardens produce more food for people who otherwise might not be able to afford a fresh vegetables, so it was. A typical horticulture center I, think it most universities where there was a mix of basic research applied research in outreach up to the public in the form of extension. And, so it doesn't sound like this was the you know the the center of the universe of Monsanto or something I mean this sounds like a really practical extension oriented center that had significant roles in community, and and and even just in the regional agriculture's that's. Is that more what it was about yes? Oh, the University of Washington is not a land grant university. It's not an agricultural school. School, in the focus at the UW has always been a basic research and the center. For urban horticulture included in its mission, some applied research and quite a bit of extension and outreach up to the public, so in that way it was different from much of the rest of campus in its mission, but by no means is the University of Washington on any kind of center for plant biotechnology now. It isn't now. Yeah. Good basic biology know basic science and a lot of really good plant people there, but it's Can you give me a little bit of sense? Outside the University of like two, thousand, zero, two, thousand and one, what was the environment like a genetic engineering in your perspective and in your area of the country? What was really happening? Then in that environment, it was an interesting time. The first genetically engineered crops that were planted on a wide scale, had only been in production for less than a decade, so as a relatively new technology on the commercial sector, perceiving though scientists and people who keep up with science for familiar with the progress of genetic engineering. How it was eventually applied in agriculture, get caught a lot of the general public by surprise, and as everyone who's familiar with plant biotechnology knows that can sometimes lead to misunderstandings. And worse at the the first inkling that I had that anyone might be opposed to the kinds of research that I was doing was just a couple of years before in nineteen, ninety nine, when Seattle hosted the World Trade Organization meetings and I had some of my. Poplars. That were growing in pots out in the back forty behind the. Urban Horticulture. Cut Down by vandals during those WTO protests mean. As often happened to these kinds of things at my mind. The damage done to my plants was fairly minimal. Because these are poplars. Cut Him off. They just re grow the we. That's how we actually propagate them through cutting, so it had zero effect on me, but at the same time they went through and cut down all of the older seedlings that a colleague of mine was growing for re, vegetating streamsides in Alder. Don't re sprout after being cut-backs. Again it was one of these ready fire. Aim moments for an activist who really didn't understand. Even the species of trees that they were looking at i. mean did a lot more damage to someone else's research than to mind we might. Research was essentially funded by the wall critics,

UW Urban Horticulture Center For Urban Horticulture Toby Bradshaw Oregon State University World Trade Organization University Of Alder Professor Washington Pacific Merrill Hall Department Of Biology Steve Strauss Union Bay Natural Area M Gino Mapping Mount Saint Helen Seattle
Bayer paying up to $10.9B to settle Monsanto weedkiller case

Guy Gordon

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Bayer paying up to $10.9B to settle Monsanto weedkiller case

"German pharmaceutical company Bayer says it's paying up to ten point nine billion dollars to settle a lawsuit over subsidiary Monsanto's weed killer roundup which has faced numerous lawsuits over claims of causes cancer beer said it was also paying up to one point two billion dollars to settle to further cases one involving P. C. B. N. water the company said the roundup settlement will bring closure to about seventy five percent of the current one hundred and twenty five thousand piled in on fly old claims the agreement is subject to a judge's

Bayer Monsanto P. C.
Bayer says it's paying up to $10.9 billion to settle a lawsuit over subsidiary Monsanto's weedkiller, PCB cases

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Bayer says it's paying up to $10.9 billion to settle a lawsuit over subsidiary Monsanto's weedkiller, PCB cases

"Waters Germany's Bayer agreed to settle U. S. lawsuits claiming that it's widely used weedkiller roundup cause cancer for as much as ten point nine billion dollars after more than a year of talks the German pharmaceutical giant will be paying almost eleven billion dollars to settle a lawsuit over subsidiary Monsanto's weed killer roundup which is facing numerous lawsuits over claims it cause cancer bear says will also be paying up to one point two two billion to settle future claims including one involving PCB in water the roundup settlement will bring closure to nearly three quarters of the current one hundred twenty five thousand filed an un filed

Germany Bayer Monsanto Cancer
How The Food Industry Manipulates Public Opinion, Science, And Government

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:40 min | 2 years ago

How The Food Industry Manipulates Public Opinion, Science, And Government

"Today. I want to talk about how the food industry many plays public opinion manipulate science. Manipulates the government. So here we go. Let's take on Science I. I mean who isn't confused about what to eat. And that's why I wrote my book action. But what's really going on is a concerted effort by the food industry that manipulates science. The government our government spends about one billion a year on nutrition research. The food industry spends twelve billion. And they find all kinds of concocted studies. That actually manipulate the truth. For example. I think Coca Cola. Spent one hundred twenty million dollars to universities and other groups to actually provide money money for research and guess what they funded three hundred eighty nine articles and one hundred sixty nine journals. Things like exercise. Is the key to weight. Loss at soda doesn't have any role in our way. The Snack Food Manufacturers Association groups that confections group funded studies that show the kids. We Candy Actually Lose More Weight and have less inflammation the kids who don't eat candy. I mean how does that even make sense? And when you look at the data I'm you know studies funded by the food. Industry Are Eight to fifty times more likely to show benefit? I studied for example on artificial sweeteners. Show that by the food industry that ninety nine percent they're safe and effective but about ninety plus percent of the studies but their independence show that they cause weight gain obesity. Damage the microbiome and definitely are not a healthy food and not good for dieting. So we have so much going on all the time in research I there was a there was a big review. For example by a group of scientists have looked at sugar recommendations it was published in the animal internal medicine which is one of the most important journals in medicine and yet it it shed very computing. Seems like there's no evidence for assure guidelines to reduce sugar that actually sugar is an harmful that our concerns are overstated in the data to support any limits on sugar in our diet. Well the study was funded by a group called the International Science Institute which sounds awesome but turns out is funded by none other than Coca Cola and Monsanto and Pepsi and all the big characters in the food industry so we're completely bamboozled by misinformation major journals and it confuses doctors nurses nutritionists computers the public and even in confuses policymakers. How do you make sense of all this? So you really have to follow the money so nutrition. Science corruption is huge. And it doesn't just stop there. He go onto fun all sorts of professional associations for example the American Diabetes Association the American Heart Association the Academy of Nutrition Dietetic which which receives forty percent of its funding from the food industry. They create a partnership with kraft singles. Calling it the smart slice of cheese you know which is crazy because it's not even cheese. Something has to be fifty one percent cheese to call it cheese so I'd say cheese like product or I don't even know what to call it. The government doesn't like to call cheese and that's called a heart healthy. Smart Snack is because they were funded by the food industry They are also corrupting their meetings. Their meetings and they provide all sorts of CO education so they have panels with makers of high fructose Corn Syrup and transfats an all kinds of crazy stuff and it just computers nutritionist. Because it seems like it's good science. They're very very good and they spend millions millions and billions on this so they corrupt all these organizations and and so Dr John Nine Ninety s as a professor at Stanford said. We shouldn't believe any recommendations coming out of professional societies that have conflicts of interest. I mean how does the American Heart Association can have fruit loops and twix cereals? Be Hard healthy when they're so full of sugar because they're low fat they get three hundred thousand dollars for putting that seal of approval so we have to be very cautious consumers. See Not just stop. With professional associations they also create front groups. Front groups are group's that actually seem like they're legitimate groups but actually are funded by the food industry or the Agan History of the oil industry. So you've got things like climate smart. Agriculture sounds wonderful. And I who's against that right but it's funded by the fertilizer companies who want to use more fertilizer and as we've talked about before fertilizer drives huge amounts of damage to the ecosystem uses tons of energy to produce damage our waterways at his huge contributor to climate change so Not so smart. In my opinion I see you've got then you've got the ways in which these companies also create corporate social responsibility and it's another mechanism. They used they. They fund groups that are social groups. It's called corporate social responsibility. And what did they find? They find the N. W. C. P. And they find the Hispanic preparation make money. And what does that do that makes them sort of loyal to them and a little bit and the it co ops them for example and there's a soda tax on the ballot. They actually will oppose a soda tax. Because they're funded by coca-cola or or the food industry or so makers is pretty pretty frightening. they also fun things like the hunger groups which which why they're so against limiting soda for snap or food stamps are we spent seven billion soda for the poor every year about thirty billion servings through our food stamp program how that make any sense. When we're trying to create a healthy population says all these insidious ways they caught these groups. I remember when I was showing fed up in Atlanta. I met with Bernice King. Martin Luther King's daughter and she wanted to the movie and the King Center instead of being nonviolent is also nonviolent yourself through how you take care of your health and she was all excited about it and I got a call later. We couldn't show the film there and I was like why and that was moving about obesity in the food industry said well because Coca Cola Funds King Center. It's pretty frightening And how they co op these groups And we also do all kinds of other nefarious things They besides the front groups besides sole told responsibility besides getting into our public health academies besides corrupting science. They're involved in terrible political efforts that are behind the scenes that manipulate public opinion for example. Now there's a couple of things that happened. One was an effort by the Grocery Manufacturers America which essentially was a representative now-disbanded thankfully that was representing the big food companies and they illegally got them to contribute to a slush fund to fight. Gmo labeling. Which would have cost those companies billions of dollars and fight it in Washington state and they pretended to sort of hide behind this this group. That wasn't actually disclosing the funding Attorney General Washington state figure this out and sued the grocery manufacturers of America for campaign finance violations and led to the biggest settlement. I think it was like fourteen or eighteen million dollars against them Yet the ballot passed to fight. Gmo labeling and they won they spent so much money but they got slapped a few million bucks. I mean they make millions of dollars. They don't really care. But after that a number of these companies actually you're standing up and doing good things and I think I see I see progress. I see change and that makes me happy for example Nestle's known Unilever and Mars Got Out of Jimmy at that point the grocery manufacturer America and they formed a sustainable food policy alliance which was a great idea. And I think it's exciting and we'll see what happens with that. Nomination hopefully work with him on my food fix campaign so so that was terrible and then of course even worse things eighty for example they create a ballot initiative in California which was to prohibit local governments from raisings local taxes unless there was a two thirds majority which would have crippled the governments in the local towns so they couldn't schools are departments police stations etc and They didn't care about that but they cared about was manipulating. The Governor Governor Jerry Brown is probably liberal governor. We had in America to put a preemptive policy that prevented any future taxes on soda. Junk food. Now think about that. I mean they literally strong armed the government by threatening them with a measure that would they spent seven million dollars promoting that would have crippled local governments and basically bribed to force the governor to create this preemptive law which is terrible so all of a sudden affairs ways that the food industries acting and we need to fight

Snack Food Manufacturers Assoc Coca Cola America American Heart Association Governor Governor Jerry Brown Bernice King Kraft Martin Luther King Coca Cola Funds King Center Atlanta Obesity Dr John American Diabetes Association W. C. P. International Science Institut
Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed by Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA for Help

Environment: NPR

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed by Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA for Help

"In some of the big farming states officials have become overwhelmed by complaints about a weed killer that farmers are using. The demand for enforcement is so high that these officials say they don't don't have time to think about anything else. Some of them argue the federal government should really just take this product off the market. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. For the past three summers the phones have been ringing like crazy. In the office of the Indiana state chemist farmers and homeowners were reporting a kind of chemical hit and run their soybean fields. Tomato plants looked sick with curled up leaves and they blamed pesticides from nearby farms. So Andy. Ross one of the field investigators had to jump in his car and head to the scene. It's sort of a mad rush at the beginning B.. Rush out you do the field work you take the pictures. You Take the samples. You get him back here back to the lab test S. those samples of leaves and Soil Pesticides Lab Supervisor Ping want says her people were overwhelmed to first issue. Was We quickly reach our maximum storage capacity. They had to buy more freezers store. The evidence there is not an inch of wall space left and their tests showed the same thing thing over and over Die Cam die campus herbicide for years ago the Federal Environmental Protection Agency approved a new use for it. Farmers now can spray special versions of camera right over some soybean varieties that are genetically engineered to tolerate it. The weeds die but these crops are fine. A lot of farmers love this technology and majority of also being planted in America. This past year. Were I can be tolerant others. Like Louis. Floor in Frankfort Indiana who's growing soybeans. That can't tolerate DOT Cambe. They think it's a plague. I had about an eighty acre field. That was whacked pretty hard with Cambe. He says it cut his harvest on those sakers by a third. That CAM has this problem. It does not always stay where it's sprayed on hot days. It can evaporate and drift across the landscape damaging other their plants and it's been happening on an enormous scale across the soybean farming belt from Minnesota in the north to Arkansas. In the south millions of acres of old old-style soybeans have been damaged also vineyards and orchards friendships of ended over this in one dispute between farmers in Arkansas one farmer shot and killed the other Louis Floor Nelson's neighboring farms as a potential threat and I just flat out tell people I've got a lawyer you know watching. What are your neighbors? Say to that they think it. It's up to state governments to investigate reports of pesticide drift. And figure out if anybody caused by breaking the rules but in Illinois the number number of complaints went from about one hundred twenty four years ago to over seven hundred in two thousand nineteen in Indiana went from about sixty two two hundred and Dave Scott. WHO's in charge of Indiana's pesticide inspections says everybody is overwhelmed? We're just running ourselves ragged. Just trying to get out there. Collect the evidence. It's also so frustrating. Field investigator Andy. Roth often sees dot can damage across entire fields. And he can't figure out where it came from WHO to hold accountable. Sundays you WPRO. Am I doing any good. Am I making an impact here or what might just spinning my wheels. Meanwhile because of Campbell the inspectors don't have time to do everything else else. They're supposed to do the check on. Pesticide uses at schools or golf courses or businesses. Leo read another. Indiana official is also president elect of the Association of American pesticide control officials. I think the most affected states would all agree that it's not acceptable to continue with this. The number of complaints. It's just not acceptable but the EPA reapproved Daikin but just a year ago before the two thousand nineteen growing season. It decided did the problem could be addressed with a few new restrictions on where that can be sprayed and more training for people who use it. I asked read about that. So what was the experience experienced in two thousand nineteen. Did it fix. The problem knows a matter of fact. A- The the complaint numbers went up in some states the numbers did go down but not necessarily because there was less damage. According to a survey of farmers in Missouri Eighty percent of them are not bothering to file formal complaints anymore. They I don't think does any good. Leo Read from the Office of the Indiana state chemist. Says he understands why you know. I've I've used the phrase die camper fatigue and it's very real thing another another possible sign of dicamba fatigue all but one of Missouri's eight pesticide inspectors left their job within the past year and a half Missouri officials said there was not any single reason for the rapid turnover but according to minutes of meetings between state pesticide enforcement agencies heavy workload and burn out was at least one reason last fall a group of state officials including Leo read had a conference call about Di Cambio with officials at the EPA. They had a question. The question is you are crinkled soybean leaves an unreasonable adverse effect. Because if if they are then. This product is federally miss branded if a product product is found to be miss branded than it can no longer be sold or used and EPA spokesperson said damage to plants can be an unreasonable adverse effect but it depends ends on the extent of the damage and on the benefits of spraying the pesticide. A lot of farmers don't want to give up those benefits nor does the company Bayer formerly Monsanto Santa which cells die camera herbicide and Campbell tolerant soybean and cotton seats. It's a billion dollar business at the end of two thousand twenty the EPA will have to decide ride once again whether to let farmers keep spraying. This Chemical Dan Charles N._p._R.

Indiana EPA Missouri LEO Dan Charles Louis Floor Nelson Andy Association Of American Pestic Cambe NPR Frankfort Arkansas Federal Environmental Protecti Supervisor America Ross Illinois Dave Scott Campbell Minnesota
Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Pesticide Police, Overwhelmed By Dicamba Complaints, Ask EPA For Help

"In some of the big farming states officials have become overwhelmed by complaints about a weed killer that farmers are using. The demand for enforcement is so high that these officials say they don't don't have time to think about anything else. Some of them argue the federal government should really just take this product off the market. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. For the past three summers the phones have been ringing like crazy. In the office of the Indiana state chemist farmers and homeowners were reporting a kind of chemical hit and run their soybean fields. Tomato plants looked sick with curled up leaves and they blamed pesticides from nearby farms. So Andy. Ross one of the field investigators had to jump in his car and head to the scene. It's sort of a mad rush at the beginning B.. Rush out you do the field work you take the pictures. You Take the samples. You get him back here back to the lab test S. those samples of leaves and Soil Pesticides Lab Supervisor Ping want says her people were overwhelmed to first issue. Was We quickly reach our maximum storage capacity. They had to buy more freezers store. The evidence there is not an inch of wall space left and their tests showed the same thing thing over and over Die Cam die campus herbicide for years ago the Federal Environmental Protection Agency approved a new use for it. Farmers now can spray special versions of camera right over some soybean varieties that are genetically engineered to tolerate it. The weeds die but these crops are fine. A lot of farmers love this technology and majority of also being planted in America. This past year. Were I can be tolerant others. Like Louis. Floor in Frankfort Indiana who's growing soybeans. That can't tolerate DOT Cambe. They think it's a plague. I had about an eighty acre field. That was whacked pretty hard with Cambe. He says it cut his harvest on those acres by a third. That CAM has this problem. It does not always stay where it's sprayed on hot days. It can evaporate and drift across the landscape damaging other their plants and it's been happening on an enormous scale across the soybean farming belt from Minnesota in the north to Arkansas. In the south millions of acres of old old-style soybeans have been damaged also vineyards and orchards friendships of ended over this in one dispute between farmers in Arkansas one farmer shot and killed the other Louis Floor Nelson's neighboring farms as a potential threat and I just flat out tell people I've got a lawyer you know watching. What are your neighbors? Say to that they think it. It's up to state governments to investigate reports of pesticide drift. And figure out if anybody caused by breaking the rules but in Illinois the number number of complaints went from about one hundred twenty four years ago to over seven hundred in two thousand nineteen in Indiana went from about sixty two two hundred and Dave Scott. WHO's in charge of Indiana's pesticide inspections says everybody is overwhelmed? We're just running ourselves ragged. Just trying to get out there. Collect the evidence. It's also so frustrating. Field investigator Andy. Roth often sees dot cam damage across entire fields. And he can't figure out where it came from WHO to hold accountable. Sundays you WPRO. Am I doing any good. Am I making an impact here or what might just spinning my wheels. Meanwhile because of Campbell the inspectors don't have time to do everything else else. They're supposed to do the check on. Pesticide uses at schools or golf courses or businesses. Leo read another. Indiana official is also president elect of the Association of American pesticide control officials. I think the most affected states would all agree that it's not acceptable to continue with this. The number of complaints. It's just not acceptable but the EPA reapproved daikin but just a year ago before the two thousand nineteen growing season. It decided did the problem could be addressed with a few new restrictions on where that can be sprayed and more training for people who use it. I asked read about that. So what was the experience experienced in two thousand nineteen. Did it fix the problem. No as a matter of fact a- The the complaint numbers went up in some states. The numbers did go down down but not necessarily because there was less damage. According to a survey of farmers in Missouri Eighty percent of them are not bothering to file formal complaints anymore. They I don't think does any good. Leo Read from the Office of the Indiana state chemist. Says he understands why you know. I've I've used the phrase die camper fatigue and it's very real thing another another possible sign of dicamba fatigue all but one of Missouri's eight pesticide inspectors left their job within the past year and a half Missouri officials said there was not any single reason for the rapid turnover but according to minutes of meetings between state pesticide enforcement agencies heavy workload and burn out was at least one reason last fall a group of state officials including Leo read had a conference call about Di Cambio with officials at the EPA. They had a question. The question is you are crinkled soybean leaves an unreasonable adverse effect. Because if if they are then. This product is federally miss branded if a product product is found to be miss branded than it can no longer be sold or used and EPA spokesperson said damage to plants can be an unreasonable adverse effect but it depends ends on the extent of the damage and on the benefits of spraying the pesticide. A lot of farmers don't want to give up those benefits nor does the company Bayer formerly Monsanto Santa which cells die camera herbicide and Campbell tolerant soybean and cotton seats. It's a billion dollar business at the end of two thousand twenty the EPA will have to decide ride once again whether to let farmers keep spraying. This Chemical Dan Charles N._p._R. News.

Indiana EPA Missouri LEO Dan Charles Louis Floor Nelson Andy Association Of American Pestic Cambe NPR Frankfort Arkansas Federal Environmental Protecti Supervisor America Ross Illinois Dave Scott Campbell Roth
Bayer faces fourth U.S. Roundup cancer trial in Monsanto's hometown

Charlie Parker

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Bayer faces fourth U.S. Roundup cancer trial in Monsanto's hometown

"The fourth trial over claims the active ingredient in roundup causes cancer opens today the case is being heard in Saint Louis for roundup maker Monsanto was headquartered before bear bought the company two years ago for more than sixty billion dollars the first three trials ended with multi billion dollar verdicts against Monsanto and bear there is appealing those

Saint Louis Monsanto
Google says new AI model allows for near 'instantaneous' weather forecasts

Techmeme Ride Home

02:23 min | 2 years ago

Google says new AI model allows for near 'instantaneous' weather forecasts

"Says that it is developing new. Ai Models that could allow for what it is calling. Nearly instantaneous weather forecasts something that would be useful in an era of climate change. Apparently even the best best most sophisticated existing weather forecasting techniques can still take hours to put together although that extra time does allow for more detailed granular forecasting quoting the verge however the work is in the early stages and has yet to be integrated into any commercial systems. The early results look promising. In the non peer reviewed paper Google's researchers describe how they were able to generate accurate rainfall predictions up to six hours ahead of time at a one kilometer resolution from just minutes of calculation the company's researchers train their AI model on historical radar data collected between twenty as seventeen in two thousand nineteen in the contiguous by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. They say their forecasts were as good as or better than three existing methods making predictions from the same data though their model was outperformed when attempting to make forecasts. More than six hours ahead of time. This seems to be the sweet spot for machine learning and weather forecast right now making speedy short term predictions while leaving longer forecast to more powerful models. Noah's weather models for example can create forecasts casts up to ten days in advance while we've not yet seen the full effects of ai on weather forecasting plenty of other companies are also investigating the same area including IBM and Monsanto and as Google's researchers point out such forecasting techniques are only going to become more important in our daily lives as we feel the effects of climate change and quote indeed. This is a direct quote from the researchers from the paper which is linked in the show notes quote as weather patterns are altered by climate change and as the frequency of extreme weather events increases. It becomes more important to provide actionable predictions at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Such predictions facilitate. It'll take effective planning crisis. Management and the reduction of losses to life and property a deal based infrastructure can provide predictions within minutes of receiving new data. Yeah allowing them to be fully integrated into a highly responsive prediction service. That may better suit the needs of now casting than traditional numerical methods and quote

Google National Oceanic And Atmospher Noah IBM Monsanto
How Hedonism Can Change Our Food System

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:38 min | 2 years ago

How Hedonism Can Change Our Food System

"That'd be surprised to learn that there is a major monopoly when it comes to seeds globally over a third of all seeds are in the hands of just three companies in this mini episode Dr I'm in sits down with mastermind chef and regenerative agriculture advocate Dan Barber together they discussed the importance of seeds why Dan supports a hedonistic approach to changing the way we out there some of the biggest problems we have are are solvable by actually rethinking how we grow food and that's really what you've come to his chef as solving the problem of hedonism you have to go back to the farm and the seed and the soil grow food empowering message I want to go into the seed coat anything permit it because most people don't understand that there's a seed monopoly out there that the centralization of seed creation production and the selling seeds is happening at scale globally and is undermining local farmers and food producers all over the world and most of them around the world are women and small holders or formal what you just said is a front page New York Times story and I don't know why this is the the the seed industry is now consolidate the point that any new variety of seed that has developed sixty eight percent sixty eight percent is in the hands of three companies Nearly seventy percent of the future of our food is in the hands of three companies choose Monsanto and while Monsanto has just been bought by the by Barry there's dupont and then there's Kim China so there's there's three big players now I mean next time we talk that might be too but that is a frightening reality because because if you if you do and I think you should look at seeds as the blueprint for the whole system then you're talking about these companies controlling the system is that just a see that doesn't taste good at I number it's a blueprint for how you're supposed to farm and that's what scares me is that you're you roll out everything from the amount of acreage that should go on the where it should be grown you know forget rotations it's not in that but that whole baked all the way to the processor is what we're talking about that's how baked in it is that's a monopoly knowing what what I find most interesting is that the three companies we just mentioned are not seed companies chemical companies yeah they're creating seeds to sell their close right in like the it's what roundup ready sees the cause and what incentive do you have in that scenario to create a strong seed that doesn't need the chemical intervention I yeah there's not and that's where it's the David and Goliath story it's like that's crazy and people don't understand that because there's so much mixed messaging and because people don't think of food as as C. Driven you know we think too much of it actually as farm and Soil Germany even though guy we should be thinking more about small farms and diversified Zim biodiverse farms in soil and regenerate farms their all important but the seed is the blueprint for how that stuff gets into play and that's where that's why went to the seeds because you can you can have the best farmer like this Guy Klaus Martins mentioned the being I went to visit the most the best rotations the most regenerative and biologically diverse soil if you ever see that doesn't have the genetics to be expressed than what are we talking about you cannot have a delicious Haute or a delicious carrot that has is a bad seed grown in bad soil probably wasn't grown locally probably wasn't picked the right moment none of those things can happen and have a delicious jaw-dropping the experience it's impossible it's so it was beautiful as it when you focus on hedonism it solves the world's problems healthier is a soil that's tickets movement I think it's because while it may seem fringy or esoteric or on the margin it actually is putting a crack in and the whole agriculture system in crack in our thinking about food and when you combine that with these other huge transfer seeing which is the decline of our health the species and the obesity and diabetes epidemics and the decline of our environment and the climate change were experiencing and all the economic burden that comes from that I mean Z.. Global problem that has solutions but they start at the farm and have to rethink that it and really appreciating it through truly great food truly great flavor is one one waited to up end the paradigm that we have now we are now going out to eat more and more and this isn't just white tablecloth residents down for an experience that is unique to the region and and that's where the power of the culture comes into play we have to breed for that and that's what we're trying to do because that's also where the healthiest seeds are gonNA come from the culture but the environment what is specific about the region soil and micro-climate that will make this seed is fits all I want the seat to work the exact same in New York California Michigan Texas Canada Mexico India China and that Boyer the dumbed down the genetics to do that that much I know and flavor is just tamped down everything has tamp down but my point is if you eat the diversity that's required in the organic system you not only have this incredible array of flavors and nutrition at your disposal but you also have the regeneration of the soil which is true sustainability so that's I just think the ticket is this is this deliciousness and this you celebrate Tori hedonistic look at food which is so interesting because that's what cuisines and cultures have taught us over time for thousands of years seeds were saved and exchange as part of community self-preservation sadly between nineteen o three and nineteen eighty three we lost an astonishing ninety three percent of our unique seed varieties this resulted in more than just a lack of selection at the market seemed diversity compliments soil diversity and unique seed varieties allow farmers our chance at a productive harvest this doubles as a form of insurance if one crop doesn't grow as hoped there are others to fall back on Conventional Agriculture Embraces Mono Culture meaning one crops may be grown over thousands of acres and then the same thing is growing again after harvest this depletes the nutrients in the soil and puts the farmer at risk should think threatened that particular crop it also perpetuates a farmer's reliance on government subsidies by cultivating seeds based on flavor and variety and supporting growers who were passionate about regenerative agriculture not only will our food tastes better but we will begun to shift food system and exciting and positive new

Michigan Texas Canada Mexico I New York California Boyer Tori Sixty Eight Percent Ninety Three Percent Seventy Percent
'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

Bookworm

11:15 min | 2 years ago

'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

"Today I'm very pleased to have as my guest the very brilliant Benjamin Moser who is the author of two biographies of Women Writers The I was a biography of Cou- reese the specter which did a good deal of bringing the Specter a writer who spent a good majority of for life in Brazil to the attention of American readers and the second is the biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been a controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems now what do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book well I think a book about Susan Santa that wasn't controversial would not be a book about Susan's contact I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see this controversial this book I see it more as just I hope it's something starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever Monsanto was always associated with fashion she was associated with with photography associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who could have been on the cover of Vanity Fair I think the real writers that we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths and who have these chances to be reevaluated I can remember the first time I read Susan Sonntags First Book which was against interpret Tation can you remember the first time he read against interpretation yes I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really I know I had read the Auger fi stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation I think I hadn't read the whole book I'd read notes on Camp I'd read the title essay I'd read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read it now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again it feels contemporary but it's all most sixty years old you know against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and ideas that feels very adding to me I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read I was astonished by it because Some of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh my you'd already read that in the early sixties choose only in her early thirties to thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to avert Arto Susan cared about our toll and in fact you know she seems to no that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when p do new things I- slivered out some quotes from Susan let's hear Susan people want to be moved on is a writer want to move people I was very moved cried even a couple of passes that I was riding this one line that made me laugh grimly where I wanna say I say but I don't feel it's me the book says it was a time when knowledge was fashionable Philistinism was unfashionable and I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness has a time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable Philipson as it was very fashionable I'm talking to Benjamin Moser son tags biographer that what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face with Susan from our first conversation and You considered deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines can you talk to me that I think it's really funny I think it's one of the great American questions I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant we don't have to name names but I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and the the all the things in her lifetime worse symbolic of Middle Brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music all these kind of things Santiago always stood for the opposite of all that crap now you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her tell me what you mean tell me what that means a lot of it might have had to do the fact that she was physically ill a lot of her life when she was forty two she got stage four breast cancer and it almost killed her and she was subjected to this very gruesome horrifying treatment that did end up saving her life and that's nineteen in seventy five to seventy eight so she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient she got more intolerant of certain people but I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then AH dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas I think that what we're talking about is a person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a her renewed ix of art and she writes about her fondness for the supremes which at that time you take some on won't take any number of someone's whether it's Irving Hauer Saul bellow they're not listening to the supremes they find it be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life she's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic criticism no well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is this is again it's almost it's more than fifty years ago in that time and in that year that was really shocking and it's absolutely really hilarious to see the reactions that she got because the thing about the supreme it's not like she wrote about this frame she said something about how she likes the supremes in one line nobody it followed her the whole life but you point down very well and intelligently and correctly in this book the Cultural Conservatives awesome is has very little to do with political conservatism. Well this is another idea that I think has been forgotten sondheim comes out of a world where out of me education where what she means a small C. conservatism is starting off with Plato and Aristotle and going up to Dante and Shakespeare through the great modern poets and that love that syllabus that Canon that became extremely unfashionable and now I think we're in a world where people aren't reacting against Beethoven you know they don't even know who Beethoven is Dante Shakespeare and so both the people who wanted to modernize that and expand it for example to feminist African American authors those people lost out just as much as the people who wanted it closed for political reasons from the right wing and what happens in that song tag is very perceptive about time and time again it said it all lose out to money it always is out to consumerism and so what happens is you know famous a great painting becomes an expensive painting a great song becomes a song that gets a lot of play on the radio a lot of clicks on the Internet and that's the thing we're in now come talking once again to Benjamin Moser Susan Sonntags biographer in a book from Echo called Sawa tag do you think that you're writing a biography of Susan or in addition a biography of her times well I think both the book is called Sante her life and work and those are two things that are complementary but I'd really there's a lot I'd like people to remember that people don't remember people don't member for example that it was quite common for women to write their husbands books as happened to attack yes fascinated yeah I had no idea will I didn't either I've inhabited this world of the great female intellectuals having done Clarissa Specter before and then Sante it's a world that generation of my grandparents grandmother's generation that I'm familiar with and so about three months ago this piece came out in the Guardian announcing that I had discovered that Sante had actually written the book upon which her husband's career was based book called for the mind with moralist and this piece went viral everybody was talking wrote me and they said are you kidding this happen to everybody nobody wire people so surprised and the reason they're surprise is that I think feminism has made so many gains is that people have forgotten what it was like so when you're talking about a history of her life and times when she applied she's got Souza's very brilliant student and she comes into the World king world and she applies for a job at a magazine and her friend a male friend says well the fact that you're a woman is a real problem but we're going to try to help them get over that and that was a totally normal thing to say to a woman at that time now you would get sued and you know rightly so a lot of the ideas that we think are able in in our culture whether you think about the position of African Americans do you think about the position of women are homosexuals or all these things they've changed really radically and one of the things I think a book like the biographies and Sonic can do is trace the evolution of these ideas so that's the part that I find fascinating because sometimes she's ahead of things and somehow she's behind wind and sometimes she's struggling to understand new ideas as they come into the world it's a fascinating

Specter Benjamin Moser Writer Sondheim COU Three Months Fifty Years Sixty Years
Roundup labels warning of cancer won't be permitted, EPA says

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

Roundup labels warning of cancer won't be permitted, EPA says

"No more warning labels for a weed killing chemical the EPA says it will no longer reprove labels warning blind phosphate is known to cause cancer the chemical marketed as a weed killer by Monsanto one of the brand roundup California requires warning labels on these products but the EPA says its own research shows the chemical poses no risk to the

EPA Monsanto California
"monsanto" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"monsanto" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now shares of the German pharmaceutical company. Bayer fell sharply today. After a California jury ordered. Bayer to pay two billion dollars to a couple who say they got cancer. After using the weed killer roundup for thirty years. This is the eighth largest product defect verdict in US history. The third time less than a year that Bayer has lost a courtroom battle defending roundup. Baer owns Monsanto, which makes up Allie Ville, she is an MSNBC anchor and economics correspondent and co host avail. She and rule Ellie big statement with this jury with this big verdict, which might go down. We remember the jury awarded two hundred eighty nine million to a school groundskeeper who got terminal cancer after using round up and that was reduced to seventy eight million. But still big numbers bad PR. What does this mean for bear? Well, look, it means a lot. It is. Bayer has suffered. A great deal of internal criticism from its shareholders about having bought Monsanto Monsanto. This is the third chemical based lawsuit that it is lost. And it's got more than thirteen thousand on deck. So at the annual meeting of Bayer there was a movement to sort of a emotion really to absolve the CEO and the board of making the decision to purchase Monsanto, and it was actually defeated them very rarely happens. So Monsanto's got problems bears. Got problems on the share price bears. Got problems from inside from shareholders and bears got thirteen thousand more lawsuits and a two billion dollar ruling against it. So at the moment and these things can work out differently. But at the moment, this is a very very bad situation for Monsanto and its parent company alley staying with the business here. Here's what we don't understand. I see roundup on the shelves. Yes. How is it that it's still on the shelves? We know that. Bayer is putting statements from the EPA that said the main agreement in roundup is not. Christina jen. But is that why they have to keep it on the shelves because they can admit that it is. And if you pick it up on the shelf, you'll notice there is no warning on it other than the poison warnings the normal warnings that if you consume this call the poison center, so glad folks eight which is the herbicide that is in there, which is by the way, the most common herbicide used all over the place has not been determined by the EPA and by other regulatory agencies to be a carcinogen. This is the problem. Lots of people who have been close to this product for a long time have argued that they've been they've got cancer from it particularly non-hodgkin's lymphoma, but the pay and other regulators haven't found that to be true. So Jerry's have juries have found it to be true. And the the reason that this one was so big is because it had the plaintiffs had more freedom to provide more evidence. And some of that evidence was about how Monsanto didn't seem to want to get to the bottom of whether or not this was carcinogenic. In other words, they seem to be more interested in making sure it says. This is a huge selling product. Everybody uses it. So the warning issue is important because for gardeners and landscaper escapers. They know they deal with chemical. So in many cases, they use masks and gloves, some don't but some do. But this product is sold on the shelf for anybody to use. I grew up with people using round up all over. So this is part of the problem. Bayer and Monsanto do not want to say that this thing is a carcinogen and requires a warning because they're already facing thirteen thousand lawsuits for it. Well, but they have lost several. And you'd think that that would force a company to say, by the way, juries have decided that this is you know, is is Christina genyk LLC MSNBC anchor economics correspondent will continue to follow. This will thirteen thousand as you said counting.

Monsanto Bayer cancer MSNBC EPA California Allie Ville US Christina jen Christina genyk Ellie Baer CEO Jerry two billion dollars two billion dollar thirty years
"monsanto" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:37 min | 3 years ago

"monsanto" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Six five O, JIMBO including Allen in champagne, Illinois. Hello, alan. I like say, this is a stupid idea anytime the government helped out anything it does nothing but drive up the cost. Just look at the cost of college. Second Americans are sick and getting sicker every day. Because number one our food is contaminated by glyphosate, and we eat hundred pounds of sugar every year, our food supply is killing us an congress does nothing about that. They believe on Santo when they say, oh, it doesn't cause anything. It's not a problem. That's ridiculous. All right. What about what Allen has had to say? Although clearly he started out by saying that any time the government does anything they mess it up and then promptly called for the government to do something. What do you? What do you think is the appropriate a policy here? Well. Terms of sugar in the diet. Do you think that congress says propped up the sugar industry with subsidies in other breaks, it it probably shouldn't? And that's that's a reflection of the sugar industry. He didn't make a comment about about Monsanto. And by that, I I think he was going to genetically modified organisms GMO's and said that he doesn't believe those who say that. It's that they're that. They're safe. Bonafide foods in some cases, have saved millions of lives just because of of crops that are made resistant to disease or people in this world right now who have not starved to death because of some of those crops, and I must confess that. I hear all of this this advertising, not GMO. And I think he will. So what the idea that any any genetically modified food is automatically evil is is a Luddite piece of nonsense. Now. To keep an eye on it. You need to be careful of exactly what did attic bought affiliations are made. But some amazingly powerfully positive things have come from genetically modified foods. Well, I agree with you in general. We're back. I'd ask him if he could actually define a GMO. Maybe surprised if he could actually, but let me just say this when he says the question is who says it saves. Let me tell you said save the World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, the pediatrics society, the National Academy of sciences, and it goes on and on these ninety percent of the feed corn that we that we grow in this country ninety percent ninety percent of the soy for all GMO, and they've made farmers very much more productive, and they would be the loudest didn't use for way less pesticides. So exactly there are crops out there that are resistant to diseases that otherwise would have to be sprayed. So yes, that's the short answer Cindy in reading, Pennsylvania. Hello. Hi, what's fun? We're having absolutely. Well, I'm calling because I was just about to turn in. And then I heard the congressman Jim Greenwood is from like former congressman just to have the record streaming. Okay. Well, God bless you. Recovery. Did have I'm sorry. I said a recovering congressman, but go ahead. Oh, okay. I got Gotcha. Our our local talk show had a similar topic maybe about a month or two ago, and I called in and with my little story. I was thinking about twenty five dollars four Ned that I got through, you know, local drugstore. From the first of the year it bounced up way over two hundred two hundred twenty or more dollars. And I called my doctor said, hey can't afford this. What can we do? She said, oh, don't worry about it. We'll call health warehouse in Florence Kentucky. We'll get a free there. Okay. Try I ordered it from them. This what it came the exact same manufacturer and a twenty five dollars Bill. So I was paying I dropped my part D plan because it was like paying for the privilege of paying for to about eighty percent more for meds. And isn't it interesting? When someone turns sixty five in every any given year that our phone rings off the hook trying to sign them on, you know. So there's tremendous competition. There's money somewhere to be made big time and its government. And like your pre previous callers, I'm set up to I am fed up. They go ahead. Please continue your thoughts. Okay. I it's no wonder that people are just knocking off and going through homeopathic medicine at work. And yet, you know, the FDA makes them put a statement at the end, you know, this this is not meant to treat her. Well, some things have been checked out. Some have not in the notion that that every passing urban spice is somehow therapeutic is is not something that we should necessarily follow. Jim greenwood. Well, first of I I don't know if the caller can still here, it's too long. But, but I hate to see the notion that she she dropped her TV because Lord knows or she gets really sick and needs and drove that that that she really wouldn't be able to afford without the insurance. And then she being real trouble every parts Arthur to Medicare a and b and what else there's a and b and d is really hospitalization be is drugs that you take either usually hospital setting this prescription drugs that you take their pills to make it simple. Their fills. Okay. And so, but you know, she talked to a pain two hundred dollars. And I don't know how often she would have to do that. But again, which he's worried about is what she is. She's forced to pay out of pocket for Medicare. And that's what I think what it'd be capped. So that she pays for Medicare Part d which made thirty dollars a month, and she's protected against ever having to pay thousands of dollars for for for medicines for serious diseases like multiple sclerosis, and and cancer and other diseases like that, so I think she would do well to keep her party. But I think she would also congressman congress people that they ought to put a cap on how much yesterday had an ultra very good back with more in a moment..

congressman congress Allen Jim Greenwood Medicare Monsanto glyphosate Illinois Santo alan Florence Kentucky FDA World Health Organization National Academy of sciences cancer Pennsylvania Cindy
"monsanto" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"monsanto" Discussed on KOMO

"Round up made by Monsanto with a five gallon backpacks Breyer. He says sometimes leaked down his back or would blow missed in his face in a breeze. The Duval man says he even wrote use around up into his client contracts because of the. Understanding in UV light in sunlight it broke down in seventy two hours, then became inert. And it was safe. Tierney says he first noticed a problem when he developed severe indigestion since I took a bite of food. I'd be doubled over with pain. I I used to eat Tom like candy. I ended up going to the doctor made the diagnosis that it was non Hodgkin lymphoma tyranny suit uses a new university of Washington study that shows the link between the life of Saint in roundup and cancer. Bayer which now owns Monsanto cintas. Two statements one which points to EPA in National Cancer Institute. Studies they say show no link to the cancers and another which says the UW study uses flawed methods and manipulates the data Ryan Harris, KOMO news. A new report finds that kids at more than one hundred schools in our state could be exposed to lead in the water at school. Come a Romero has more out of nearly two hundred schools tested for lead in the water more than sixty percent had levels above one part per billion. That's according to the report by environment. Washington director Bruce Speight says according to the. American Academy of pediatrics more than twenty four million children are at risk of losing IQ points due to low level lead exposure, he says schools can take preventative steps now including installing filters which are certified and can help to significantly reduce lead in the drinking water. The report also recommends schools shut down any taps or faucets. Where lead has been detected Romero, KOMO news. Komo news time four ten sports now from the Harley exterior sports desk. Huskies in first place in the Pac twelve playing host to the utes of Utah tonight. Eight o'clock the game time at Alaska Airlines arena. You'll hear it right here on KOMO news with our pregame. Coverage getting underway at seven thirty head coach Mike Hopkins of Doug Saint his team needs to overcome. Some recent slow starts now. So I think the experience of being both situations is going to help us find ways to win when it's not pretty important coming out. And hopefully, you're going to have those good starts. If you don't you know, what we have to do to be able to recover so poison win the game. Top twenty five action tonight includes number eight North Carolina ad number one Duke. Mariners open their spring portion of the scheduled tomorrow as they take on the Oakland A's down in the desert. We'll have more sports coming your way in thirty minutes. An American woman who left home to join ISIS is now in Syria and wants to come home and his telling her story ABC's James Longman reports Twenty-four-year-old says she was radicalized and brainwashed by secret Twitter group up to three thousand ISIS youth.

KOMO utes Romero Monsanto Monsanto cintas Mariners Tierney Alaska Airlines arena Bruce Speight Duval American Academy of pediatrics ISIS indigestion UW North Carolina EPA Washington university of Washington Pac
"monsanto" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"monsanto" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And from that, we get we get that data and basically were were testing things before we have to go and put it on the acre of the farmer. We have our seven tools that allow us in. It's what our platform is called that allow us to identify different ways that they should produce. And so, you know, go back to this. It's really fascinating to me because technology is heavily in use in the sector. There's tremendous investment coming in it, really. I I look at it. I think of two things that are really. Quite interesting to me, people are very uncomfortable with technology in food production. Yes, they are. Well, because we think Monsanto is going to make some seed that's going to kill us all the good. Well, wait now, I'm just going to get killed by Monsanto head. Sorry is by or no, right. But the, but the reality is that that people are very say that again, people are people hearken back to the day where you know, I want to go to the farm stand and right and everybody that's terrific. But you're not gonna feed grow a population. That is soil at green. I'm just telling you. That's why people get their vision of that concept from that movie. Well that and I think everybody's a foodie. No, yeah. Exactly. They wanna have a farm stand. They want everything every tomato to be grown perfectly by one person who cares for it. Exactly. Right nurtured. And we're rubbing it special is spent doing that with the cows. Yeah, we do. And they're happier for it. They us better. Now. Now how to cows live in California. I don't know if you know that they are some happy that's the whole. That's that's an advertising thing for California. Well, there some nice happy cousin the upper mid west. Okay. But, but I will tell you, you know, it's fascinating to me. Because people first of all that folks don't understand that. There's some technology significant technology in use in agriculture. And then Secondly, how resistant many folks are to the use of technology and modern agriculture. These are safe Reuven, tools, you're using one.

Monsanto California Reuven
"monsanto" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"monsanto" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Listening to on air with Doug Jenin, Victoria, right? So Jennifer the monarch butterfly used to love me most important pollinators population declining like the bees thanks to those bastards at Monsanto, the nonprofit Zirk sees society says the number monarch butterflies traveling to California over the winter. It's below they've decided to stop in Nevada and stay there. Apparently, they're going to Vegas. Gambling problem. Right. So the monarch thanksgiving count ever population fell one hundred and forty eight thousand how do they know that to a twenty five count them? Takes place over a couple of weeks. Not all the data apparently is finalized over. Although population of butterflies reduced to less than five percent of the size. Researchers say used to be in the millions then in the hundreds of thousands and now down to the tens of thousands. And they say, oh, well, we can't conclude baloney. You can't conclude it's all pesticides Monsanto and that bunch. That's all it is how do you fix that the cell phones to with the bees? Well, I don't know whether it's cell phones. But I know the biggest culprit is Monsanto maybe fresh air, right? Cellphones problem, but not the biggest problem radiation from cell phones. Yeah. That's what a lot of reports. At least in California say that the cell phones that the frequency transmitting from them is responsible for that ten before the hour and the DJ program..

Monsanto California Jennifer Doug Jenin Victoria Nevada Vegas five percent