17 Burst results for "Monaco Magazine"

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:23 min | 3 d ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Fragmented across the world. I mean, in the light of the last few years where we have seen strongmen exerting power all over the place. Yeah, exactly. So column is Jan and Ganesh is arguing that we shouldn't worry so much exactly about this vast and oppressive state with a strongman dictator as he puts it, actually fragmentation and chaos is more of a concern. And yes, as you say, what we've seen in France, the splits in the U.S., obviously, because we have the January the 6th inquiry going on at the moment. You can see people questioning the legitimacy of the president. And also John and Ganesh points out that Britain were not in a position really to feel smug because he points out there have been as many prime ministers since July 13th, 2016 as the war between May the second, 1979 and June 17th, 2007. So it's quickly deemed mass there, but you know, in those sort of 18 years, we had as many presidents as we've had in the last 8. So there's sort of a lack of political stability perhaps in this country as well. I mean, I suppose depressing though it might be. It's just important to flag up that it's not just the strong men, the oppressors that we need to look out for, but also we need to be very aware of that real when fragment fragmentation turns into chaos and perhaps you know the price of liberty is eternal vigilance from that direction as well as from the vast and oppressive state. Finally, let's turn to a slightly more lighthearted matters or is it really and forever and a day we've all been told that a good breakfast breakfast puts us in the right position for a decent day. Have we all been getting it wrong? Yes, so you have to push aside your bacon and eggs that I'm afraid of. And this is very unfair. Yeah, the Melbourne age says that almost everything we've been told about breakfast is wrong. Breakfast is back in the headlines. It says with professor Tim Spector of King's College London O gutt and health nutrition guru who says that we should delay our first meal of the day if we want to stay healthy and lose weight. According to the Melbourne age, it turns out that the microbes in our gut have a circadian rhythm like us. They need a rest period, which helps them to become more efficient. And because most of us eat quite late, that means we don't give them a 14 hour fasting period that they need. So in fact, skipping breakfast or shifting it to 11 a.m. to create this sort of overnight fasting could help people apparently, according to professor Specter, could help us lose two to 5 kilograms of weight over several months, but I like my breakfast. I'm sorry. Regardless of the time, I think the thing that you've just said to me that stood out is the fact that someone is seriously suggesting that I go for 14 hours without eating. It's just cruel, isn't it? Really, for goodness sake, I mean, nobody's going to do that really, are they? I think this is one of those wonderful examples where a wonderful example of where the experts, the doctors might come up with a bit of science and everybody goes, oh, okay. It's not going to happen. So yeah, I think perhaps if you do want to lose those extra pounds, stuff have a really good dinner, have a wonderful breakfast the next morning and then just grit your teeth and go to the gym probably. Brilliant, thank you, Simon. Our new health guru. Thank you so much for joining us on monocle 24. You're listening to the globalist. Now in the current issue of Monaco magazine, you can find out the results of our long anticipated quality of life survey in which we rank the world's most livable cities. Also is in comfortably in 14th place is the Dutch city of Amsterdam, an earlier monocles Emma cell sat down with the Dutch ambassador to the UK, his excellency, Carol von ostrum, to find out why the city is so dear to him. Carol welcome to the program. We are here to reflect on monocles newly released 15th edition of our quality of life survey in which our editors rank the world's most livable cities and Amsterdam has once again done very well and it's sitting comfortably in 14th place. But before we get into the details about why Amsterdam is such a desirable city, can you start by telling our listeners why you think Amsterdam is always a perennial on these kinds of lists?.

Ganesh Tim Spector King's College London professor Specter Melbourne Jan Britain France U.S. John Monaco magazine Emma cell Carol von ostrum Amsterdam Simon Carol UK
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:54 min | 5 d ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Stoltenberg has said the war in Ukraine could last years and that the west must continue to offer Kyiv's support. Mister Stoltenberg added that the costs of war were high, but the price of letting Moscow achieve its military goals was even greater. The former mayor of Bogotá Gustavo Petro has won Colombia's presidential election. Petro, who is a former rebel fighter defeated the right-wing businessman Rudolf of Hernandez by 700,000 ballots to become Colombia's first left wing leader. And Macau is conducting a round of mass COVID-19 testing, following the confirmation of dozens of locally transmitted cases. The gambling hub and former Portuguese colony appears to China's zero COVID policy and aims to eradicate all outbreaks of the virus. This is the globalist stay tuned. Now, in the current issue of Monaco magazine, you can find out the results of our annual quality of life survey, in which we rank the world's most livable cities. Coming in fourth was Finland's capital Helsinki. Patrick bertolf, Monaco's Helsinki correspondent, caught up with the city's mayor, Johanna Vatican, to discuss what makes Helsinki special, including its role as the host of the annual startup and tech event slush. Patrice started off by asking the mayor what makes for a good quality of life. A city must be well planned. So that it's easy to move around, be it by bicycle for pedestrians. But even other ways of traffic, then we like to have a city where it's safe to go, whatever you are. Even for children and you are a lonely woman, you should not be afraid anywhere. Then a mixture of architectural styles and pockets. A nice mixture of old newer modernists and hyper modern. That's great. And then the city must be big enough to have at least two symphony orchestras and some more. That's quite a specific criteria. You did. So, okay, so one of the aspects that Monaco commented Helsinki for was the combination of being a functional city, but also being a fun city. What do you think it is that Helsinki does correctly in this regard? I guess we get the balance right between not having the large metropolitan congestion problems. We are small enough to be cozy, but we are big enough to have the entire array of fun things that go together with great cities, like the architecture, the museum, the restaurants, the universities, and then of course we are blessed by having a big seafront. And.

Stoltenberg Helsinki Mister Stoltenberg Bogotá Gustavo Petro Colombia Monaco magazine Patrick bertolf Johanna Vatican Kyiv Petro Rudolf Ukraine Hernandez Macau Moscow Monaco Patrice Finland China
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

05:35 min | Last week

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"That I have. Finally, today we head to Vancouver, a city that has been steadily climbing our rankings over the years, and this time has managed to crack the top ten. So what is it about this West Coast duel in Canada's crown that secured its place at number 9 in our list? Well, let's hear now from our man in Canada, Thomas Lewis, who sung Vancouver's praises during our selection process. Our very own Tom Edwards, caught up with him a little earlier. Vancouver's regularly made the quality of life survey at monocle for years and years by this stage. And what I found over the years from covering various cities here in Canada is that you know our listeners and our readers here in Canada in those cities do hold both their cities to pretty high standard, but also hold those who cover them to pretty high standard two. So if we say something that's a little bit off, we'll hear about it pretty quickly and be sort of put in our place as opposed to put that in the nicest way. Possible. But I was in Vancouver, I suppose the first time I went since the pandemic began was last summer. And living here in Toronto, Tom, you know, we had one of the longest city lockdowns depending on which measure you look at anywhere in the world. And going to Vancouver felt like a breath of fresh air to put it lightly, there was a real energy there. There were lines outside the nightclubs in the pubs and the bars, and it just felt like there was a real embracing that things were open again. And I think, you know, if you look at other Canadian cities around the country, that wasn't necessarily the case for lots of them. And I think there's a sense of being nimble in Vancouver and in the province of British Columbia more broadly, that I think has really been a model that sort of caught our eye. So that's why we thought it was good to have it in the top ten this year in the quality of life survey Tom. Where the cities are regarded as great places to work and live. Lots of people move there. And one of the challenges therefore is how these big urban centers deal with increasing population growth, but Vancouver looks to have plenty of plans to ensure that it takes that kind of ongoing expansion in its dried. Yes, well it's trying at least it's before looking about this. And I think if you look at the last census here in Canada, it was regions right around Vancouver that are the fastest growing in that of course is going to bring pressures for the city itself. And I think if you look at some of the infrastructure projects that are coming up in Vancouver, of course, with lots of major generation defining infrastructure projects, there's obviously a lot of debate perhaps opposition that comes around those. But I think the more clearer eyed view of some of these projects in Vancouver is that it really is a very forward looking way of meeting the demands that are going to come and it is very heartening to see a city hall be so forward looking about it. And welcoming people to come and live there with open arms in a sort of tangible way is something that I think is worth taking note of and is something that means that the next few years should be quite good ones to be able to meet the increasing population, the number of people who want to piece of the Vancouver life for themselves. Throughout the top 25, there are still could do betters, little hints and tips from our humble crew to suggest ways that these cities can get even better and one of the ones that struck me as interesting is for Vancouver, it's to loosen its collar a little and maybe you look at things like lifting restrictions on drinking alcohol in the city's parks as an inveterate street drinker, you would presumably concur with that. Absolutely very close to my heart here, Thomas, you rightly note. I would say, you know, we did make this note in our entry for Vancouver. The city's parks really became sort of a very important part of life for cities across the country during lockdown measures. And there's a lot of frustration going that the city's councillors can't really wake up the people are going to do this anyway and I'm going to do it responsibly and enjoy the city that they are residents of and that they contribute to the life of too. So in Vancouver it is worth noting there is a pilot project underway at the moment. That has taken a few parks, it's expanded recently, but taking a good handful of the city's parks and made it legal to go and have a drink there to go and have a picnic. And there's a lot of hope that this is the first step really to making this permanent. So yes, we have put as a sort of loose in the collar a little bit of Vancouver, but is worth noting that there are some very positive moves in that direction already. So maybe Tom, if you and I ever find each other in Vancouver one day, we can raise and clink a glass together in the years to come then one of the city's fine array of public parks. Well, that's nice for you, but the saver drink for me too guys. That was Thomas Lewis there in conversation with monocles Tom Edwards. And that brings us to the end of this week's episode of the urbanist, be sure to pick up a copy of the latest edition of Monaco magazine to uncover the full list of our top 25 cities to live in available on newsstands now or simply subscribe at monocle dot com. Today's episode of the urbanist was produced by Carlos rebelo and David Stevens, and David also edited the show. And to play you out this week, his Denmark's own F da clang with Scandinavian love. Thank you for listening, since he loves..

Vancouver Canada Thomas Lewis Tom Edwards Tom West Coast British Columbia Toronto Thomas Monaco magazine Carlos rebelo David Stevens David Denmark
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

07:50 min | Last week

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Well, if you haven't already heard this week, ask secret is out. And we can officially confirm that Copenhagen has taken top spot yet again in Monica magazine's annual quality of life rankings. And, for how the Danish capital did it, well, there's no secret. The city has long been a shining light in many of the metrics that grab our attention here at the urbanist, from putting pedestrians first and a push for ever more cycling to a metro system that continues to expand and any number of city led environmental efforts, Copenhagen is a place that is preparing for the future. One forward looking project in the city that has caught our eye is luneta home, an artificial island rising out of the harbor, which plans to house 35,000 people and protect the city from rising sea levels and climate change induced storms too. Well, I'm joined now by Anne scurvy, CEO of by and harven, the development company, which is in charge of building lene home, and which has even been using surplus soil from construction projects in Copenhagen to create it. And thank you for joining us. Let's start with the ambition for this project. What are you hoping to achieve here? What's actually required? Well, the ambition is actually to ensure that the flood protection that we need to do of Copenhagen that we do it in a quite new and fantastic manner. Saying that flood protection, which a lot of cities will need in the years to come. Maybe we can do it in a quite different way. The ambition is to do it in a way, so it's not only a dike, it's actually an island where you can have housing in the future. If you don't have a big beach park area towards the sea and then also adding new housing districts on this flood protection island will be sustainable. From top level of new sustainable ambitions, we have been quite good at doing that in Copenhagen. But of course our ambition for the future is to go to the next level of sustainable new urban districts. How do you build an island? What does it require? How do you even begin that process? Well, actually, it's not that difficult because when you look at the history of Copenhagen, we're actually very much like the Netherlands. You know, we are city based on two islands. So we have actually been doing land reclamation and sort of building in the harbor for decades. So it's not that difficult. The difficult part in this project is not the technological solutions. It's the process. As many things these days, it's the process with the dialog with citizens and do we need to do this now? Do we need to have this in my backyard? And is this really sustainable? And the debate on what are the facts actually when it comes to a project like this? Because as I see it, it's very difficult to have a debate on a problem that will come. The need for storm fraud protection. And on the other hand, also the need to do the long-term planning issues like we do in Copenhagen. When we think about Denmark and we think about Copenhagen, people seem to be everyone gets their say, it's a bit more cooperative about how decisions get made. Does that make it difficult actually for pushing through big projects? It's just slow and cumbersome and you have to persuade a lot of people to get anything done. Well, I think when we started the northern harbor development, we started that also with a lot of dialog with citizens. But I think it was easier to comprehend because you saw there was sort of a big harbor area industrial brownfield side which were more or less empty. So it was easier to comprehend and to have a dialog, okay, look at this, what would we like this to be in the future as a start of a dialog and starting off the international architectural competition? And we had all these input. It's more difficult when you look into having a debate on a solution with a storm flight protection that although people know that we have some winter storms where you can see the sea level rising in the harbor. Still say, okay, but can we use the Stanford protection for new housing district? It is more difficult. So for us, you know, just having the dialog, we can see that it has really changed from the northern harbor dialog to what we are doing now. You know, things are very based on trust when people ask me, do you feel that the fact that there's a lot of critique that it's because that you have failed? I said, yeah, we can always do better, but actually it is also because the Danes in Copenhagen, when they have this critic, I guess it's because they know that we will listen. Basically, there is some sort of trust. And that's very important. And we need to take care of that trust. And maybe just as a final question, it's interesting when we talk to urbanist designers, planners, that it feels like we're coming up to some crunchy decisions for all cities that that desire to leave things as they are and not change and the need to deliver protection against environmental change at the same time. Do you think that for all cities is going to have to be a bit more of a robust public conversation to get things done? Definitely. Actually, as we see it, the way the dialog is on the unit home at the moment, it's a bit more comparable to what we've seen in Germany, whether it really has been a lot of dialog on large projects like this. And of course, that has also been the case in Copenhagen, the metro city ring was a tough dialog. But there's some changes at the moment, definitely. What we do at the moment is to try to use new tools in order to ensure that we have a dialog, because in the northern harbor development, we invited everyone, but you know when you have dialog like that quite often, a lot of the people who are maybe a bit more negative towards development will join the conversation. So what we do now is to design a new process where we actually choose a board of citizens who can have a more direct impact on development. So 66 citizens which will be picked from a very statistic method based on OECD delivered democracy, guidelines, something. To ensure that we have different citizens with different backgrounds to join the conversation on the future of the development in unit around before we go on to the design and have architectural competitions. And I think that's important that we need to develop these methods for dialog before going into design. What I find at the moment is that I'll have some architects who say why haven't you done a visual and architectural vision for the island. And I said, well, if we do that, the critic we will get is that now you are doing chop down planning, you don't listen to the citizens. You have done a vision of how this can be, but now you have narrowed down what actually could be the future of genetic art. So we are going in the other direction, spending more time on the dialog before we are going into competitions. And I really think that this is one of the big discussions in the years to come. That we need to take more care of our processes and democratic dialog before going into architectural competitions. And fascinating to hear you speak, and perhaps a lesson for all sorts of cities around the world who are not so good at the dialog bit. So thank you for joining us here on the urbanist. And to hear more reasons why Copenhagen topped the charts in this year's survey, be sure to pick up a copy of the latest issue of Monaco magazine,.

Copenhagen Monica magazine Anne scurvy harven the Netherlands Denmark Germany OECD Monaco magazine
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

01:34 min | Last month

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Nature, <Speech_Male> even in the best <Speech_Male> green city designs. <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> I think we're in a <Speech_Music_Male> very good position <Speech_Music_Male> to think about <Speech_Music_Male> that 2100 <Speech_Music_Male> city framework. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm very optimistic <Speech_Music_Male> that we can <Speech_Music_Male> be smart, <SpeakerChange> but <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that's not fool ourselves. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> There's a lot of work. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> For <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> monocle <SpeakerChange> and Davos, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'm carlotta <Music> ravella. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> While the fascinating <Speech_Male> show there, and <Speech_Male> I'll just point out that actually <Speech_Male> in the June issue of <Speech_Male> Monaco magazine <Speech_Male> on sale now, <Speech_Male> there's also a report <Speech_Male> about rebuilding <Speech_Male> Ukraine <Speech_Male> cities. So <Speech_Male> I recommend you get the <Speech_Male> magazine. Oh, <Speech_Male> come and subscribe, hey. <Speech_Male> That brings us <Speech_Male> to the end of this <Speech_Male> week's episode of <Speech_Male> the urbanist. <Speech_Male> Get your weekly fix <Speech_Male> of urbanism and <Speech_Male> built environment <Speech_Male> news by subscribing <Speech_Male> to our <Speech_Male> podcast and <Speech_Male> you can also find us <Speech_Male> on Spotify, <Speech_Male> Apple podcasts. <Speech_Male> And of course, at <Speech_Male> Monaco dot com. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> with it, you also get <Speech_Male> 5 minute bite <Speech_Male> sized sister show, <Speech_Male> tall stories, <Speech_Male> new <Speech_Male> episodes of which are out <Speech_Male> every Monday. <Speech_Male> Today's episode, <Speech_Male> however, was produced <Speech_Male> by carlotta rebelo <Speech_Male> and David <Speech_Male> Stevens and David <Speech_Male> also edited <Speech_Male> the show and <Speech_Male> to play out this week. <Speech_Male> Well, his <Speech_Male> vendre sumer <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a good sherry. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you for <Speech_Music_Male> listening <SpeakerChange> city lovers. <Music>

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:15 min | Last month

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"We're going to have a look through the days newspapers with the broadcaster and journalist Juliet linley Juliet joins me here in the studio in Zürich good afternoon, Julia. Good afternoon, Chris. So we are going to start sort of in Davos, which we have been speaking about quite a bit on our show. The Swiss president was there, but he actually confirmed what will be coming next, I suppose. A lot of the focus has been on Ukraine in Davos. What's happening after that? Indeed, I've got Korea de ticino right here in front of me and it's talking about Logano cultural. So kick-off for Ukraine's reconstruction in Yahoo. Has announced that lugano his host city where his home city will host a two day summit focusing on the reconstruction of Ukraine. He said that speaking in Davos, and he said, 40 countries and 18 international organizations have been invited to attend what was originally Chris to have been the Ukraine reforms conference. Now that you are see as a yearly summit, it started back in 2016 to help the country get on its feet economically, reform its judiciary, encourage foreign investment and so forth. Now, of course, the country's in dire need of foreign aid while destruction continues as also the need for some reconstruction. So Chris Switzerland's hosting the conference in July this year. Every year, the country that hosts changes this year, it's Switzerland, it'll be ticino and cassis who holds the rotating presidency is of course chuffed that it'll be in lugano. He made the announcement together with Ukrainian premier Dennis schmill, who was in live link up from Kyiv. Now of course it remains to be seen whether president zelensky will actually manage to attend in person, certainly it will be a very high profile event. And the stakes are pretty high. Construction costs are being bandied about at around $600 billion. Give or take as you can imagine with Kyiv saying it's already working on a plan to include new infrastructure, housing, fighting joblessness, a massive task ahead, Chris. But it's a start. Absolutely a massive task and I can say that we did do a story on Ukraine's reconstruction for the out now June issue of the magazine of Monaco magazine that I worked on with our Ukraine correspondent Olga takayaki and yes, it was incredible to talk about the numbers that are involved one person from the as we spoke to Barry, I can grant said, essentially, it's like the new Marshall plan that came from western Europe. And also it's just been interesting that Ukraine really wants to show that it will be involved in this. It'll be taking the lead on the reconstruction, so it'll be interesting from that perspective to see if president zelensky does decide to attend as well, but let's move on to one other story out of Switzerland and Juliet. You have something from the NSAID set. Swiss universities collaborating with the Chinese military. Yeah, Chris, this is looking at the story, but it's actually all over the press. And it's their investigative unit that's running a story on how yeah, Swiss universities apparently unwittingly sponsored or supported, dozens of research collaborations with scientists linked to the Chinese military. So many were reportedly doctoral students from Chinese military universities and in some instances they were working on technologies with clear military applications. So the investigation was carried out together with journalists from several European countries and leading papers, and they say this has been going on for decades. Now out of 34,000 research collaborations with scientists from Chinese universities in Switzerland a total of 87 projects were found to have been developed with Chinese military institution researchers. Now, they give an example for instance of one researcher let's call him goo, who came to Zürich's prestigious ETH. She stayed a year. He was paid for by the Chinese government. And he was here to research and develop technology to accurately track a person's location within a building. Chris, we know that GPS puts a pin on where you are, but then which floor you're on or which room, we can't do that. And so this is what he was looking into. Well, he left having provided very little in exchange to ETH in terms of content and he left after a year and they've sort of lost track of him. And this is just one instance. So it's in China, have been cooperating in the field of science for many years, and since 2014, this was government has been funding joint research projects through bilateral cooperation programs. Now, of course, China is an attractive partner, Chris. It's a world leader in areas.

Ukraine Davos Zürich president zelensky Juliet linley Juliet Chris Korea de ticino Chris Switzerland Kyiv Dennis schmill Logano Monaco magazine Switzerland Olga takayaki lugano cassis Julia Yahoo
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:13 min | Last month

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"You were the globalist. Finally, let's squeeze in a little bit of urbanism, news, cat Hannah. Good morning, urban affairs commentator. How are you this morning? I'm not too bad. A bit of a bit of a rush, but got here in one piece. Like all good urbanists, you have the neatest notebook full of scribbles that I have ever seen. Those scribbles tell us what's on your paper. So a few things, and I'm sure people have seen it's been doing the round certainly on Twitter, a very good FTP on shopping centers. Again, looking at what do we do with them? How they've been hit, obviously, particularly by COVID, but also for a long time. We've had that shift towards buying things online. So again, what do you do with these assets and the piece starts by looking at croydon, where you've almost got these different generations of shopping centers that have been lost and saying, actually, location wise, they're great. So do we just need to rethink about what they're used for that isn't just about shops. The accordance is a very good example of a place that overreached itself, isn't it? It's one of those places just outside the center of London, where they have built and built and built and built lots and lots of apartments in the hope that I think it was westfield was going to come along. Westville said no, ultimately pulled out, and it left the high street and the area in a state of freefall. And the thing that marked it out as being such a desperately sad place to go to was all these half empty shopping malls. What is it that's bringing things back to life? So what the article does is it actually looks at a few developers who are still saying, do you know what? We still have faith, particularly in the location, even if it's not in shopping centers as they used to be. So it's about thinking this is actually prime real estate. You know, I think the figure, you know, it's you've got if you think on the high street in, you know, you've got long frontage, you've got a lot you could do. Is it about well-being is about gyms, culture, sports, actually bringing in some housing as well, so you think how do we go back to creating something that feels like a piece of city because what we do know is that massive amount of retail, particularly when a lot of those anchor tenants who think about debenhams, you think about topshop, you know, they've all gone down. You're not going to be able to get a big retailer in, let the rents come in and just let that go. It's not the same anymore. So you've got to be a bit more imaginative when it comes to those uses. Let's stick in London because of the opening of the Elizabeth line, otherwise known as crossrail, anybody who's ever heard of it will just associate delay and expense. And it's going to happen. Is it this weekend it opens? It is this weekend. Are you going? Do you know what? I really want to go. I really want to go. So if we do it right, let's have a date. Let's go to reading on Sunday. Excellent. I can't think of that a weekend plan. No, I genuinely do really want to go more, I think both to experience the trains of which quite a lot has been written in terms of their size, they're much bigger actually than tube trains that we're used to, but actually the stations themselves and the station architecture. The interesting thing about this is it's not just because it's interesting. If you like going on trains, it clearly do. But the scale of this thing has been enormous. I mean, if you look at the stations, they are twice the length of the average underground metro station. The tunnels are twice the width. They are huge. It was, wasn't it? It has been the biggest infrastructure project in Europe for a very long time. It has, and it's been the kind of biggest extension of the tube, you know, in London's real network overall, in a long, long time as well. And again, it's really about, I think there's this tension now about does this do we still need all this? And I think what everyone who's been involved in it says, just get on it, just go and you will see that yes, there may have been delays, yes, there may have been overruns, but you know what? This is a world class transport system. And it's worth it. And if you're not unable to join cats and myself for a trip on this weekend and actually there's a rather lovely article written about it in Monaco magazine. Finally, very, very quickly. Composting is something that you would not naturally associate with an urban life. This is just changing in New York City. This is quite niche cat. It is quite niche, but you know what? I genuinely, I will share the link to this article because it was just a really wonderful article. About a young man from New York from The Bronx who was kind of struggling in terms of unemployment, poorly paid jobs, saw, it was a nonprofit advertising about training young people in green jobs. And one of those happened to be composting and this young man is now we've probably not quite so young anymore. It's basically the kind of the poster boy for community composting and for helping people realize you can save money. You can do your bit for saving the planet and make the most of unused spaces and it's just a really to me a really great example of making the most of some of those opportunities and cities. Cat Hannah, thank you so much and I shall see you on the Elizabeth line next week. In the meantime, that's all we have time for today. Many thanks to my guests and to the producers color rebella Charlie filmer court and Sophie monahan coombs are such a Lillian fawcett and our studio melodic Callum McLean. After the headlines more music on the way, the briefings live at midday here in London and the global list is back at the same time tomorrow. But for now, from me Eminem goodbye, thank you very much for listening..

London Westville croydon Hannah westfield debenhams Twitter Monaco magazine Europe Cat Hannah New York City Charlie filmer New York Sophie monahan coombs Lillian fawcett Callum McLean
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:33 min | 2 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Write that I <Speech_Male> was surprised that I could <Speech_Male> remember it in <SpeakerChange> its entirety <Speech_Male> but then <Speech_Male> music has that capacity <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> once you hear it or <Speech_Music_Male> once you know it it <Speech_Music_Male> just you can <Speech_Music_Male> recall it much <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> more readily than <Speech_Male> names <SpeakerChange> even <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> faces. <Speech_Female> It somehow <Speech_Male> holds a place <Speech_Male> in our minds. <Speech_Male> We have a <Speech_Music_Male> kind of archive <Speech_Music_Male> actually of <Speech_Music_Male> music that <Speech_Music_Male> we don't <Speech_Music_Male> always know we have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> it's triggered <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by something. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Yeah and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how does it feel to be <Speech_Music_Male> representing Britain <Speech_Music_Male> on this <Speech_Music_Male> grand stage <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> at this <Speech_Music_Male> time in 2022? <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> am incredibly <Speech_Music_Male> nervous because <Speech_Music_Male> there's a cure people <Speech_Male> outside coming <Speech_Male> to see this <Speech_Music_Male> show and <Speech_Music_Male> I mean, of course it <Speech_Music_Male> was enormous <Speech_Music_Male> honor and I was <Speech_Music_Male> completely <Speech_Music_Male> shocked when they <Speech_Music_Male> gave me a call because <Speech_Music_Male> I didn't apply for <Speech_Music_Male> it. <Speech_Music_Male> They just gave me a call and <Speech_Music_Male> said we want you to know <Speech_Music_Male> there's a time of people <Speech_Male> who sat around and <Speech_Music_Male> said we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> should give this this on your voice <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and it's like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I have to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> admit and this is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> terrible. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My first response was <Speech_Music_Male> why <Speech_Music_Male> because I could as like <Speech_Music_Male> why now <Speech_Music_Male> how did that happen? <Speech_Music_Male> I was a bit confused <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> I'm really <Speech_Music_Female> really <Speech_Male> pleased and honored <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> to have been <Speech_Music_Female> thought of by my <Speech_Music_Female> peers <Speech_Music_Female> to be <Speech_Music_Female> I don't want to <Speech_Music_Female> say worthy but to <Speech_Music_Female> be interesting enough <Speech_Music_Female> for <Speech_Female> this platform because it <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are in those shows. <Speech_Male> So I'd never ever <Speech_Music_Male> looked at <SpeakerChange> the actual <Speech_Female> space before. <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> was the British artist <Speech_Female> Sonia Boyce <Speech_Female> in conversation with <Speech_Female> Monaco's Alexa <Speech_Female> itself. And you can hear <Speech_Female> their full conversation <Speech_Female> and many interviews <Speech_Female> with artists <Speech_Female> at the Biennale on <Speech_Female> this week's episode of <Speech_Female> monocot and culture. <Speech_Female> And that's all <Speech_Female> for today's program. <Speech_Female> Thanks to our producers <Speech_Female> MSL page Reynolds <Speech_Female> and Sophie monaghan <Speech_Female> coombs <Speech_Female> are researchers Lillian <Speech_Female> fawcett and Samson <Speech_Female> and bogu and our <Speech_Female> studio manager <Speech_Female> Christy Evans with <Speech_Female> editing assistance <Speech_Female> from Steph Chung. <Speech_Female> After the headlines, <Speech_Female> there's more music on <Speech_Female> the way, my chat <Speech_Female> with Chloe ashby <Speech_Female> a former monocle <Speech_Female> staffer who's just <Speech_Female> come out with her debut <Speech_Female> novel wet paint, <Speech_Female> and then we'll also be <Speech_Female> hearing from Ilya <Speech_Female> Leonard Pfeiffer, the Dutch <Speech_Female> author of <Speech_Female> grand hotel <Speech_Female> Europa. You can <Speech_Female> read all about him in <Speech_Female> the May issue of <Speech_Female> Monaco magazine <Speech_Female> and see pictures of <Speech_Female> our time together <Speech_Female> in Genoa. <Speech_Female> I'm Georgina Godwin, <Speech_Female> I'll return at the globalist <Speech_Female> at the same time <Speech_Music_Female> tomorrow. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you, for listening. <Music>

Sonia Boyce Sophie monaghan Christy Evans Steph Chung Chloe ashby Leonard Pfeiffer Monaco magazine Georgina Godwin Genoa
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:46 min | 2 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I sort of mentioned at the top, I mean, we've sort of seen a hive of activity over the last 12 months as people have regained confidence projects more projects have come online. But I think the thing that stands out for me and maybe it's less to do with 2022 for me, it's the fact that good design is probably the same as it was last year when we did the awards. And it's probably the same as it was ten years ago. It's about putting people at the center of your work and about quality and about proving improving quality of life. And I think that's what we've captured here. And I think what we're seeing is that there are plenty of designers all across the globe from Ghana to Switzerland that are working on projects that are delivering those sorts of outcomes. That's also a deputy designer, so Nick managed, thank you very much for joining me today. And don't forget to pick up our copy of Monaco magazine, which is available on all good newsstands today. It is almost 1226 year in London. You are listening to Monaco 24. And finally on today's bro Grammy's first day, which means that Monaco was Fernando Auguste joined me in the studio for this week's edition of the global countdown good afternoon. Fernando. Where are you taking us today? We are going to Portugal, which is a music market that I like not only because of the language, of course, is speak Portuguese being from Brazil. But I like that the Portuguese they're very open to all their loser phone countries, including Brazil, including Angola, Mozambique, among many others. So for example, the list that I'm going to show you, Marcus, perhaps there might be not too many Portuguese artists, but there are quite a nice spread here, including a lot of Brazilians actually. A lot of Portuguese language, sadly. Shall we start with the song that's number 5 this week. Number 5, it is a bit silly. What do you mean? Well, it's funny. It's one of those hit of the summer in a way. Well, let's have a listen to have kind of a plane after that. Oh yes. And number 5 we have Pedro San paio, a singer from Rio de Janeiro. The song is called galapa to gallop. I do watch and follow the quality of her dog listening to bands that they push through by the same people I see people go on style I don't care about I.

Monaco magazine bro Grammy Fernando Auguste Ghana Brazil Switzerland Monaco Nick Fernando Portugal Angola London Mozambique Marcus Pedro San paio galapa Rio de Janeiro
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Actually, despite all the sound and fury, if what we see now is the worst that happens, I think actually Kyiv and the west will be really quite happy, not just simply because they've averted a full scale war, but also in some ways it makes things much more clear that in fact, from the first these Donbass eudo states have been covert Russian protectorates. Well, now they're just becoming overt Russian protectorates. The Minsk process was always dead. As I said, it's kind of clears the area of some of the nonsense and the downright disinformation that we've seen in the past. Vlad, I wonder what Ukraine will do next and how prepared it is for war. Are they prepared? They've spent the last months saying to me, Americans don't know nothing to see here, where we should watch the situation carefully, but there's too much hysteria in the air. That was good because they were economic effects. And hysteria is unnecessary. But it is the fact that there was no emergency situation. Last night, the reservists or a couple of hours ago reservists were not called up. There are no roadblocks, there are no, there are no security measures here in the capital. It's very difficult to say if the Ukrainians are taking the situation seriously enough. So alarmism is bad, and will cause a bank run on the cause all sorts of unpleasant things to happen. But also, it's not apparent that they've been taking the situation very, very, very seriously. And last night, a very sage political commentator by the name of Sean Penn said to me, I would not want to be in zelensky's shoes for anything in the world. I would not wish that on my worst enemy. What's Sean Penn doing in Kyiv anyway? Saving us from ourselves? Because he's a politician. Shown to the world. I think we've just lost the blood for a moment there. Mark, are Russian troops in forward positions. I mean, if they are how long can those be held? And is there a chance that Russia doesn't launch a full scale invasion in the foreseeable future, but just keeps up the threat level indefinitely? Well, yes, I mean, we have a situation in which the Russian forces can move literally within hours. And there's no signs that the Russians plan to uncoil this force. Now again, this could be precisely because they are planning some kind of major escalation. But again, it's also absolutely classic Putin. He likes to give himself multiple options to keep the west guessing and to keep himself free to maneuver. And I think this is because this is an authoritarian regime that can decide what it wants, they can absolutely keep this force in place for weeks certainly months probably. A lot of the troops won't be happy about it. It'll cost money, but let's face it. Does Putin really care what a squad on the Ukrainian Russian border thinks, obviously not. And meanwhile, first of all, it maintains the pressure on Ukraine and particularly the Ukrainian economy. And at the same time, I think from Putin's point of view, there is an assumption that the west is not very good at keeping up pressure and keeping its attention on the single crisis. There is that sense that after a certain point, Ukraine fatigue might set in in European capitals in particular and another crisis arise to distract the west. So yes, I mean, at the moment we have, I mean, in some ways, there's been dramatic moves and in some ways nothing really has really changed on the ground. It's still a situation in which Putin could invade within a couple of hours or Putin could never invade the initiative in his entirely with him. And what about diplomatic negotiations? I mean, we know that the U.S. Secretary of State's canceled his meeting with the Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, do you think that that's the end of talk? There won't be continue. I mean, there won't be under the same format, but at the same time, of course, they have to be continued talks. I mean, although there's obviously the immediate negotiations had to be blocked because obviously from the Americans point of view that the Russians were not treating with them honestly. But when it comes down to it, look, talks are not a reward for good behavior, talks in some ways to become all the more important when you are in a crisis and when you are at loggerheads with others. So whether it's directly between the Americans and the Russians, whether it's through other intermediaries and to be perfectly honest as far as the Russians are concerned, they really just want to talk to the Americans because they think they're the only people who matter. But one way or the other, there will be diplomatic channels open. They need to be. Mark galeotti, thank you very much indeed and also thank you to vladislav Devils on in Kyiv. And we'll return to this subject a little bit later in the program. Up next we turn our attention to the changing geopolitical landscape in Asia with the rise and rise of China and increasingly antagonistic North Korea and constitutional questions for Japan. It's been a rather tumultuous time for the continent over the last decade and a half. Ahead of the 15th anniversary edition of Monaco magazine hitting newsstands this week, here's Monica's Asia editor and Tokyo bureau chief in the city, Fiona Wilson, on the changes that she's seen. Much has changed in East Asian geopolitics in the 15 years since we ran our first cover story, but two narratives have been constant. The spectacular rise of China and North Korea's pursuit of.

Putin Kyiv Sean Penn Ukraine zelensky Minsk Vlad Sergei Lavrov Russia Mark Mark galeotti vladislav Devils U.S. Monaco magazine Asia North Korea Fiona Wilson China Japan Monica
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:26 min | 4 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I think it's a question of, you know, we live in the era we do and people get jump on words and every word counts at this moment. So I think that that is a combination of those the general sort of attitude or suspicion about Macron, which seems to be part of the way other countries see France and see his action that and then the sort of tenseness of the situation that has prompted all this all this criticism. Where do you think this trip fits into Macron's foreign policy vision generally in the current issue of Monaco magazine, the our new feature that debate takes a look at his record and whether or not it merits another go at being president and one of the participants in that debate gerardo the former UN and U.S. ambassador of France said that Macron and I quote has a grand vision of France's role on the world stage, but he has little experience of foreign policy, and that has led to initiatives that went nowhere like Beirut referring of course to Macron's sudden appearance in Lebanon after the Beirut port explosion, is this another one of those or do you think that Macron does perhaps know something the rest of us don't? You know, I think we can't possibly know whether this is going to be one of those. Maybe it will. I think it's quite difficult to fault him for trying. He did try and fail to sweet Donald Trump as well as other initiatives like the Beirut one, which came to nothing, and I suppose you have to situate his desire to try and talk to Putin in the context of an effort to try and find a dialog with Russia that dates right back to his election. If you remember shortly after he was elected in 2017, he invited Putin to Versailles and gave him really, there's a royal treatment there. And so far, that hasn't come to anything. In some ways, he is trying. He thinks that there may be a possibility of traction here. And I think you certainly can't say yes that it's failed. I think he's also learned if you look at this particular trip and how it was put together. It's really interesting to me to see how many phone calls you put in to different leaders, including those who might have been skeptical about what he's doing. I'm not talking about the Germans. I'm talking about the Baltic states. I'm talking about even Boris Johnson or certainly President Biden, who spoke to twice before going and once actually last night as well. This is an attempt to consult a coordinate. He's not doing this as a sort of rival initiative to upstage NATO or the Americans. I think he genuinely thinks maybe misguidedly that he might be able to make a difference, but I don't think he's not trumpeting any kind of triumphant result. Absolutely not yet. Just finally, every minute he is spending on this, of course, is amenity is not spending campaigning for reelection, which is something that is looming quite imminently. Does he calculate that this isn't going to shift any votes one way or the other? I mean, it's interesting just to note he hasn't actually declared that he is running for election yet. And in France, it's quite funny. And we were all waiting for him to do that. So he's not officially on the campaign. And in fact, his team made very clear that it was it wouldn't have been possible for him to go to Moscow at least not in their view as a candidate. He needed to go as president of France and that he's delayed that announcement because of it. As a sort of more broader point, I don't think that the French judge an election or vote according to foreign policy no, that's not true. On the other hand, it won't have hurt him to have been seen on all the French TV channels sitting at the table with Putin looking like a statesman who has a role although on the world stage. And sort of participating in diplomatic efforts to resolve this tension over the border with you with Ukraine. So I think that in the sense of projecting the image of someone who's standing up for France and defending French interests or European interests or even western interests, that certainly won't harm him. Sophie peder, thank you, as always for joining us. That was the Paris based author and journalist Sophie peder, and this is the briefing on monocle 24. Japan might be one of the world's biggest economies, a global leader in everything from architecture to food, and a country whose brands have flourished around the world, but it remains a bit of a mystery. Published by Thames and Hudson, the monocle book of Japan is the culmination of years of reporting across the country by monocle,.

Macron Beirut France Monaco magazine Putin President Biden gerardo Donald Trump Lebanon UN Baltic states Boris Johnson Russia U.S. NATO Sophie peder Moscow Ukraine Paris Japan
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:09 min | 5 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Towards 22 minutes past 1 million 300,000 Zürich 20 minutes approximately here in London and a new issue of Monica magazine hits newsstands and hopefully possibly doormats as well around the world today our editor in chief Andrew tuck. He's not the punchline to a joke. He's the boss, and he joins me in the studio right now, and Andrew, we gathered around this table exactly a week ago today and we talked a little bit. I think it was on the global list about the need for some levity in challenging times. But that's very much isn't it at the heart of the new February issue of Monaco magazine. So dives into the world of comedy. And comedy and cartooning and satire and why we need it and why it's good to have the right poke fun at your kind of leaders and your better supposedly in society. So it looks all of these people. But I think it also throws back a question to us in a way, which is oddly when we spoke to many comedians, we thought that maybe this notion of wokeness would be kind of curtailing what they felt they could say on stage. And actually, some people said, look, it's more just tastes of changing and no comedian wants to die on stage. So you use material that you think will just work and make people funny. But really that bothered about testing these boundaries that much. What was more interesting was it kind of threw it back on the readers and us as individuals, whether we've outsourced the right to be funny to professionals. And it's just us that's a bit more nervous about telling jokes and I don't know maybe that whole world has vanished a bit like going to big dinners and dinner parties and having a joke and all these things. We live in a slightly different age. So it's about our sense of humor and need to have a sense of humor. Well, that's really interesting. I know obviously we canvas quite a few in a very common serious people to tell us a joke is what demonstrate how they look on the lighter side of life. And actually, a lot of captains of industry types and people in very, very public facing figures were in some cases Andrew reluctant even to enter the discussion. I wonder that's perhaps because of a perception or a misperception that to be shown to be laughing in tough times. Insensitive or shows that might show that you didn't care about or people or you weren't serious about your work, but as an editor and also as someone who runs a big team of people, it's always important even in the darkest moments, isn't it? So retain it helps you retain a sense of perspective. Well, the funny thing is here in the UK and I don't think we see it much at the moment, but there used to be a kind of a tradition of humor being seen as a skill set in a way. So some of the best, for example, MPs questions questions rather, you would hear MPs towering with a prime minister. And there would be a lot of humor in the chamber and somehow people landed their points better slightly making a laugh run around the room. And I think that's the same whether you are in business, whether you're in politics, even now, somebody who can change the mood in a room by having a bit of levity by being funny, it's a good thing. So we want our diplomats and business leaders all earnest fools, but to be people with more depth to them, in a way. There's a playful twinkling energy talk. So I listen as I can tell you. And you're just very briefly the mag is out now. People must go and get a copy. It's about the power of humor with comedy. But there's the usual heft in there as well. It's not all it's not all glib and amazing what you've heard of obviously across multiple 24 this week is we have page and Chris chamak down in Kyiv. And actually the big lead piece, the big long read is by a Ukrainian writer Artem check, talking about his view on society, but also he's been a conscript. He went out to the front and Don bass a few years ago. He's a reserve is still and him talking about how you navigate every single day in Kyiv, trying to go to work, do your job when you know that there's this threat of war all the time. And there's just this tiny detail and then he says that him all his friends they all have a bag packed just in case something does happen and they have to flee with their families and head westwards towards the rest of Europe. Amazing stuff, light and shade. That's what we like, isn't it Andrew? That is Andrew tuck. That's the new issue of Monaco out right now. Get yourself a copy. Right now though, get ready for Fernando. He.

Andrew tuck Zürich Monica magazine Monaco magazine Andrew London Chris chamak Kyiv Don bass UK Artem Europe Monaco Fernando
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Find one no matter where you are. He says there's something amazingly grounding and healing about being in a church, even during wartime amid to the horrors of conflict churches, have always been places of repose. She tells me that during the nineteen Ninety-four massacres in Rwanda, people hidden churches, seeking sanctuary from the genocide only to be murdered. In two thousand sixteen the country's Catholic church apologized for its role in the violence. Did Giovanni is reporting has been formed by her experiences in churches during the reign of Saddam Hussein. She spent time worshipping alongside Syrian Christians in Mozell who were praying to stop the US invasion of Iraq. Traditionally Christians in the Middle East side with the caters like Hussein who offer them protection, she says when the dictators full it often leaves them vulnerable in recent years, she's spoken to Syrian Christians who support Al Assad for the same reason, New York's hectic pace has spawned avast and sophisticated relaxation industry and industry that the Giovanni is only too happy to ignore. People. Spend thousands of dollars to go to spas in retreats. She tells me, but the every corner of the church or temple or mosque will you can find the same thing. Very simply her. Attachment to church is is less about religious observance and more about being able to always find a home, even a strange land. No matter how alone you are you go to church, and you feel that the other people. There are also looking for something. She tells me that quest is an is being the quest. My whole life. Thank you very much. Indeed, Henry daylight is issue of Monaco magazine is out on all good news stands this week. Let's continue with a look at some newspapers unsurprisingly as we heard from Lawrence earlier. I guess Brexit is front and center. Making sense of it for us Markle's page Reynolds is hair is Brexit. The only story in town in the British papers, at least in the British papers. It certainly is the lead story on pretty much all the papers. I've got with me in the studio right now that all the coverage is almost quite unanimous for once. And they're just said that may is pretty much in for an almighty defeats. The question isn't whether she's gonna lose the phone. It's how much she's going to lose that vote by most of the papers have got that figure about two hundred votes. Anil of them relating to war next may and also what next for the labor party. So you know, how soon is Corbin going to potentially cool this vote of confidence in the government. The times are putting on her sort of even vote pitch yesterday. We're only half the conservative party members turned up one MP present said her last-ditch attempts were competent, but not transformative. And they've said that missus Michael is about one hundred eighty votes. There's a slightly more dramatic turn from the telegraph out of allies out of time. And they lied initially. And they say Theresa May will be expected to stand down. If she loses the vote by a heavy margin. And they've said the Coburn would cool the no confidence vote in a matter of minutes and they're also predictions. They'll be further resignation from maize party before this evening. So what a lot of drama coin from the telegraph on their financial times. Again, they're saying that she's definitely going to lose by about one hundred votes, but Downing Street preparing for about two hundred and also said that may is going to be under a lot of pressure to promise Britain will leave without a deal and to extend the article fifty divorce process, I'm if you open the first page, the third page also has a lot of coverage devoted to the. Brexit turmoil. And there's quite nice infra graphic that sort of details how NPS are expected to vote sort of pitting best and worst case scenarios against each other. Quite an interesting angle from the international New York Times, they have liberal column on a front page that said in Britain, and US a shed paralysis. I'm so they're making parallels between the US government shutdown and the and the Brexit. This Brexit meaningful happening at the same time. And it is really interesting. They say rarely have British and American politics in quite so synchronized so three years after the victory is Brexit and Trump we see a quote to governments paralyzed to populous project stalled and two venerable democracies in crisis, and they sort of go through all the.

Brexit Catholic church Giovanni US Saddam Hussein Reynolds Corbin Rwanda Britain New York Times Middle East Al Assad Coburn Mozell labor party Lawrence Iraq Anil Henry Monaco magazine
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And if he didn't he's initiated this sort of consultation, which on one hand, you can kind of understand because precise that difficult cutting identifying who the key stakeholders other he could or his government could actually engage with what are his critics saying he should have done differently. If at all because one of his criticisms is that he's been a little too lofty. He's not engaged with a public. The let's not forget not that long ago. Voted him rather enthusiast ikley into office. What's the suggestion that he should be doing differently? Do the opposition have to suggest something else? And they just have to Chrissy to get some critics, and that's all well, let's that's what's happening anyway. So what what they say is that you know, is that what you should have done before. Which is of course, not helpful. But what she should should you. Now, they said that he should have listened to you the people earlier than you should be more respectful to the people a few days ago your ear against president micro against that. Frankly, Paul lost the sense of effort, which of course, didn't go. Well, so they're saying what you should do is try to be some try to be so not so scornful anymore to the French people. But I don't say that's what you should. Absolutely. That's the solution. I think you should think about there's no I mean, the debate is not as intelligent as a start. I guess at the moment. It's more the French people the year of s than the others were trying to say something to the president the prime is as you said, there's no no career directory in a way in this yellow. Vast movement some say, they are presentative. But when they just put the head above the parapet they just being taken off because they did universe. Don't want to have representatives. Meaning that the message and the way the thing that they would want the president. Did you do doesn't basically reach the executive? So it's a bit of a mishmash of everything position is in disarray is no official position. You don't know if it's the right the left or the centre riders the opposition to the to the president that doesn't help. Because of course, when you're your position the best thing to do is not to be precise. So you should you have as much as you can and the universe movement. Even have a, you know, a voice to say what they want. So at the moment America McCall is evolving in void in a way and trying to do the best c-can, and it's very very important moment for for him. Because if he fails in that he might be used the word very in very interesting. He might. Impotant meaning that he could be an impotent president and not being able to do anything much for the rest of his mandate. So it's very very important and doesn't really help that there's no clear feedback coming from the population woman frustating stuff Marie? Thanks for joining us. That was our friend Mary beyond joining us hair on the briefing. Now, let's take a look at what else is making news today. Canadian national convicted of attempting to smuggle drugs out of China has been sentenced to death Robert Lloyd Schellenberg received the sentence following an appeal against his previous fifteen year. Custodial term observers have linked the increased penalty to going dispute between China and Canada relations have been frosty since Canadian authorities arrested Mang when Joo chief financial officer at telecom giant Huawei last month. Meanwhile, a Saudi Arabian teenager who took to social media to plead her case for asylum from Bangkok hotel room last week has arrived in Canada Ralph half Mohammed Al Cunanan fed fled Saudi Arabia barricading himself in our toll room in Thailand. Following a ruling from the U N High Commissioner of refugees, she's been granted refugee status and with the United States government shutdown in its twenty four day. US President Donald Trump was forced to order in for -ception, welcoming the national college football champions, the president ordered more than three hundred burgers as well as pizza and fries. Is blaming the partial government shutdown for the lack of catering staff at the White House. This is the briefing a monocle twenty four. The new February edition of Monaco magazine is out of this very week. It's how fit lean.

president Chrissy White House US Monaco magazine Donald Trump Saudi Arabia Paul Huawei Canada Mohammed Al Cunanan China executive U N High America McCall Marie Robert Lloyd Schellenberg official Mary Commissioner
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Josh the drama just finished with one of the report, you'll find in the latest issue of Monaco magazine, which is out on newsstands. This week. Continuing. Now with some printed information on the page before us we have eluding in the studio with today's newspapers Bill what have you found high? Bam was dying in the financial times on the opinion pages. An interesting take not necessarily agree with but worth discussing is by both gang moon. Chow who see me as chairman, and it says, the e you should kill off a Brexit reversal. Sipho stayed out of the UK's internal compilations. I've Brexit for good reason. It's easier for continental Europe. To learn the rules of cricket than to make sense of what the hell is going on in the house of Commons. But he's suggesting they actively interfere by taking the the kind of idea of Brexit reversal completely off the table saying maze tactic Saif off to by remain as and Brexit is into backing head Dale, but it's not really working. So what he's saying is if MP's impose no Dale than e you take on second if as opposed. No, Dale, and the EU takes no Brexit off the table, then you're can have to have a deal. So what you're saying? Is if they say, right. You can't have any extra time, and there's no extension, and when you can't renegotiate the only option is to take the deal, otherwise we're going to descend into chaos, and nobody wants that to happen. Yeah. I'm not sure that he's really fooled through perhaps he's a. Renting this really to try and stir the politics and get a female readers bit of attention, perhaps. But it doesn't sound like a very sensible idea given the criticism that's going to come from the other side of the Brexit debate the levers saying, the E U is religious too big bunch of bullies not going to let us leaving in good faith. I think that would surely just I it would make those accusations even worse yet. But what he's saying is that what may that was in this country? But as far as the EU is concerned of forced the hand when people here upset by that because you know, they have to they've kind of got self-preservation in mind, and and if kind of this just goes on and on, and that's a second referendum. And then the remain is due way. Not ready when you know, it's just going to kind of blur the line more and go on and on no shortage of takes on that Bill. Let's turn to some of the other pages in the paper. What else have you got? This is a fun story from the New York Times. But it's about Europe the making of Italy's popular strongman at lots of Natella story about matai, Sal. Vini we how we know he likes to spread Mattel Arana's bread. He winds down with a glass of Barral. I am and he drinks Moretti bay. We know all of this because he posts literally everything on social media and his parents of a carefully studied and remarkably successful strategy to sell his common mom brand in an empty elitist era. So this is. Mataz any kind of making the most of his Facebook page and his Instagram and his Twitter apparently the right of engagement on his Facebook page is higher than tunneled Trump's which is kind of incredible. And it's OPA of this thing to make him look like an everyday guy, you know, he poses topless, and he's got like, he's not the, you know, the skinniest or the most muscular managed, so he's like every day. You know, this is saying he's got a little bit of extra flab around unsurprising. If he's got an attempt. I've got to say those those Facebook metrics of engagement are probably just as questionable as pairing Parola with Natella. But I I digress. Bill. Unfortunately, we are out of time on that. So if you're still curious about Matteo Silva's Natella habits, you'll have to visit his Facebook page there that is an not necessarily instruction or a recommendation from me ability. Thank you for taking us through today's newspapers here on the briefing that brings us to the end of today's program. It was produced by Malcolm sippy, and researched by your linga phone at Nikola niece of studio manager was Kenya. Scarlet the briefing returns at the very same time tomorrow do join Juliette foster for today's edition of the Dory house. He's going live at eighteen hundred here in London thirty nine hundred if you're listening in New York City, I'm Ben Ryland. That's the briefing.

Facebook Dale Brexit EU Europe Bam Matteo Silva Josh Monaco magazine Juliette foster New York Times Mattel Arana Moretti bay Dory house chairman Chow Sipho UK Malcolm sippy
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Just after nineteen minutes past the Albany edition of Monaco magazine is out this week. It's our fit lean and shop special filled with speedy deliveries. Very fast running retail and everything you need to be primed charged up and ready for action in twenty nine nineteen. It's also where you'll find Monaco's executive editor Josh venit, performing a hospitality health check. Specifically. He's wondering whether it's checkout time for hotel gimmicks. I'm staying at the Grand Hotel. It's the most expensive hotel in Berlin yet all the best people. Stay. The best hotels can ensconce us in the neighborhood. They can winus they can diners, and they can even take lighters. They can tell us tall tales insurance sports. Unfortunately, the overblown millennial minded Martin pump for and some new openings peddling, a cosmos, garish gimmicks to transport somewhere father entirely. A recent press release for hotel at mentioned, the kind of increasingly automated teas that our editors of cult recently days into the potential to sponsor a V T quarter bottles sparkly hot pants intimacy kit, so interesting, they named him twice in the excitement and tight available in black or caramel, even an adjustable emergency engagement ring on offer, though, if anyone proposes to your hair, I'd suggest you run this particularly short on irony. Promotion also noted that the hotels itself dubbed at trendy vending options would include alcohol which was planned for the coming weeks. Right. We'll need a snifter after all that hotels can change communities that these trivialities undermine the mission. But I'm being unkind apps PO faced even perhaps it's all just a bit of fun. The broader point is the everything within a hotel is a sentence in a wider story. An artfully node light switch rather than a cheap. Plastic one sheds lights on the designers attention to detail and investment in the. Experience. The fact that the in room crockery comes from a local maker is in short a commitment to the community and an on premises. Shop can showcase hotels values for all his fans, fullness sponsoring a B is a harmless diversion that said missing.

Grand Hotel Josh venit Monaco magazine Monaco Albany executive editor Berlin Martin nineteen minutes
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

10:07 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Above sea level is a beautiful journal edited by Amy Hartley that has as its founding mission starting different conversation around wine, Amy from whom you might have heard or more accurately read in the pages of Monaco magazine. Join me a little earlier to tell me more about it. I think traditionally wine journalism has has been quite mild pick its focus very much on elaborate flavor. Descriptors and details about soil and rocks and things that people find quite difficult to engage with unless you're ready have a certain amount of kind of finis knowledge, obviously for me wine is very much about people and place and the relationship between the two, and and I felt that wind journalism could could really do with a bit of a refresh not taking away from any of the authenticity of of wine itself. But just offering fresh perspective, which is highly I've managed to do with about Seattle nothing. I've myself folded into the trap of thinking those a traditional way of ROY. Writing about one talking about wine all considering y journalism. But I think that even the things that we think are the traditional approach is themselves not that award. It's a storied history. But actually, it's relatively recently written d-, do you think one of the key risks? Whether it's about one or one is that people just make sumptious that don't borne out by by fact, is that a problem is is it a whole sector a theme that for whatever reason draws people into jumping to inaccurate conclusions about things, I think this kind of accuracy versus inaccuracy is is really interesting in it self because taste is so subjective my role as a as a wind journalist icy is is not to tell people what I think they should like it's inspire them to drink better. And and to experiment, and and I think experimenting is something that people traditionally find quite difficult with wine because they feel like they need to know about it before they can really get into it. And I think traditional wine journalism is. Interesting and it self because really flavor descriptors and point system, which white spectator and Cantabria around and Robert Parker, who's a very big wine critic, they really only have happened since sixties and seventies. So the way that we've kind of talked about wine for this period of time. As is really quite limited the full that we can look back to literature. We about to poetry and people waxing lyrical about the amazing aspects of wine and using metaphors and it being decadent and then even reaching back to ancient Greece Socrates used to prescribe different styles of wine for different ailments. I think it's it's really fascinating to see actually the wind journalism now is almost more limiting than it's ever been. I do think in the last few years has been changing with publications like raw alchemy, and Pat, and I think that people are are more receptive to to hearing about wine and people playing around a little bit more with with how. How that's done and tell me about the approach because I think leafing through these volumes. We have here of pages where there are some bottles of wine, but there's a lot of just beautiful photography assoc- beautifully designed pace at a quick browser. You could be forgiven for not even being able to immediately divine that it is a wine magazine how committed where you to bringing sense. You must have a great love for independent publishing and for some of those principles that may be defined some of your phone favorite magazines of balancing passion for wine with a passion for for print as well. Is it a question of marrying this to they natural bedfellows? I I definitely think they are in winus such a tactile thing for me. It's it's an experience, you know, when I meet winemakers. I I try and have dinner with them. I sit with their my awesome questions. I I learned something more than just about the wine making. And that's what makes it really interesting, but above sea level. Also looks at wine in context of food and design and people in place, and and really I think that's where I'm personally interested in, and I really hope kind of resonates with readers because working with people like stack magazine on this issue was really exciting for me because the magazine went out to three thousand eight hundred people that might have pick up wine magazine, and I very specifically have chosen talk about wine in the context of other things and use it more as thread than a kind of focus, and I think an hope that that means that wine kind of resonates with more people as a result. I wonder what about the pressure that you put on yourself? Do you have a sort of a selection of cuttings or maps of places you want to go that is growing exponentially? Because I guess you could probably real off fifty practically additions of the magazine that you'd like to start commissioning and reporting yourself tomorrow. What's that process? Like, it is fun. But it's kind of restrictive in some ways, or do you just think look, it's a it's the whole gloat tension look at so once defer time, it's it's interesting because I'm changing every single time. I make an issue. So my learnings from each you are also valuable in terms of, you know, why even started to do this in the first place, and I think when I choose an issue or a country or region, it's because I feel like there's this really lovely balanced between relevance for that moment. The timing is right. But also the sense of timelessness. So for me, California was my first issue. I I lived in San Francisco for two years ten years ago. And it's a bit of a love letter to California because it was where my love of wind began. And it's you know, as a place, it's very four thinking, it's very experimental. And and it really shaped the way that I think about wine today, and then Portugal was interesting for me and very different because I hadn't spent much time there. But I knew that Portugal is becoming creatively. Very interesting. And I thought that there must be a different story to tell about the wines weren't just rooted in their fortified which were poor Madeira. I spent a long time going back and forth in Portugal, and and trying to find these people and find out why they were making this kind of freshest olive wine, and how they're working with really really old vineyards and going back to kind of pre industrialization and the way that they're working fields and working very gently with our wines is is something that is really interesting to me and the Portuguese are very quiet. Very humble people. You know, you can go to America and somebody can chat forever about what makes them excited. You have to spend time with the Portuguese. To understand them. And and for them to trust you and for them to share things with you. And and it really forced me to slow down. And take my time. I didn't really have another choice in how to make this issue. I find that really in itself and really supporting those winemakers, and and photographers and writers and talent, you know, that that is one of the most exciting things for me is how can I kind of push those people out there into the spotlight. So they got a bit more kind of celebration for they're doing just took a little bit about the future little bear. And I wanted from each about the learnings for inch issue in this thing. I wonder they against generals slightly they editorial encourage they journalistic in character, although about storytelling or they lessons about hard world of the business of of independent publishing. I imagine it's probably a bit of everything. Have you been surprised about how much of a business hat you've had to wear much the time is that balance K is it what you foresaw the balance has definitely not. Doesn't feel okay right now. If if I'm really honest about it, and I do think you have to be honest about that when you're running independent magazines. There is a lot of romanticism around an lot of hard work that goes into it, which I guess is why in part people love them. I think I have to become more focused with feature issues in terms of funding and making it a little bit more straightforward that doesn't mean they come out more frequently. It just means I'm able to kind of balanced doing the magazine with with areas of my work life. And I think, you know, I often tell people that like, oh, wow. You work on this predominately by yourself. And as I he asked that I say. But it's interesting because as you mentioned, you know, their times where it's has me on my knees. And then there are other times where I'm so excited about it. And I feel like I have something to say and to share with people, and and it needs to come out. It's like a vehicle for that. I think I have a few different countries. I'm exploring at the moment. I think some places I'm really interested in is Greece. I think Greece, you know, it's not near a peaceful country steeped in a lot of wine history, and culture, obviously commercially who's had many problems too. But there's a kind of third generation of winemakers who are coming through. And and ca- tightly redefining what we would perceive Greek wine to be so that those types of countries are really interesting to me and not to dimissed even dismiss places like England. We had our best ever vintage last year, the English Weinstein. Is is growing all the time. And I'm quite intrigued to see what happens kind of post Brexit. Well, I think Richard winemakers amongst probably British. Everybody's aware and say what the post Brexit. Let's become session for another day. Amy, so great to speak. If this has picked the interest of our listeners, how should they find out more and support above sea level? So I do distribute myself madly. It is available internationally in London. You can pick it up and places like my culture, but you can also order it directly from my website as well. I mean, it's not so delighted to chat with you. And I do hope wherever you alight next that you'll come back and tell us about it. I would love to thanks so much.

wine magazine Amy Hartley Greece Portugal California Seattle Monaco magazine stack magazine Robert Parker London Cantabria Pat winus America England Richard San Francisco ten years two years