35 Burst results for "Monocle"

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:56 min | 4 d ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Built environment and how to make our city better places to live in. I'm your host Andrew tuck. Coming up. You can see that this kind of like small acupuncture activation of public space actually becomes a strategic tool to improve streets and spaces in the city for everyone. What can we learn from temporary interventions? On today's episode, we flick through the pages of the new book, meanwhile, city, which explores how good city making can be aided by a bit of experimentation. We also browse through another recent publication, monocle's latest edition of the forecast to speak to a mayor whose city came up big in our annual small cities index. And we visit one in permanent solution being rolled out in Austria. All

Andrew tuck monocle Austria
Test Burst 202209041238

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Test Burst 202209041238

"What it really shows is that this pipeline is the key method with which Putin and Russia are turning the screws on Europe and will continue to do so throughout the winter. We also understand that there's going to be more maintenance possibly in mid October. So every time this happens, Europe worries that flows won't restart that this'll be it. We'll have a full cutoff in Russian gas. And that's exactly what the point is to keep everybody guessing to keep markets elevated and to keep Europe really on its toes and under pressure about the sanctions that it's given to Russia.

Europe Putin Russia
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

03:06 min | 6 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"It's not got me backronym stands for frei kurper couture. Literally, free body culture. And when the mercury rises in Vienna, the free bodies come out in force. What sort of people are these people? So it could be. It could be anybody from everybody. It's one young to old and from, I don't know, from the manager of the CEO of a company to whatever position you could have in them, but it is everybody. And that makes it so interesting because same thing. If they were close and you meet them in public, you kind of have a feeling maybe or at least an idea. They come from, if you need to make it, it doesn't make a difference. Actually, what do you do? I am in the management board of education, institution. My name is Florian. In German. Vienna has many riverside spots designated F kakar. But the undisputed nerve center is the Danube island. The city's biggest recreation area. And that's where I meet Florian. There are two different parts of the tournament in the northern and the south with a big sign on the pathway when you understand you can get naked and that's the place to come. I have began life in the late 19th century as part of a wider labor form or life reform movement in what was then the German Empire. The reformist promoters organic food, sexual liberation, and a simpler way of life. And nudity was seen as a key part of it. In the 20th century the idea was briefly hijacked by the Nazis, who used it to showcase good German bodies. While in post warriors Germany, it was held up as an example of communist equality. But for Florian another F Kaka enthusiasts in Vienna, it's just about having a good time. As soon as you get naked, there are no boundaries somehow it's just it gets much easier. The tension is gone and you're just connect to each other quite easily. What sort of things do you talk about? Everything. So it's really just normal life, right? It is like normal life. Yeah, and you talk about everything, maybe not about the private parts, but it's. Actually very interesting that it's as soon as you get naked that whole sexual thing is kind of not in the focus anymore. Which is kind of paradox, but that's the way it is. It's not that's what they think. Although I must say, many people are probably would not recognize it, though. With clothes on. Yeah. 'cause you look so different when you're naked in my eyes. And sometimes it's really funny, and at the end of the day, when you're picking stuff and get twists, it's just like getting another person somehow..

Florian Vienna management board of education, Danube island Germany
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

07:50 min | 6 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Well, if you haven't already heard this week, ask secret is out. And we can officially confirm that Copenhagen has taken top spot yet again in Monica magazine's annual quality of life rankings. And, for how the Danish capital did it, well, there's no secret. The city has long been a shining light in many of the metrics that grab our attention here at the urbanist, from putting pedestrians first and a push for ever more cycling to a metro system that continues to expand and any number of city led environmental efforts, Copenhagen is a place that is preparing for the future. One forward looking project in the city that has caught our eye is luneta home, an artificial island rising out of the harbor, which plans to house 35,000 people and protect the city from rising sea levels and climate change induced storms too. Well, I'm joined now by Anne scurvy, CEO of by and harven, the development company, which is in charge of building lene home, and which has even been using surplus soil from construction projects in Copenhagen to create it. And thank you for joining us. Let's start with the ambition for this project. What are you hoping to achieve here? What's actually required? Well, the ambition is actually to ensure that the flood protection that we need to do of Copenhagen that we do it in a quite new and fantastic manner. Saying that flood protection, which a lot of cities will need in the years to come. Maybe we can do it in a quite different way. The ambition is to do it in a way, so it's not only a dike, it's actually an island where you can have housing in the future. If you don't have a big beach park area towards the sea and then also adding new housing districts on this flood protection island will be sustainable. From top level of new sustainable ambitions, we have been quite good at doing that in Copenhagen. But of course our ambition for the future is to go to the next level of sustainable new urban districts. How do you build an island? What does it require? How do you even begin that process? Well, actually, it's not that difficult because when you look at the history of Copenhagen, we're actually very much like the Netherlands. You know, we are city based on two islands. So we have actually been doing land reclamation and sort of building in the harbor for decades. So it's not that difficult. The difficult part in this project is not the technological solutions. It's the process. As many things these days, it's the process with the dialog with citizens and do we need to do this now? Do we need to have this in my backyard? And is this really sustainable? And the debate on what are the facts actually when it comes to a project like this? Because as I see it, it's very difficult to have a debate on a problem that will come. The need for storm fraud protection. And on the other hand, also the need to do the long-term planning issues like we do in Copenhagen. When we think about Denmark and we think about Copenhagen, people seem to be everyone gets their say, it's a bit more cooperative about how decisions get made. Does that make it difficult actually for pushing through big projects? It's just slow and cumbersome and you have to persuade a lot of people to get anything done. Well, I think when we started the northern harbor development, we started that also with a lot of dialog with citizens. But I think it was easier to comprehend because you saw there was sort of a big harbor area industrial brownfield side which were more or less empty. So it was easier to comprehend and to have a dialog, okay, look at this, what would we like this to be in the future as a start of a dialog and starting off the international architectural competition? And we had all these input. It's more difficult when you look into having a debate on a solution with a storm flight protection that although people know that we have some winter storms where you can see the sea level rising in the harbor. Still say, okay, but can we use the Stanford protection for new housing district? It is more difficult. So for us, you know, just having the dialog, we can see that it has really changed from the northern harbor dialog to what we are doing now. You know, things are very based on trust when people ask me, do you feel that the fact that there's a lot of critique that it's because that you have failed? I said, yeah, we can always do better, but actually it is also because the Danes in Copenhagen, when they have this critic, I guess it's because they know that we will listen. Basically, there is some sort of trust. And that's very important. And we need to take care of that trust. And maybe just as a final question, it's interesting when we talk to urbanist designers, planners, that it feels like we're coming up to some crunchy decisions for all cities that that desire to leave things as they are and not change and the need to deliver protection against environmental change at the same time. Do you think that for all cities is going to have to be a bit more of a robust public conversation to get things done? Definitely. Actually, as we see it, the way the dialog is on the unit home at the moment, it's a bit more comparable to what we've seen in Germany, whether it really has been a lot of dialog on large projects like this. And of course, that has also been the case in Copenhagen, the metro city ring was a tough dialog. But there's some changes at the moment, definitely. What we do at the moment is to try to use new tools in order to ensure that we have a dialog, because in the northern harbor development, we invited everyone, but you know when you have dialog like that quite often, a lot of the people who are maybe a bit more negative towards development will join the conversation. So what we do now is to design a new process where we actually choose a board of citizens who can have a more direct impact on development. So 66 citizens which will be picked from a very statistic method based on OECD delivered democracy, guidelines, something. To ensure that we have different citizens with different backgrounds to join the conversation on the future of the development in unit around before we go on to the design and have architectural competitions. And I think that's important that we need to develop these methods for dialog before going into design. What I find at the moment is that I'll have some architects who say why haven't you done a visual and architectural vision for the island. And I said, well, if we do that, the critic we will get is that now you are doing chop down planning, you don't listen to the citizens. You have done a vision of how this can be, but now you have narrowed down what actually could be the future of genetic art. So we are going in the other direction, spending more time on the dialog before we are going into competitions. And I really think that this is one of the big discussions in the years to come. That we need to take more care of our processes and democratic dialog before going into architectural competitions. And fascinating to hear you speak, and perhaps a lesson for all sorts of cities around the world who are not so good at the dialog bit. So thank you for joining us here on the urbanist. And to hear more reasons why Copenhagen topped the charts in this year's survey, be sure to pick up a copy of the latest issue of Monaco magazine,.

Copenhagen Monica magazine Anne scurvy harven the Netherlands Denmark Germany OECD Monaco magazine
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:25 min | 7 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"To round out today's show, we're going to hear from Monica's architect of the year do mandra. She was selected as winner of this gong for a host of different reasons from her care for the people using her structures to an appreciation of local materials and building methods, as well as her ability to seamlessly and sensitively integrate buildings into a host of different contexts. We feel that she embodies what a great contemporary architect should be. To talk about her work and approach more, Mandarin join me down the line. So this is going to be a very broad question to start, but I want to ask about the key ingredients needed as a foundation for making good architecture. What's your personal approach? Our approach is very much too address a context and two to try to understand the potential of a place. So I think please making is in a way key, not to blend in necessarily with what is there, but to try to understand what are the social content, what is the economic context and what is the larger open, if you're in an open space, if you're a landscape, what is the larger context in the landscape and in the history or there are many parameters that you need to understand. So what we do usually is we spent an awful lot of time trying to understand the broader context. So we do research or we collect data you could say around a subject. I mean, so there's the economic context and the social context and the landscape context where this work is taking place. Can you tell us about a particular project of yours where you sort of put this analysis of these components into practice, just so I guess I can understand how it's permeated or influenced your work? Well, I think when we've been working with the ice short center in queenland, we work together with experts that work knowledgeable about the greenlandic context and so it's also about working in teams with people that are not necessarily architects, but that has knowledge that you want to put into your project. So in Greenland, we worked in a team also with a geologist whose half queen landing and also very knowledgeable about Greenland. So working and trying to understand the broader context of Greenland, which is, of course, both a social but it's also knowing that Greenland is the oldest bedrock in the world and in a way you have to address the issue of time when you do a building. And to get a listeners up to speed, do we're talking about the ice forward center, which is located 250 kilometers north of the Arctic circle in Greenland and it's a cultural center of sorts that functions as a hub for research and education and exhibitions. And you talk there about addressing geology and time and I guess part of the pun using that as a bedrock for the projects. But I'm curious what other elements you pulled into this project in Greenland. In Greenland, we worked, of course, also with understanding the climate, how does snow drift, how does it work with the wind in this climate? Because it's really a very extreme climate. So in a way, working with the shape of the building in relationship to the climate to the snowdrift to the meltwater and of course understanding that building in Greenland, you don't have any building materials, you have to ship everything there, and you don't have large machinery. So the whole thinking around the building was to be able to create it somewhere else prefab and to ship it and to be able to build it in that very small window that you have in the summertime where there's no snow and where the ice doesn't close the water so you can actually ship material up there in May June, July. So that kind of planning is, of course, a large part of how to shape the building, so creating these frames that you could pack and containers, which means that the members doesn't have to be large members you can't work with concrete prefab concrete, which would also be very unsustainable to do. So working with these quite small frames to be able to pack them in containers and to be able to mount them as quickly as possible on site was an important part of the design of the building. I mean, that sounds like a challenging construction process. I'm curious as well about the design. For me, it feels like the building just blends into the landscape. Was that intentional, and if so, why do that? It was important to us to create a building that had a potential of being part of the landscape for one part, but also to be creating almost like an landscape icon, you could say, by creating this pill or part of the path of the UNESCO heritage trail, we actually created sort of a landscape Beacon. You could say where you were you move up on the roof and from the top of the roof you're able to overview the vast area that you're moving into if you're going on a hike. And I think what is the great success of that building is actually that the local community has absolutely embraced that thought and they use it as part of the path every day, but also they have their marriages on top of that roof. So that is part of, I guess, a way of looking at social sustainability is also to ensure that you're building has a positive impact on the local community. And I guess just finally, I mean, we've used this Greenland project for the basis of a lot of this conversation, but are there lessons here or are there lessons in Greenland that can be applied to other projects? And I guess I want to know how your approach changes from project to project is the best construction method in Greenland, the best construction method elsewhere, or is the most sustainable material choice in Greenland the most sustainable material choice elsewhere. Those sorts of things. I think depending on where you are, I'm also if you're talking about materials, it's not always the same materials that is the most sustainable materials. I mean, when we worked with the one C center in Denmark on the one seat coast, one of the material, the main material we've been using is reads because it's part of the history of the area, it's been used since the Vikings were there and it's also harvested very close by so you don't have transportation. It wouldn't be sustainable if you bought the REITs somewhere in Poland or somewhere else. So it really has to do I guess there's a lot of knowledge you can gain from understanding the tradition of building the local sort of heritage, not in a sentimental way, but in understanding why this buildings look like this in this area and if you look at the Reba area, it's very, very flat. It's very horizontal. The wind is very it's always present. So in a way, trying to understand that it creating an interior outdoor space is important because otherwise it's quite difficult to actually be outside a lot of the year you could say. So there's this kind of relationship to, of course, a tradition, as I said in a non sentimental way trying to understand what is the building culture and why, especially why. And then you need to interpret that, I think, in a modern way, because I'm not interested in tradition for tradition's sake, but I'm interested in why things look like they do. And that's all for today's show. Do you pick up a copy of Monica's may issue which features all 50 winners of our design awards. The magazine is on all good news stance now. And of course, for more design stories, listen to our 5 minute midweek bonus show, monocle on design extra. That is, on Thursdays. Today's episode was produced by Charlie filmer court and mainly Evans, and edited by Jack chewers. I'm Nick manis, thanks for listening..

Greenland queenland Monica Arctic circle UNESCO Denmark Vikings Poland The magazine Charlie filmer Jack chewers Evans Nick manis
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:36 min | 7 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"But with hand picked some of our favorites to unpack in audio over the next 30 minutes. A year on from the successful launch of the monocle design awards, we've reset, retooled and rigorously scoured the globe to highlight the industry's biggest successes this year. And so on today's episode to coincide with the release of monocles may issue, which features our design award winners, we're profiling a selection of our favorite projects. And joining me in the studio to discuss them is monocles executive editor and the driving force behind the awards Noel and Giles, Nolan, welcome. I mean, I want to start by asking why we have our own awards in the first place. You're the man that kicked this all off. We have such a, I guess, unique view and a unique take on design. It's so broad. So we talk about urbanism how to make cities better, but we also talk about the perfect bar trolley that you might want to have in your house. And we decided that it was a good idea to kind of reward good design, but through the lens of Monaco. And that's why it's quite vastly awards, Nick. So we have 50 in total and we essentially spent a year figuring out what works, which is quite difficult because sometimes you have to hold back on a story when you see something really, really amazing. But at the same time, I think the award winners are pretty happy with the awards. Nick, maybe it's a good idea for you to kind of describe the emotions that you've heard from winners of these awards because we do provide them with a pretty beautiful trophy. I'll dive into the emotions in a second, but I think it's like you said important that people are recognized for doing good work, which is what we've always sort of championed here. It's always been about quality. It's always been about designing things that are meant to last, that are also meant to serve people. So I think people may be appreciate our perspective. So when they get that recognition, it does feel really nice to them. I was speaking to Francis Carrie this morning, which we'll hear not on today's show, but on a later episode, that's a little teaser there. And he received one of our awards this year, and he talks about the whole studio coming together, crowding around the parcel with the award winning arrived, opening it up and the joy of, I guess, unboxing it like on Christmas Day. Yeah, certainly people appreciate being recognized, but I also hope for our raiders and our listeners on today's show. It's also a chance to reflect on what good design is and essentially today we're going to unpack that with a selection of our favorite interviews that we've done over the course of choosing these 50 winners. I mean, it may be a nice place to start is with the award for the best social project, which is the end straight garden villas by Anna oak Gorman architects. This one is particularly close to your heart. I know. It's really close to home. It's on the Gold Coast where my family still live and where I kind of grew up. And I think we're both big appreciators of Australian architecture, particularly residential architecture. Australia has the kind of, well, it does have the largest average house size in the world. Obviously because of the vast amount of space you can build upon and they have these sprawling suburbs where people can buy these quarter acre blocks and put a big house on with a double garage and all this kind of thing. Which does happen on the Gold Coast, but this project in particular was really interesting because it was a social housing project. You actually wrote the story, Nick, so you have a little bit more kind of intelligence about the story than idea, but I think it's particularly amazing because it kind of exemplifies everything that's good about building in Australia. There's lots of natural light. There's a very good use of materials. There's beautiful landscaping, but it's a social housing project. I'd love to hear kind of what Anna, the architect's view was on the project. Absolutely. I mean, and we'll play a clip from her shortly, but I guess the big thing like you said there is these are sprawling suburbs, but what's kind of interesting is that typically public housing developments tend to still be drab towers in a desolate lawn and surrounded by car park with very little imagination in their design and has done with this project is give the residents a sense of place and a sense of self that I painted at each dwelling a different color to give them their own character each dwelling also has its own letterbox rather than like a big sort of communal one where everyone has to go to. So there's a privacy to it. There's each dwelling has its own entry and exit point and multiple entry and exit points so you're not always on show like you are in typical big public housing developments. And what I like most and what we'll hear from Anna is the fact that these weren't designed almost as public housing. They were designed to be somewhere where you or I would want to live and I certainly would want to live in one of them. So let's hear from Anna now. From the get go when we started the project, that was our key vision. Was to make a place that didn't feel like social housing, but everyone was one of those. And I think with social housing rather than putting them in boxes with very bad lighting. I think we need to lift the people who are in those situations because they're often people like you and me who have just found themselves in a bad situation and need housing. It's important that we lift them up and give them good housing and pull them out. Rather than make their housing, you know, affect maybe their mood or how they're feeling, there's a role to play for design and architecture in that. We can't solve it all. But I think there's an important role for design and architecture in social housing. We definitely need more of that. We did undertake a lot of research which informed our design and part of that research included visits to local exemplar projects, but also visits to current social housing where things weren't working very well. So it allowed us to take stock, talk to the current tenants, find out what was working, what wasn't working, and that then informed the design. So one of the things that came out in the workshop was that people felt like they needed to have a choice about how they might enter or exit their residents. So we've got all the ground floor units have a front and a back door. So one door opening onto the garden, but also a door that they can sneak out if they want to go to an appointment and they don't have time to talk to people in the garden. So there's things like that, just having choice that are really simple that don't necessarily cost more in a design. But also passive design is really key too. So providing good cross ventilation, access to natural light. No screening for shades. Trees and vegetation in the garden to help with that cooling effect around the home. We've pulled back the concrete and the pathways from the units in order to provide that layering of vegetation but also there are places for deep planting for big trees because they help with those providing shade and homes for wildlife to bird life. That was NO Gorman there. We know of the best social project for AN street garden villas. It's also important to note that that was a project that was commissioned by the Queensland state government as a demonstration project for other public housing initiatives. So hopefully they can draw on her work and build better public housing across the state and across Australia and who knows even across the world. We'll be back with the award for best community builder straight after this..

Nick Francis Carrie Anna oak Gorman Gold Coast Anna Nolan Noel Giles Monaco Australia Queensland state government Gorman
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

02:50 min | 10 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"In northern force them to do well. Yeah, but if you also look at what they've kept and what they've allowed, there's this amazing balance between gamla Stan, the old town, set, you know, it can't get any bigger because it's on an island, connecting to the rest of it. There's an area where the palaces that can't get any bigger. It's on an island, and there's also a famous and kind of famously tutted at body that encourages people not to go too far beyond the strictures of the city. It's kind of the Nordic beauty council of the Stockholm beauty council, which stops you building too big, which stops you going too wide, which stops you, breaking that visual continuity that makes it incredible. And it's a respect for that built environment built over time that I think makes Stockholm such an incredible place, but I think the interesting thing is that you couldn't accuse Stockholm or the Nordics of living in the past. They're incredible experiments with timber towers with wooden architecture if you go to sudham, I guess they're kind of sure ditch equivalent may be of Stockholm. They're doing amazing things they're building new railway lines, they're connecting the city better and there's that room for innovation as well amongst the beautiful old townhouses in the correct proportions. So I think rather than knock everything down and start again. Stockholm, I think, succeeds because it keeps things a little bit the same and keeps a flavor of its illustrious past and everything it does in the future and I think that could probably teach certain cities rather a lot. Yeah, and just on that, you're right, it's not stuck in the parking lot. And of course, all these Nordic countries face some of the challenges that any city faces, how do you integrate new communities into the city, they have some certainly some neighborhoods which have some tougher issues going on. But again, when it comes back to the things you're talking about, there's also this invisible thing that helps the urban world and the Nordic world quite a lot of safety nets in place for people when they're unemployed and when they need help. Their social democracy shines through. But thank you, Josh. Let's go and have an open sandwich. I think that's what's on the cards for us. Definitely definitely. Well, that's all for this edition of the urbanist. Remember to subscribe to the program for your weekly dose of urbanism. You can find us wherever you get your podcasts or monocle dot com, and if you had to Monaco dot com slash shop, guess what? You can find the monocle book of the Nordics. Today's episode was produced by carlotta rebelo and David Stevens, and David also edited the show, and play you out this week. Here's one of Sweden's best known exports. ABBA, with summer night city. Thanks for listening, city lovers..

Stockholm Nordic beauty council of the S gamla Stan Josh carlotta rebelo Monaco David Stevens David Sweden
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Well, that's almost time to head off. But before we do, we're in Iceland where early last year, we investigated the eye catching architectural style that can be seen all around the world's northernmost capital. Here with an exploration into Reykjavík's ironclads, as heard on our sister show tour stories, is monocles Kimberly Bradley. When it comes to landscape, Iceland lives up to its cliche of being a land of fire and ice. Rugged, volcanic and Arctic. But in Reykjavík, the materials in question are less natural and highly unusual. In the city center, a lot seems to be clad in corrugated sheet metal. Houses large and small, simpler ornate, municipal buildings, mansions, even churches are covered in wavy iron than painted in bright colors. The corrugations run vertically, making for some jaunty stripes in the Icelandic capitals eclectic, colorful streetscape. Many of the houses are charmingly small and have sizable south facing backyards to catch what little sun might shine in the winter. Locals call the houses ironclads, and it's hard to imagine Reykjavík without them. I'm from the American Midwest and had never seen corrugated metal cladding beyond farm sheds, industrial factories and military huts, so I had questions. Was this a design decision made or a trend followed at one point in Icelandic architectural history? Is the iron about durability? How long have the house has been clad this way here? A bit of asking around yielded quick answers. The corrugated iron was indeed kind of a trend in the late 19th century until the early 20th, when icelanders still under Danish colonial rule but moving toward independence, were quickly transitioning from the traditional turf housing most of them lived in. Turf houses are unheeded longhouses sided with thick layers of packed earth and sod, and had to do with Iceland's lack of trees. Blame that last bit on the Vikings. Legend has it that they showed up centuries before and chopped down all the native forests to build ships and then made the land into sheep pastures. The trees never grew back, or if they did too slowly to use this construction material. So the ironclad's represented modernization and a move past poverty at the time. But they also had to do with early globalization. Around the turn of the past century, some icelanders had begun building prefab imported housing made of wood. But the island's rugged weather proved a bit too harsh for these homes to last long. The iron that the British had invented in 1828 and that its trading ships brought to Iceland, however, we stood the whipping winds and sheets of rain when galvanized and used as cladding. At first, only for rooftops, but then also for exterior walls. Corrugated iron sighting even protected buildings from a major fire that raged through Reykjavík in 1915. For decades, icelanders traded their hardy sheep with the British for the material, and after the fire until the mid 1920s, the capital city even enforced a building code requiring that new builds for sided in the stripey iron. The very center of Reykjavík is still packed with these squat one or two story gabled houses. Some of them are so small they're reminiscent of the current North American tiny house trend. Others sport the Swiss infused chalet style that appeared throughout Scandinavia at the time. White window frames, kitschy ornament and all. Iceland began building with hardy concrete in the 1930s and beyond. When Reykjavík began growing and the idea of apartment living began to catch on. And for a long while, the ironclads were seen as backward and uncool. But city preservation protections have been ramped up and more residents recognize that these houses charm and color only add to Reykjavík's welcoming intimate atmosphere. Welcoming and weatherproof, here it's an unbeatable combination. My thanks there to Kimberly Bradley. Well, before we head off, we thought we'd do a kind of live book review. And I've asked Josh fena, who's the editor of monocle. And a man who knows his Nordic capitals to come and join us here on the show and I think it's a wheelbarrow he's used to get this giant book in through the doors. It's a handsome beast. The book. I was gonna say, what were you referring to there? I'll take the confidence. Yeah, I just managed to wrestle a copy of our new book from our production editor Jackie. Obviously it's out available for people to buy from January 20th. We have some book launches coming up, but they're kind of few and far between in the office. They're kind of float past like icebergs in people's hands. And then they quickly melt and disappear into people's personal collections. It's a very handsome book and I'm delighted that a region that means so much to monocle throughout our reporting that cuts through from our worldview to our love of design has been rendered so beautifully by the books team. Well, backstory, so often the paper comes from Finland, one of our earlier investors was from Stockholm, still is. We've always had deep connections there at editor in chief had a house in the archipelago. So there's something about the atmosphere of the Nordic nations that was imbued into the pages of Monaco very early on. Now one of the places that you know quite well is Stockholm, you've done some reporting there, produce some kind of guides as well to the city in the past. What are the things that strike you when you go to a city like stock on what are the things that appeal to you? Well, I think it's funny it's true of Stockholm but it's true of the Nordics more generally as we kind of look through the headlines and see a more polarized world. There's also this other world and part of Northern Europe that is extremely good at speaking quietly and respectfully at espousing social democracy about thinking carefully about how cities are built about how what we eat is important about how the design of our homes is important. You know, as we sit in this studio, we're surrounded by I presume for its soundproof and qualities as well as it's nice, but Danish wool. And you know, these are countries that know how to make things at home. So what's special about Stockholm almost everything in my opinion, the food is great. There's a real sense of kind of small to medium scale cities done well, and also a sense that these are places that should be part of a broader debate about how we think about the world that we live in, how we think about making cities, making food, making clothes, making furniture, and they also make fur quite a nice place to go for the weekend. So that's never a bad thing, either. And I think what's interesting when you go there is a visitor, not just in the tourist heart. But the scale of the city is not a massive high rise city. Lots of apartment blocks. But all roughly the same high built in a kind of modest way. But because of the weather that had to learn how to make sure that places are properly insulated and have good windows and because of the darkness in the winter, they've had to think about lighting and street lighting and domestic lighting. So there's lots of small things that perhaps geography.

Reykjavík Iceland Kimberly Bradley American Midwest Josh fena Stockholm Arctic Vikings Scandinavia Jackie archipelago Finland Monaco Northern Europe
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:58 min | 10 months ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Michael booth found out. My name is Sebastian Aristotle, and I'm the cofounder of Sega space architects. Why don't we actually go inside your space house? We call it a space habitat a moon habitat. Just going past little portable toilet and into the cup. Actually, as we were coming in, it suddenly dawned on me. This is a maybe a bit of an unpleasant place for you to come back to because tell me how long did you actually spend living in here in Greenland? We spent we were two people for 61 days living inside of this four and a half square meter space habitat because you could go outside, but it was pretty cold and there were polar bears, right? Yeah, exactly. So we specifically chose northern Greenland a thousand kilometers north of the Arctic circle almost as far up you can get in Greenland. For the specific reasons that it's very, very cold. Because it's in human nature to cheat. So if you, after 50 days, it would have been easy if you wanted to cheat to go outside. But because it was so cold, we were forced to be inside 95% of the time. So we are standing right here in the living quarter, which is where we spend the majority of our waking hours. And then if we look up, we see two sleeping pots. So those are the most private parts of the habitat. And in one side, I would leave and in the other side cut would sleep. So this was actually designed to work both in graviton without gravity. So the rooms are stacked on top of each other because moving vertically on the moon is very easy because you don't weigh that much. So it was actually a bit harder in Greenland because we still weigh. I still weigh 85 kilograms. Tell me about the genesis of the project. Where did this start? So we are small architecture studio. We are about four years old. And for the first two years we worked very theoretically doing concepts of what we believe would be a better way of living in outer space. I think to give some context for about 50 years people and the entire space industry have worked on making people survive in outer space, but now when there's such a big industry just thinking about that, our purpose is to figure out how do we thrive in outer space? How do we actually make comfortable living spaces stimulating healthy living environments for future astronauts? And it's on Mars or the moon or of course that very different environment. Yeah, they are. Yeah, so we both work with in orbit. On the moon on Mars, but this space habitat this simulated moon habitat is for the moon. It's for the surface of the moon and very specifically. It's designed to stay at the peak of eternal light on the moon, which is on the South Pole, which is the destination where humans will set foot in a couple of years. Asa was just about to start architecture school a lot of things were happening in the space industry and specifically the innovations in travel in space travel in rockets. Specifically, you're more specifically SpaceX has been landing rockets and got really good at that. And that created a tiny slice of hope that maybe in my lifetime, people would set food on Mars. And that was enough for me to say, okay, if there's just a tiny chance that people would go on Mars and I love architecture. Maybe I can create the home for people on Mars and there's been I think almost 600 people in space. And there's been engineers and doctors and fighter pilots and all these professional trained astronauts. And I believe that our professional background shapes the solutions that we see. So we can see all the same problems. People have a hard time sleeping in space, people are alone in space, people are under stimulated in space, but our professional background makes us think of different solutions. Tell me about this solution. What's it made out of, how did you come to this conclusion? So this was a long design process. So first of all, the habitat unfolds. So we are standing right now in the unfolded habitat. When it's compact and when it's packed together, it's 7 and a half times smaller. It weighs 1.6 tons, and it's incredibly lightweight because it's made out of aluminum and carbon fiber. There has been made inflatable expanding volumes in space before, but never with rigid panels. So our entire habitat is inspired by origami, the Japanese, paper folding technique, and the benefit of Richard panels in the structure is that we can have solar panels on the outside. So we used the sun in Greenland to charge the batteries. So there was a completely off grid living system exactly like you would do in the moon. Who are you selling to? How do the economics of that work? Yeah, so that took us a while to figure out, but right now we are selling analog habitats or simulated habitats like this for research and education. So for example right now, it's been a year since we got back from the expedition. Right now we are developing our next habitat for client in Switzerland. And that habitat is informed by all the things that we learned from this expedition by living in it ourselves. And then it's going to be used for research. Can I ask how much one of these costs I can not put an exact number on it, but it's not cheap. It is a pretty expensive structure. Do you dream about going to space is that your long-term goal? Are you in touch with Elon Musk? We want to be the first architect in space is what I'm asking. I don't need to be the first architect in space, but I would lie if I said that I did not dream about going to space. We are in touch with SpaceX though. So we can count our potential clients on one hand, so right now it's the European space agency, we were rich in SpaceX and NASA. And the dealer Deutsche Luftwaffe. Sebastian's giant origami space egg is on exhibition.

Greenland Michael booth Sebastian Aristotle northern Greenland Arctic circle Sega SpaceX Asa Richard Switzerland Elon Musk European space agency NASA Deutsche Sebastian
Queen seems chatty at largest reception since health scare

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 10 months ago

Queen seems chatty at largest reception since health scare

"Britain's Britain's Britain's Britain's Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth the the the the second second second second has has has has attended attended attended attended technologist technologist technologist technologist events events events events since since since since the the the the recent recent recent recent health health health health scare scare scare scare on on on on the the the the eve eve eve eve of of of of her her her her seventieth seventieth seventieth seventieth anniversary anniversary anniversary anniversary of of of of her her her her accession accession accession accession to to to to the the the the throne throne throne throne the the the the monarch monarch monarch monarch could could could could be be be be seen seen seen seen laughing laughing laughing laughing and and and and chatting chatting chatting chatting at at at at an an an an offense offense offense offense at at at at Sandringham Sandringham Sandringham Sandringham in in in in Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk Norfolk the the the the ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five year year year year old old old old queen queen queen queen leans leans leans leans on on on on a a a a walking walking walking walking stick stick stick stick as as as as he he he he mingled mingled mingled mingled with with with with guests guests guests guests will will will will expect expect expect expect Robert Robert Robert Robert Lacey Lacey Lacey Lacey says says says says part part part part of of of of the the the the queen's queen's queen's queen's appeal appeal appeal appeal during during during during his his his his seventy seventy seventy seventy years years years years on on on on the the the the throne throne throne throne is is is is a a a a personality personality personality personality a a a king king king a a a British British British monocle monocle monocle queen queen queen is is is all all all about about about the the the person person person doing doing doing the the the job job job I I I mean mean mean that's that's that's what's what's what's its its its weakness weakness weakness but but but that that that can can can be be be its its its strength strength strength and and and has has has been been been the the the strength strength strength in in in the the the case case case of of of Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth the the the second second second duty duty duty seriousness seriousness seriousness a a a sort sort sort of of of gravitas gravitas gravitas but but but a a a sense sense sense of of of humor humor humor the the the upside upside upside down down down for for for the the the president's president's president's despite despite despite recent recent recent concerns concerns concerns about about about health health health Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth moved moved moved freely freely freely and and and appear appear appear to to to any any any cystic cystic cystic when when when she she she stopped stopped stopped Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas London London London

Britain Norfolk Queen Queen Queen Queen Elizab Sandringham Sandringham Sandri Robert Robert Robert Robert La Queen's Queen's Queen's Queen Elizabeth Elizabeth Elizabeth Cystic Cystic Cystic Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thoma London
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"My thanks to enigmas for that lovely report all the way from long eaten. I think it's my turn now to talk about my favorite piece of the year, but maybe we can do this as a team because I believe we were all at salone, maybe except for one, one poor Charlie film a court, but we'll definitely get you there. Someone had to keep it going back here, right? Exactly, but we were all in the sunshine together. And I feel like we were all together when we actually recorded this piece or we definitely met the Swedish girls as they're known Josephine and Meera, who put together one of my favorite exhibitions, maybe a salone ever, and I think the reason I loved it so much is because it was a showcase of young talent as part of this broader exhibition called alcova. And often when you see designers kind of entering the industry, their workers may be a little bit unpolished. It's not quite at that level where you know you could imagine it in a home or in a public space. Whereas with this piece that we're talking about, Nick, I think you'll probably agree. You stepped out onto this veranda space. And there's this beautiful like steel curved seating system and these little miniature seating systems executed with the highest level of polish and then the girls actually take you through the design process and the materials behind it. It's a Swedish steel they're using. And it's just super inspiring. I mean, did you have the same sort of reaction? Yeah, I mean, I think you might have actually been up on this terrace before me, but when I came out, instantly, you were drawn to it, and there were people already sitting on it. This might have been these might have been like, I guess, display part of the festival, I guess to show the potential of the design, but they were actually being used. I remember talking to Mira and Josephine about the actual work and we immediately dived into like, could this be rolled out somewhere? What would this look like in a city? Could this withstand the pressures of urban life? It wasn't about a showroom. It was immediately talking about it being applicable to real life. And I think that's the beauty of an event like this, but also at alcove actually seeing these works in a space that wasn't a gallery that was a building that had a life and is filled with pieces that I guess we're adding to the actual texture of the building is that the right word, but for sure. And I think your landscape architecture skills did come out on this occasion because you were literally imagining these pieces in their urban landscape, you were saying, you know, wouldn't this be great in a park like you could see it straight away. And I think you really encouraging them to get this out there on the market. Let's hear from Josephine Zach and miura bag. This is my interview with them at salona del mobile. We are at Alcoa in the terrace where we exhibit motion surrounded. It's a two project exhibition with a project called seat system, furniture series, and a glass project called mess. It's a series of glass sculptures. Yeah. And maybe you could outline what you'll actually sat on right now because it might not look super comfortable when you're looking at it, but when you sit on it, it's surprisingly comfy. So can you maybe explain the design, the material and how you've made it so beautiful? This is the original series. Now the series is like several different. But this is a chair that you can sit on different levels on it. You can see it's down there where you are sitting. And then you can sit up here where I'm sitting, which is like the height of a barstool. We kind of was inspired by movement and shadow play and the material itself, like still is so hard, and we wanted to make it have a soft outer. The series is called seat system, and it all circles around a circle, really. There's these lines that you can get in different degrees. So there's the stool that is 45° and this chair that we're sitting on now is 90° and this bench is 108° and it's all modular and we work a lot with social values to create interaction between people. And I guess one of the lovely things about all of these pieces is there's so many different variations, but they just sit so well together. It seems so seamless is that the material that does that is at the shapes and forms how have you made it feel super cohesive. We've been working a lot with non shapes like in between shapes that are only air or other elements so it can play with the room, both with lights and all the shadow place. It creates, and also the repetition, I think. Because that's what it has in common. So all the pieces are there a lot, but they're the same. They're all made of the same profile. That's just multiplied. A lot of times. So that makes it so simple in a way, but still so like strong aesthetically. And you guys are from Sweden. I don't want to stereotype Swedish design 'cause I know it's quite broad but you know I do go up to the furniture fair and you see like a lot of timber designs and then you also probably think about Ikea when you think about Sweden. But what is the kind of world that you're operating in there you talked about founding sort of a collective with other designers? What is new and exciting up there that you guys are involved in? We usually see that we kind of in between art and design. And that scene in Stockholm, Sweden, we really miss a lot. But I think we are seeing a little bit more about it more and more and maybe that's the thing we're part of. We're hoping to be part of starting something new in Stockholm to break down. I don't know, because it's very strict there. People really follow the rules and design. Like, art is art and design is design. And when you approach the sign with more sculptural values, I mean, Swedish design is traditionally very functional and very minimalistic and less is more but it can also I think for us we like to look at other values too. Art and design collectors with these girls is kind of also based on this like whole thing where we graduated and just wanted to create our own place to work and context where we can be ourselves because we couldn't really find it somewhere else. So we just had to create it ourselves. My thanks to Josephine, Zach Kristen and Mira bag there. And that's all the time we have on today's show my thanks to the team here in the studio. And for everyone listening, you can catch more design related programming on our 5 minute midweek sister show monocle on design extra. Today's show was produced by Charlie Phil mccord and mainly Evans, who also edited the show with assistance of Chris a Blackwater. Thanks to our researcher and in-house landscape architect Nick manis, I'm known the Giles. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye..

Josephine Josephine Zach salona del mobile Meera Mira Charlie miura Alcoa Nick Sweden Stockholm Ikea Zach Kristen Mira bag Charlie Phil mccord Evans Blackwater Nick manis Chris Giles
New York prepares for possible staff shortages as health care COVID vaccine mandate nears

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

New York prepares for possible staff shortages as health care COVID vaccine mandate nears

"Hospitals in new yorker expecting to lay off thousands of workers as a result of the new mandate requiring all healthcare employs to be vaccinated against the covert nineteen. Those who fail to comply with this mandate will be placed on unpaid leave in anticipation of stuff shortages. New york's new governor kathy. How cool is considering bringing in the national guard as well as vaccinated workers from other

Kathy New York
As Tunisia’s President Cements One-Man Rule, Opposition Grows

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:15 min | 1 year ago

As Tunisia’s President Cements One-Man Rule, Opposition Grows

"Two thousand and eleven revolution in tunisia triggered the arab spring and the country was hailed as a beacon of democracy. But now after the president's qeisi edge gave himself polit rule by decree two months after he sucked. The prime minister suspended parliament and assumed executive authority. Several thousand people have demonstrated against him in the biggest show of public anger since his coup. Well joining me. Eliza volkmann a freelance journalist based in tunis elizabeth. Thanks for coming on. How has tunisia reach this point. Since the heady days of two thousand eleven what happened to the democratic gains the the big problem in tunisia has been a downward spiral intensive While it's been negative economic development unfortunately The there's been a lot of problems within parliament's because the complicated list system has meant that this never been a majority policy. So one of the big problems politically is that you've just had this very kind of rambunctious politics point-scoring within the assembly and not the type of results that would have liked to

Tunisia Eliza Volkmann Tunis Elizabeth Parliament Assembly
Fuel pumps run dry in British cities, sowing supply chain chaos

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Fuel pumps run dry in British cities, sowing supply chain chaos

"Ninety percent of petrol stations in the uk have run dry d to chronic delivery problems causing an enormous knock-on effect across all factors. The healthcare system appears to be crumbling. A combination of price rises tax increases and benefit cuts will leave the poorest british families. A thousand pounds out of pocket and there seems to be no viable opposition. As the labor party descends into kaethe the. Uk is a mess. Does boris johnson's government have plan. When i'm joined by vincent mcilvanney monocle. Twenty fools political correspondent to investigate that vinnie. Let's start with fuel you've been in yorkshire talking to a haulage company. The root of this problem is the shortage of drivers. Tell us mole. Yeah that's right. Spent yesterday morning with a haulage company. Just outside of said they do haulage right around the uk they have forty two big eighteen wheelers and they deliver all kinds of things and i spoke to a couple of drivers guys who've done this for decades and they said you just cannot get young people into this profession that they don't want that lifestyle anymore. When you climb into one of these trucks that i was in yesterday it has a fridge stocked with food for the week so they can at least try and eat healthily. It has a microwave has a bed and they will drive up and down the country. They will sleep in that cab but the problem is as well on top of that They don't have access to proper facilities because there are currently around fifteen thousand spaces short for them to park at service stations in the uk. Hey so they end up often sleeping slipways on the sides of roads and then they're only facilities for them so it is a very strange lifestyle that some of these guys live and something that younger men More used to being home more used to having a work life balance wanting to see wives in kids. They don't want to do that

Kaethe Vincent Mcilvanney UK Boris Johnson Labor Party Vinnie Yorkshire
France-US Spat: What happens when diplomatic relations turn sour?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

01:38 min | 1 year ago

France-US Spat: What happens when diplomatic relations turn sour?

"Me. I to explain not so much what france. He's angry about as why. France is being quite so demonstrative in its anger is agnes poirier author of not saddam the sole of france. So agnes. we don't want to get too bogged down in the details of the diplomatic spat which involves australia. The united states the united kingdom and france. But we want to talk more about the diplomatic spatters. An idea in this program both in theory and in practice. But let's start with france's participation in this particular diplomatic spat a. You surprised that. France is being quite so expressive as it is. I was at first when i first heard about that sim rain contract. I mean i knew it had been signed five years ago. Sign you about it. But it was remote souvenir and so i was quite struck. Yes by the force with which show young who is usually very cow passan. Very cautious minister very appreciated. Actually minister on the right and on the left informs used to be a defense an army ministers now the foreign affairs minister for france saying the morning when he talked about stabbing the bike etc. Everybody thought hang on a minute. There's something to it expire unusual for him and so we looked carefully at the small print and we looked into it and of course as the days passed and the anger was even more palpable. We sort of understood. What was it stake and why the french government was behaving that way

France Agnes Poirier Agnes Saddam United Kingdom Australia United States Army French Government
Inside the US-Australia Submarine Deal

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Inside the US-Australia Submarine Deal

"The dutch prime minister mark rutta will reportedly offer his uk counterpart. Boris johnson a defense and security cooperation. Deal with the eu. When the leaders meet in downing street later today it follows yesterday's announcement that the uk. The united states and australia had agreed their own defense. Pack called aucas. the deal has angered many. You states with france calling australia's decision to scrap a huge submarine. Deal in favor of eight nuclear powered subs deal with the us establish back. Let's get the latest now from paul rogers international security advisor at open democracy. Paul some very harsh words from paris. Today tell us what happened here. I on the australian deal and why the french are feeling blindsided by it over the australian deal. The australians essentially decided to replace their existing collins class submarines richard come to the end of their useful life with new pout submarines rather than diesel-powered submarines. The previous decision was to gain with france which has quite a good recorder producing diesel-powered submarines. It can actually produce a new pout. Submarines for self. I don't think he's ever exported them considered it. But anyway australia's decided they need to new capelle. Submarines had this deal with the french for the best essentially for the Diesel-powered ones they basically dish that and gone in with the united states with britain as well although the suspicion is that as far as the building of the new submarines consent bush will be done as an australian yard in adelaide. That will be done. Under american supervision with the british relatively small this is partly because britain is producing own new class of astute hunting submarines as well as its missile submarines an in both cases. It has pretty serious problems with developing the reactors rolls royce history. Having great difficulty in getting things right the to another words in america wants a more reliable. So that's the basis of it. The the fringe obviously are pretty furious of this because what was a pretty big contract with a lot of money in. It was basically dish in favor of a basic and anglo american agreement. So that's the background this at beyond that. Of course you have all the issues in the eu and the whole question of how one handles a rapidly growing china which does have increasing military capabilities.

Boris Johnson Paul Rogers Paul Today Yesterday Adelaide Mark Rutta Paris Prime Minister Australian Eight Nuclear Powered Subs Both Cases America China France Anglo Australia Australians Dutch Later Today
U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 1 year ago

U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

"The biden administration's efforts to counter chinese dominance in asia and support allies in the region is gathering steam. This week the us uk and australia agreed a landmark security pact in the indo pacific. The move will see australia. Build nuclear powered submarines for the first time the pack will also cover artificial intelligence cyber and quantum technologies. So what does all this mean for australia. Monaco's contributor in canberra ardebili. Gary sent us. This report the news that ustralia is going to be getting nuclear-powered submarines came out of the blue five years ago. We signed an agreement with the french to provide us with diesel-powered submarines. It has since become clear that these technology would not be adequate to meet security challenges. Plus they wouldn't be delivered for almost twenty years at the same time. Need security partnership between australia. The us and uk was announced called aucas. All of this is pretty big knees. Even if you're not someone to spend a lot of time thinking about submarines the full details haven't yet been announced but it is clear that it's all about sending a strong message to china. Tensions between australia and china has been increasing over the past few years so this deal is all about australia. Proving to beijing that it has big and powerful allies that it can rely on but it will get australia. Offside with other friends new zealand and pacific countries are avowedly anti nuclear. Oh new zealand has already said it won't allow the subs in its waters. Australia is a signatory to the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. So we can expect that e inspectors will be doorsteps wanting access and china has put out a statement. Saying it's irresponsible big questions now. Are this tacitly. Say that his strategy is undoubtedly in a cold war situation with china. And just how much safer will australia. Now be

Australia Biden Administration Indo Pacific Ardebili Ustralia Aucas UK Monaco Canberra Asia Gary China United States New Zealand Beijing
Nicaragua: How to Write Yourself Into Exile

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Nicaragua: How to Write Yourself Into Exile

"There is only one good thing to be said for the spectacle of a given government picking on writers and novelists and artists of any description. It saves the busy bypass whatever valuable time. They may have spent wondering whether the government in question still has all marbles in one sock when a given government starts picking on writers and novelists and artists of any description. It is announcing itself as tyrannical foolish and deranged. Such is the unhappy if altogether unsurprising point arrived at by the regime of daniel ortega president of nicaragua as demonstrated by its issue of a warrant for the arrest of sergio ramirez. Probably nicaragua's best known and most admired novelist. One time winner of the guel devotees prize awarded by spain's ministry of culture to recognize outstanding spanish language literature and therefore a peer of borges for enters vargas loeser and pass among other distinguished scrivener's any has split wishing to note at this point that the warrant has been issued by nicaragua's state prosecutors and not by the presidency has not been paying much attention to the evolution of ortega's thinking vis-a-vis the separation of powers ramirez. Who took the clearly sensible precaution of leaving nicaragua a few months back and is now resident in costa rica stands accused of inciting hatred and conspiring to undermine the integrity of the country. What ramirez actually appears to have done is written a novel entitled tonga. Lali did not know how to dance. An exceedingly thinly veiled parable set in contemporary nicaragua. who's people being terrorized by overstaying revolutionary government. Which has long since abandoned whatever principles may once have animated it and is now concerned only with maintaining power at any price up to and including the blood of its own citizens

Nicaragua Sergio Ramirez Vargas Loeser Daniel Ortega Ministry Of Culture Scrivener Ramirez Spain Ortega Lali Rica Costa Tonga
Boris Johnson Hopes to Meet Biden for Talks at White House

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson Hopes to Meet Biden for Talks at White House

"British media reports that prime minister. Boris johnson will travel to washington later this month for a frank conversation with the us. President joe biden. The means income says attesting time for the special relationship between washington and london. With both johnson's allies and foes in westminster questioning whether they can rely on. Us support after the hasty withdrawal of american forces from afghanistan. Let's get the latest now with thomas gift director of the ucla sensor on us politics. Thank you very much for joining us this afternoon. Thomas so first of all. How necessary is this face to face. Meeting between these lead us. Well it's great to be with you. Marcus and thanks so much for joining me. I think it's particularly significant time for the two leaders to mate especially given what happened in the aftermath of afghanistan. I think the first point to note here is really the obvious that boris johnson is reaching out to joe biden about holding a meeting and not the other way around reflects the rather straightforward state of affairs that the uk needs the united states more than the united states needs the uk both countries of course would prefer to be on good terms with one another and a healthy working transatlantic. Collaboration is in the interest of both london and washington. However despite the special relationship the power imbalance is real. And i think what we saw with afghanistan and what the johnson administration really has to come to terms with is that joe biden is not unlike any other leader in that. He's going to prioritize interest of his home country. It's clear that he wanted out about kenniston that he thought exiting afghanistan was in the best interest of the united states and that very little would've changed his mind. And that was the case. Regardless of what the u k thought or any other western ally for that matter but against this backdrop. I think it is a timely opportunity for both leaders to get together over over a table and kind of talk through things. What happened and how they can do things better

President Joe Biden Boris Johnson Thomas Gift United States Afghanistan Washington Joe Biden Westminster London Ucla Johnson Marcus UK Thomas Kenniston Johnson Administration
Is Taiwan About to Lose Another Long-Term Ally to Beijing?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Is Taiwan About to Lose Another Long-Term Ally to Beijing?

"Is the upcoming election in honduras in central america causing a storm over fourteen thousand kilometers away in east asia. The answer is the country's longstanding relationship with taiwan which china claims as its own territory and allegations that beijing is trying to undermine the historical ties between taipei and all seagull palm. Well some some ellis bloomberg's taipei bureau chief. And he's on the line with more something. Can you begin by filling us in on that relationship between taiwan and honduras. Well hundreds is one of taiwan's last few remaining official diplomatic allies so one of the last few countries anywhere in the world. The officially view taiwan as a country so photon The importance of maintaining as many of these last fifteen allies as possible is huge. Like it is Really crucial to maintaining. It's the tight covered. Taipei governments claimed that. Taiwan is a sovereign independent country separate from the people's republic china. Now of course the relations that These last few allies have with taiwan officially the republic of china taiwan the state. And taiwan's official name. You know a legacy. Leftover from the government that used to rule china before the people's republic had sleds to taiwan during the civil war. And so you know over the last eight years. More and more countries have been switching recognition to beijing. As the people's republic of china is the official government of china. So y- taiwan is is very much invested in maintaining these last few allies as as possible Because it really does. Maintain this claim that taiwan suffered sovereign independent

Honduras Ellis Bloomberg Taipei China Central America East Asia Beijing
Iran to Allow UN Nuclear Watchdog to Service Monitoring Equipment

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Iran to Allow UN Nuclear Watchdog to Service Monitoring Equipment

"Yesterday an agreement was reached between the head of the united nations nuclear watchdog and iran's nuclear chief. It's hoped this will prevent another crisis looming over the prospect of restoring. Iran's two thousand fifteen nuclear deal. The hastily-arranged meeting comes after the international atomic energy agency. The ira released to worrying reports sharing the agency's concern over iran's nuclear program. Holly digress is senior fellow at the atlantic council and curator of the iranian newsletter. She joins me now to discuss this. All you can you tell us what was within those reports. What are the. Ira ea specific concerns. Well these two reports were confidential and so what we learned about it basically. Was that the two issues. The international atomic energy agency had noted specifically was that iran had not given urgent access to some of its monitoring equipment to swap out memory cards and the other one. Was that There hadn't been any There there were actually still for the past year looking into investigating uranium traces. That were found at several old undeclared sites and iran had yet to provide answers for them. So these were too large concerns. The iowa had about iran's nuclear program and so there was some worries last week When these two reports came out because of course There hadn't been any talk since june. And the fact that raphael grassi there were talks that he would visit tehran and that these memory cards had actually ran out of space so they had they have to be switch every three months and without these memory cards on these security cameras. That monitor iran's nuclear program. They wouldn't be able to see what's going

Iran International Atomic Energy Ag Holly Digress Atlantic Council United Nations IRA Raphael Grassi Iowa Tehran
Biden Calls Xi as US-China Relationship Grows More Fraught

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Biden Calls Xi as US-China Relationship Grows More Fraught

"Us president joe biden has held a lengthy phone conversation with his chinese counterpart xi jinping the first time the leaders from the world's most powerful countries have talked in seven months. A white house statement said both men had discussed. The responsibility of both nations to ensure competition does not veer into conflicts. Let's get more on this now with former. Us diplomat. Louis lukens lose now. A senior partner at the consultancy cigna global. Good afternoon to you lou and tell us this phone call after a hiatus does he represent a real meaningful breakthrough in your view. Hey tom i think it's too early to tell. If this is a meaningful breakthrough. But i think it is significant. As you mentioned there was a quite a height as they hadn't spoken the two leaders for seven months and this book for ninety minutes yesterday which include interpretation that that's forty five minutes of substantive discussion so it's meaningful in the sense that it's important. The leaders of these two countries communicate and talk and try to find areas that they can cooperate and work together. And that's what joe biden has been trying to. Do i think so whether this results in a ratcheting down of tension. I think remains to be seen. But it's certainly a step in the right direction

Louis Lukens Cigna Global Xi Jinping Joe Biden White House United States LOU TOM
Race to Succeed Japan PM Suga Heats up

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Race to Succeed Japan PM Suga Heats up

"Is now a wink. Since japan's prime minister yoshihiko super said he is to stand down as leader of the ruling. Ldp the race to succeed him is already in full swing. Well let's get the latest now for monaco's tokyo bureau chief in asia editor funeral wilson Good to have you with us. Thanks for joining us. Fear with good very good afternoon. Good morning to you. And now has the announcement of sucres departure really sunk in among the japanese yet. I mean it was. It was quick. It wasn't necessarily great surprise but it was a bit of a shock. Actually it was surprised he actually resigned. Honestly that was a shock because on thursday he was saying he was going to stand for re election as leader. If the ldp of course everyone knew this election was going to happen at the end of the month. Trenchant temper no surprise there but it looked like he was gonna run. He was getting all his Pieces in place softening up the right people look like he had and then suddenly on friday. He said no. I'm resigning and it seems that he was really hope by the The big the heavyweights in the party. It was time to go so it was a surprise. It has sankei. And i think there's been a lot of dissection in the media and the candidates are now emerging so who are the front runners in all this well. It looks at the moment. I mean lots of names have been mentioned obviously and anyone who follows japanese politics and you have to follow it closely to know who lost these people are but it looks like it's going to be a three way race basically. You've go tara conner. Who's the front runner. He's the man in charge of vaccines at the moment administrative reform. He's the one most people think he certainly has popular support. He's he's a bit of a loose cannon in some ways. He's very good at disrupting. He's not always good building consensus. I think he's the front runner. You have to mir kishida former foreign minister and sunai takeuchi. Who's the wildcard. I would say former intern faz. Minister earned would be japan's first female prime minister and she is being back rather curiously. I have to say patients up. Who's obviously still very influential. But in every other sense i would say she's an outlier.

Yoshihiko Super Wilson Good Monaco Tokyo Japan Asia Tara Conner Mir Kishida Sunai Takeuchi
Hong Kong Arrests Pro-Democracy Leaders Behind Tiananmen Vigil

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Hong Kong Arrests Pro-Democracy Leaders Behind Tiananmen Vigil

"Several members of one of hong kong's pro democracy groups have been arrested over accusations of foreign collusion. The hong kong alliance is well known in the city for its role in organizing an annual vigil for victims of the deadly nineteen eight thousand nine tiananmen square. Crackdown

Hong Kong Alliance Hong Kong Tiananmen Square
Poland Imposes State of Emergency on Belarus Border

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:20 min | 1 year ago

Poland Imposes State of Emergency on Belarus Border

"A state of emergency has been declared by poland along its border with belarus. The government in warsaw claims that the belorussian authorities a pushing migrants in poland direction. There's also the added problem of upcoming military exercises led by russia but opposition politicians have pushed back against poland's move saying it's disproportionately tough joining me. Now from warsaw is johanna chin guy. Who's a political journalist for reuters. Good morning jonah. Morning just tell us. What's the situation. So currently poland had been well parts have been in a date of emergency since last thursday at the border right. Now there's a lot of military they're they're continuing to build a border fence And media and ngos are no longer allowed to be in that. Three radius of epa parts of the border. Do we know as a result of the fact that we have a media blackout on this but do not see what's happening. It's difficult to tell for that exact reason because there's no longer media on border her. Most of the time at there was basically ngo that was stationed at part of the border. Where thirty two migrants. Who are stuck. And they were giving daily reports about the situation and now that stopped so it's much more difficult to tell what's going

Poland Warsaw Johanna Chin Belarus Jonah Russia Reuters EPA
The Taliban Have Taken Over Afghanistan

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

The Taliban Have Taken Over Afghanistan

"The taliban have declared victory. In the eastern provinces of punchier the part of afghanistan to fall under their control the group posted of their pfizer raising their flag in the territory however the region's resistance groups maintain. They haven't been defeated.

Taliban Afghanistan Pfizer
Fighting Continues in Panjshir Valley as Anti-Taliban Resistance Vows to Hold Out

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Fighting Continues in Panjshir Valley as Anti-Taliban Resistance Vows to Hold Out

"The taliban have declared victory. In the eastern provinces of punchier the part of afghanistan to fall under their control the group posted of their pfizer raising their flag in the territory however the region's resistance groups maintain. They haven't been defeated. Let's get the latest now with surgeon. Gazelle a visiting teacher at the london school of economics. Welcome to the program. So is john. Do you think the war is really over now homeless. Do we actually know about what's been happening in punchier. Well the war has perhaps An ended in the sense that the taliban have declared victory across afghanistan but there will be another conflict internally where you will see pockets of resistance across the ghanistan against taliban role and that is something that will likely last for years come because there is resistance towards the taliban at the moment it is not significant enough to concern them but it is something that is noticeable and it is getting a support across many of the urban centers of the country. And what about in in pens year. The region's resistance groups. They claim that they are still fighting. Well the resistance in punchier. Is that now off. A insurgency ironically similar to how the taliban used to be previously the punchier valley is a geographically very difficult place to control. It's god valleys and ridges and no one had previously been able to take control of it. Not even the soviets during the occupation of aghanistan in the nineteen eighties. So the fact that the taliban claiming victory and they've been able to hoist their flag in the capital of punchier is significant but they don't entirely controlled into the whole region off the punt share valley. There are still some pockets of resistance.

Taliban Afghanistan Gazelle London School Of Economics Pfizer Punchier Valley John Aghanistan
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"The necessity for these services things like us clubs so the not the shared number of youth clubs that have been caught across london and the country and removed from the availability of so blend community life. If if a young person who pays for their life oil doesn't necessarily have a very peaceful home life for shows either being excluded at school. When they're walking on the street. I get stopped and such entreated may be heavy-handed by the police. All of these things set in and a youth club might be a place that they can feel safe. And i try and show this repeatedly in control you know someone like call for example feels extremely constantly at risk but when he steps into the youth club he can he can have space to talk to you to have mentoring sessions. So i think that is easy. There's a low of there's been an all talk about youth clubs being con. You've subs is being caught. But the problem is people. Don't know why that's important and i try and show that in cut short is this. This is one of why the is failing young people because he doesn't recognize that these support systems are life and death. lifelines they unnecessary and so cutting things. I that boso inclusion teams in schools. You know the the social problems that young even bringing into school was growing and they were just not is not the infrastructure. There is not the staff base often to be able to support them properly. So there's lots of different directions. That goes in writing about dmitri. He looks out across london and sees all these high rise buildings with dark windows. And that really comes to to speak to the impact of gentrification how how does that run alongside youth violence. Gentrification is really is essentially are used inch interpretation almost as proxy or as a as a medium through which to explore of inequality so. I think i would argue that. Gentrification so the process of of an area's changing often developing in a way that allows those who capitalize who owned land to profit and that oversee in london in particular but in other cities of course the western world has meant that often poor communities get displaced because that land becomes after and as a result. The local comas ends up suiting. The people moving in and making it more and more difficult for the people for the communities that live there before to survive and and feed themselves and just navigate life in general and through the character of dmitri bowl of other people in social. You see how the pressure and the fear of displaced set in and dmitry has often expressed this. He said this to me recently when we film for cultural recent People should check out on the penguin. Uk youtube channel and in that he sums out very well..

boso london dmitri dmitry youtube Uk
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"I'll have a movie more about his rights of the right to seeing the side of him that we don't see and then finally we have possibly i. I would argue saying the leading political satire editorial cartoonist in the world moment patrick pat and that adds an element of the graphics. We've got the traditional print. Also regarding distilling ataman graphic adamant and we've got switzerland covid franz cover the united states covered and very sadly will not able to have eluded bell near which would be representing an english english. Because of the same reasons that eugene were able to make it to the event in person but he has promised that he would be attending while shot. Twenty twenty two and of course. We're were not only missing. These wonderful presentations were also missing. Lots of great communal dinners and parties in the whole social side. That goes along this way. You make an excellent point georgina. Because that is something that was always in. My vision will dream When i conceived this idea is i wanted to be an opening direction. Dialogue without any kind of celebrity without any commercial aspect of publishes trying to promote themselves without books that will just being comfortable environment in fact all the present who have been invited was specifically told that we will also be very happy to host the houses and young children if they couldn't leave the children at home so it's a very inclusive event. And as you say it'll be a series of males that will be In various local spots in the village i also activities to hikes and visit cheese makers on saturday. So it's more than just an academic exercise now. This is all happening this weekend. And unfortunately the public kant just turn up and that again bucked onto covert but they can access what's been going on later through your website. They can raise up because it reminds me two points on the outside. That could be interesting for the listeners. Is that we never. I never intended this to be as small as it is. So small as it is it's re looking at about fifty attendees and the six Who will be coming. But this was done deliberately. Not only for the intimacy point. I made it also as you say. For the covert restriction reasons however it is not only our intention to publish on the website will they professionally recorded presentations to shed with the world. But also it's important to note that we already thinking ahead to next year in the years ahead will have. The original concept will hopefully be executed and that concept was. We will sell tickets for anybody who wants to buy a ticket up to the cop and i wouldn't want to commit to any number but we're hoping to in our second year we get funding and if we have the support of Literary foundations to help us get off the ground that would be the one two hundred people level without fifteen speakers so it'll be here a slightly different dynamic. But i still think it merits the name symposium because there is still that level of intimacy absolutely thomas finally..

six saturday second year fifteen speakers next year thomas english patrick pat two points two hundred people about fifty attendees Twenty twenty two united states this weekend one switzerland
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

"Working in the finance industry in two thousand and nineteen. She received a london writers award in the tree. Fiction category where she developed her very well received debut novel assembly. The tasha brown. Welcome to monaco reads. Hi thank you for having me. I read your book in one sitting. Granted it's not long but it obsolete utterly compelling and for me what it felt like was that all of the literature that came out of the black lives matter movement had come of age that this was part to that this sophisticated du safely written utterly moving and challenging read. That made one question everything. In a way that has a previous literature had been a little like a blunt cautious over the head. This was a silken untangling of all of these threads that make this argument. While i guess i guess what i'm asking is this seems to me. The natural successor of of all of the first wave of literature that came off the back of the black lives matter movement. I think the great pricing and thinking sorry don at the moment fed into how i approached assembly but i also wanted to look backwards so i started reading a lot of You know frantz fanon bell hooks cornell west loss of some of the older thinking bats exposed during my education and really tried to understand how they were approaching some of the same challenges and topics that we're talking about today and also little bit deeper meeting. Samal i suppose critical theory around Structuralism post structuralism getting basic foundation linguistics. All of this. It seems to me was really important to understand to try. And get the the cabinet. Talk about without current mets light. Because i think it's quite is quite complex. And so i wanted to come at it with as much background information as i could. But i think there's a lot in some of the older thinking writing. That's been done that i felt was really helpful to feed in. I the conversation today. Let me see. The basic story is black british woman working in the finance industry. Much like yourself. She's preparing to go to a love each party at her boyfriend's family state that very english and and all the rest of it and into that you have written some of the most excruciating lies. I mean it's it's it's real it's real examination of colonialization but the way you talk about how how bones broken to fit into the system and so on thank you i. I really wanted to kind of take this idea of a physical experience. And what what. The narrator experiences moves through the different spaces. She enterprise physically. What she here's what she sees what she fails and try and marry that with. I suppose the thought the thought she's having and the compensations that she wants to be able to have. Because i think sometimes we focus too much on the theory all too much on the physical and i wanted examined the interplay between two Now previously you've talked about this book saying that you want to write something in which a person of color has it. All but still is totally happy. Just unpack that for me. Sure yes. I was kind of my intention going into writing assembly but it was something i noticed when i was looking at it. As a whole really doing some structural big piece edits and lots of the novels and stories. I've enjoyed have been about characters who you all quite comfortable quite happy but still dissatisfied of one reason or another a honeyed. Crushes intimacy was a big influence..

two two thousand one sitting today first wave each party brown nineteen one Samal one question writers english british black london frantz fanon
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Rooms have accustom fiber piece. It was designed for the space in curated. Space it's really powerful art program in the hotel and of course as usual will have a chef partner who will join us soon to open our kitchen and assisted dr democrats going to contribute to brooklyn in its food history. Were really going to have a very special opportunity to have a demo kitchen near where we can feature a lot of the chefs. Help our people to come back post coated and tell their story. I think apple become real. Focus for us in brooklyn as we come open. Brad wilson the president of the ace hotel group in conversation with monaco's daniel bates on the latest edition of the entrepreneurs in celebration of summer. Finally joining us here in london. Let's send this week's edition of curator with a favourite tipple for food neighborhoods this week. Demand behind london's call miss galleria shares. One of his favorite cocktail recipes maximum shelter originally from germany. Now here in. London co previously worked and travels mostly through asia wilson east. And they're always and bass mostly hotel. So i'm gonna explain to you a bit about our sebok. Phone call on french seventy-five cocktail behalf. On our menu. French seventy five very classic champagne cocktail of sparkling wine cocktail normally with gin and lemon citrus. Sugar and talked up with champagne. Our version here. We wanted to challenge us and try. Get meskel into a champagne cocktail so we you see about phone. Because it's possibly one of the only ingredients that grows in the uk that gives you an bright acidity and tartness like citrus too. So i won't see villainous from scotland on the branch frozen on the branch and it's quite hent breaking work. If i can put it that way to get it off and then we steep this into an expert in moscow quite light not too smoky. Because you don't want to have that through in that sort of refreshing. It's about me. We stood for three months filtered. It out got like an addition office city fruit. Tina seabrook thrown is amazing. It has also a lot of orange flavors in that. And i think i've read somewhere. It's probably one of the healthiest fruits. There is like the amount of antioxidants and vitamins and through. We passed with a mexican corn. Lacuna call mice. Nick stor and it gives a great richness to it. It built an off flavor as well because people wouldn't spot necessarily calm. But i would like to compare it with. Brioche has a rich brady flavor and that compared with this freshness and toddlers of the seabrook and the mascot is just fantastic. We do that. We add a tiny tiny bit of seabrook from pure as well just to give a bit more brightness to it then shake it up and topped up sparkling one but now we wanted to find another link to mexico and actually i gave it to santiago to try and he was like you know what needs to be chilly in the of course the needs to be chilly in there because every one of dishes chilly so i expected a common lettuce but then i got reminded of when i was in thailand. A lot of fruit. When you buy it at a vendor on the street you will get chilly saw with it and you can dip the fruit into chili salt. And it's just an amazing combination so we wanted to have that flavor commission and deliver that experience or that memory. Let's say you know. Deliver that memory of fruit with chilies soul.

london Brad wilson thailand germany sebok uk scotland Tina seabrook santiago mexico three months asia wilson east this week one brooklyn One mexican London ace hotel group seabrook
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Your with a curator. Our weekly highlight show here on monocle. Twenty four. I'm carla rebelo up next. We look back at our show dedicated to the world of business. It is of course the entrepreneurs. Brad wilson is the president of the ace hotel group which is set to open. Its latest property in brooklyn's boerum hill. Where toronto property soon to follow a surprise itself on looking at different kinds of existing buildings in off the beaten track neighborhoods and to find out more about the latest offerings. Brad joined the shows host. Daniel h the early aces that alex developed. Seattle was very small hotel. It really didn't carry a lot of what i think. People think of is the kind of the social health aspect of ace hotel. Think some of that really started when they opened portland lobby and being connected to the stump town coffee in just that lobby became surprisingly active for relatively small space. It was going a communal environment. It ended up. You know attracting people to pound away on their laptops and meet and greet in. It really did become small hub for that city. Certainly that portland lobby was kind of the precedent Dan later reinterpreted. In collaboration with roman and williams to create kind of the ace new york lobby. Which certainly as new york lobby in many ways. It's kind of our flagship. I meant so many people think of at lobby when they think of ace and its ability really to be a workspace by day a cocktail place in the evenings and even a club at night really transforms overtime to the lifestyle of its inhabitants. And so it's a really fun living human space. We're very inspired by a and it's interesting in the industry that lobby kind of was the label of ace hotel in to us. It was really about the social environment. The scene it was created there and we recreate that all the time. It's just that we recreate it through a different lens. Everywhere we go. It's not a programmer standard. We're putting lobby everywhere to attract people. It's actually in every environment. So when we went to los angeles for instance a lot of people were asking us like what what. What's the lobby. actually interesting that la hotel. It was originally a sixteen hundred seat theater and a very small office tower. So that didn't actually have a lot of space on the first floor. We still operate to sixteen hundred seat. Theater restored it. It's gorgeous in the hotel. Next door has a check in a restaurant on the first floor but really has no lobby. People thought that was crazy. Considering the expectation probably built from the new york lobby but we transferred a garden rooftop into similar kind of social hub and it probably is a lot more. What la is. It's an indoor outdoor life. There's a pool you can sit around. You can drink coffee under a tree. And that's really what i think is critical for the way atelli teams think is every environment is really different and so while we have certain expectations of our hotels i think our guest as well as social environments each one will end up being very specific to its own location in new orleans. We bring in a jazz club into the lobby and these kind of things so it really is an opportunity to create a hang out there frequently. Obviously music base and things of that sort and as we grow. I think there's a lot of were get a lot of credit for having created a lot of the idea programming in hotels whether it be our bingo night in the diner restaurant palm springs or dj nights in the lobby in new york. We kind of added that thought process of energizing hotels through programming which has become bigger and bigger in the industry. It's interesting for us. it really started. I think because the new york in palm springs hotels opened right into recession. There was a real need to kind of make these places known to get the word out. So i think the programming article kelly sodden whenever partners vary involved in building that structure in our company continues today with a lot of great people and i think that continues to kind of keep that energy around our hotels. Talk to me a little bit about the newest property coming into the fold. And that is in brooklyn. I believe again like the mid town hotel. You're working with. You've worked with roman and williams as designers talked me about what we can expect for when many of us can get back on a plane and come visit you in brooklyn as we're coming out a covert and approaching the opening of our brooklyn hotel which is kind of for us in long anticipated. And we're planning to open probably mid july. It feels now that the timing is brilliant was probably more accidental than brilliant. But certainly i. It will probably end up being a good opportunity for us to come out of color pen. Hope in what. I think is gonna be really spectacular. Hotel brooklyn was very much an opportunity for us to bring back the crowds. Roman williams came back. They designed a new york probably close to ten years ago. Coming back and joining us to design brooklyn but also at the same time represent a lot of the evolution. We've had over the period of moving through said historic buildings into more modern buildings into purpose. Built buildings as brooklyn is we really collaborated closely with roman and williamson can of what is ace now. End coming into brooklyn looking at brooklyn not just as part of new york brooklyn as the city itself the true sense of brooklyn as like a working city and kind of the strain to that so the building ends up representing us slightly route. A-list compression possibly but the interiors very warm modernist interiors think really coupled into beautiful space. We do have to pay a new york style lobby but it has the real kind of modern feel. That's warm and inviting in philo sunlight during the day. Beautifully warm in the evenings at night. So it's kind of like a new york but very different it's less manhattan mode. Say we do have a an interior garden which we call springs feed garden sun-filled space and spills out into an art gallery. So it's a really interesting program. And i think probably the highlight at least for me. 'cause it's really interesting to see the art programs as they develop in the our program. This hotel curated by nikki. To auto is fiber and textile based art in each of the guest..

Brad new orleans Brad wilson first floor kelly sodden carla rebelo los angeles williams brooklyn sixteen hundred seat mid july ten years ago today new york Daniel h Seattle each one williamson nikki Dan
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Big story rumbled on across the week. Was that of naomi. Muzak has withdrawal from the french open. The wti number two ranked tennis player withdrew from media duties at the french open on the grounds of mental health resulting in a barrage of criticism from prominent voices in sports and media. After being faced with a fine from the tournament. She made a decision on monday to withdraw altogether prompting a wide range of debate on mental health and media pressures in elite sport to find out more monaco's alexis self spoke to kaitlin thomson the co founder and publisher of tennis magazine rocket. He began by asking her. Whether this strong media reaction was to be expected. I wish i could say i was surprised. About how the tennis press has taken this. I've been as the publisher of an independent media company within the tennis landscape calling for a overall change in how we approach. Press what we do with the access how we're talking to these players during a tournament for years. I've always gotten a very sort of Clutching response from the largely. White largely old largely sort of archaic media infrastructure. And so i wish. I could say i was surprised. And that niamey's couching of this withdrawal. In the mental health context would have been met with a little bit more empathy. But i can't say i'm terribly surprised that these are folks who are terribly concerned about their futures of their jobs more than they're concerned about the health of the sport and taking seriously one of the sport's biggest stars so we're in a real conflagration at the moment do think that asakusa ethnicity and gender have played a part in this. Do you think that female players feel especially pressurized often objectified by the tennis press. Absolutely i think the questions that i've heard in this press conferences and to be clear one of the main objections that now posed in making the statement pretournament and now with the withdrawal is about those post mass press conferences that body of journalists is more white male. An old than the folks you hear on broadcast news and on television commentary. So it's really. I can't emphasize enough a very archaic and sort of ossified body of people. And you know. They've been asking questions. Objectified women's bodies talking about race in a very very ham. Headed manner is best for years. And so if you look at some of the larger issues that are going out on the sport right now such as a call for a robust domestic violence policy or policing to a greater degree some of the misbehavior on the side of the men. They're not at all getting the same kind of reactions at naomi has gotten through this and so it's hard not to say that her as a biracial black and asian woman. A young woman is really sort of ruffling feathers in a way that we haven't seen male misbehavior male deviation from tennis norms in gender. I hope that's not the case but it's hard not to read it within the greater context and as i've said sitting in those press conferences for years there is a very very heavily. Wait to tradition and sort of very defensive reaction from the press corps so of course. That's the viewpoint i initially read. The statement as in that sort of continued to be my context for understanding. What's happening right now. And in terms of the specificities of the sport south you know. It's an individual sport. Do you think that the format of the game invites more mental pressure on players. Absolutely i mean. Tennis is only similar to boxing. In the sense that it's pugilist and you're out there alone in the case of tennis especially grand slams. You're not allowed to be coached on the court. And so i think you know for a player to be open and vulnerable about some of their approach to the sport in terms of preserving their mental health. We should be especially at tuned to understanding where they might be coming from and thinking hard about how we might be able to do better. That's the conversation waiting to have that conversation. I've been trying to have but through our sort of platforms and podcasts and various other mediums. I've been trying to have it for a couple of years and now honestly i'm thrilled that we're having the chance to really dig into it because i can't emphasize enough how the tennis press specifically you're talking about the sport and how it's individual but also the tennis press specifically if the same cast of characters showed up at football press conference or some of our sports american football or the nba. They would be laughed out of the room in a lot of cases not all of them a lot of professionals on the ground doing great work but a lot of folks who get led into these rooms have no business being there. And i can't help but think that's largely who niamey is talking about. And that's largely who i've been talking about in the past couple of years about who really needs to be put under greater scrutiny. About how they behave in those contexts especially in an individual sport. Yeah talking about other sports suddenly hair and in the uk foot born and cricket which team sports in cricket. Obviously though being teams boy is also quite pugilist. As you say it's very about the individual. Both of those sports have made efforts in recent years to increase awareness of the psychological strains placed on athletes. Not just by the competition but by the press by social media. Obviously you've made it clear that eating tennis is lagging behind in terms of pastoral. Care what do you think the sport could do to improve that kind of support for athletes. While i was encouraged to hear to see that the league at least in terms of the women's side the wto has made more awareness and resources available to players who are struggling. A lot of this came up in the context of women who had children and their changing needs and how they need the tour to meet them halfway in terms of making less events mandatory or providing on site child care and certainly some of the mental fatigue and pressure that can come along with differing stages of life for a career. I think my focus is on the media. Because that's what i see. And that's what i am and that's where i see. The hugest gulf between where the players are were. The tours are and where the sport needs to really evolve. And i would love very much for folks to have taken asaka seriously when she said listen. This is for me a mental health issue and instead of letting it go or or deciding that a player knew what was best for herself. There was a lot of blowback in terms. Of what are the symptoms. Is this really mental health. She just doesn't want to talk about having a bit of a dicey record on clay and again. I think that illustrates just the sort of common reactions to somebody. Who's telling you that they're in a bit of a tricky spot and instead of responding with empathy we're asking for evidence and i think the further statements that she's made and the one made by her sister kind of on her behalf have serve to clarify in fact she's not in a place that she feels like is ripe for being picked apart by the media but this is really not a new thing. I mean serena williams and venus famously have been ask terrible questions by the media in terms of you know personal stuff that they're going through. Venus williams was involved in a manslaughter case in florida involving a car accident and walked out a press and numerous times. Because the press wouldn't let it go and it turned out of course she was not at fault and there's really no need for that to be brought up in a context but we have precedent of this for players sort of asking for space at times when they feel like they're not getting it creating it by walking out. I think the difference here is no miyasaka was premeditated. I like to think knowing her a little bit. That this was more of a heads up out of politeness instead of petulant on court sort of reaction. Because the truth is player skip. Press all the time. It's just usually not announced a premeditated manner that they were doing it. And give it an explanation as to why and so. I'd like to think that the empathy that was missing here will really be looked at by members of the press to say. Okay something clearly is going wrong and are we not the good guys here and if we're not how can we help make this better so that we can evolve the sport and avoid situations like this in the future caitlin thompson their co founder and publisher of tennis magazine racket speaking to monaco. Alexis self.

serena williams caitlin thompson kaitlin thomson Venus williams naomi Muzak florida Both monday asian niamey miyasaka uk Alexis one past couple of years two venus years french
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"Dr anthony. Fauci and conversation would monaco's thomas lewis staying stateside for next highlight as we look back to cheeses edition of the briefing on june twenty-sixth. Sixth two thousand fifteen. The united states supreme court ruled out. State bans on gay. Marriage were unconstitutional legal throughout the united states. But the road to victory was much longer than many no in his new book. The engagement. america's quarter century struggle over same sex marriage. Sasha eisenberg takes us through to coast to coast conflict through courtrooms. Then war rooms bedrooms and boardrooms to shed light on every aspect of political and legal controversy that divided americans like no other monaco's andrew. Mueller was joined by sasha to find out more yeah. The story begins in hawaii. Nineteen ninety when three same. Sex couples are led into the local public health departments west marriage licenses by local gay rights activists and it's basically a public relations stunt. He's gotten into an unbelievably petty rivalry for control of pride week planning committee in honolulu and has had a separate conflict with the local. Aclu the american civil liberties union which doesn't Particularly want to a back him in this and he decides he's going to try to force their hand by this media stunt and effectively spiraled out of control. The case gets handed civil rights lawyer the next year and they have an unexpected victory at the y. Supreme court in nineteen ninety-three and part of the story. That's familiar to most americans as sort of what happens after that. There's the defense of marriage act which was passed in nineteen ninety-six and that is effectively. The mainland of the united states recognizing that hawaii is very close to marrying same sex couples and that they will need a new set of laws to prepare for for what happens if they do so well. Same sex marriage not really an animating cause of the prominent gay liberation movements of the late sixties early seventies. When did it become a thing. It only became a cause for the gay rights movement when their opponents started prioritizing fighting it in the mid nineties. You had a brief flurry in the early nineteen seventies in the wake of stonewalling that serve early gay liberation politics of individuals going in and requesting marriage licenses and then suing but very few of them were lawyers or had illegal strategy behind them and by the nineteen eighty s folks fighting again incremental progress in other areas non-discrimination trying to get hate crimes coverage things like that and and very incremental recognition of gay and lesbian families and other spheres nineteen eighty nine denmark becomes the first country on our to to recognize same sex couples. It's not actually marriage and there was not an active movement in the us. Until the wake of this hawaii decision in nineteen ninety-three 'cause this is one of the things that emerges from the book how recent this has all become as an issue and how quickly it has happened. Which is it tough to say whether it's depressing. That it took this long or heartening that it did eventually happen so quickly. Because i think a part of the book that will be quite bracing to a lot of readers is figuring out how many prominent american liberals were quite iffy on this until quite late in the picture not just bill clinton who you mentioned signing the defense of marriage act but president barrack. Obama didn't take a stand obviously firmly in favor of same sex marriage until as late as two thousand and twelve right and so i think there's a few different divides on the left. I mean through the eighties. Among gay rights activists. There's a real principle disagreement over whether marriage is actually worth fighting for and you have a a section of largely lesbians lawyers. Legal theorists informed feminists thinking who think that marriages patriarchal hetero normative institution. Why should as want to kind of adjust their a sexual values for acceptance into it. And then you have some you know arguments that are more about tactics and strategy and prioritization and what what happens is to some extent a gay marriage. Activists are a victim of one of their successes. Which is for create civil unions in in two thousand which are a very robust form of domestic partnership at it basically is marriage all the rights and legal rights and benefits of marriage without the actual name marriage and without a lot of the the the religious conflict comes along with that and that becomes a sort of safe position for the kind of centre-left democrats you're talking about and so by two thousand four. All the democrats will running for. President support civil unions and it allows them to say i think marriage is too far it has a religious meaning but i also wanna do for the gay community and and by two thousand ten that becomes a big strategic problem. Georgie of the country supports marriage or civil unions. But there's a big chunk in the middle. The sort of moderate middle where gay marriage campaigners have to go out. And convinces people who have been persuaded that gay and lesbian couples are all the same rights and benefits opposite. Sex couples can have by being married but that the actual symbolic value of the term marriage has its own is its own goal and denying gay couples. The ability to be married is a form of injury to them. The author sasha eisenberg. They're speaking to monaco's andrew mueller earlier this week. One.

sasha eisenberg Sasha eisenberg Obama bill clinton andrew mueller june twenty-sixth hawaii honolulu sasha late sixties early nineteen seventies next year Mueller thomas lewis one anthony nineteen eighty s eighties andrew Nineteen ninety
"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

Monocle 24: The Curator

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"monocle" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Curator

"He would have everybody crying all my life. You all as teddy boys right. So i thought jesus christ if this fellow you know starting off we'd take on the ends up and we'd all weeping if you the do that that is dead it is right there hit a nutshell so all those things. I was taken on board. You say and then when. I got to sing myself in these clubs. I rely on stuff like that and you can do with a rock and roll song. Or if like when. I first went into workman's club with a with a band with my with my rhythm section right. The first thing was paired off is not to play. Pay you not to blame once. They saw electric guitars and oblivious is so you've got to learn to to give people what they want. Then you can. You can teach them if you like. You know with something that they wouldn't ordinarily listened to so much so that by the end of the night the federal that book that says said. Could i call to the police station to get an extension and you can play the midnight and remove all the tables and jazz dance while i thought. Look at this from pay them off at the beginning to. Would it be any possibility of getting an extension. He put my life in one night. And you think we'll see that the legendary singer sir. Tom jones there in conversation with our very own robert bound. For this week's edition of monaco on culture saying in the cultural round for next highlight cinemas are back and with it. The return of the summer blockbuster. There's no one more excited for this then monocle. Senior correspondent fernando augusta official. Who tells us what films we should be watching on the big screen this summer. Okay i got to be really honest here cinema wise. Do you know what. I really really want fast cars. Maybe this is the now. I've ride to death. With redo of classic disney villain was born fast and plenty of horror last year. There were not many summer blockbusters around due to the pandemic it was a great time to catch up with some of the smaller films and masterpieces such as normal land but have reached the point just wanted to girls of popcorn with a medium coke of sprite and watch the latest hollywood offers and it seems i'm not the only one for the beginning of the summer season a quiet place bar to opened with rave reviews and strong box office in.

jesus christ last year Tom jones fernando augusta first this week one night hollywood disney this summer robert bound normal one