6 Burst results for "Monica Burton Yolly"

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That police in Pasadena have walked back their claim that a suspicious device on a u haul truck was meant to look like a bomb. The guy arrested on Monday told the cops odd-looking canister was a drug canister that he would hide on the truck using magnets. Police found a similar device at the man's house with drugs he was arrested on outstanding warrants news brought to you by American vision windows, the seventh week of the Thomas strategies KFI an NBC four poll shows the race for Lieutenant governor is one of the closest statewide contests is a very official pollster term to describe the race for the number-two job in California dead tied gave political consultant John Thomas says there's less than a point difference between the candidates at Hernandez at thirty four point one percent in the Laney at thirty three point six percent. In a lot of fish stew. Dylan the huge unsure population at thirty two point three percent margin of error is plus or minus three and a half points. Chris ancarlo KFI news before Gary and Shannon talk about TV on which watch Wednesday. We should tell you that the panic. Temple says it's going to sue net. Flicks. Now for ripping off a goat gods statue, the Netflix show, the chilling adventures of Sabrina shows, the statue of the occult daddy, daddy, baffled, met, these satanic. Temple says, it looks similar to a statue temple. Designed a spokespersons says the show's knockoff statue represents something evil, and it could cause people to fear the temple a new survey shows just how much Americans worry about the cost of cancer seven per cent said they'd be most concerned about the financial impact on their families or about paying for treatment. Fifty four percent somewhat lower said they'd actually be most concerned about dying Harvard surgical professor. Monica Burton Yolly says four in ten people who have had cancer reported barriers. And treatment due to insurance. Some people even reported cutting chemotherapy doses in half to save money. Another common concern is whether there's a good hospital close by zip code is one of the strongest predictors of cancer survival rates traffic from your helpful socal Honda traffic center. There's a police activity going on in north Hollywood on the one seventy. Yep. This is ongoing. So southbound side of the win seventy between Sherman way and victory only the car pool is going to be available for you. So right now, it is.

Temple cancer KFI John Thomas Pasadena Monica Burton Yolly Laney Netflix Hernandez Dylan Chris ancarlo California consultant Sherman Sabrina official
"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The other scientists who've been working on therapies and cancer, because this is one thing that I think you know, the Nobel prize does a great job at at acknowledging great work and focusing, you know the public's broader attention on things that are happening in science and medicine in particular. But. Hope you don't mind me saying, but I presume you're not the only person who's had a big impact in this field. No, I'm the way that science and there I work in works. As we, we have students and postdoctoral fellows, and you know, we direct their efforts and as a team, you know, approach things and I, it would be I'd have to give you a long list people that contributed to this, but you know. They mothers work was done to foundation for the stuff was done in the mid nineties, actually massive graduate students in my lab at the university of California, Berkeley at the time, and I have to give them a lot of credit most notably, guiding max krummel, who was the guy that did the cool experiments that showed that seeks for it was the breaks on the immune system. Britain Yuli. I, I mean to that point, there's a lot of their many people out there working on this. There's a labs across the United States and around the world where what do you think is the best thing that the public could do to further support enhance, you know, advance this research. So I think it's incredibly important that the public understand the value of participating in clinical trials. Clinical trials, research working with physician researchers who are trying to advance these new news therapies. All the wonderful discoveries in the laboratory don't don't mean much to human beings unless we can have patience, you know, partner with us to really test them and study them. So that's one way where people can make a tremendous difference in the world in hopefully for themselves. But also even if not for the world and future cancer patients, you know. And then finally, a lot of research is supported by by the by the government and continued public support for the type of research that has led to these breakthroughs that comes out of our public funding is really, really something we'd like to see our our citizens continued to advocate for well, Monica, Burton Yolly president of the American society for Clinical Oncology and chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks magnates been great. And Jim Allison, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize winner in physiology or medicine on a award that he shares with soup Honjo of Kyoto University. Jim Allison is also chair of the department of immunology at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Mr. Ellison. Thank you so much for joining us today and congratulations on the Nobel prize and all your research. Thank you so very. Much. Thank you. Thank you so much the chance to do this and by the way folks, if you've been wondering why I've been calling Jamal's and Mistrals Dr Ellison he is Jim Elson PHD but our journalistic standards here at NPR say, MD's get called doctors, PHD's get PHD's, I guess. So that's the quick explanation there, but go to our website on point, radio dot org. If you've got thoughts about cancer treatments today and immuno therapies as well, I'm gonna trucker body. This is on point.

Nobel prize Jim Allison Mr. Ellison MD Anderson Cancer Center Clinical Oncology and chief hospital cancer center postdoctoral United States Berkeley university of California MD NPR Britain Kyoto University max krummel partner Jamal Brigham Monica
"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We're also joined by Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology and a little earlier in the show. Dr Brittany Lee told us that we've never seen an explosion in terms of the number of possible treatments or therapies for cancer. As we are seeing right now, some two thousand different treatments in the pipeline. The. Research or clinical trial pipeline is a very exciting moment in cancer research, but Dr Bernard newly just before the break. We were also talking about how how individualized these therapies can be. So are we talking about, you know, slightly different therapies tailored for from person to person. Oh, perhaps you know. There is a whole emphasis right now on understanding the individual biology of every patient and being able to target that specifically that not only helps us develop treatments that work better. It helps us develop treatments that have fewer side effects. You know, many examples of this in its general direction. I believe we're heading in all of on college. I see. But Jim Nelson? Yeah, nearly was talking about the antigens that t- says, recognize we know now that many of those are generated by mutations that are part of the carcinogenic process itself. And so there's a big effort I'm I'm involved in some, but there's many, many groups trying to develop rapid ways of genome sequencing is that gets faster and cheaper to identify possible antigens, make them synthetically and then give them to patients along with with the I mean checkpoint block. With therapy, perhaps it much much lower doses and focus the response even more tightly on the cancer cells themselves. Well, Jim, Allison, and Monica Bertin newly. We've got a comment here this come in on our website and the person wants us to to make a point that I wanted to ask you about someone says, pla- come and calling themselves. Planes dealers says, I hope that in addition to the brilliant science involved, the show addresses the practical impact. In other words, the prices of these therapies. I mean the Jim, let me start with you. I mean, I'm seeing hundreds of thousands of dollars as a cost for some of these therapies is that is that right? Yes, just that's correct. And it's, it's, it's it's too. It's too high. It really is. I mean, I can understand some of it because in in development, aluminum, for example, it changed all the rules, the standard in points that used clinically for evaluating drugs that targeted cancer cells weren't useful anymore. So there are a lot of failed trials because he used the wrong in points and cetera, et cetera. So developmental costs were amazing as well. Probably the most expensive ever. I'm not sure, but still that's no, that's no reason to keep those prices up for they are now because they certainly don't reflect the cost of making the drug itself. So they've got to come down particularly as we get into combinations. And I all I can hope. I mean, that is outside my area, but I, I gotta hope that they they come down fast so that they can get to more patients newly. I mean, I know that you neither you or Jim or setting prices for drugs that are. That are coming out of clinical trial. I wanna knowledge that and also we've heard frequently over the many years and Jim just pointed to it that the development costs are. These drugs are very high because sometimes we're talking about decades of research, so that point also should be made. But on the other hand, I mean, both of you are in the world of cancer research. Are you concerned that as we have these potentially very game changing therapies coming out of the pipeline, but because their costs are so high, it could further sort of drive a wedge between the haves and have nots when it comes to availability and access to to healthcare in the United States. Well, that wedges there now Magna, you know, and and it's terrible, and it's something that concerns us every day. And you know, I think it's a broader discussion than just the cost of some very expensive Neutra transformative drugs. It's the cost of our entire healthcare system in the United States and how are we going to focus..

Jim Nelson Monica Burton Yolly Dr Brittany Lee United States Clinical Oncology Dr Bernard Magna Monica Bertin Allison
"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Only attack tumor cells or by turning T-cells on, are we sort of doomed to have them be, you know, over over active, but even more active throughout the body and every body system, right? You know, it's it's such the the wonderful promise of the immune system is its selectivity. You know, we, we can get a, we know that the immune system can vary precisely identify signals and only t attack cells that contain those particular signals. Signals are known as antigens t. cells can are, are tailored by the body to respond to particular antigens. And fortunately, cancers can develop on the surface of their cells very selective antigens that t cells can recognize. So when you have a situation like that and the signal on the tease on the on the cancer. That I- dentist it as foreign and identifies it as something that the immune system is able to attack. When that signal is only on the cancer cell. We're all set. Unfortunately, when those those proteins can be in other places in the body, and when those signals are shared by other tissues in the body, that's where you see the harmful side effects. So the that's the goal, find the specific signal and use that to our benefit. Right. And with, would that specific signal change from individual to individual? Absolutely. That's the other thing we know every human being is different. Well, we're going to talk more about about that in a second because it's a big part of the story. You're, we're talking with Dr Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. And with Jim Allison, he was awarded the twenty eighteen Nobel prize in medicine for his research on cancer immunotherapy. We'll be right back. I'm gonna Chuck awardee. This is on point. NPR's code switch tackles race in identity in America with humanity and humor, you'll laugh. You'll learn, you'll get uncomfortable. It's worth it fine coats which on the NPR one app or wherever you get your podcasts..

Dr Monica Burton Yolly NPR Jim Allison cancer American society for Clinical Nobel prize I America
"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So as as she was saying, I think that after time people can quit look over their shoulder every day. I get up and wondering if the is looming for them again and move on. I mean, that's what makes me so happy about the show about Sharon's experience because she was told by physicians don't have any children and after a while five and she said, none cared. I'm gonna have my kids normal life, Monica mcnealy. How I mean, how many immunotherapy is are are out there right now. Well, we have fifteen cancer indication. Fifty indications. So fifteen specific cancer conditions that are now approved have drugs approved by the US FDA for treatment using him, you know therapies. But what's another fascinating thing about our field is there are literally thousands last count about two thousand different new immunotherapy drugs agents approaches that are currently undergoing clinical testing. So the field is just been blown wide open by by the proof of principle that untangling this biology can have a true transformative effect on patients lives, and I just took a single landslide two thousand currently in development or clinical trial, different agents from hitting different tart, different components of the immune system are all undergoing. Nicole testing across the world. And when's the last time cancer research has seen that kind of explosion in potential therapies? Oh, I don't think ever. I mean, this is really this is really a completely new era. And you know, we really have to knowledge that why are we here? We're here because there's been a tremendous investment on the part of our government on the part of of of industry in understanding tumor biology in a very deep level. And that understanding is leading to so many different possibilities for for treatment of cancer. I wonder if I, I, I wanna just inject a little bit of not skepticism, but perhaps a little caution here because and please correct me if I'm wrong because I remember a while ago maybe a generation ago, there was a lot of excitement, for example, around Judah Folkman research and NGO Genesis and cancers thinking like if we, if we sort of figured out a way to block the blood flow to tumors at that would be a way to. To really get rid of any and all cancers in the body. Very exciting line of research perhaps didn't yield the kind of treatments that we're seeing. Now with immunotherapy should we so should we continue to have some some measure of a grain of salt or skepticism, even around this moment of great excitement of jail Magnette couldn't have possibly picked a better example. You know, we didn't plan this, but you know, one of the things I'm sure Dr Alison can will chime in here too, is that that work that Dr Folkman did to look at the blood vessels is now being combined with the drugs that Dr Allison's group has developed with with came out of his work and the combination of targeting the blood vessel together with targeting the tea with activating the taking the brakes off the t. cell is producing even better responses in some tumors. So at that nothing goes wasted. That's that's correct corrected the one of the things that we're realizing that. Is coming coming. True is that does that just immunotherapy can be combined with not only other therapies but with conventional therapies chemotherapy. And as you said end you enter Genesis therapies in virtually anything that kills tumor cells can be used to prime immune response. So that's why they're so many combinations out there. So many that we've, we've got a really, you know, have have data before deciding to do a combination in any kind of scale or else would you know we're going to be going down a lot of false leads. All right. Well, you know, we've had a lot of callers who want to join us because obviously cancer is a huge issue that does have an impact on so many people's lives. You're listening to our to Jim Allison. He was awarded the two, the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize in physiology or medicine for his work in cancer immunotherapy, he shares that a word of the tussock Honjo of Kyoto University, and you're also hearing from Monica Burton Yolly. She's president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. Chief of the division of surgical oncology at danafarber, Brigham and women's hospital cancer center. So we've got a couple of the top researchers in cancer with us this hour..

cancer Dr Folkman Monica Burton Yolly Sharon Nicole hospital cancer center Monica mcnealy Jim Allison American society for Clinical US FDA Nobel prize Judah Folkman Brigham NGO Genesis Magnette Dr Allison Dr Alison
"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"monica burton yolly" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point Meghna trucker. Bharti. We're talking this hour about where we are with cancer research and why they're so much excitement around immunological therapies for treating cancer. And we're joined today by the two thousand eighteen Nobel prize winner in physiology or medicine. He's Jim Allison, and he shares that a word with suco hundreds of Kyoto University. His work in cancer immunotherapy was recognized by the Nobel committee this year. Jim Allison is also chair of the department of immunology at MD cancer center, and I want to bring in another voice into the conversation. Mr. Allison, if I could joining us now is Dr Monica Burton Yolly. She is president of the American society for Clinical Oncology. She's also chief of the division of surgical oncology at Dana Farber Brigham and women's hospital cancer center and a professor of surgery at Harvard Harvard Medical School as well. And she joins us today from Washington after newly welcome to on point high magnetic great to be here. It's great to have. You know, you heard Jim Allison. Described his research and also, you know, meeting the first patient that he had. He had met one on one who'd undergone immunotherapy for her cancer really moving story. But I'm just if you could sort of describe from the point of view of as a fellow researcher. So sort of how revolutionary is it that that we're thinking or focusing so much on using the immune system rather than external chemicals for treating cancer? Well, you know, there is nothing more exciting to biologists researchers in our field than to see something some understanding from human biology finally reveal that we can really use it help patients. And that was an incredibly moving story that you know. Fortunately, we're hearing lots of these stories in, you know back it was it's a couple of decades. Now in the early nineties that there was a first clue that the immune system could do this. There was some work done by Steven Rosenberg at the National Cancer Institute where he. Found that giving natural drugs called cytokines kinds that could really jazz up. The immune system could really re eliminate tumors in patients with melanoma and renal cancers. And and you know, it was. It was just a glimmer that this might be possible, and then it took decades of really careful work in the laboratory and understanding the biology to really make this something that could help patients. And so it's just wonderful to see the Nobel prize awarded in this field and even better to see this brand new tool that we have to fight cancer. No, are we're talking about treatments and fighting cancer here? Is anyone thinking that immunotherapy might lead down to the root of a cure. So we do see some cures from immunotherapy. What is cure mean? You know to to clinicians cure means you have someone who has a tumor and you're somehow something we can do is able to eliminate that tumor and the doesn't come back in their body. That's what we mean by cure. And some of these initial immunotherapy is perhaps the patient that Dr Alison just described. She lives her entire lifetime with this tumor. Never recurring that that's a cure. So clinicians are very cautious in using the cure word. But what really matters to patients is that they live a long long life and never have the burden of cancer in their life. So that's what we're seeing. We're seeing that with immunotherapy. Okay, Jim Allison, let me let me turn back to you here. I mean, what? What do you think about what Dr Brunelli has said is, are we should we be talking about potential cures. For a long time. It's been considered really, you know, impr- inappropriate to use the word catcher in the same sentence. But but I agree with Dr bird nearly melanoma patients that receive if you map just as a single therapy, a single round of treatments, it's for injections, but about delivered twenty percent of them are alive at least ten years after a single treatment..

Jim Allison cancer Dr Monica Burton Yolly Nobel prize MD cancer center National Cancer Institute hospital cancer center cure Bharti Nobel committee Meghna American society for Clinical Dr Brunelli Dr Alison Kyoto University Steven Rosenberg Dr bird Harvard Harvard Medical School