10 Burst results for "Monica Duffy Toft"

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Visa stamps to my family to get here a movie is on the state department fellowship at the Harvard Kennedy School I asked for volunteers from there and the Fletcher school of law and diplomacy at Tufts University not that many people want to talk some students worried that sharing their perspectives could put their careers at risk the handful who agreed had very personal reasons for choosing the foreign service and they were resolute despite recent testimony by some officials who said they were cut out of the process by trump political operatives these future diplomats say they haven't lost faith in foreign service not at all no administrations change the work of the foreign service doesn't they say that work being an individual face of the United States around the world that still has power Carlo James out a gun at tufts Fletcher school has already served an embassy he's from New Mexico of Indo spatter when Filipino descent and is fluent in Arabic Akon says when he meets people abroad it changes the way they see Americans people can start to see people of color representing a very powerful nation that's what being a diplomatic officer is worth it to him even though he knows that he most likely will simply have to follow orders in the pharmacy we are asked to carry out the wishes of the administration and we will but if we aren't able to if we find a point that we're unable to ethically carry on morally carry out these commands then we have the responsibility to recuse herself resign or perhaps testify in Congress that's good ever gone and other students thinking about their own so called redlines points at which they too would choose loyalty to the constitution over loyalty to a president what they're learning and what we're trying to teach them a sticker themselves to think about ahead of time what are their red lines what is their ethical code Monica Duffy toft is director of the center for strategic studies at the Fletcher school she says they're teaching students to thoroughly understand the agency's they'll serve and what their rights and responsibilities are so maybe this generation going in let's say will but what what will fight back of maybe a little bit sooner than what we've seen so far but these diplomats in training may not have the same amount of guidance the past generations of Pat Duffy Top says the state department has been hollowed out many senior staff have left in their positions remain unfilled and so what's going to happen is you're going to have this gap of professionalism you're gonna have a lot more political appointees were not gonna have the depth of expertise that we need in order to administer these agencies properly to protect the national interest still what some people see as a crisis other C. as democracy at work marina because my word and he is a student from Indonesia at the Harvard Kennedy School I know that in in the US of people are are sort of the complaining of what's happening on my god the government and but you should also you know a be grateful for days for this process to like shows how healthy American democracy is fellow Harvard student hi nurse the baton agrees his parents are from Mexico in El Salvador he points out that there are ways to voice dissent within the state department he recalls when Thomas a Shannon junior came to speak to students here Shannon was Under Secretary for political affairs before leaving the state department in twenty seventeen he said this is a permanent disability agency is an agency of debate there is the ability to go up to your boss and say Hey I'm not really clear on what the policy objective here is I don't see how it aligns with our priorities and so there is the ability to kind of work through the channel the internal journals but all the students admit they don't really know what kinds of situations they'll face I just have a personal philosophy of of not warning until you have to so Majeed has not beat the Harvard student whose family is from Russia and Afghanistan he says he'll stay on the path he seems to have been on since before he was born to join the state department with so many people leaving they have to be replaced in those positions have to be filled so the work is even more important now than it ever was before and I just motivates me to get in as as as quickly as I can and do the work especially now he says it's important to have dedicated people representing America's values of broad values that has the V. says haven't changed the world I'm professionally last year an Indonesian passenger jet crashed into the Java sea all one hundred eighty nine people on board the line err flight were killed five months later an Ethiopian airlines flight also crashed again everyone on board died a hundred fifty seven people both planes were Boeing seven thirty seven MAX jets today investigators in Indonesia issued a report about what because the line air crash and pointed to a serious design flaw airline pilot Patrick Smith explains what went wrong the airplane was sensing a condition that did not exist an aerodynamic stall in response to that it was pushing the nose down via this automated system that the pirates didn't really even know existed and it kept engaging over and over forcing the plane down down down in the crew did not know how to properly disconnect the system and and react to it in time to save the airplane now the Indonesian report cites nine different causes both human and mechanical that led to the crash ultimately though as it comes down to this one system that was failing and wasn't understood by the crew I mean that's really the essence of it what were a few of those other variables that were interfering with the pilots as they were dealing with this plan continuously pointing downwards there were maintenance issues ways in which the pilots reacted the weren't necessarily the right things to do in that circumstance and that's kind of easy to analyze when you're an investigator looking back on something you have all the time in the world but these pilots were in this cockpit the technology in front of them was failing alarms were we're sounding lights were flashing the airplane doing things that it just wasn't supposed to be doing and that there were only seconds to save the day and and maybe they could help but really in essence this is a design defect so let's zoom out here talk about the seven thirty seven Max some people say it was never really designed to do what Boeing wants it to do can you explain that this was an airplane conceived back in the nineteen sixties to make short hops around Europe or the US wherever and bowing his stock by this basic template of a plane and they now created ten different variants of it and each one has gotten more sophisticated with bigger engines fancier cockpit avionics and so on and they've pushed and pushed this thing the result five decades on now is this seven thirty seven Max which is kind of this monster eyes hybrid of an airplane with all of this power and muscle in technology crammed into this fifty year old framework what incentive does Boeing have to push this one line in the seven thirty seven Max to its limits it streamlines maintenance that streamlines training it streamlines just airline logistics you know it's a way of of for airlines and the plane maker to save money that's not necessarily a bad thing but in this case it's maybe resulted in them just pushing the line too long and too far of course now part of this whole stories at Boeing reveal that a pilot raised issues about the system as early as twenty sixteen two years before the accidents how damning to think that is on the surface you know it's a pretty serious indictment on on the other hand it's taken out of context it's it's hard to say but I think there's no denying here that the plane had a defect has Boeing fix the problems because they expect the seven thirty seven Max to be back on the air by early next year from what I was reading today a document the Boeing put out summarizing the steps they've taken the number of software fixes training enhancements for pilots global fleet support in the play will be safe when it's back up in the air but it's not necessarily easy to convince the average passenger about it is that I can result in the while refusing to fly on your plan airlines refusing to order the airplane those are open questions right now Patrick Smith is an airline pilot and runs the website ask the pilot dot com Patrick thank you very much for your time today thanks for having me.

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

14:46 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The lyrics of Francis Scott Key ringing out in Hong Kong protesters in Hong Kong appeal to President Trump for help and Beijing has a message for them. The new video shows Chinese troops rolling over mach protesters. It is a warning. Don't go too far because we can come in and it's not a pretty sight. It is to use a force also today in the Bahamas. The rescue effort continues with some good news a father and child reunion after the storm so she's because now I can focus on continuing to help. I'm fully focused. I'm Marco Werman those stories and more today here on the world. I'm Marco Werman an and you're with the world on a Monday chaos pain and finally for some relief a few of the feelings on board a ship carrying people from the Bahamas to safety in Florida Florida after Hurricane Doreen tore through the Bahamas. A mass exodus has not been easy emotionally. There have been lives destroyed by the storm as well as final looks looks at homes and uncertainty about what lies ahead logistically. There's pressing technical concerns for instance getting permission and visas to come to the United States still many from the Bahamas managed to board ships bound for Florida reported cave on Antonio had Dari was on the first boat to leave report a ship bound for Florida. He told Oh that's what it was like for those families. It was a pretty chaotic scene. People trying to get on the boat they walked they drove to the port of Freeport and they were able to get over thousand thousand people on this boat. There were people desperate to leave people who had lost their houses people who had family who had drowned. There's no food there's no water. There's no electricity city so this was perhaps the only escape valve. They had you know so thousand people thousands stories of survival. What did you hear from them. This one was a basically a mini soon nami that came through with a storm surge and the fact that storm was over for forty eight hours some of them like John McKenzie they would be in a house and then when the storm would abate a little bit or the or the water would go down they would move to another spot and he lost who members of his family in this transfer they were moving from house to house when the storm came back over these forty eight hours on my cousin died he died on him and his wife have died his name was will he died in his wife drowned the only been married for two months and died and they drown he actually drowned. We'll try to save her because they came into Jetski. He got safe own a jet Ski. They came and got him but he said he got to go back for his wife. So during the second second trip time of him trying to go back for his wife died in the end up losing his life overwhelmed by the Nami because that's how the flooding was there was like a Salami. I came to the ball muscle. I also heard incredible stories like a woman who tied herself to a tree trying to avoid the wintering hurricane but it was actually the flood that came above tree three level that drowned her then. There's others like Romania Tibi who was on the ship traveling with his daughter and no close not even a bag. Never know is going to be. We like that. That's bad but it's come a underwater but he just guard make it to be life cave on a once these thousand some odd. Bahamians landed there at the port of Palm Beach. What was their reaction. How did they had. How did they look. How do they feel well. They were very patient. They actually got a good meal on the ship and good breakfast and then they waited too off board a took a few hours and then the last group to unload out of joy they started seeing in the in the passport line up at the port well safe and sound there a lot of people though back in the Bahamas still unaccounted for but thanks for the good news from Miami reporter. Cave on Antonio had Dari appreciate your time thank you Marco later in the hour will be back on the ground in the Bahamas checking on the rescue efforts there where the head of the Bahamas air and Sea Rescue Association says he's overwhelmed by the unity of his neighbors but for rescuers like him now. It's crunch time. That's still ahead ahead this hour. They are dead. As far as I'm concerned. They are dead. That was President Trump's declaration this afternoon saying that an attempt to reach an agreement with the Taliban is over negotiations to withdraw a substantial number of US troops appear to be nearly complete but it's been a whiplash forty eight hours in the diplomatic cla matic world on Saturday. The president said the secret meeting at Camp. David is off stunning words both secret meeting and off today. The president drove the diplomatic nail. Further into the coffin by saying negotiations are dead. The president has received criticism and praise for this city Siddiqui a spokesman for Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said President trump made the right call to call off talks. How do you trust group that at the same time they talked to you and then they kill people and then kill you. It is not possible and for many women. The collapse of the talks is a good thing says Mary crummy who directs the Afghan Women Network crummy Chroma was a delegate to a landmark peace conference between the Taliban and Afghan officials last July in Doha. She says women now see renewed opportunity this. This news has so far met most people happy or tickly for the woman the way that the discussion was when it was really was not accepted by most most people during the last nine months we have called on both sides particularly on Taliban that they should. I offer dishes respect. The ceasefire otherwise it was really was disappointing. Most people a lot of civilian casualty on the People WanNA son were sober. Each now domestic floated next on Indicia talk face to face as you know though the Taliban claims it respects women's writes although that definitely was not the case two decades ago when they were in power. What do you think Mary has a Taliban changed since it's been in power on such an Ignatius to in really to say the Taliban they have changed. They cannot convince us because of the countries descended control girls are not allowed to go to school and undoing not allow toward the a lot of fundamentalism right now. Beaumont and main our constitutional have equal rights but for the most part of the country's war and conflict is going on. We cannot select all over the country. People have equal rights. That's what the constitution says. The the Taliban officials have called women intellectually and religiously incomplete. That's their words. So do you think the US has been betraying Afghan women by negotiating with the Taliban in the first place. DIVORCE ATLANTA SON has changed a lot during the last fifteen years. The woman have access to hydrogen occasion. There were about both to sign the agreement but it is need for more open discussion between op plans between Taliban government. Unfortunately the woman should have Khalil representative of the government or is it a percentage of woman cornerstone initiatives seat to woman as a victim anymore should see fig woman as Abby L. Chin maker as help the country since the Taliban have been pushed from power in two thousand and two what are the freedoms of women have gained or are now clinging to to that you most worry would disappear under an incomplete or a rush through peace deal. Now we have one and or me we have one lease as we have has adopted as we have millions of girls going to schools thousands of doctors dear old woman we have woman as a minister recoupling government as a ambassadeurs. We have bowman and upon them on. We cannot compare you worry that all of those gains could just disappear if the the Taliban are not at the table as solid on his brokers. Definitely woman must be officially part of the negotiation edition being as a negotiator. They must sensitive woman really want peace but we want to be part of this birding this piece because runoff honest honest the development of twenty nine thousand nine here's before Maria crummy is the executive director of the Afghan women at work. She's been speaking with us from Kabul Mary. Thanks so much for your time time. You're welcome so let's review this weekend. President trump reveal there was a secret Camp David summit in the same tweet. He said it was cancelled. Donald then today he declared any talks between the US and the Taliban to be dead. The trump administration's handling of the process has left many observers bewildered but how unusual well is it style of diplomacy. Monica Duffy Toft is director of the Center for Strategic Studies at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. I studied more than one hundred conflicts Monica. Is there any precedent for what the US has been doing in talking with the Taliban. Yes there's precedent for it. you know you're just talking to the opposition. You're talking talking to the former combatants that you're fighting of course if you WANNA get into Goshi to settlement you have to deal with them and have a dialogue I think think was unprecedented was the lack of agreement within the administration and in particular the highest levels and how it was going to be handled and then how when pulling the plug gone it was going to be announced so the fact that the negotiations that's good actually that you know we're we're thinking about bringing all of the parties perhaps to the table so at this point it was just the Taliban and then trying to seek a negotiation at political settlement to this war because there's not going to be a military settlement. We've been trying that for eighteen in years but I think what was odd about this was the manner in which the plug was pulled and then the announcement and actually many in the administration not being being aware that the chief executive who was going to bring the party there to finally sign and seal the deal just made an announcement that nope not going to happen. We're done when when you have a civil war with a strong foreign intervention force like the US in Afghanistan typically. How do these conflicts and they usually end well? They actually don't end of what you get is decades or you know years and years if not decades of continued very low activity so I think what you'll likely see is each side arming themselves again and trying to defeat. I think the Taliban's made it very clear that it will it calls the Afghan government stooge government right. It's uses it as a proxy for the United State and so I do think you're going to see them trying to overthrow the government and then I think you'll go into lowest scale low intensity conflict for a very long time all right right. That's a really depressing scenario. Let's just say you know what we've got. Facing US right. Now is a draft. US deal with the Taliban it's been going to walk away from it did not don't even include a ceasefire. Where would you start again. I mean we know the talks include the Afghan government what is needed for peace right now. What's the I think everybody but he needs to step back and take a deep breath. I think what really needs to be done is a little bit more patients in the sense of trying to get the two main parties in Afghanistan to talk to one another. I don't know how you do that. It's GonNa take a lot of time because both the Taliban now and the Afghan government feels if the United States was not doing right by them them and so I think for a while talks are going to be stalled but then I think what they're going to have to do is diplomacy with all sides to try to bring them together but the current administration as you know is very impatient I mean these things take years and years to negotiate and the trump White House impatience. What's that about. Is that about twenty twenty I think it is I think that he he you know president. Trump said he was going to solve this problem that he was going to bring peace to have Ghanistan and he he does not appreciate and I have to say generally speaking you know how difficult diplomacy is that. It's not a business deal you. There's not necessarily a price to this that that people can be bought off with something that you actually have to work really hard to understand the fundamental issues and work with the different parties and shuttle back and forth Ortho. I actually was impressed. They you know there's nine different meetings in Doha Ussamma Hollas odd you know was the one negotiating this and I guess what's really tragic about about this. They were actually doing the right thing in in in taking a longer term sort of negotiating strategy willing to work with the Taliban finally recognizing in that yes. This is an indigenous in the eyes of many Afghans legitimate political group. That should probably have a say the table. Oh and I guess what's so. Tragic is all of that work seems have been tossed out because the president just decided that he was going to tweet and say no. We're not going to go to Camp David David and on top of that the way in which they were going to bring people to Camp David not being fully honest and open about how that was going to be done as than the parties even if they had gotten there they they may not have been willing to negotiate will leave it there Monica Monica Duffy Toft Director of the Center for Strategic Studies at the Fletcher School at Tufts University in Medford Massachusetts. Thanks very much Monica thank you mark have a great day just ahead on the show protesters in Hong Kong show no signs of letting up and now they're appealing to president trump to to help them fight. Beijing's power but not everyone in Hong Kong agrees some see the protestors as traitors when my country is going bake and strong and powerful folk they think Oh you know freedom at all in China's no deaths row. They have very good life over that Hong. Kong is simmering. That's coming right up on the world. I'm Marco Werman your th world in Hong Kong protesters show no signs of letting up and this weekend they appeal to someone new for help. President Donald Trump tens of thousands thousands of people marched to the US Consulate.

Taliban president United States President Trump Marco Werman Bahamas Hong Kong Donald Trump Monica Monica Duffy Afghan government Beijing David David Afghanistan Florida Center for Strategic Studies Hong Hurricane Doreen Afghan President Ashraf Ghani Francis Scott Fletcher School
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:40 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Safe and sound there are a lot of people though back in the Bahamas still unaccounted for but thanks for the good news from Miami reporter gave an antenna dari your time thank you Michael. later in the hour we'll be back on the ground in the Bahamas checking on the rescue efforts there the head of the Bahamas air and sea rescue association says he's overwhelmed by the unity of his neighbors but for rescuers like him now it's crunch time that's still ahead this hour. they are dead as far as I'm concerned they are dead that was president trump's declaration this afternoon saying that an attempt to reach an agreement with the Taliban is over negotiations to withdraw a substantial number of US troops appear to be nearly complete but it's been a whiplash forty eight hours in the diplomatic world on Saturday the president said the secret meeting at camp David is off stunning words both secret meeting and off today the president drove the diplomatic nail further into the coffin by saying negotiations are dead the president has received criticism and praise for this city exit decay a spokesman for Afghan president Ashraf Ghani said president trump made the right call to call off talks how do you trust the group but at the same time to talk to you and then they kill people and then kill you it's not possible and for many women the collapse of the talks is a good thing so this is merry a crummy who directs the Afghan women network the comic was a delegate to a landmark peace conference between the Taliban and Afghan officials last July in Doha she says women now see renewed opportunity this news has so far may most people happy what you could do for the long run the way that the discussion was when it was really was not accepted by most people. including the last eight nine months we have called on both sides particularly on Taliban that they should first of all different respect the ceasefire otherwise was really was disappointing most people I looked all civilian casualties on the people of of one the sun Warsaw would eat and not all. domestic thought that Nixon on and they should talk face to face as you know that the Taliban claims it respects women's rights although that definitely was not the case two decades ago when they were in power what do you think merry has a Taliban changed since it's been in power unfortunately justice to elect to stay the column on the have changed they cannot convince us because part of the country's just under control of thought of when the sun the Gosselin not allowed to go to school and you're not allowed to war yeah there's a lot of fundamentalism right no woman and men are going to construction of of wanna some have equal rights but for the most part of the country's war and the conference is going on and we can also look all over the country the people have equal rights that's what the constitution says the Taliban officials have called women intellectually and religiously incomplete that's their words so do you think the US has been betraying Afghan women by negotiating with the Taliban in the first place the one off of one the sun has changed a lot during the last eighteen heroes the woman have access to higher education there were about to sign an agreement but there is a need for more open discussion between Aslan's maturing hello one in government unfortunately the woman should have the prison to dissolve the government as it appears in the book the woman up up on the sun they should seek to woman as a victim anymore you should see a distinct woman as a retail chain maker as a responsible citizen of the country since the Taliban have been pushed from power in two thousand two what are the freedoms of women have gained or are now clinging to that you most wore a would disappear under an incomplete or a rush through peace deal now we have a whole month and told me we have one one in please re house woman has a doctor's we have millions of girls went to schools thousands of doctors dear old woman we have a woman as a minister of woman as a lesson to me. woman and upon a month we can compare and you worry that all of those gains could just disappear if the Taliban are not at the table as solid honest brokers this woman must to be also should be part of the negotiation on dish from being as a negotiator you must listen to the woman we really want to peace but we want to be part of this burning this beast because one of our funnest honest not the woman of twenty or nineteen here's before. Maria crime is executive director of the Afghan women network has been speaking with us from Kabul merry thanks so much for your time your welcome. so let's review this weekend president trump revealed there was a secret camp David summit in the same tweet he said it was canceled then today he declared any talks between the US and the Taliban to be dead the trump administration's handling of the process is left many observers bewildered but how unusual is a style of diplomacy Monica Duffy toft is director of the center for strategic studies at the Fletcher school of law and diplomacy at Tufts University I used to be more than a hundred conflicts Monica is there any precedent for what the US has been doing and talking with the Taliban. yes there's precedent for it you know you're just talking to the opposition you're talking to the former you know combatants that your were fighting of course if you want to get a negotiated settlement you have to you know to deal with them and have a dialogue I single was unprecedented was the lack of agreement within the administration of the particular at the highest levels and how it was going to be handled and then how when you know pulling the plug on it how it was going to be announced so the fact of the negotiations that's good actually that you know we're we're thinking about bringing all the parties perhaps of the table at this point was just the Taliban and then and trying to seek a negotiation up political settlement to this war because there's not going to be a military settlement we've been trying that for eighteen years but I think what was odd about this was the manner in which the plug was pulled out and then the announcement and actually many in the administration not being aware that the chief executive who was going to you know bring the party there to finally signed and sealed the deal just made an announcement that no it's not going to happen we're done what when you have a civil war with a strong foreign intervention force like the U. S. in Afghanistan typically how do these conflicts and. are they usually end twelve that they actually don't end what you get is decades or you know years and years of not decades of continued very low activity so you I think what you'll likely see is inside arming themselves again and trying to defeat I think the Taliban's made it very clear that it still what calls the Afghan government the student government right it's uses it as a proxy for the United States I'm sorry do you think you're gonna see them trying to overthrow the government and then I think you're going to low skill low intensity conflict for a very long time all right that's a really depressing scenario let's just say that you know what what we've got facing us right now is a draft U. S. deal with the Taliban it's been kind of walked away from it did not even include a ceasefire where would you start again I mean we know the talks in include the Afghan government what is needed for peace right now. of what's the I think so everybody needs to step back and take a deep breath I think what really needs to be done is a little bit more patients in the sense of trying to get the two main parties in Afghanistan to talk to one another I don't know how you do that it's gonna take a lot of time because both the Taliban now and the Afghan government feels of the United States I was not doing right by them and so I think for a while the talks are going to be stalled but then I think what they're gonna have to do is diplomacy with all sides to try to bring them together but the current administration as you know was very impatient I mean these things take years and years to negotiate and the trump White House impatience what's that about is that about twenty twenty. all I think it is I think that he will hear you know president trump said he was going to solve this problem that he was going to bring peace to Afghanistan and he does not appreciate and I have to say he generally speaking you know how difficult diplomacy is that it's not a business deal you're in it you know there's not actually a price to that is that people you know can be bought off with something that you actually have to work really hard to understand the fundamental issues and work with the different parties and shuttle back and forth and I actually was impressed they you know there's nine different meetings in Doha is on my hall is odd you know was the one negotiating this and I guess what's really tragic about this is they were actually doing the right thing and and and taking a longer term sort of negotiating strategy willing to work with the Taliban finally recognizing that yes this is an indigenous and and and and and in the eyes of many Afghans legitimate political group that should probably have a say the table and I guess what's so tragic is all of that work seems to have been tossed out because the president just decided that he was going to tweet and say no we're not going to go to camp David and on top of that the way in which they were going to bring people to camp David not being fully honest and open about how that was going to be done is within the parties even if they had gotten there they may not have been willing to negotiate. we'll leave it there Monica Monica doubly tough director of the center for strategic studies at the Fletcher school at Tufts University in Medford Massachusetts thanks very much money I.

Bahamas trump president Kabul executive director Maria eight nine months forty eight hours eighteen years two decades
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The story from now on in order to dampen the level of violence because you know now we're tens if not hundreds of people dying as a result of these kinds of sentiments monica duffy toft professor of international politics at tufts university. Thanks for being with us today. Thank you very much. Pakistan is reacting with outrage today. After india's decision to end the state of kashmir's special status within india yeah today is the blackest deal indian democracy. That's mehbooba mufti. She's a former chief. Minister of the state of kashmir india a special status for kashmir provided some protections and atonomy for india's only majority muslim territory in less seventy years. The territory disputed between india in pakistan has sparked warren conflict between the two countries the b._b._c.'s. i see for rookie explains the rights given to kashmir's under the indian constitution so that was kind of a buffer between india and the state of kashmir which has now been taken away now. India can directly rule in kashmir but the indian government has argued that the arrangements stunted kashmir's development and its integration within the rest of india just prior to the decree today. The indian indian government started a security crackdown. A telephone lines our own since last night internet is not working. There's no yeah no way of communicating with the people in kashmir. It's kind of a situation which is very alarming. The indian government says that's been done onto preempt. Any violence. Pakistan of course has a very different take on the contested territory. It has long insisted that kashmir is internationally disputed and that india alone cannot decide to change status. The pakistani government is also saying it will exercise all options to counter the move the u._n. Secretary general antonio guitarfish rush has called for restraint from all parties. You're listening to the world to disin- cousins me for the first time generations after the slave trade tore their family apart somebody who was born in africa you get your process naked. That's person means you share a common ancestor who was taken to american four hundred the using of their stories still ahead on the world. I'm marco werman. This is the world a co production of the b._b._c. world service w. g._b._h. Boston p._r._i. N._p._r. ex you learn something new.

kashmir india indian indian government Pakistan pakistani government marco werman professor tufts university antonio guitarfish rush Boston africa warren seventy years
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Who's traffic jams. Try and say block the subway system here and that of course is definitely frustrated asserts and section of society who feel the older that perhaps what they're doing is now clearly affecting that that today life is affecting businesses is affecting their choosy so make money so officials was <hes> in mainland china. Danny seemed to be on the sidelines watching how these protest play out at what point do they say enough is enough and assert themselves and what does that look. It's like well. We're in uncharted waters hair if he mostly guys the possibility of the people's liberation all main entering into the streets of hongkong wrong end essentially cracking down on this protest movement that was something which most observers much journalists full was not really possible in modern china. It's simply. It's not something that would have been winning sedating. It's very conscious of how it savings nationally and in many ways teen to portray itself as a modern harmonious sonia's society and country but things have changed quite rapidly here. China does have the the right legally see sending the trait exclusively stage. We sent you how this ends the b._b._c.'s danny vincent in hong kong. Thanks for your time. Danny thank you. I'm marco werman. This is the world president donald trump spoke to the nation earlier today about the mass shootings in ohio and and in texas the shooter el paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate in one voice <music>. Our nation was condemned racism bigotry and white supremacy these sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in america hatred warps. The mind ravages the heart and devours the sole trump called saturday's attack in el paso domestic terrorism it might well be trump's strongest condemnation of racist violence today but it follows several years of this sort of thing. The u._s. has become a dumping ground bringing drugs. They're bringing crime their rapists. You also had people that were very fine. People on both sides the sender backchat their recent trump rally directed at congresswoman illinois more. It's the kind of rhetoric from the president that many see empowering a white nationalist fringe in this country will avoid quoting the shooter's hateful manifesto but it does reflect a world view shared by other young white supremacist extremists from norway to new zealand. They believe their national identity is under threat from changing demographics. That's how monica duffy toft sees that she's a professor vessel at tufts university and a leading expert on the roots of civil conflict and civil war <hes> let me start monica with the question you asked in an article early this year what happens wanna countries core national identity no longer matches its demographic reality well at what it does is at least a quite a bit of anxiety and trepidation among those some some segment of those who were formerly in the majority they feel as if they're going to lose political and economic power and so they sort of react to what they i see. Is you know what they feel. As if dramatic changes within their country and what they think should be the makeup of that country they have an ideal in their head what they think like the country is supposed to look like in the case of the united states is largely white christian and i would go so far as to say protestant christian <hes> an and also with males in charge and so we've seen a lot of dramatic changes in the country and only now are we saying it reflected much more publicly in the open and i would say politically as well so you you would argue that white christian americorps national identity. I mean what about nation of value. I wouldn't make that argument what i would say is there's some segments of the population elation that believes that that is what the core of the united states narrative <hes>. It's history is in has been forgetting that of course the united states is largely been a melting taking part since its inception since the founding of the country so you also can put this in context because you've studied over one hundred civil conflicts around the globe. What is the worst example. All of this pattern that you've seen the worst example is probably former yugoslavia in the.

danny vincent china united states donald trump hong kong president monica duffy toft el paso marco werman sonia america yugoslavia illinois tufts university norway texas professor ohio
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Racist hate in one voice our nation must condemn racism bigotry and white supremacy <hes> that was his largest denunciation of weight negativism and this sort of extremist rhetoric and action but i don't think it's too late to dampen it but but we we need this to be the story from now on in order to dampen the level of violence that was monica duffy toft will hear more from her later in the show today but we begin with the world's immigration editor monica campbell who covers the u._s. mexico border and what she's been hearing. There's a collective morning on both sides. I was checking being with people in what is el paso and also in other parts of the border and <hes> one of the pastors that i met when i was in ciudad juarez recently he runs a migrant shelter in that city in he said that he was including prayers for people from mexico and the united states in this weekend services everybody everybody was. You know another ways kind of bracing themselves for something like this. I think just not just along the border but among latino communities and people live poor brown in the united states were bracing themselves for something horrible like this to happen in some ways. It's not surprising with the rhetoric in the country. You recently got back monica from tijuana san diego border where you are an assignment and this week. We're going to be hearing a series of your stories from there called the waiting room. What have you been looking at exactly what i've been looking at how you with the changes and u._s. policy at the border the reality that thousands of migrants are now waiting in mexico. <hes> you hear people say it that it's become this big waiting room. You know and i wanted to go back to tijuana to see the and hear what that's like. How are people managing. These prolonged weights. What's it like for somebody who's just arrived to the border to see other people. Who've been there for nearly early year. I also want to see how people were living. You know the day to day living conditions and how people are thinking about what's next. How long can mm people wait on the mexico side of the border would of those daily calculations like right and despite what we hear about migrant caravans coming from central america. You've found it to be along the border. There and increasingly international mix of people not just central america absolutely i mean it's still large central american people from honduras el salvador guatemala tamala but also people from mexico asylum-seekers people fleeing dangerous parts of mexico arriving to the u._s. Mexico border in this case tijuana and seeking asylum from their own country in being forced to wait at the border in mexico so that is something that's always striking to me. Mexicans being kept opt in mexico wanting to find a safe place to live. It's also a very international increasing international group of people at the border their entire apartment buildings things in tijuana filled with people from cameroon from haiti from cuba from ethiopia <hes> including the person that will hear from next in this first story story. His name is one rochman and he's from iraq a young man from iraq in tijuana and he told me how he he made his way to the u._s. Mexico border incredibly long journey but also wind that is not too unusual to find at certain parts of the border all right monica. Thanks for that setup. What's your story. Rodwin rochman had never done anything like this for one week. He says he trekked through the sharing gap. It's a stretch of rainforest running from colombia to panama. Anyone who's migrated north by land from south america knows about it. It's grueling ruling and dangerous rowen took videos for his mom along the way aardvark by six hours of walking each day. He says in the video the jungles so dense. It's like night under the canopy. There are no roads rowen. Who's twenty eight years old is is drenched in sweat and his following this swampy path dotted with empty water bottles but he isn't alone and points to people with him and oh she's from cuba from nepal to from scuba the three from iraq nepal cuba in the iraqis that includes ruin and his older brother all headed for the united states for ruin that was just one lake in his three month journey north..

mexico tijuana united states u._s. mexico monica duffy toft iraq monica campbell el paso ciudad juarez america cuba rowen honduras el salvador guatemala Rodwin rochman editor south america colombia san diego cameroon
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Supremacy the sinister ideologies must be defeated Hey it has no place in American hatred warps the mind ravages the heart end of ours the soul trump called Saturday's attack in a possible domestic terrorism it might well be trump's strongest condemnation of racist violence today but it follows several years of this sort of thing the US has become a dumping ground bringing drugs they're bringing crime they're rapists you also had people that were very fine people on both sides this interaction third reason trump rally directed at congresswoman Ilan Omar it's a kind of rhetoric from the president that many see empowering a white nationalist friends in this country will avoid quoting the shooters hateful manifesto but it does reflect a world view shared by other young white supremacist extremists from Norway to New Zealand they believe their national identity is under threat from changing demographics that's how Monica Duffy tosses it she's a professor at Tufts University and a leading expert on the roots of civil conflict and civil war let me start Monica with the question you asked in an article early this year what happens when a country's core national identity no longer matches its demographic reality well what it does is it leased to quite a bit of anxiety and trepidation among those some segment of those who were formerly in the majority they feel as if they're gonna lose political and or economic power and so they sort of you know react to what they see is you know what they feel as if dramatic changes within their country and what they think should be the make up of that country they have an ideal in their head what they think the country is supposed to look like in the case the United States is largely white Christian and I would go so far as is a Protestant Christian all in and also with males in charge and so we've seen a lot of dramatic changes in the country and only now are we seeing it reflected much more publicly in the open and I would say politically as well so it you would argue that white Christian as America's core national identity I mean what what about nation of value I wouldn't make that argument what I would say is there some segments of the population that believes that that is what the core of the United States narrative its history is and has been forgetting that of course the United States has largely been a melting pot since its inception since the founding of the country so you also can put this in context because you studied over hundred civil conflicts around the globe what is the worst example of this pattern that the worst example is probably former Yugoslavia in the early nineties where you store shift particularly in Kosovo that led to Europe with in Kosovo feeling as if the course of our Albanians had taken over there what they saw as their homeland territory and leading to you know first of all of the civil war and then of course to the break up of former Yugoslavia but we also so similar dynamics in the Soviet Union I would go so far as to say you can tell a pretty basic demographic historical narrative story for the break of the Soviet Union which is that the Slavic population particularly the Russian Slavic population was becoming a minority and so there was a sense that okay we can let the non slow parts of the country go but we want to hang on to the score and so today now Russians upwards of eighty two percent ethnically Russian but in the late nineteen seventies it was going to be a minority in other parts of the union were growing having higher birthrates another paramedic kicking is Lebanon and the break up of Lebanon where you had different parts of the population sort of cooking the books actually not giving proper senses accounts in order to maintain control over the political system and if you control the political system to a large extent you can control a lot of the economics of markets as well so in the case of Russia you mention that today it's eighty two percent ethnic Russian what what does that tell us about about this kind of push back what it tells you is is that if it's allowed to sort of faster that it can lead to you know large scale violence it can it doesn't have to or it can lead to you know civil war and so what I've been starting and finishing up a book on this is is looking at these sorts of dynamics about how in the political arena once this becomes public and gets vocalize like this one of the dampers order the institutional mechanisms resources washing and I'm a bit nervous right now in the United States because at the highest levels you are seeing this sort of antipathy this sentiment this a hostile sentiment against non whites in the country and and you know they're being label criminals and and you're using language about them being insects and invading the country and to me this is the beginning of you know what I have seen in other cases where you may end up having pushed back right by those populations if they're strong enough and you can lead to large scale violence and already what you could see this is it's a slow moving revolution that's happening and the question is is it going to be violent or not are you going to see the majority of whites than the majority of the country by the way a you know let's not even talk about race that actually supports immigration I can actually get their voice heard and get it put into the political arena that we have some immigration reform so that we can move away from these levels of hostility but the concern is as we know I I know that president trump today that was his largest denunciation of weight nativism and and and this sort of extremist rhetoric in action but it I don't think it's too late to dampen it but we we we need this to be the story from now on in order to dampen the level of violence because you know now or tens of not hundreds of people dying as a result of these kinds of sentiments Monica Duffy toft professor of international politics at Tufts University thanks for being with us today you very much.

eighty two percent
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One voice our nation must condemn racism bigotry and white supremacy that was his largest denunciation of weight nativism and and and this sort of extremist rhetoric in action but it I don't think it's too late to dampen it but we we we need this to be the story from now on in order to dampen the level of violence that was Monica Duffy toft we'll hear more from her later in the show today but we begin with the world's immigration editor Monica Campbell who covers the U. S. Mexico border and what she's been hearing there's a collective mourning on both sides I was checking in with people in quite as in el Paso and also in other parts of the border and one of the pastors that I met when I was since you're not quite as recently he runs a migrant shelter in that city and he said that he was including prayers for people from Mexico and the United States in this weekend service says everybody was you know in other ways kind of bracing themselves for something like this I think just not just along the border but among Latino communities and people of who are brown in the United States we're bracing themselves for something horrible like this to happen in some ways it's not surprising with the rhetoric in the country you recently got back Monica from the Tijuana San Diego border where you are an assignment in this week we're gonna be hearing a series of your stories from there called the waiting room what have you been looking at exactly what I've been looking at how you with the changes in US policy at the border the reality that thousands of migrants are now waiting in Mexico you hear people say it that it's become this big waiting room you know and I wanted to go back to Tijuana to see and hear what that's like how are people managing these prolonged wait what's it like for somebody who's just arrived to the border to see other people who've been there for nearly a year I also wanted to see how people were living you know the day to day living conditions and how people are thinking about what's next how long can people wait on the Mexican side of the border what are those daily calculations like right and despite what we hear about up migrant caravans come from Central America you you found it to be along the border there and increasingly international mix of people not just Central America absolutely I mean it's still larger central American people from Honduras El Salvador Guatemala but also people from Mexico asylum seekers people fleeing dangerous parts of Mexico arriving to the U. S. Mexico border in this case to ana and seeking asylum from their own country in being forced to wait at the border in Mexico so that is something that's always striking to me Mexicans being kept in Mexico wanting to find a safer place to live it's also a very international increasing international group of people at the border their entire apartment buildings in Tijuana filled with people from Cameroon from Haiti from Cuba from Ethiopia and including the person that we'll hear from next in this first story his name is want rock man and he's from Iraq a young man from Iraq into Quanah and he told me how he made his way to the US Mexico border an incredibly long journey but also one that is not too unusual to find at certain parts of the border all right Monica thanks for that set up let's hear your story growing Rockman had never done anything like this for one week he says he trekked through the daring gap it's a stretch of rain forest running from Columbia to Panama anyone who's migrated north by land from South America knows about it it's a grueling and dangerous robin took videos for his mom along the way five hours twelve five six hours of walking each day he says in the video the jungle so dense it's like night under the canopy there are no roads Rollins who's twenty eight years old is drenched in sweat and is following this swampy path dotted with empty water bottles but he isn't alone and points to people with him from the few via a few the from the fall from Hoover three from Iraq Nepal Cuba in the Iraqis that includes robin and his older brother all headed for the United States for rob when that was just one lake in his three month journey north many migrants choose to travel by land because they're tighter visa restrictions for air travel when we met the other day robin had reached the border and was in Tijuana.

twelve five six hours twenty eight years three month five hours one week
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on Future Tense

"And so for me, Connecticut diplomacy is this idea of diplomacy by armed fours where special operators actually become the face of the United States. And they're the ones sort of trying to, you know, get other countries to do what we want them to do, you know in the old days? It was you know, diplomacy and coercion, and and compellance and without the diplomats on the ground. My concern is is that the special operators and then related -ly drone operations where you're not putting Americans on the ground are they're special operators or diplomats to me this very unsettling. We don't have as much public scrutiny about what they're doing. And as a democracy. We would like to know where our forces in where our tax dollars are being deployed, and that's not happening. So there's some worrisome aspects with the use and the deployment of these special operations worse as around the world. The reason rapid change sink. We still have systems of diplomacy that in some ways nineteenth or early twentieth. Century installed. That's a fundamental change that we're still coming to terms with those of us that want to see a highly effective highly engaged United States as a renewed forceful lady shape in rules by squabble. Lord. We want to see the United States engaged comprehensively with the world Rory medcalf, the head of the national security college at the I N, you these trillion National University to reflect I guess the better angels of the United States. The fact that it does have a very sophisticated civil society. It's not all about military proponents. And so I guess it's true that they would be concerned about the US emphasizing the military sought of things too heavily in its diplomacy. But on the other hand it's also with noting that diplomacy. These days. I think into the future is never going to be the sole preserve of foreign ministry's. Again, you're seeing all kinds of arms of government. Whether it's military and intelligence on the one hand, whether it's development assistance, industry, science education, technology, you name it on the other hand also becoming much more international much more outward-looking, but we do need to find a way of integrating all of these elements of national authority in national path in the way that we engage with the world, and that will have a role for the military, but as one Platt among many. From Brussels, the president flaws to Britain where he'll make Brexit and Prime Minister Theresa may the Queen and probably play Gulf in Scotland it's their he'll pay for the summit meeting in Helsinki with Russian prison fled Putin. So I have. I have the UK which is in somewhat turmoil. And I have Hooton frankly, Putin, maybe these of all who would think we would think. In the United States at the moment, the foreign policy seems to be dictated by the president himself. It's a very personal foreign policy. So what are the implications of that Monica? Duffy Toft again on the one hand when I in moments where where thinking about this because it is a pretty dramatic change under President Obama, you say President Bush and also President Clinton, they did have, you know, this incredible staff of experts that in the State Department their national security department offense, and they relied on them. And you know, some people said that Obama relied on them too much, you know, he want he should have made more decisions. And then I think back to Ronald Reagan Haya Gorbatov. I mean in a sense, it was their personal relationship that broke the end of the Cold War that sort of helped where they two men understood each other and that that it wasn't necessary to threaten one another the problem. I think with the Trump administration in President Trump in particular is he seems so Curiel. And and it seems so really personalist when we talk about personal Listrik leaders, and he's not the most educated, and and he doesn't have the most knowledge of history..

United States president President Obama Putin Ronald Reagan Haya Gorbatov Curiel Connecticut President Clinton National University Platt UK Brussels Rory medcalf Duffy Toft Monica State Department
"monica duffy toft" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"monica duffy toft" Discussed on Future Tense

"But you know, you read them the more recent news, and it looks as if pump pay was not going to do that. And that's not only because of the. Skepticism about sort of expertise, but then also political reasons ideological people believing in small government that the State Department's too big it needs to be cut further back. But then also political reasons that they wanna get rid of people who they believe were loyal or were supporters of the prior administration or administrations and not wanting them to be part of this government structure. And I think that second explanation that second illogical political argument, the evidence is pretty clear when you've got this sort of tilting, the shifting balance from career diplomats to now, these a political pointys complete shift over from the bomb administration, and, you know, Bama followed on the Bush administration yet, this is the most heavily skewed in terms of State Department terms appointments on the political side versus the career side. There still is a very big part in world affairs to be played by diplomats. And if you limit those diplomats abilities to do their jobs because political rations with their see United States or anybody else, I think the whole world suffers because of that Phillips a professor of public diplomacy and international relations at the university of southern California. The plumbing is important and diplomats to know what they're doing and be able to do their jobs as professionals anything that gets in the way of that is going to produce bad results. I think that trained particularly under the car president does that reflect a distrust of the diplomatic service, and they and the ability of diplomats to achieve goals. I think there's some distrust, but that's is misplaced for some fairly obscure partisan reasons. I think it's more lack of understanding of. Of how the hell foreign policy works, and you don't just conduct foreign policy by Wim. You don't just hop on Air Force One and go to a country and engaged in a heavily televised meeting and say well that's diplomacy. Diplomacy is an ongoing process. The requires a very solid foundation deaths. What diplomats build, and then you have your summit meetings, very occasionally. But the foundation has to be built if you strip you're you're foreign policy establishment of the people who are competent to design and build that foundation. Eventually it's gonna claps and get that exactly what the current US administration seems to tend to Monica Duffy Toft ole side Tokes about a rise in what she calls Connectik diplomacy where the military and the intelligence community are increasingly seeing as America's chief. Agents of international phase. So I started looking at US deployment force military force overseas since the founding of the nation in seventeen seventy six, and I was really struck about sort of this precipitous increase. I mean this real increase in the number of deployment. So the use of armed forces overseas, particularly since two thousand since the beginning of the century in in particular, looking at the deployment of special operations forces. So these are the green berets the navy seals air force army in the the Rangers. They have their own. And then also drones when unnerved me about that is at the same time. We're seeing diminishment in the use of diplomacy or or the State Department not being as strong as it was in the path. You see this rise in the deployment of these forces a wholesale increase it right now, we have eighty five ambassadorial appointments at one hundred eighty eight made yet the numbers that we have is one hundred forty nine special operations. Forces deployed around the world. So in one third of the countries we have ambassadors, but in three quarters, we have special operators..

State Department United States Rangers university of southern Califor air force army Bama Monica Duffy Toft president Phillips professor Connectik America three quarters