40 Burst results for "Monkeypox"

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:02 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"The fact that Venice so loved by so many people that it's actually sort of we all know it sort of feels as if it's sinking under the weight of tourism. And for those Venetians whose cool the city their home, it becomes a particular problem. That's right, a tourism really is a double edged sword in a way on the one hand. It's good for making money and Venice has been flagged as a cash machine for the region. But on the other hand, it does bring about issues at the local level in terms of rising housing and living costs, for instance. So The Guardian indeed reports that the population in the historic center of Venice is expected to fall under 50,000 any day. It's only a few hundred above that figure at the moment. And this is already down by more than 120,000 inhabitants since the 1950s a drastic last and the article points to an electronic ticker that's displaced on a window of a local pharmacy in Venice and then the owner has called this drop extremely demoralizing. And of course, the key reason there are many, but the key one is tourism that has led to extremely high costs of living back over the affordable housing and local businesses essentially being replaced by souvenir shops. Tell us a little bit about what can be done to try to maintain Venice's integrity. So there are a few measures. So Venice, the authorities earlier this year announced a plan to try to attract more remote workers to the city, so Italians who would come and work. In the city, kind of partly enabled by home office made more popular during COVID. To this day, apparently there has not been a major impact. Reached by this measure. So what the local associations interviewed in this article are calling for financial incentives. Two property owners to essentially stay in the city or render flats to a local Venetians. But the city council has dismissed some of these concerns saying that they are a lot of commuters. Italian commuters coming to the city on a daily basis, students, and many people are not formally registered as residents even if they reside most of their year in the city. So there seems to be a bit of a difference in terms of perspective. And again, the economy and the fact that tourism does bring a lot of money to the region is an important consideration here. Finally, Emily, this weekend, note for everybody's diaries. It's the world's biggest techno parade. In Zürich, I can't wait. Can you? That's right. I think I will only be able to observe it from a distance in the late afternoon. Have you got your glow sticks ready? You get exactly, I need to purchase those later this week. So the street parade as it's called, it's been organized since 1992 and it is the most attended techno parade in the world with around 1 million attendees every year and the Swiss papers are reporting on it, not from parting perspective, but rather from a health perspective when it comes to monkeypox, and there are great concerns that when million people come and dance on the streets of Zürich, it is expected to be in the up 20s again in terms of temperature, people might be shirtless with their bare chest so it is a risk factor for monkeypox spread to have such close physical contact. And there haven't been too many cases in Switzerland thus far. I think in Zürich, they've tested around 80 positive cases, but again, there's a great concern that the numbers will rise, whilst Switzerland, to this day, does not have a vaccination program on monkeypox, unfortunately. Because obviously, if you have a very, very close physical contact, the transmission of monkeypox increases Emily, thank you so much, say stay safe but rayvon. Those Emily is with our pay per view from do force twice in 90 in Zürich. Here is monocle 24. This is the globalist. Time to talk business now

Venice Zürich Monkeypox The Guardian Emily Switzerland Rayvon
 US will stretch monkeypox vaccine supply with smaller doses

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 d ago

US will stretch monkeypox vaccine supply with smaller doses

"The U.S. will stretch the monkeypox vaccine supply using smaller doses I am Lisa dwyer with the latest U.S. health officials are endorsing a new monkey pox vaccination strategy designed to stretch limited supplies by allowing health professionals to vaccinate up to 5 people instead of one with each vial The new recommendation calls for the dose to be administered with an injection under the skin rather than into deeper tissue The White House's monkeypox response coordinator Robert Fenton said the plan would help the U.S. stay ahead of the virus It is a game changer when it comes to our response and our ability to get ahead of the virus It's safe it's effective and it will significantly scale the volume of vaccine doses available for two years across the country Recipients would still get two shots spaced

Monkeypox Lisa Dwyer U.S. Robert Fenton White House
Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:01 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"And I'll give you a little bit of proof. Eric, what do you think is do we have an official religion in America? Do we have a state church? I think we do. I think it's the LGBTQ, my name is legion movement. I think the church of Saddam is the established church in the United States. The danger is not Christian nationalism. It's gay, Sharia. And why do I say that? Well, do you remember something called COVID? It was a public health crisis, right? It was a pandemic. We had to close down. They all in essential stuff. Like church services and schools, they kept open abortion clinics, liquor stores, and casinos, but they closed churches. And our pastors, so most of our pastors fell all over themselves, closing their churches. Right. And telling people to get the dead baby vaccine. Telling people there was no moral problem with using a vaccine developed through aborted babies stolen organs. Because they were saying, yeah, you're right. Churches and then important. The worship of God is not essential. Well, now we have another pandemic. Monkeypox. And monkeypox is a disease that men get when they go to public places and have sex with dozens of strangers, other men usually. So gay orgies are essential because no public health authority is demanding that those be shut down and eat when Ned Ryan on Fox News had the temerity to say, you know, maybe you all shouldn't be having orgies with dozens of people because it's kind of spreading a disease. The other so called conservative hosts, including Kennedy, all latched down laced into him like you're promoting bigotry. You're stereotyping. Think about that. The conservative network won't even countenance the idea of a temporary suspension of 20 man gay orgies because that is the official rule. That's what I was going to say. That's exactly right, John. That is exactly right. And again, I think most people Intuit this, we need to be clear, the constitution makes plain that we're not to have an established religion. That is effectively what has happened. In other words, when you're talking about religion, we're not just talking about, oh, it's the congregational church. We're talking about a way of seeing reality that the government gets behind. The government's not supposed to do that. It's supposed to be up to we the people to determine what we think about these things. And the government is supposed to be agnostic on that stuff, just the way that's supposed to keep its thumb off the scales with regard to the free market. It's not supposed to get involved. That's what the constitution says. Well, we now know that you have a situation where the government is saying, we're going to get behind that. If anything departs from where we're coming from on that, in this area, we're going to keep our mouths shut. We will shut down churches, but we will never shut down or we want to even mention any of this other unseemly stuff because it goes against this new orthodoxy, which is exactly what John was saying. This is the establishment of a religion, but because it's not an official religion, nobody is saying anything about it, but we the people need to know this is genuinely unconstitutional what is happening. When the government is making these kinds of choices, the government is completely out of line with the constitution..

Monkeypox Church Of Saddam Ned Ryan United States Eric Fox News Intuit Kennedy John Government
The More You Inject, The More You Infect

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

The More You Inject, The More You Infect

"From Massachusetts. Hey, Charlie. Love your conversation with Steve kersh. Can you kind of illustrate more on how the vaccine is not working the way they said they would? Well, for example, in Australia. Over 96% of the adult population in Australia is fully vaccinated. More than 70% are boosted and yet they just set a new record for COVID deaths. Just give me an idea. A new record for daily COVID deaths has now been hit for this year in Australia. Not exactly working the way they said it would. Not even close actually. In fact, it's looking like. And I'm willing to have anyone disagree, come on this program that is a vaccine peddler. The more you inject, the more you infect.

Steve Kersh Australia Charlie Massachusetts
Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:33 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Of a Seattle film commission is taking off John libertini explains. An 11 member Seattle film commission would target movie and television production. Mark a McIntyre is director of economic development. It's one of those key moments in time where if we don't take advantage right now, we don't really lean our shoulder into it. We're going to miss out because this is a national and international competition for these film productions. And the opportunity is right now. Georgia, Tennessee and Louisiana have been wildly successful, and Seattle's natural beauty seems like a natural fit, says council members Sarah Nelson. It's bad enough to see Vancouver in movies and films that are supposed to be about Seattle. 5 members of that commission would be appointed by the mayor. That's political will, council member, Lisa herbal. That's a pretty good signifier that we would buy in with this administration. This is an aggressive effort, and it comes on the heels of an increase in the states film budget to $15 million. Julie Damon, Washington film works. We're looking at an increased possibly ten projects and not just feature films. We might be able to attract three episodic series. It's moving fast. John lobert, northwest news radio. Monkeypox is on the rise in Washington. We now have over 200 cases, cases have been doubling every 8 days or so. That's doctor Tao Shang guan get with the Department of Health. He says most of the cases are in gay and bisexual men, but the disease is in no way isolated to those two groups. A vaccine is available but supplies are limited. Like Seattle, the city of Portland is struggling with an increase in crime and more than 100 vacancies in the city's police department for victim families. That means a long wait for justice, Carlin Johnson reports. 78

Seattle Film Commission John Libertini Sarah Nelson Lisa Herbal Seattle Mcintyre Julie Damon John Lobert Monkeypox Louisiana Tennessee Mark Georgia Tao Shang Guan Vancouver Washington Department Of Health Portland Carlin Johnson
How Can Parents Push Back Against Chemical Castration Drugs?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 2 d ago

How Can Parents Push Back Against Chemical Castration Drugs?

"We as parents push back if our kids go to government schools on our kids possibly getting chemical castration drugs? I'm very worried about this. Thanks so much. This is something that's a huge problem. And it's happening more and more. Biden assistant secretary for health, Levine, said that we need to empower kids to go on puberty blockers. So let me be very clear. If America had a any ounce of sanity, Richard Levine would be court martialed and arrested and have to post bail for saying something like this. In fact, I believe Richard Levine should be arrested. For the widespread promotion of child abuse for saying this, play cut 64. So we really want to debase our treatment and to affirm and to support an empower these youth not to limit their participation in activities and sports. And even a limit their ability to get gender affirmation treatment in their state. How is that how is that any different than someone saying on television? We need to have young kids on cocaine and heroin. How is that any different? You are pushing life altering chemical castration drugs that show to increase depression, suicide rates, self harm, social isolation, outside of parental guidance and support. The direct quote is we need to empower kids to go on puberty blockers and get sexual reassignment surgery. You know the only community that really likes that pharmaceutical companies because that's a gold mine of the therapists, not doing therapy. They're doing affirmation therapy, which is the opposite of therapy, and kicking it on over to kids. Here is a bunch of drugs. Here's a bunch of chemicals. Yeah, you might want to kill yourself, be super depressed and anxious. Don't worry, we have Xanax benzodiazepines, and we have all these other drugs for you. But that comes later. It's a massive pharmaceutical cocktail that gets controlled by Pfizer estrogenic and Moderna and all the others.

Richard Levine Levine Biden America Depression Pfizer Moderna
Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"About violence and threats of violence against law enforcement. An intelligence group that tracks extremist activity online also says violent rhetoric is escalating again, but it hasn't reached the same level as what it saw ahead of January 6th. President Biden talked to inflation today as consumer prices went up 8.5% in July from a year ago. While the price of some things go up went up last month, the price of other things went down, but the same amount. The result is zero inflation last month, but people are still hurting. Lower prices at the pump helped, triple-A says gas now averages four bucks a gallon nationwide. An Iranian operative is wanted by the FBI for plotting to murder former national security adviser John Bolton. CBS Stacy Lynn reports. The Justice Department charged sharan poor safi in the murder for higher plot. He allegedly tried to pay individuals $300,000 to murder John Bolton in Washington, D.C., or Maryland, saying he didn't matter how the murder was carried out, but that his group wanted video confirmation of the death. Health officials are responding to a polio scare overseas. No actual cases of polio have been reported, but since February, more than a hundred polio viruses have been identified in sewage samples. In response to that, around a million children ages one to 9 in the London area are being urged to get polio boosters. Authorities may clear this as a precautionary measure the last reported case of polio in the UK was in 1984 last month the U.S. had its first reported case in nearly a decade. Steve futterman CBS News. Meantime, the U.S. has now surpassed 10,000 cases of monkeypox, about 900 cases were confirmed within just the last 24 hours. This is CBS News. Liberty mutual customizes your car and home insurance, so you only pay for what you need. Visit liberty mutual dot com to learn more. Good evening glad to have you with us on this very difficult Wednesday evening August the tenth, 78°. Hey, I'm Hillary Howard. And I'm Shawn Anderson. Of course, our top

President Biden Polio John Bolton Stacy Lynn Sharan Poor Safi Washington, D.C. Polio Scare Justice Department FBI CBS Steve Futterman Maryland Monkeypox U.S. Cbs News London Liberty Mutual
One Example of How Government Schools Are Being Completely Corrupted

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | 2 d ago

One Example of How Government Schools Are Being Completely Corrupted

"Gregory from Alabama says Charlie, I've been telling my Friends that schools across the country are teaching some rather perverse things, but I get pushback saying it's not that bad. What are some examples you can give? Of how schools have been totally corrupted. Well, look, we don't have time to go into all of them. But there's one that stood out this week, and we want to keep this theme going. We want to keep on building the parents party and a restoration of the protection of our children and the innocent and the complete and total rejection into oblivion and to create a stigma around the perverts. The perverts that are teaching are children. This is a remarkable thing happening in San Diego public schools. In San Diego public schools, they're teaching children that heterosexuality is a system of oppression, and that they should instead become gender queer, pansexual or too spirit. So let me take this a step further of which media matters will try to take out of context, so I'll be very precise how I say this. If they're teaching that heterosexuality is a system of oppression, AKA bad, and they instead should become gender queer pansexual, how is that not trying to make kids gay? Let me say that again. If the training materials say that heterosexuality is a system of oppression, which implies bad and that children instead should become gender queer, pansexual or too spirit, how is that not encouraging or pushing kids into a gay lifestyle?

Gregory Alabama San Diego Charlie
Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on All Things Considered

All Things Considered

01:02 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "monkeypox" discussed on All Things Considered

"On the next city lights author George Dallas green. His new novel the kingdoms of Savannah reveals things you don't typically learn on their durable Savannah. I love the city. I do think that it rests upon a bed of evil and the history is something that we have to deal with. I'm Lois Wright says join us Thursday at 11 a.m. Live from NPR news and Culver City California, I have Dwayne Brown. President Biden signed healthcare legislation today that ends a long effort to expand benefits to military veterans who were exposed to toxic burn pits in Iraq and Afghanistan. The law expands access to healthcare and disability benefits for veterans harmed by toxic exposure. It empowers the Department of Veterans Affairs to move quickly to determine service members illness and related military service to see if they qualify. Today, ceremony was personal for Biden, whose son Beau died of cancer after his service in Iraq, burn pits were used to dispose of chemicals, cans, plastics, and medical equipment, among other things, the legislation will also help vets get disability payments without having to prove their illness resulted from their service. It's the latest in a string of bipartisan measures Biden has signed into law in the past week. Ukraine's president says he wants to liberate the southern Peninsula of Crimea, which Russia took control of in 2014, but as NPR's Joanna cassis tells us the Ukrainian government denies it was involved in explosions at a Russian air base in Crimea yesterday. In a video posted to his telegram page president volodymyr zelensky said Russia's war against Ukraine began with Crimea and must end with its liberation. He said Russia had brought war repression and economic ruin to Crimea, turning one of the best places in Europe into one of the most dangerous. Russian media reported that at least one person was killed on Tuesday after several explosions at a Russian air base on the western coast of Crimea, social media videos showed Russian tourists leaving the beach and fear as smoke billowed from the site, and adviser to zelensky says Ukraine did not bomb the air base and hinted that pro Ukrainian partisans were responsible. Joanna kisses NPR news Odessa. Stocks finished much higher on Wall Street. This is NPR. From WAB E. News in Atlanta, good afternoon. I'm Jim burris, our time now is 5 32 monkeypox cases are quickly rising in Georgia and around the United States, but the latest numbers show the virus is affecting some groups in the state more than others. Just made or has this report. The virus can affect anyone who's exposed, but so far, most cases continue to impact men who have sex with men. That's also the picture in Georgia, where CDC numbers show the state with around 750 confirmed cases and initial demographics indicate their overwhelmingly affecting black men, a fact advocates say echoes other health disparities in the state. Monkeypox causes a painful skin rash in some cases also headache, muscle aches, sore throat, and other flu like symptoms

Crimea Ukraine George Dallas Lois Wright Npr News Culver City California Dwayne Brown President Biden Biden Joanna Cassis Ukrainian Government Iraq NPR Volodymyr Zelensky Savannah Department Of Veterans Affairs Beau Zelensky Afghanistan Monkeypox
"monkeypox" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

01:36 min | 4 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Zayn, thank you <Speech_Female> so much. This has been great. <Speech_Male> Yeah, no, <Speech_Male> thanks for having me. I appreciate <Speech_Telephony_Male> you doing a deep dive <Speech_Music_Male> into some pretty <SpeakerChange> wonky topics. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> Zayn <Speech_Female> Roosevelt researches <Speech_Female> pharmaceuticals and <Speech_Female> access to medicine <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at public citizen. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that's it for our show today. <Speech_Female> What next <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> TBD is produced <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> by Anna Phillips <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and Evan Campbell, <Speech_Female> or shows edited <Speech_Female> by Tory Bosch, <Speech_Female> Joanne Levine <Speech_Female> is the executive <Speech_Female> producer for what <Speech_Female> next, Alicia <Speech_Female> Montgomery is vice <Speech_Female> president of audio <Speech_Female> for slate, <Speech_Female> TBD is <Speech_Female> part of the larger <Speech_Female> what next family. <Speech_Female> TBD <Speech_Female> is also part of future <Speech_Female> tense, a partnership <Speech_Female> of slate, Arizona <Speech_Female> state university, <Speech_Female> and new America. <Speech_Female> If you're a <Speech_Female> fan of the show, I have <Speech_Female> a request for you. <Speech_Female> Become a slate <Speech_Female> plus member. <Speech_Female> Just head on over <Speech_Female> to slate dot com <Speech_Female> slash what next <Speech_Female> plus to sign up. <Speech_Female> We will be <Speech_Female> back next week <Speech_Female> with more episodes. <Speech_Female> I'm Emily peck, <Speech_Female> filling in for <Speech_Female> Lizzie O'Leary. <Speech_Female> Thanks for listening. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Myrtle <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Beach, South Carolina <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is the beach. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Here, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you're free to be your best <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> self because Myrtle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Beach is 60 <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> miles made for <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you. In <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Myrtle Beach, you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> always go at your <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> own pace. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Lie out on the sand, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lie up by the pool. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Go boogie <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> boarding, go surfing, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> walk the marsh walk, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> eat the freshest <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> seafood. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The list is exhaustive, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> but the experience <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> isn't. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can go all out <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> or do nothing at <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> all. How you relax <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is up to you. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> If this sounds like <Speech_Music_Female> what you need, then <Speech_Female> this is where you <Speech_Female> belong. <Speech_Female> Plan your getaway <Speech_Female> to Myrtle Beach, South <Speech_Music_Female> Carolina, at <Speech_Music_Female> visit Myrtle Beach dot com.

"monkeypox" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

05:58 min | 4 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"Well, I mean, to talk about that in 2020, I believe Moderna announced they wouldn't enforce the patent on their vaccine. Was that a big step or did it help at all? So when we talk about the Moderna vaccine and what Moderna has done, really what we're talking about is what the U.S. government and Moderna have done together. Moderna is a company that is built of a technology that was funded by taxpayers. And so you had this kind of constant federal support in the background as this company was developing its technology. And then you finally got to the kind of commercialization, right? And what you heard was, wow, Moderna, what a company, you know, the small BioTech, the scrappy BioTech has done what no one else could have seen coming. And it's like, yeah, you know, what the behemoth behind it of the U.S. government. And so yes, Moderna did this thing about patents, but it left out this whole other spectrum of action that it could have taken. And most importantly, what it could have done and what it did not do was actually share some of the know how, right? And so the key question both for COVID-19 for monkeypox, but also for any kind of disease in the future, right? One question we have to kind of confront is should the knowledge that is funded by taxpayers be kept a secret? Should that knowledge be kept a secret if it can help end an epidemic? In terms of keeping this a secret on monkeypox vaccine, so not only am I reading that African countries have no vaccine. I'm reading reports now daily in the United States that people can't get vaccinated. The populations that need access are scrambling, they can't get, they can't get appointments, et cetera. I mean, is that because of IP and secret hoarding also? It is, in a sense, and the reason I say yes is because right now the decisions are being made by Bavarian Nordic. They are being made by this company sitting in Denmark about how doses are allocated about how doses are delivered about how doses are filled and finished. And so we are introducing this kind of, again, this layer of scarcity by allowing this by allowing this mechanism of IP to interfere. And in this specific context, what a better would look like would actually be just the U.S. government stepping up.

Moderna monkeypox U.S. government Bavarian Nordic United States Denmark
"monkeypox" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:24 min | 4 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Well, I mean, to talk about that in 2020, I believe Moderna announced they wouldn't enforce the patent on their vaccine. Was that a big step or did it help at all? So when we talk about the Moderna vaccine and Moderna has done, really what we're talking about is what the U.S. government and Moderna have done together. Moderna is a company that is built of a technology that was funded by taxpayers, right? So you had this kind of constant federal support in the background as this company was developing its technology. And then you finally got to the kind of commercialization, right? And what you heard was, wow, Moderna, what a company, you know, the small BioTech, the scrappy BioTech has done what no one else could have seen coming. And it's like, yeah, you know, what the behemoth behind it of the U.S. government. And so yes, Moderna did this thing about patents, but it left out this whole other spectrum of action that it could have taken. And most importantly, what it could have done and what it did not do was actually share some of the know how, right? And so the key question both for COVID-19 for monkeypox, but also for any kind of disease in the future, right? One question we have to kind of confront is should the knowledge that is funded by taxpayers be kept a secret? Should that knowledge be kept a secret if it can help end an epidemic? In terms of keeping this a secret on monkeypox vaccine, so not only am I reading that African countries have no vaccine. I'm reading reports now daily in the United States that people can't get vaccinated. The populations that need access are scrambling, they can't get, they can't get appointments, et cetera. I mean, is that because of IP and secret hoarding also? It is, in a sense, and the reason I say yes is because right now the decisions are being made by Bavarian Nordic. They are being made by this company sitting in Denmark about how doses are allocated about how doses are delivered, about how doses are filled and finished. And so we are introducing this kind of, again, this layer of scarcity by allowing this mechanism of IP to interfere. And in this specific context, what a better would look like would actually be just the U.S. government stepping up. Taking some responsibility, disclosing how many doses exist in the world right now, disclosing what production capabilities are at Bavarian Nordic, what can be done, what other partners are out there that can make this. So we're not just reliant on this one single company and on this one single site in Denmark for so much of our public health security. Yeah, it seems like you're really saying the U.S. on the front end is spending billions of dollars on these on these drugs that have all have a big interest in a big public health interest in the world does. And then when push comes to shove at the end of the day, whatever cliche I should use, they don't exercise that power and leverage it into distribution. It's like, what are we waiting for here? Look, the pharmaceutical industry is one of the most powerful industries in the world. There are huge, huge, huge sums of money at play, and the industry is, let's put it gently, not in favor of proposals that would increase the role of the public sector in pharmaceutical production and pricing, and so I think that unfortunately sometimes outweighs the kind

Moderna monkeypox U.S. government Bavarian Nordic Denmark U.S.
"monkeypox" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

The Secret History of the Future

03:57 min | 4 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on The Secret History of the Future

"It to monkeypox. With monkeypox treatments were still studying how to figure out how to best use the treatments and how to deploy them because they were, you know, they were approved based on some limited data for smallpox emergencies. And so there's still kind of that initial work being done. However, we are still also seeing that simultaneously similar attempts at kind of monopolizing supply of treatments, but it's clear from the past the past few years and the kind of the terrible inequalities that more should be done at the global level to kind of fix these problems, right? Because we sort of go from problem to problem without really addressing the structural reason that is creating the problem in the first place. Which in this case, again, is IP and that idea of. Letting a private corporation dictate the public health response rather than having it the other way around. COVID wasn't the first time pharmaceutical companies came under fire for abusing IP rights during a global health crisis. In the 1990s, HIV was spreading around the world, particularly in Africa, treatments were finally introduced, but they cost thousands of dollars. Many Africans couldn't afford that. These HIV treatments came online and it's worth remembering actually just how effective they were, right? It was called the Lazarus effect, right? Because people were literally on their deathbeds with aids. And after taking these medicines, they would be okay within weeks and resumed normal life. At the time, HIV was decimating sub Saharan Africa. It was devastating, right? There were lines that at cemeteries. There were lineups at cemeteries because there was just so much loss and yet we had something that was life saving and it was priced out of reach. So in 1997, Nelson Mandela passed a law that allowed South Africa to import cheaper generic versions of the treatments, essentially working around patent laws. And the pharmaceutical industry was pissed. They were so pissed. They actually ended up suing as a consortium. They ended up suing Nelson Mandela's government in South African court. They enlisted the muscle of the U.S. government to kind of bully South Africa into submission and instead a group of activists from around the world really pushed back and were able to generate sufficient outrage that both the U.S. government and the pharmaceutical industry sort of backed down. And we have seen now actually the miraculous impact of generic HIV medicines around the world that have saved literally millions of lives. South Africa now has one of the world's largest HIV aids treatment programs. And that was possible in large part due to getting over some of these IP barriers. And so, you know, it's an amazing story. It's a kind of a remarkable victory, but it was also an incomplete victory, because we ended up getting what sort of this piecemeal solution to the specific disease area. And so we sort of won the battle for HIV, but we kind of lost the bigger war for IP reform globally. And so with COVID-19, you know, we saw some of those same themes emerge. Now with monkeypox, different disease, different outcomes, but we're starting to see some of those same patterns persist. How many more new disease threats do we have to see before we understand that actually a new approach is needed that prioritizes public health from the start.

monkeypox HIV COVID Saharan Africa smallpox Nelson Mandela South Africa South African court aids U.S. government Africa
Rep. Troy Nehls Shares His Suggestions for After the Midterms

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:17 min | 4 d ago

Rep. Troy Nehls Shares His Suggestions for After the Midterms

"An idea before we came on air what we should do as conservatives after the midterms, what was your suggestion? My suggestion is that we have to make a big splash in the first two years. The American people are going to give us the gavel in the house. We are going to have the speaker. So we must take care of that gavel. Years previous. You know, we've had the gavel. We had both chambers. We had Donald Trump. And what did Paul Ryan do? Yes, we got the tax cuts and job deck, but we did nothing to secure the southern border. Now the American people are paying for it. So I think it's incumbent upon lunar McCarthy to make sure that we can rein in this out of control spending, take care of the gavel and make sure that we focus on 2024. This is about 2024 right now. How have we done enough to clean up what happened in 20 20 to make sure that 2024 is in stolen? Well, I think that a lot more attention, the states are given a lot more attention to this specifically the state of Texas. I think that the Democrats aren't going to have COVID and don't bring me this monkeypox story to all of a sudden declare another national emergency where you can see then these liberal mayors and governors and county clerks and stuff all of a sudden change the rules to the voting. And that's what you saw in 2020 all in the name of COVID. So I'm hoping that these individual states have tightened up the rules and made sure that we have voter integrity. Because without it, we don't have a country.

Paul Ryan Donald Trump Monkeypox Mccarthy Texas
Monkeypox Is Not a Public Health Emergency

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:02 min | 5 d ago

Monkeypox Is Not a Public Health Emergency

"The White House has declared monkeypox a public health emergency. Sort of like Michael Scott, declaring bankruptcy. The Health and Human Services secretary Xavier becerra basically went out to the middle of the office and shouted. I have declared a public health emergency. Here he was yesterday. In light of all of these developments and the evolving circumstances on the ground, I want to make an announcement today that I will be declaring a public health emergency on monkeypox. Okay, and then Xavier becerra said to reporters quote, we are prepared to take our response to the next level in addressing this virus, and we urge every American to take monkeypox seriously. I'm not going to take monkeypox seriously. On a personal level. Sorry, not going to. I don't mean like, I'm not worried about people getting monkeypox or transmitting monkey box. On a personal level, I have zero concern about getting monkeypox, and you shouldn't either unless you are engaging in promiscuous sex with people you don't know. That's all. This idea that everybody is equally vulnerable to monkeypox in the same way that you were vulnerable to COVID is totally crazy. And the fact that the federal government continues to push this line is ridiculous on its face.

Monkeypox Xavier Becerra Michael Scott Health And Human Services White House Federal Government
US declares public health emergency over monkeypox outbreak

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 d ago

US declares public health emergency over monkeypox outbreak

"The U.S. has declared a public health emergency to bolster the federal response to the outbreak of monkeypox The Biden administration has faced criticism over monkeypox vaccine availability clinics and major cities such as San Francisco and New York say they haven't received enough of the two shot vaccine to meet demand White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre says We have made more than 1.1 million doses available and shipped more than 600,000 doses monkeypox has already infected more than 6600 Americans We also have ordered 5.5 million additional doses which are helping us get more doses out sooner knowing that more are on the way Symptoms include fever body aches chills fatigue and pimple like bumps on the body I'm Lisa dwyer

Biden Administration Karine Jean Pierre Monkeypox U.S. San Francisco White House New York Fever Body Aches Chills Lisa Dwyer
US to declare health emergency over monkeypox outbreak

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 6 d ago

US to declare health emergency over monkeypox outbreak

"The Biden administration is said to boost the federal response to the monkey pox outbreak that has infected more than 6600 Americans Two people familiar with the matter say the U.S. will declare a public health emergency which would free federal funding and resources to fight the virus That comes amid criticism over the pace of vaccine availability with clinics in places like New York and San Francisco saying they simply don't have enough doses to meet demand The White House says it has made more than a million doses available and helped boost testing capacity Monkeypox spreads through prolonged and close skin to skin contact and may cause fever body aches chills fatigue and pimple like bumps Sagar Meghani at The White House

Biden Administration Monkeypox U.S. San Francisco White House New York Fever Body Aches Chills Sagar Meghani
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:49 min | 6 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Who wanted the vaccine. This seems very sloppy, Joe, I've read op eds by very smart people who compare the government's response to monkeypox to the government's response to HIV and aids in the 1980s. Do you think that comparison is fair? You know, again, New York and San Francisco were American epicenters of HIV aids, New York, and San Francisco are the American epicenters of monkeypox now. The two viruses could not be more different. They are very different viruses. We do not want to flatten and say this is so reminiscent of HIV aids. This is a much faster moving crisis, but we also have much better biomedicine. We know this virus. We've studied it for decades. The reason we don't know it better epidemiologically and virologically is that it, until now has only affected people in Congo at Nigeria and countries where, frankly, we don't study the viruses that harm people there because of biomedical racism. I did a call with the head of the CDC in Nigeria. They have zero countermeasures. They have zero vaccine and zero medication to help people when they get ill or to prevent spread of illness within households or within close contacts. Now, the real question is, what is driving the incredibly slow response to this outbreak in the American context, you know, a bunch of my colleagues and I all queer folk have been trying to figure out is it ineptitude or is it homophobia? And I think early on everyone was just kind of saying these people are not homophobic. They're just slow moving federal bureaucrats. There's a little bit of ineptitude. They're just not responding to the scale of the crisis. But look, I don't understand it. How this got this out of hand with a virus where there are tests, treatment, and vaccines. So I do think there is some, you know, and the WHO when they were trying to decide whether or not to name this out public health crisis of international concern. The committee actually voted against that, literally saying that it's not a public health emergency of international concern because it was only impacting men who have sex with men and our sexual networks. As if our health is not an emergency. Look, Joe, to me, as a reporter who reads a lot of news, it's also pretty clear that some groups are using monkeypox to push homophobic narratives about queer men about the way they behave about the way the disease is transmitted. How should public health officials handle a topic that has been politicized and try to dispel the politicization? Is that even possible? I've been having some of these conversations about how we give good risk aware advice to queer folks and the people we have sex with without sort of making us a target to fascist backlash. And I'm sorry, fascists are going to hate fags no matter what we say about ourselves, no matter what we call it, we can not capitulate to the anti queer mafia in this country that is on a march to roll back our rights and to do harm to our personhood. We do harm to our own person hoods if we do not speak frankly with one another in a sex positive way in an honest way about what risks are and what risks aren't and how to keep yourself and your community safe. So no, I'm just like, we can not have the conversation on those terms. We can not care for ourselves and our community. If we don't say, hey, sex is awesome. Group sex can be incredibly fun for people who like it and people who like it should absolutely be able to do whatever type of sex that they want to do. Group group sex or places where people meet for anonymous sex are basically the highest risk places for monkeypox transmission and we need to talk very frankly about that. So we need to be able to talk about sex. What people like to do, how people find pleasure in it. And if those are risky behaviors for viral transmission, how people might want to think about minimizing that risk. Can I ask you for our listeners out there who might be at risk, a personal question? Have you changed your behavior at all? I have and I started actually in May, one of my Friends was a pretty early case in June, so I had personal experience with exactly what this feels like. I love a bathhouse, even just a relax and hang out. I avoided places where men meet for sex. And our sexual networks meet for sex. Because that's a lot of the epidemiology has been traced back to those types of places as someone who loves the community that goes there. It is the community that goes there. It's just been my call that until we get vaccine out at scale, it's too risky for me personally to go to those places. And me and public health professionals published safer sex in monkeypox guidance just a week and a half ago where we did recommend avoiding places where people meet for sex. And anonymous hookups, maybe sex potting, right? So you have a few friends, you're all kind of hookup buddies, maybe have a conversation around. Let's wait a few days, monitor for symptoms, and then kind of keep our sex within our bubble. Until I coined the term anal autumn, I really hope we all get to have a very fun anal autumn, but it is not the safest thing right now in terms of monkeypox risk to have anonymous ex at this time. Doctor Joe osmin wrote a book, it's called virology. Essays for the living, the dead and the small things in between. Today's show was produced by Tory Dominguez, it was edited by Matthew collect, it was fact checked by Laura bullard, and it was engineered by Paul mountie. We're working on an episode about long COVID. If you have questions about long COVID that you would like to hear answered, or if you have a personal story about how it's affected your life, please email us. Today explained at vox dot com or you can call us at 202-688-5944 202-688-5944 and leave us a voicemail. Please make sure you leave us your name where you are located at and how we can get in touch with you. All right, thanks so much.

monkeypox HIV aids Nigeria San Francisco Joe New York government Congo CDC Joe osmin Tory Dominguez Laura bullard Paul mountie Matthew
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:03 min | 6 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Groups. What does their attention involve? Once something becomes a public health emergency, what is it get that it wouldn't normally get? One of the most important things that declaring this global emergency does is it encourages and sort of signifies to countries that they need to think about donating vaccines and perhaps even treatment to countries that have lower resources to access those means of stopping transmission and treating infection. So higher resource countries, this helps mobilize them to start thinking about donating or otherwise getting vaccines to countries that have lower access to those things. And so when something is declared a public health emergency, that's different than declaring it a pandemic, which is what COVID is. Where do the main differences lie? Yeah, you know, it's tough because even though the definition of a public health emergency is pretty clear, there's a little bit of fuzziness there and how much the criteria actually lead to a declaration. But also the definition of a pandemic is pretty squishy. It just kind of means that there's an epidemic that's reached worldwide and that has affected a large number of people, but those are really relative terms, right? We know that COVID is a pandemic. We know that HIV is a pandemic. What actually qualifies as a pandemic is a lot less clear than what qualifies as an emergency. I think you could say that a pandemic is basically an outbreak that has bred worldwide and that is out of control. Whereas there is still a window of opportunity open when you declare something an emergency. What's the situation with vaccines in this country? All of the vaccine that's being distributed right now in the United States almost all of the vaccine is called jynneos. The vaccine called jynneos right now is only available for someone with direct exposure to a confirmed monkeypox case. And it is sourced from a company called Bavarian Nordic that's headquartered in Denmark and that is where their main production facility is. The U.S. ordered this vaccine before this monkeypox outbreak even started just to have in the strategic national stockpile. And it's intended to be there as protection against smallpox, actually. It does look like if you've had the small packed vaccine before, you're pretty well protected. Smallpox has been sort of thought of as a potential bioterrorism threat, even though that has never actually happened, it's considered a threat because it is such a fatal disease. It kills 30% of the people that it infects. And it's been eliminated worldwide. You know, we haven't seen cases worldwide since very early 1980s. So there is a relationship between the U.S. government and the Bavarian Nordic company for a long time. The Virginia's vaccine was approved by the FDA in 2019 for use for both smallpox and monkeypox prevention. But I don't think anybody anticipated that they would need to use it. The way we're talking about using it now. The state now recommends people who have been exposed to someone with monkeypox, get the vaccine. This includes people whose sexual partner was diagnosed with monkeypox in the past 14 days. I've been waiting for four hours. Four hours. You'd think that we would have more of a structured process for vaccine rollout and they're just wasn't really anything. Until now, there had been several 100,000 doses of vaccines distributed and allocated to states for use. There was a press release out of HHS, the Department of Health and Human Services indicating that an additional 786,000 doses of vaccine are now available for use in the U.S.. So hopefully we'll see another big flood of vaccines hitting states and locals soon. Governor hochul announced today, New York City will receive 32,000 doses of the vaccine in the first of three additional installments in the coming weeks. New York State will get nearly 12,000 vaccines. So the rest of those vaccines, it sounds like they're going to come at least for now. It seems like they're going to come more slowly. The date given by the secretary of HHS Javier becerra sounds like it's going to be mid 2023. So that's a lot later than I think most of us would really want to see those doses arrive. I want to say, and I know you didn't ask this, but I want to say that vaccines aren't the only tools we have to prevent the spread of monkeypox among the highest risk folks here, right? The people who should be getting monkeypox vaccines are sexually active, men who have sex with men, whether they identify as gay or bi or not. And especially those who have multiple partners on a regular basis, meaning people who are having basically group sex with multiple partners that they don't really know very well. So this is a smaller group of people than just all gay and by an MSM men who have sex with men in the United States. There are ways to make sex and sex like this a lot safer. You know, you can talk to people, you can ask people what's going on down there, whether they've been feeling safe and healthy. A lot of guys that I've talked to who've had these infections say, you know, they wouldn't have even really known that they had monkeypox if they didn't know to look for it because the lesions can be really hard to detect and sometimes really not particularly symptomatic. I realize that that introduces some awkwardness into sexual encounters that people may not really want to have. But this is a tool and we should acknowledge that we have it in addition to vaccines to help prevent the spread of this. I know this is a hard question for someone with a lot of experience to answer. But I also know that it's something that an average listener is going to want to know. Are we now in a place with monkeypox where we should start being really concerned? I mean, how should we be feeling about all of this? The folks that I am most worried about are the people who do not have the resources to know how to get vaccine. You know, how to line up for it, who don't get the messaging on this. Whether that's because they have sort of low incomes and low resources and low access to health information, health messaging. Or because they're not in the out community of gay and by men, you know, they're closeted or they're just not open about their sexuality. And so they kind of stay away from faces or from messaging sources that might help them understand what they need to do to keep themselves safe or get themselves treatment if they do get sick. The thing that is most likely to perpetuate spread of this disease is stigma, whether it comes from people's communities or from inside themselves. So I'm really worried about how homophobia could play a role in making this disease go on a lot longer than it really should and cause a lot more suffering

monkeypox smallpox COVID jynneos Bavarian Nordic HHS fatal disease United States Governor hochul Javier becerra HIV Denmark U.S. government FDA Virginia New York City New York
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:10 min | 6 d ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Hey, I'm Sam Sanders, and I'm hosting a new culture podcast. It's called into it. From vulture and New York magazine. Each week on the show, we get into the pop culture that we just can't stop thinking about. Like Beyoncé. I mean, we'll talk about other things too, but let's be real. Beyoncé, it's gonna be a big part of the show. And that's the that on that. Into it, the weekly culture show, from vulture, with new episodes, every Thursday, subscribe, wherever you get your podcasts. Hey there, it's Noelle. In this episode of today explained, we have some Frank descriptions of sexual behavior. If that's not your thing or if you're listening with young kids, we will see you back here tomorrow, same place same time. Karen landman, medical doctor senior health reporter at vox, the WHO says monkeypox is a public health emergency which means what exactly. So what it means is that as the WHO has been following this outbreak and gathering information about it, they have seen that it is changing and it's continuing to spread and it continues to exist outside the borders of places where we normally see this virus exist. And that it's sort of meeting their criteria for qualifying as a public health emergency of international concern. And those criteria include being unusual or unexpected, which this definitely is we did not see monkeypox spreading outside the African continent previously. And we also didn't see it spreading among sexual networks previously. So that's a real change for this virus. Has potential for international spread that's another of their criteria and that clearly is the case this is in more than 70 countries right now. And also the third criteria is that it requires an immediate international response. And I wonder if that is really the criteria where some people may have differed on it. On Saturday, I declared the public health emergency of international concern over the global monkeypox outbreak. Ultimately, the determination whether to call something, a public health emergency of international concern is really up to the director general. More than 18 thousand cases of monkeypox have now been reported on two WHO from 78 countries with more than 70% of cases, reported from the European region and 25% from the region of the Americas. So what this means is that in his view, this met the criteria and would benefit from the WHO's attention to this matter. In this way. This is an outbreak that can be stopped. If countries, communities, and individuals informed themselves, take the risk seriously and take the steps needed to stop transmission and protect vulnerable

Beyoncé monkeypox Sam Sanders Karen landman New York magazine Noelle vox Frank Americas
New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

New lab gives early alerts for zoonotic diseases

"Monkeypox and COVID-19 have raised awareness around the world of zoonotic diseases that are passed between animals and human beings According to the Centers for Disease Control more than half of all human infections such as malaria Ebola and SARS are zoonotic in origin It's scientists estimate more than 6 out of every ten known infectious diseases in people can be spread from animals Now the Ugandan government has built a lab that tracks zoonotic diseases in national parks where many communities live close to a wide variety of wildlife The Uganda wildlife authority says the country must address the major challenges faced in wildlife conservation and disease control I'm Charles De Ledesma

Monkeypox Ugandan Government Ebola Centers For Disease Control Sars Malaria Uganda Wildlife Authority Charles De Ledesma
California governor declares monkeypox state of emergency

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

California governor declares monkeypox state of emergency

"California has joined New York and Illinois and declaring a monkey pox state of emergency Nearly 800 cases have been reported according to health officials Governor Gavin Newsom says the declaration will allow emergency measures and help get more vaccines something people in San Francisco like Peter tran waited hours in a very long line for The rollout of the vaccines throughout this nation is absolutely horrible Doctor Luke John day at Zuckerberg San Francisco general hospital says Friday they got 4000 vaccines Once we go to our vaccine allotment we'll have to close the clinic until we receive our next allotment Monkeypox spreads through close skin to skin contact most getting sick so far have been gay men though health officials note the virus can infect anyone I'm Julie Walker

Peter Tran Gavin Newsom Luke John Zuckerberg San Francisco Gener Illinois California New York San Francisco Monkeypox Julie Walker
Biden names FEMA, CDC officials to head monkeypox response

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Biden names FEMA, CDC officials to head monkeypox response

"I Mike Gracia reporting President Biden will appoint fema and CDC officials to head a monkeypox response Under criticism for a slow vaccine rollout president Joe Biden is set to appoint a White House monkeypox response team The White House says Biden will name Robert Fenton of the federal emergency management agency as White House monkeypox response coordinator Doctor Dmitri zhaoxin of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be Fenton's deputy Fenton helped lead fema's max vaccination effort for COVID-19 when Biden first took office The scallop is a national expert on issues affecting the LGBTQ community The monkey pox virus spreads through prolonged and close skin to skin contact as well as sharing bedding towels and clothing The U.S. saw its first case of confirmed monkeypox on May 18th There are now over 3000 confirmed infections Mike Gracia Washington

Fema Monkeypox Mike Gracia President Biden White House Centers For Disease Control An Robert Fenton Doctor Dmitri Zhaoxin Biden Fenton Joe Biden Covid U.S. Mike Gracia Washington
"monkeypox" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:24 min | Last week

"monkeypox" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Or woman. Few people would even talk about men having sex with each other. So targeted warnings, which would have been most effective, were slow to come. But we are in a very different situation now. There is a much greater acceptance of gay and bisexual men, and that means that they seek healthcare more openly, public awareness campaigns can be directed towards them. They have very actively organized communities which have been very helpful in spreading the message with monkeypox, outbreak, so a very, very different place. But that being said, we were off to a late start with public messaging on monkeypox because at the beginning of this outbreak started in May, there was still problems of public health officials saying anyone can get monkeypox, and it was clear that yes, anybody can get it, but the really high risk was among men who have sex with men, the risk for the general population was in Istio is quite low. The director general of the World Health Organization, in fact, was very specific and said you should limit your sexual partners be careful just directing this message to this group. And of course, this time around, we have a vaccine and gay and bisexual men have readily lined up for the job, which will make a huge difference. Now, vaccination, of course, is a big difference between the HRV pandemic and this monkeypox outbreak. How has it been possible to offer vaccinations so quickly? Well, it would be a remarkably fast turnaround for a disease that first started spreading in May, wouldn't it. The truth is that monkeypox is very closely related to the smallpox virus. And we already have several vaccines for smallpox. So some countries have even stockpiled them in the event of bioterrorism with smallpox. So we don't know exactly how effective the vaccine will be in this particular outbreak that data is being gathered, but the thinking is that it will be highly effective. Do you think effective vaccination programs will prevent the virus from becoming broadly endemic from spreading into other groups? Yes, I do think so. It's of course how to tell where this outbreak is going to go. The virus is probably not going to disappear. It has spread quite widely at this stage. So experts are of two opinions of what may happen. Some experts think that the way the virus is spreading is it just needs those networks of people with multiple sexual contacts to continue to spread. So those experts think that if it does spread out of those groups, it may hit a dead end just because the contact required the intensity of the contact between many people wouldn't be there. But other experts fear that the virus may cross over into other groups and spread their in a more sustained manner like HIV in America, HIV first spread among gay men is still primarily the circulating among gay men with a quarter of new cases now are among women, mostly black women, and of course some people worry that small children with skin to skin contact in day care settings and kindergartens is very high, may read it, spread the disease widely if it does end up in those groups. But these are just scenarios that may not come to pass and we've already had more than 20,000 cases. And they're clearly confined to one specific group. It's also lined up for the vaccine in large numbers. I think gaming in general, we're quite healthy people and we're always getting checked and probably more regular than straight people to be honest. And so ultimately, I think we want to lead by example. It's not just something affecting the gay community. It's something that can affect everyone as a whole, and we need to get on top of it while we can. And hopefully because of the widespread awareness among this group about the virus and the availability of vaccines, these things will dampen down. It spread. All right, Slovakia, thanks so much for your time today. Thank you for having me. The

monkeypox smallpox Istio World Health Organization HIV America Slovakia
Russian Officials Respond to US Offer for Brittney Griner

The Officer Tatum Show

00:41 sec | Last week

Russian Officials Respond to US Offer for Brittney Griner

"Another story. That just literally makes me smile. But also make our country look bad. Is that there is no deal according to Vladimir Putin. That Brittany griner is going to get out of jail because Joe Biden is going to exchange a hardened criminal. You know, it's funny because I could imagine in Russia they like keep that food. We don't want him. We want your America here 'cause we want to show the world that I ain't gonna do nothing. That y'all fake. Y'all not gonna come rescue none of your people. We're gonna take them. We're gonna keep them good luck.

Brittany Griner Vladimir Putin Joe Biden Russia America
Caller Brent Has Some Very Kind Words for Officer Tatum

The Officer Tatum Show

01:17 min | Last week

Caller Brent Has Some Very Kind Words for Officer Tatum

"Brent from LA welcome to the off to Tatum show. Blessings to you officer Tatum. Yes. Thank you. Yes, you do not present with rants. You present with sublime spiritual soliloquies and righteous sermons and you are brilliant courageous and stunning and common sense and down home wisdom. And you have armies of angels, Americans and children cheering you on. So you keep asking how people can be so stupid. Heartless and hateful, especially towards children these days, unfortunately, there is an easy answer. The moment we are honest enough to identify exactly what we're looking at. This is pure satanism and evil and we must not fear to identify the Democrats as being the agents of the devil. They have indeed transitioned into atheism, socialism, communism, fascism, maoism, and Democrat progressivism are all the same monstrous manifestation simply wearing different masks of Satan. Brent, can you write my next book for me? I appreciate the kind words, man. I think that you are on .1 100%.

Tatum Brent LA
Even Nancy Pelosi Knows the True Definition of 'Recession'

The Officer Tatum Show

00:44 sec | Last week

Even Nancy Pelosi Knows the True Definition of 'Recession'

"I want you to listen to Nancy Pelosi, the one who has a bad Botox, I want you to listen to her because she even said years ago that a recession is when you have two quarters of negative GDP, essentially. Road a clip. And so while they may have saved the second quarter from a technical definition of recession, the fact is we are now into the third quarter and we need we need to have another stimulus package. I wish somebody would do her Botox, right? 'cause she looked like she looked like she's a dead. She look like she a dead man walking.

Nancy Pelosi
Clinton Said “A Recession Is Two Quarters in a Row of Negative Growth"

The Officer Tatum Show

01:33 min | Last week

Clinton Said “A Recession Is Two Quarters in a Row of Negative Growth"

"Want to play a clip from Bill Clinton to beloved Democrat who was, maybe not say that. I'm supposed to be a Christian. Who was doing stuff he wasn't supposed to be doing in the Oval Office that involved him and another young lady that wasn't his wife. But let me play the clip of him saying out of his own mouth. This is the thing with these Democrats. They are so double sided and they're so hypocritical. They say one thing one election season and then they say something completely different. They're just complete lives. Why do anybody vote for them? Here's Bill Clinton saying that a recession is two quarters of negative GDP, wrote a clip. Well, an assessment is two quarters in a row of negative growth. I don't think we're going to have that. But we couldn't keep up 5% of the year. You know, forever. So I think 49 of the 50 blue chip forecast essentially relatively 2.5% of better next year. I didn't have sex with that woman. I don't know why anybody listening to that dude said he did not have sex relations with that girl and he got caught. And he ended up into it. However, are we do we have two quarters of negative GDP negative economic growth? The answer is yes. So why are Democrats comfortable saying that then, but then now they want to change the entire definition? Can you believe this is not a conspiracy?

Bill Clinton Oval Office
Economist Stephen Moore Joins Brandon to Discuss the Recession

The Officer Tatum Show

02:08 min | Last week

Economist Stephen Moore Joins Brandon to Discuss the Recession

"Like I promise you yesterday, I was going to bring on a person who's an expert who's smarter than me on these topics. One thing you guys are going to know about me is that I speak with common sense, I'm authentic, but I'm not the smartest person in the world. So I recruit smarter people to talk about certain subject matter, so we all become smarter together. So I'm going to bring in a gentleman who I think is amazing. Stephen Moore, he's a distinguished fellow in economics at the heritage foundation. He's also the founder of the committee to unleash prosperity. Steven, welcome to the off state of show. It is still fair to be with you. Thanks for having me. And I know great expert on this stuff. But you know what? You don't have to be an expert to understand what's going on with this economy right now. It's just a disgrace. Yes, yes, I think that most people will understand that it's a little bit of common sense sprinkled in with facts, and I think we'll understand, but I have a few questions for you, then I had is that are we in a recession? Well, the dictionary definition of a recession two quarters of negative growth. And unfortunately, we've had that and we confirm that yesterday. Now look, it's a mild recession. It's not we were slightly negative in the first quarter and slightly negative in the second quarter. But the biggest problem right now, I'm calling this a recession in people's personal income. In other words, what's going on right now is that the inflation rate is running at about 9 to 9 and a half percent. And wages are rising by about 5 to 5 and a half percent. So I think the math is pretty easy there, right? If you've got 5% wage growth in 9% inflation, you're following behind. And by my best estimates, the average family when you adjust for the inflation that's out of control has lost about 3000 to $5000 in income in just the last year. That's a lot of money. Let's say you got a family with a 60, $75,000 income. That's a big loss

Stephen Moore Heritage Foundation Steven
Cop Charged With Felony Battery for Grabbing Female Officer by Throat

The Officer Tatum Show

01:54 min | Last week

Cop Charged With Felony Battery for Grabbing Female Officer by Throat

"Another thing I want to touch on is this police getting charged. I spoke about it before, but I just made a video on my YouTube about it. The police officer out there in Florida who was on video yelling at a subject in the back of a patrol car, then a female officer grabbed him by the belt, pulled him, and then he turned around and pushed her, his hand, grazed her neck, and all the reports were saying he choked her, I just, I'm having a problem finding that that makes sense to charge the sergeant with pushing an officer after the officer pulled him and almost made him fall over because of she perceived that he went too far. When there is no law against what the sergeant did, he didn't touch the guy, all he had was harsh words. That's not against the law to have harsh words for somebody. It's not a violated violation of somebody, somebody's constitutional rights, if they're under arrest and a person has harsh words for them. And say, if you hurt any one of my officers, I'm going to take your soul. It's pretty much what he said. That's not against the law to say that. Somebody may believe that it's improper. But as a officer with three years on a police department, you go and grab your sergeant and pull him in, almost make him fall on the ground. To me, you are out of bounds. If the man, if the officer was assaulting this guy, then I have a different tune. But nobody touched his officership, you, you ran from third base to the home plate just to pull his officer pull his sergeant out of the back of that patrol car. But when the sergeant wasn't there, you wouldn't even touch the suspect to get him in the car. But you're willing to grab the police, your police sergeant but you won't touch the suspect.

Youtube Florida
The Biden Administration Is Completely Incompetent or Evil

The Officer Tatum Show

00:43 sec | Last week

The Biden Administration Is Completely Incompetent or Evil

"The Biden administration is completely incompetent or evil. Or both. They can not mention or say that we are in a recession. They are lying to the country to say that we are or we are not in a recession. Changing the definition of a recession that under Trump if this would have happened under Trump, we are in a recession ladies and gentlemen. But under Biden somehow they can just change the definition. Wikipedia changed the definition. Of a recession to match what the president is saying. This is communist China type stuff. It blows my mind how evil these people are.

Biden Administration Biden Wikipedia China
"monkeypox" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:28 min | Last week

"monkeypox" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Grace, your

"monkeypox" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

08:11 min | 2 weeks ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"This episode is brought to you by mint mobile. What can you buy for just 15 bucks? How about monthly phone service from mint mobile? Get unlimited talk, text, high-speed data, plus keep your phone, your number, and your contacts, switch to date, and mint mobile dot com slash tech. What you need to know about monkeypox by Jamie ducharme. On July 23rd, following months of rising case counts in numerous countries, the World Health Organization's director general Tetris Gabriel declared monkeypox a global health emergency. That label is meant to prompt a coordinated global response with the aim of getting the viruses spread under control. After that development on the global scale, you may be wondering what the monkeypox outbreak means for your own health. This is an infection that we need to be aware of, says doctor Roy gulik, chief of infectious disease at wheel Cornell medicine and New York Presbyterian. But people don't need to be fearful of it. Here's what to know. What are the symptoms of monkeypox? Monkeypox is related to the virus that causes smallpox. Monkeypox symptoms are similar to those associated with smallpox, but they are not as severe. The disease is rarely fatal. Someone infected with monkeypox can experience flu like symptoms such as fever, muscle aches, headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and chills, and a blister like rash, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some people get a rash across large swaths of their body, while others get only a few lesions or blemishes in non obvious places, such as inside the mouth, or the genitals and anus. Where is monkeypox spreading? The WHO has recorded more than 16,000 monkeypox cases in 75 countries. According to a July 23 statement, 5 people have died worldwide, since the outbreak began in May, almost 2900 confirmed cases have come from the U.S., CDC data show. New York is the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, with 900 confirmed cases as of July 22nd. California has the next highest case count at 356. Monkeypox was first identified in the 1950s. Prior to the current outbreak, it was endemic to parts of western and Central Africa, with cases often linked to exposure to infected animals. The current outbreak is unusual in its scale, global reach and spread from person to person, experts are still trying to figure out why that is. But possible explanations include viral mutations, declining use of the smallpox vaccine, and shifts in human behavior. How does monkeypox spread? Human to human transmission mostly happens through close contact. Either direct skin to skin contact with someone who has a monkeypox rash or less commonly by touching items such as clothing or bedding that have come into contact with an infectious person's sores or bodily fluids. Someone is considered infectious until their rash has fully healed and fresh skin has formed the CDC says. That process can take up to four weeks. Monkeypox is not a traditional sexually transmitted infection. While sex is a form of close contact and thus a possible way for the virus to spread, monkeypox doesn't only spread through sexual activity, any close contact with a monkey pox rash could potentially transmit the virus. A pregnant person can also transmit the virus to their fetus. Some cases, including that of a young boy and the Netherlands have stumped doctors, because they can't find a clear source of spread, such examples have raised concerns that the virus can occasionally spread by air, a theory the CDC has rejected. Monkeypox can sometimes spread through exposure to a sick person's respiratory droplets, but the WHO says that usually requires sustained face to face contact. Gullick says that form of transmission is most likely if someone has sores in their mouth. This is not COVID, gulick says. This is not a virus that is transmitted readily through the air. This isn't the kind of thing you'd pick up by riding the bus. Who is at risk of a monkeypox infection? The bulk of cases in the U.S. have been diagnosed among men who have sex with man, a study published July 21st in the New England Journal of Medicine analyzed more than 500 monkeypox cases and 16 countries during the current outbreak, and found that 98% of the cases were among gay or bisexual men. The researchers traced 95% of the cases back to sexual activity. There's nothing specific about monkeypox that would make it more common in men who have sex with men. It's just a virus that found its way into that community of individuals. That doesn't mean it can't spread beyond that community. Anyone can get monkeypox. If they have close contact with an infectious person's rash. Who should get vaccinated against monkeypox? There are two vaccines that can prevent monkeypox infection. The ACE2 thousand smallpox vaccine, and the jynneos smallpox and monkeypox vaccine. Jenny us, which is given in two doses, is the preferred shot for widespread use because it carries a smaller chance of side effects, but the U.S. is still building up its stores of that product, which means at least for now, demand exceeds supply. People with known exposure to someone who has monkeypox should get vaccinated, ghoulish as. When, given within four days of exposure, the vaccine can prevent disease entirely, and can also lessen symptoms if given within two weeks of exposure. The CDC says. In hotspots, like New York City, and Washington D.C., public health officials have broadened vaccine eligibility to include higher risk individuals, such as sex workers, and men who have sex with men who have recently had multiple or anonymous partners. Check with your local health department to find eligibility and scheduling requirements in your area. Our monkeypox treatments available in the U.S. there is no drug specifically approved to treat monkeypox. Doctors can prescribe antivirals kept in the strategic national stockpile to fight smallpox, the most common is called teapots, but it's a labor intensive process. Since the drug isn't approved for use against monkeypox, it is considered investigational and access is controlled by the CDC to prescribe it, a doctor has to get informed consent from their patient, and deal with a lot of paperwork and requirements school access. Google says only certain high risk monkeypox patients, including young children, pregnant people, immunocompromised individuals, and people with serious rashes need antivirals. Most people get better on their own in a few weeks, and can control symptoms using anti itch treatments and painkillers. This episode was brought to you by mint mobile. Hate your phone bill? Yeah, most people do. Except mint mobile customers. They get premium wireless for just 15 bucks a month. Unlimited talk, text, and high-speed data on the nation's largest 5G network. What's the catch? There is none. Keep your phone, your number, and all your precious contacts. Including those you'd rather forget. To get your new plan for just 15 bucks a month, go to mint mobile dot com slash tech.

monkeypox smallpox CDC Jamie ducharme Tetris Gabriel Roy gulik wheel Cornell medicine and New U.S. Gullick gulick World Health Organization monkeypox infection chills Central Africa headaches fever flu Washington D.C.
"monkeypox" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on WTOP

"Have cases of monkeypox. They are predominantly in individuals or men who have sex with men, although they are found in other individuals in the first cases in children, were found in the United States, from infectious disease specialist doctor William schaffner at Vanderbilt. We will have more and more of this monkeypox vaccine, but it will take some time. Tom CBS News. And his physician, President Biden's physician, has released more information about the president's coronavirus infection. President Biden's reported by The White House to be improving in isolation there as you recovers from his case of COVID that his doctor believes as a highly contagious strain, infectious disease expert, doctor William schaffner, of Vanderbilt medical. It has the capacity to infect people who are well vaccinated, such as the president. It can infect people who have been previously infected with the virus itself and have recovered. But in those instances, it almost invariably produces a much milder illness. Tom CBS News Washington. Minnesota abortion clinic is trying to figure out how to deal with unexpected run on its services, CBS News correspondent Allison keyes reports. The only abortion clinic in northern Minnesota is bracing for a surge of out of state patients as fallout continues from the Supreme Court's decision overturning roe V wade, the we health clinic has patients from Wisconsin and Texas sitting in its waiting room along with women from Minnesota, doctors say they are trying to accommodate as many patients as possible. This is doctors across the nation report an increase in men seeking vasectomies and women seeking sterilization. Allison keyes, CBS News. Coming up on WTO after traffic and weather, a sinkhole opens up, causing an unexpected detour for some drivers. It's 5 36. The Washington area has certainly had some very intense storms this summer. Heavy and frequent downpours over a short period of

monkeypox President Biden William schaffner Tom CBS infectious disease coronavirus infection Vanderbilt medical Allison keyes Vanderbilt Minnesota roe V wade CBS News White House United States Washington Supreme Court Wisconsin Texas WTO
"monkeypox" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:53 min | Last month

"monkeypox" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Of the monkeypox outbreak in the U.S. may resemble the early phase of the COVID pandemic, testing is hard to come by and vaccines are in short supply. But in Pierre's ping Wong explains why monkeypox is different. More than 400 people in the U.S. have been afflicted with painful, itchy, epoxy and lesions that can last for up to a month. It's the 2022 monkeypox outbreak, and it's just getting started. And in the United States, I think we're certainly in a phase of increasing cases. That's doctor Jennifer mcquiston. She's incident commander for the monkeypox response at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. cases first appeared 7 weeks ago and people who would travel to Europe. There appears to be more sustained community transmission happening in some cities in the United States with people maybe not knowing who they got monkeypox from, but mcquiston says monkeypox is not spreading in the same ways as COVID. Monkeypox is very different. It's not spread easily. It requires direct close contact and most of the cases that we're aware of are associated with intimate contact and even sexual contacts. The current monkeypox outbreak is concentrated among men who have sex with men with multiple partners and have been somewhere monkeypox is known to be spreading. The question says this is actually dramatically different from the way monkeypox has historically spread. Outbreaks of the virus have been common in parts of central and West Africa, where it typically spreads from animals with limited human to human transmission. This week, the government rolled out its monkeypox vaccination campaign, making tens of thousands of doses available to people who might have been exposed. Through a combination of the tools we have in hand, and that would be adequate contact tracing, isolating cases, offering vaccine more widely. We'll be able to see cases start to be contained, but she warns that the U.S. will be at risk until the global outbreak is also under control. Ping Huang and

monkeypox U.S. ping Wong Jennifer mcquiston Centers for Disease Control an mcquiston Pierre Europe West Africa government Ping Huang
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"They exist and they're a big problem in places where they circulate and have been circulating for a long time. And they are often introduced within our borders by travel, but what could contribute to their persistence is, you know, changing climates here. So for example, think about dengue. Dengue is a disease caused by a mosquito borne virus that generally lives in the tropics, right? You need a certain kind of mosquito to transmit dengue. And for a long time, you didn't see that mosquito in the United States. But you'd occasionally see those mosquitos and occasionally dengue virus being transmitted by them in places like Key West or in Hawaii. Rarely and public health thankfully was able to control those episodes, but as we see climate conditions changing, I think there's certainly a risk that we'll start to see a little bit more of this dynamic evolving in the future. Karen landman is a senior reporter on health and science here at vox and a physician and an epidemiologist. You can read her at vox dot com. Our show today wouldn't have been possible were it not for the efforts of halima Shah and also Matthew collette, Laura bullard, and Paul mounsey. It's today explained..

dengue mosquito borne virus Karen landman Key West Hawaii United States vox halima Shah Matthew collette Laura bullard Paul mounsey
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:32 min | 2 months ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"This 180 year old ominous chord progression resonates with Cobain's melancholy lyrics, and the sound is connecting with listeners still today, something in the way climbed billboard's Hot 100 in March 2022. Marking the 5th time Nirvana has been on the chart. Just like today explain breaks down the days latest stories switched on pop does the same for today's songs because it's not just Nirvana that's having a resurgence. The angsty sounds of 90s alternative music has made a comeback. The genres, anti corporate perspective, which developed out of the excesses of the 80s, is a fitting backdrop to contemporary activist attitudes. This genre is back, but it's taken on a new sound with new faces the second time around. Subscribe to switched on pop and discover the new alternative. I'm co host songwriter Charlie Harding. You can find switched on pop anywhere you get podcasts. Well, I tracked down Marcel and get this. He's healthy. He's happy, and he's right here in New York, filming outbreak two. The virus takes Manhattan. You're kidding. This is amazing. I know. I finally get a part on TV and the monkey's making movies. Today explained Sean Robinson here with Karen lanman senior reporter on health at vox Karen, how do we prevent the spread of monkeypox? Contact tracing is the start of prevention efforts. Fortunately, there is no known asymptomatic transmission with monkeypox. So that means that in the period before a person starts to have those flu like symptoms, we don't think they're transmitting. And if you may recall from COVID, that was a real problem, a real difficulty in COVID is that you had to go back and think in the days before I was sick. You know, who did I have contact with? We don't really have to do that with monkeypox in the same way. So contact tracing is the beginning of all prevention efforts with monkeypox. And then once you know who has who has been infected, and who those contacts are, you first get them to stay home and then in some places they're starting to vaccinate those people. What vaccination? They're vaccinating these folks with smallpox vaccine. And the smallpox vaccine, many of us have either not really had to think about or even really know about. But a large number of humans living in the world where smallpox was a problem until about 1980, have been vaccinated for smallpox. And my mom's got the scarf. Yeah. Yeah, so there was quite a bit of immunity as a consequence. We still have smallpox vaccine in often in national strategic stockpiles for example, where we keep it in case some country has a smallpox isolate that they might want to weaponize, for example, for a bioterrorism attack. The old smallpox vaccine that was used by the way is not the kind of one we would use now. It was a live virus vaccine. It was weakened, but it could replicate in people who had severe immunocompromised. And we would not want to use that as eagerly as we might want to use a safer virus for folks with immunocompromised. And so a new, safer smallpox vaccine. And it is called jynneos, I believe, is the branding. And jynneos is a non replicating live virus vaccine. That's a better candidate for using in these situations where you basically vaccinate all the contacts of somebody who is a case or although particularly close contacts to prevent them from either developing infection or transmitting it. And ideally you do that within four days of infection. How much of the world is still getting a smallpox vaccination of some kind? A nun. Step by step, the disease was pushed back to the very last case, Ali Mao Mali. It's not necessary to vaccinate people against smallpox anymore because it's been eradicated. Smallpox was no more. On the 8th of May, 1980, doctor Hoffman mahler, director general of the World Health Organization, signed a certificate of eradication. So there's no point in vaccinating people broadly for a disease that's not causing a whole lot of death. And what about treatment if you actually get the monkeypox? So most people don't really need a particular drug directed at killing the virus or stopping its spread. Most people do find just taking care of themselves at home, drinking lots of fluids, controlling any fever, symptoms with pain and fever medicines. And getting through it themselves that way, most people don't require hospitalization. But are currently being hospitalized, I think, often just to prevent spread while other sort of contingencies are managed. But there are a couple of medicines that are being explored or have already been approved for use in people with this infection. One is called teapots. It's sort of the brand name for tech of aromat. There's some evidence from human trials in the Central African Republic that are promising. So that's a good thing. And there's also another drug called Brinson Dauphine. And that also seems to show some efficacy treating monkeypox. But honestly, I think most of the people, if you have a healthy immune system, most people will be able to manage this is just an infection that goes away by itself, but just has some unpleasant symptoms while it's making its way through you. Is there anyone out there right now saying we should have never stopped vaccinating people for smallpox because if we hadn't this monkeypox thing wouldn't have happened? I haven't heard that particular perspective. I have seen there was a study published well before this. Particular outbreak. Sort of explaining how monkeypox is sort of filling a niche that smallpox previously occupied. Because people are no longer broadly immune to smallpox. And that's probably true. But global vaccination campaigns are costly. Once you eradicate an infection, there are a lot of other places to put the resources that you previously put towards smallpox vaccination. So whether it's other vaccination campaigns or other disease prevention campaigns. The ten year campaign cost $300 million, a real bargain. The world saves each year 1000 $1 million on vaccines and care of the sick balloon. Since 1980, when smallpox was eradicated, the amount of travel that people are able to do and that people do has changed quite a bit has gone up quite a bit. And we're also seeing enormous changes in the border between humans and the wild animals where this disease normally circulates, right? Climate change has accelerated deforestation has accelerated conflict, although conflict has always been present at least since colonialization. Throughout various parts of west and Central Africa, that has been a really active dynamic over the last few decades. So all of this has brought humans and increasing contact with the reservoirs of this infection and so this may be accelerated monkeypox arrival into this niche, that smallpox previously occupied. But these trends that we're talking about deforestation, you know, humans moving more and more into previously unoccupied territory, climate change, travel, these trends don't seem to be going anywhere. Does that mean that monkeypox is just the latest in a host of new diseases we're going to be coming into contact with? I mean, it is the latest, but if you'll recall, there is a coronavirus that also kind of jumped species and has caused lest we forget. A fair bit of havoc. So yeah, yes, absolutely. I mean, coronavirus, obviously, was not the first either. There are a lot of diseases that we don't often have to think about in the U.S. and in Europe..

monkeypox smallpox Charlie Harding Sean Robinson Karen lanman jynneos Cobain Ali Mao Mali Hoffman mahler Nirvana Marcel Brinson Dauphine fever Manhattan flu World Health Organization New York Central African Republic
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:06 min | 2 months ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"And one of the symptoms like. So it usually starts with a flu like illness, you know, some fever chills, muscle aches, headache. And then with a couple of days, it'll progress to a rash, and that rash looks a lot like chickenpox, which doctors traditionally described as sort of a dewdrop on a rose petal, which means it's kind of a wet looking but clear, blister on a reddened base. And so it'll look like that for a couple of days and then progress to being a more pussy looking blister, then that'll pop and then usually within two weeks from the onset of the blister they start to crust over. The infectious period is thought to start with the onset of rash, although there's also some discussion of the possibility that infectivity starts that someone can be contagious when they start having the fever and the muscle aches. In part because they're made during that period be rash inside the mouth and throat that is not really detected by the person who has it. It sounds kind of gnarly. Who's most vulnerable here? Until 2017, we mostly saw bad outcomes among small children and babies who were also the primary people who got infected with this. So what that portends for us is that people with some level of immunocompromised are at higher risk for a bad outcome from a monkeypox infection, even with this West African, less severe version of monkeypox. Does it have lasting effects? It can, of course, if it causes severe disease, you can have outcomes from the severe disease, including death. But also even mild disease, if you have substantial rash, it can leave some pretty significant scarring, which can be a cosmetic problem for some people. And I think what we're learning with COVID, there can be post viral effects that we have not yet identified. So I think there may be some consequences that we know about. And then there are some that we may not yet know about. Should people be concerned that this could turn into another COVID? So we're seeing it in places and among a community that actually has a lot of resources to stop its spread. This is a containable situation, particularly in the countries like where we are seeing these outbreaks that are happening across Europe in North America as well. Both the general public and public health have a lot of practice. The general public has a lot of practice washing their hands, watching potentially touched or infected linens or clothes wearing gloves wearing masks. I think masks are a lot less important for preventing transmission here, but contact precautions are something that many of us who had never heard about those things before COVID now know very well. I think we're actually in a pretty good position. But, you know, if there is a whole lot of transmission going on that's undetected and there are chains of transmission that public health authorities are not able to catch, then this may become something that kind of burbles at a low level uncontrolled in the general population in countries that where it didn't circulate before. That is that is a possibility, but for it to cause the kind of widespread severe disease and death that COVID cause that seems right now unlikely. How to prevent monkeypox in a minute on today explained. Support for the show today comes from click up. They want to know what you would do if you had one whole extra day a week, like an 8th day. I'd probably play some tennis. No one asked me. The folks at click up say that an extra day might just be out there for you, waiting for you to just come and take it because they have a productivity platform and its goal is to save you a whole day of work every week. Click up is designed to replace all the different productivity tools that live in totally different ecosystems. It can house all your tasks, projects, docs, goals, and spreadsheets, so.

fever chills muscle aches monkeypox monkeypox infection chickenpox general public and public heal mild disease headache flu fever North America Europe tennis
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"What are all the ways monkeypox can spread between people? Most of the spread happens from contact with the source, the open-source, a pretty high number of viruses in them, and so they're pretty infectious. It can also be spread through respiratory droplets and possibly aerosols, but John Brooks during the CDC press conference said that usually happens because there are undetected sores in the mouth and throat. And so when somebody before they have an open sore on their visible skin may have a sore in their mouth or throat may cough or breathe heavily around another person and transmit it that way. So really the sores are where the transmission comes from in monkeypox. Okay, so it's not like COVID style transmission where 15 minutes in a closed quarter, you're definitely gonna get it or something like that. Right, no, it's a very different type of transmission and you do not, you're so unlikely to catch this during just casual contact with somebody. So it makes it a lot easier to protect yourself if you are out and about in the world. The CDC this morning wants to calm the public fears over how the monkeypox virus is transmitted, transmitted. The agency emphasizing that it does not spread easily through the air like COVID-19. Monkeypox is primarily spread through sustained physical contact, such as skin to skin touch or someone with an active rash. The kind of contact that you need to have to transmit this really needs to be skin to skin or contact with an item that a person soar has had contact with. So what's unique about this virus compared with many others, including COVID is that it lives for a long time on surfaces. So there have been cases of transmission, for example, to the person cleaning the bedding of an infected person because they have contact with fluid that leaked from the sores onto that bedding. So you do need to have contact precautions around somebody that you know to be sick with this in order to prevent transmission. But that's a very different kind of practice than not sharing airspace as you can imagine. It could spread through aerosols just to be clear, but not nearly as likely as something like COVID. That's right. And it's just not nearly as likely for this particular pathogen to spread through aerosol as it is to spread through skin contact. How long is this disease been around and not, you know, been studied that closely? Well, good question. Monkeypox was first identified in the late 1950s when it was found to be infecting research animals, which were monkeys, which is why it has its name, but it usually lives in small rodents, usually in western Central Africa, and is kind of burd up in small outbreaks. Usually, chains of maybe one to three people usually household members in that part of the world since then. And only recently, maybe since 2017, have we started to see a whole lot of human to human transmission, and that has been in Nigeria primarily. An 11 year old boy living in abura was infected by the monkeypox disease, he and his family have been quarantined at the ninja Delta university teaching hospital. It kind of started with a big rainfall event that caused both people and animals to flee to higher ground. And so there's just a lot more contact between humans and the animals where this disease more naturally circulates. And there have been more and more transmission events and clusters in Nigeria such that there have been now 450 human cases.

Monkeypox CDC John Brooks cough abura Central Africa monkeypox disease ninja Delta university teachin Nigeria
"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:21 min | 2 months ago

"monkeypox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's today explained, I'm Sean Rama's firm. I'm here with Karen landman who is a senior reporter on health and science here at vox and a physician and an epidemiologist Karen did I get it all right? You did, Sean, great job. Welcome to the show. The president's talking about monkeypox, the World Health Organization is talking about monkey pox, so it seemed like high time we talk about monkeypox on the show, how worried should the world be about monkeypox, Karen? First of all, I think we're all primed to worry quite a bit about any new pathogen that we are not used to seeing on the scene here in the U.S. and in Europe. But this is fundamentally a different situation than when COVID came on the scene. This is a smallpox like illness, but it's not nearly as virulent. It doesn't cause nearly as bad a disease as smallpox did. And it doesn't spread as easily from person to person as smallpox did. So it's not likely to lead to the kind of mass deaths that we saw with COVID-19. So I don't think we would expect to see a whole lot of deaths due to monkeypox in places where good access to hospital care. When we see monkeypox in the U.S. or in Europe, it's usually in sporadic cases where it kind of travels with a return traveler from Nigeria or some other place in central or West Africa where there is a lot of monkeypox circulating either among animals and occasionally in little outbreak situations among people, but we don't usually see the kind of person to person spread that we seem to be seeing in Europe and in the United States leading to the kinds of numbers of cases that we're seeing now. Italy and Sweden have become the latest countries to confirm cases following Britain, Portugal, and Spain. Tonight, a potential case of monkeypox is being investigated at this New York City hospital. After the U.S.'s first case of the year was confirmed Wednesday in Massachusetts, a man who'd only recently traveled to Canada. And we're still not seeing like bananas numbers like we do with COVID, right? We're still seeing relatively small numbers of monkeypox. Yeah, that's absolutely right. I mean, as of Tuesday morning, there were 270 odd suspected and confirmed cases of monkeypox worldwide. You know, given the rigor with which various clinics and events where it might have been spread have been doing case finding, that's actually not that high a number. You know, you could imagine given that there's some probable transmission happening that is not being detected, that it could be a much higher number than that. It could be in the thousands, but we haven't actually seen those numbers turn up yet. And if I'm understanding you, this is traveled from Africa to Europe and North America. Is that correct? That's usually the way it moves. Right now, at least one travel associated case that is part of this outbreak that sort of has happened at the same time as this outbreak, and a whole lot of other cases, most of the other cases are among gay and by men. Men who have sex with men, many of whom are linked by having been in the same place at the same events at the same time. None of those seem to be linked to the travel cases, so there may have been some transmission that has not yet been detected that sort of does link those two groups of people. Where was this event? So there are several events. There was a asana that's sort of the European term for a gay bath house. So about how it's used for adults for sex, usually by queer men. In Spain, that's responsible for most of the cases there was a gay pride event in the Canary Islands that I believe has been linked to several cases are thought to have been linked to several cases. And also a gay fetish event in Antwerp that's called darklands and that has also been linked to several cases. So the people who run those events have already reached out to attendees and done a lot of work to do case finding. But those are some of the events to which and places to which some of these clusters are linked. You said this is sort of like a smallpox type disease, but now we're talking about it being related to gay sex. Is this sort of like an STD? What's the deal? I'd actually talk to John Brooks at the CDC if he's one of the leads in the investigation on this. He said, you know, what defines an STI they call it an STI now, sexually transmitted infection is a disease that requires sex to be transmitted. So gonorrhea and chlamydia are sort of the classic examples of this. But there are also a lot of diseases that do not meet that definition that can be transmitted during the kind of close contact that happens during sex. So like meningitis is an example of that there have been outbreaks of meningitis among also among gay and by men just due to the close contact within that community that happens during sex. So not really technically transmitted during the biologically defined sex, but during the close contact that sort of surrounds all of that. If monkeypox is being transmitted during sex, it's more likely just because of the close contact that goes along with sexual activity, not necessarily.

monkeypox smallpox Sean Rama Karen landman Europe U.S. Karen New York City hospital World Health Organization West Africa Sean Spain Nigeria Portugal Sweden Italy Britain Massachusetts smallpox type disease Canada