15 Burst results for "Monaco Magazine"

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:13 min | 5 d ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"You were the globalist. Finally, let's squeeze in a little bit of urbanism, news, cat Hannah. Good morning, urban affairs commentator. How are you this morning? I'm not too bad. A bit of a bit of a rush, but got here in one piece. Like all good urbanists, you have the neatest notebook full of scribbles that I have ever seen. Those scribbles tell us what's on your paper. So a few things, and I'm sure people have seen it's been doing the round certainly on Twitter, a very good FTP on shopping centers. Again, looking at what do we do with them? How they've been hit, obviously, particularly by COVID, but also for a long time. We've had that shift towards buying things online. So again, what do you do with these assets and the piece starts by looking at croydon, where you've almost got these different generations of shopping centers that have been lost and saying, actually, location wise, they're great. So do we just need to rethink about what they're used for that isn't just about shops. The accordance is a very good example of a place that overreached itself, isn't it? It's one of those places just outside the center of London, where they have built and built and built and built lots and lots of apartments in the hope that I think it was westfield was going to come along. Westville said no, ultimately pulled out, and it left the high street and the area in a state of freefall. And the thing that marked it out as being such a desperately sad place to go to was all these half empty shopping malls. What is it that's bringing things back to life? So what the article does is it actually looks at a few developers who are still saying, do you know what? We still have faith, particularly in the location, even if it's not in shopping centers as they used to be. So it's about thinking this is actually prime real estate. You know, I think the figure, you know, it's you've got if you think on the high street in, you know, you've got long frontage, you've got a lot you could do. Is it about well-being is about gyms, culture, sports, actually bringing in some housing as well, so you think how do we go back to creating something that feels like a piece of city because what we do know is that massive amount of retail, particularly when a lot of those anchor tenants who think about debenhams, you think about topshop, you know, they've all gone down. You're not going to be able to get a big retailer in, let the rents come in and just let that go. It's not the same anymore. So you've got to be a bit more imaginative when it comes to those uses. Let's stick in London because of the opening of the Elizabeth line, otherwise known as crossrail, anybody who's ever heard of it will just associate delay and expense. And it's going to happen. Is it this weekend it opens? It is this weekend. Are you going? Do you know what? I really want to go. I really want to go. So if we do it right, let's have a date. Let's go to reading on Sunday. Excellent. I can't think of that a weekend plan. No, I genuinely do really want to go more, I think both to experience the trains of which quite a lot has been written in terms of their size, they're much bigger actually than tube trains that we're used to, but actually the stations themselves and the station architecture. The interesting thing about this is it's not just because it's interesting. If you like going on trains, it clearly do. But the scale of this thing has been enormous. I mean, if you look at the stations, they are twice the length of the average underground metro station. The tunnels are twice the width. They are huge. It was, wasn't it? It has been the biggest infrastructure project in Europe for a very long time. It has, and it's been the kind of biggest extension of the tube, you know, in London's real network overall, in a long, long time as well. And again, it's really about, I think there's this tension now about does this do we still need all this? And I think what everyone who's been involved in it says, just get on it, just go and you will see that yes, there may have been delays, yes, there may have been overruns, but you know what? This is a world class transport system. And it's worth it. And if you're not unable to join cats and myself for a trip on this weekend and actually there's a rather lovely article written about it in Monaco magazine. Finally, very, very quickly. Composting is something that you would not naturally associate with an urban life. This is just changing in New York City. This is quite niche cat. It is quite niche, but you know what? I genuinely, I will share the link to this article because it was just a really wonderful article. About a young man from New York from The Bronx who was kind of struggling in terms of unemployment, poorly paid jobs, saw, it was a nonprofit advertising about training young people in green jobs. And one of those happened to be composting and this young man is now we've probably not quite so young anymore. It's basically the kind of the poster boy for community composting and for helping people realize you can save money. You can do your bit for saving the planet and make the most of unused spaces and it's just a really to me a really great example of making the most of some of those opportunities and cities. Cat Hannah, thank you so much and I shall see you on the Elizabeth line next week. In the meantime, that's all we have time for today. Many thanks to my guests and to the producers color rebella Charlie filmer court and Sophie monahan coombs are such a Lillian fawcett and our studio melodic Callum McLean. After the headlines more music on the way, the briefings live at midday here in London and the global list is back at the same time tomorrow. But for now, from me Eminem goodbye, thank you very much for listening..

London Westville croydon Hannah westfield debenhams Twitter Monaco magazine Europe Cat Hannah New York City Charlie filmer New York Sophie monahan coombs Lillian fawcett Callum McLean
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:33 min | 3 weeks ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Write that I <Speech_Male> was surprised that I could <Speech_Male> remember it in <SpeakerChange> its entirety <Speech_Male> but then <Speech_Male> music has that capacity <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> once you hear it or <Speech_Music_Male> once you know it it <Speech_Music_Male> just you can <Speech_Music_Male> recall it much <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> more readily than <Speech_Male> names <SpeakerChange> even <Speech_Male> or <Speech_Male> faces. <Speech_Female> It somehow <Speech_Male> holds a place <Speech_Male> in our minds. <Speech_Male> We have a <Speech_Music_Male> kind of archive <Speech_Music_Male> actually of <Speech_Music_Male> music that <Speech_Music_Male> we don't <Speech_Music_Male> always know we have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> until <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> it's triggered <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by something. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Yeah and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> how does it feel to be <Speech_Music_Male> representing Britain <Speech_Music_Male> on this <Speech_Music_Male> grand stage <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> at this <Speech_Music_Male> time in 2022? <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> am incredibly <Speech_Music_Male> nervous because <Speech_Music_Male> there's a cure people <Speech_Male> outside coming <Speech_Male> to see this <Speech_Music_Male> show and <Speech_Music_Male> I mean, of course it <Speech_Music_Male> was enormous <Speech_Music_Male> honor and I was <Speech_Music_Male> completely <Speech_Music_Male> shocked when they <Speech_Music_Male> gave me a call because <Speech_Music_Male> I didn't apply for <Speech_Music_Male> it. <Speech_Music_Male> They just gave me a call and <Speech_Music_Male> said we want you to know <Speech_Music_Male> there's a time of people <Speech_Male> who sat around and <Speech_Music_Male> said we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> should give this this on your voice <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and it's like <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I have to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> admit and this is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> terrible. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My first response was <Speech_Music_Male> why <Speech_Music_Male> because I could as like <Speech_Music_Male> why now <Speech_Music_Male> how did that happen? <Speech_Music_Male> I was a bit confused <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> I'm really <Speech_Music_Female> really <Speech_Male> pleased and honored <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> to have been <Speech_Music_Female> thought of by my <Speech_Music_Female> peers <Speech_Music_Female> to be <Speech_Music_Female> I don't want to <Speech_Music_Female> say worthy but to <Speech_Music_Female> be interesting enough <Speech_Music_Female> for <Speech_Female> this platform because it <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> the biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are biggest platform within <Speech_Music_Male> the visual arts <Speech_Music_Male> being on. <Speech_Music_Male> I have come to the <Speech_Music_Male> pavilion <Speech_Music_Male> many, many times. I've <Speech_Music_Male> always just come <Speech_Music_Male> to see the shows to <Speech_Music_Male> see the artists that <Speech_Male> are in those shows. <Speech_Male> So I'd never ever <Speech_Music_Male> looked at <SpeakerChange> the actual <Speech_Female> space before. <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> was the British artist <Speech_Female> Sonia Boyce <Speech_Female> in conversation with <Speech_Female> Monaco's Alexa <Speech_Female> itself. And you can hear <Speech_Female> their full conversation <Speech_Female> and many interviews <Speech_Female> with artists <Speech_Female> at the Biennale on <Speech_Female> this week's episode of <Speech_Female> monocot and culture. <Speech_Female> And that's all <Speech_Female> for today's program. <Speech_Female> Thanks to our producers <Speech_Female> MSL page Reynolds <Speech_Female> and Sophie monaghan <Speech_Female> coombs <Speech_Female> are researchers Lillian <Speech_Female> fawcett and Samson <Speech_Female> and bogu and our <Speech_Female> studio manager <Speech_Female> Christy Evans with <Speech_Female> editing assistance <Speech_Female> from Steph Chung. <Speech_Female> After the headlines, <Speech_Female> there's more music on <Speech_Female> the way, my chat <Speech_Female> with Chloe ashby <Speech_Female> a former monocle <Speech_Female> staffer who's just <Speech_Female> come out with her debut <Speech_Female> novel wet paint, <Speech_Female> and then we'll also be <Speech_Female> hearing from Ilya <Speech_Female> Leonard Pfeiffer, the Dutch <Speech_Female> author of <Speech_Female> grand hotel <Speech_Female> Europa. You can <Speech_Female> read all about him in <Speech_Female> the May issue of <Speech_Female> Monaco magazine <Speech_Female> and see pictures of <Speech_Female> our time together <Speech_Female> in Genoa. <Speech_Female> I'm Georgina Godwin, <Speech_Female> I'll return at the globalist <Speech_Female> at the same time <Speech_Music_Female> tomorrow. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you, for listening. <Music>

Sonia Boyce Sophie monaghan Christy Evans Steph Chung Chloe ashby Leonard Pfeiffer Monaco magazine Georgina Godwin Genoa
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:46 min | Last month

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I sort of mentioned at the top, I mean, we've sort of seen a hive of activity over the last 12 months as people have regained confidence projects more projects have come online. But I think the thing that stands out for me and maybe it's less to do with 2022 for me, it's the fact that good design is probably the same as it was last year when we did the awards. And it's probably the same as it was ten years ago. It's about putting people at the center of your work and about quality and about proving improving quality of life. And I think that's what we've captured here. And I think what we're seeing is that there are plenty of designers all across the globe from Ghana to Switzerland that are working on projects that are delivering those sorts of outcomes. That's also a deputy designer, so Nick managed, thank you very much for joining me today. And don't forget to pick up our copy of Monaco magazine, which is available on all good newsstands today. It is almost 1226 year in London. You are listening to Monaco 24. And finally on today's bro Grammy's first day, which means that Monaco was Fernando Auguste joined me in the studio for this week's edition of the global countdown good afternoon. Fernando. Where are you taking us today? We are going to Portugal, which is a music market that I like not only because of the language, of course, is speak Portuguese being from Brazil. But I like that the Portuguese they're very open to all their loser phone countries, including Brazil, including Angola, Mozambique, among many others. So for example, the list that I'm going to show you, Marcus, perhaps there might be not too many Portuguese artists, but there are quite a nice spread here, including a lot of Brazilians actually. A lot of Portuguese language, sadly. Shall we start with the song that's number 5 this week. Number 5, it is a bit silly. What do you mean? Well, it's funny. It's one of those hit of the summer in a way. Well, let's have a listen to have kind of a plane after that. Oh yes. And number 5 we have Pedro San paio, a singer from Rio de Janeiro. The song is called galapa to gallop. I do watch and follow the quality of her dog listening to bands that they push through by the same people I see people go on style I don't care about I.

Monaco magazine bro Grammy Fernando Auguste Ghana Brazil Switzerland Monaco Nick Fernando Portugal Angola London Mozambique Marcus Pedro San paio galapa Rio de Janeiro
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:47 min | 3 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Actually, despite all the sound and fury, if what we see now is the worst that happens, I think actually Kyiv and the west will be really quite happy, not just simply because they've averted a full scale war, but also in some ways it makes things much more clear that in fact, from the first these Donbass eudo states have been covert Russian protectorates. Well, now they're just becoming overt Russian protectorates. The Minsk process was always dead. As I said, it's kind of clears the area of some of the nonsense and the downright disinformation that we've seen in the past. Vlad, I wonder what Ukraine will do next and how prepared it is for war. Are they prepared? They've spent the last months saying to me, Americans don't know nothing to see here, where we should watch the situation carefully, but there's too much hysteria in the air. That was good because they were economic effects. And hysteria is unnecessary. But it is the fact that there was no emergency situation. Last night, the reservists or a couple of hours ago reservists were not called up. There are no roadblocks, there are no, there are no security measures here in the capital. It's very difficult to say if the Ukrainians are taking the situation seriously enough. So alarmism is bad, and will cause a bank run on the cause all sorts of unpleasant things to happen. But also, it's not apparent that they've been taking the situation very, very, very seriously. And last night, a very sage political commentator by the name of Sean Penn said to me, I would not want to be in zelensky's shoes for anything in the world. I would not wish that on my worst enemy. What's Sean Penn doing in Kyiv anyway? Saving us from ourselves? Because he's a politician. Shown to the world. I think we've just lost the blood for a moment there. Mark, are Russian troops in forward positions. I mean, if they are how long can those be held? And is there a chance that Russia doesn't launch a full scale invasion in the foreseeable future, but just keeps up the threat level indefinitely? Well, yes, I mean, we have a situation in which the Russian forces can move literally within hours. And there's no signs that the Russians plan to uncoil this force. Now again, this could be precisely because they are planning some kind of major escalation. But again, it's also absolutely classic Putin. He likes to give himself multiple options to keep the west guessing and to keep himself free to maneuver. And I think this is because this is an authoritarian regime that can decide what it wants, they can absolutely keep this force in place for weeks certainly months probably. A lot of the troops won't be happy about it. It'll cost money, but let's face it. Does Putin really care what a squad on the Ukrainian Russian border thinks, obviously not. And meanwhile, first of all, it maintains the pressure on Ukraine and particularly the Ukrainian economy. And at the same time, I think from Putin's point of view, there is an assumption that the west is not very good at keeping up pressure and keeping its attention on the single crisis. There is that sense that after a certain point, Ukraine fatigue might set in in European capitals in particular and another crisis arise to distract the west. So yes, I mean, at the moment we have, I mean, in some ways, there's been dramatic moves and in some ways nothing really has really changed on the ground. It's still a situation in which Putin could invade within a couple of hours or Putin could never invade the initiative in his entirely with him. And what about diplomatic negotiations? I mean, we know that the U.S. Secretary of State's canceled his meeting with the Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, do you think that that's the end of talk? There won't be continue. I mean, there won't be under the same format, but at the same time, of course, they have to be continued talks. I mean, although there's obviously the immediate negotiations had to be blocked because obviously from the Americans point of view that the Russians were not treating with them honestly. But when it comes down to it, look, talks are not a reward for good behavior, talks in some ways to become all the more important when you are in a crisis and when you are at loggerheads with others. So whether it's directly between the Americans and the Russians, whether it's through other intermediaries and to be perfectly honest as far as the Russians are concerned, they really just want to talk to the Americans because they think they're the only people who matter. But one way or the other, there will be diplomatic channels open. They need to be. Mark galeotti, thank you very much indeed and also thank you to vladislav Devils on in Kyiv. And we'll return to this subject a little bit later in the program. Up next we turn our attention to the changing geopolitical landscape in Asia with the rise and rise of China and increasingly antagonistic North Korea and constitutional questions for Japan. It's been a rather tumultuous time for the continent over the last decade and a half. Ahead of the 15th anniversary edition of Monaco magazine hitting newsstands this week, here's Monica's Asia editor and Tokyo bureau chief in the city, Fiona Wilson, on the changes that she's seen. Much has changed in East Asian geopolitics in the 15 years since we ran our first cover story, but two narratives have been constant. The spectacular rise of China and North Korea's pursuit of.

Putin Kyiv Sean Penn Ukraine zelensky Minsk Vlad Sergei Lavrov Russia Mark Mark galeotti vladislav Devils U.S. Monaco magazine Asia North Korea Fiona Wilson China Japan Monica
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:26 min | 3 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"I think it's a question of, you know, we live in the era we do and people get jump on words and every word counts at this moment. So I think that that is a combination of those the general sort of attitude or suspicion about Macron, which seems to be part of the way other countries see France and see his action that and then the sort of tenseness of the situation that has prompted all this all this criticism. Where do you think this trip fits into Macron's foreign policy vision generally in the current issue of Monaco magazine, the our new feature that debate takes a look at his record and whether or not it merits another go at being president and one of the participants in that debate gerardo the former UN and U.S. ambassador of France said that Macron and I quote has a grand vision of France's role on the world stage, but he has little experience of foreign policy, and that has led to initiatives that went nowhere like Beirut referring of course to Macron's sudden appearance in Lebanon after the Beirut port explosion, is this another one of those or do you think that Macron does perhaps know something the rest of us don't? You know, I think we can't possibly know whether this is going to be one of those. Maybe it will. I think it's quite difficult to fault him for trying. He did try and fail to sweet Donald Trump as well as other initiatives like the Beirut one, which came to nothing, and I suppose you have to situate his desire to try and talk to Putin in the context of an effort to try and find a dialog with Russia that dates right back to his election. If you remember shortly after he was elected in 2017, he invited Putin to Versailles and gave him really, there's a royal treatment there. And so far, that hasn't come to anything. In some ways, he is trying. He thinks that there may be a possibility of traction here. And I think you certainly can't say yes that it's failed. I think he's also learned if you look at this particular trip and how it was put together. It's really interesting to me to see how many phone calls you put in to different leaders, including those who might have been skeptical about what he's doing. I'm not talking about the Germans. I'm talking about the Baltic states. I'm talking about even Boris Johnson or certainly President Biden, who spoke to twice before going and once actually last night as well. This is an attempt to consult a coordinate. He's not doing this as a sort of rival initiative to upstage NATO or the Americans. I think he genuinely thinks maybe misguidedly that he might be able to make a difference, but I don't think he's not trumpeting any kind of triumphant result. Absolutely not yet. Just finally, every minute he is spending on this, of course, is amenity is not spending campaigning for reelection, which is something that is looming quite imminently. Does he calculate that this isn't going to shift any votes one way or the other? I mean, it's interesting just to note he hasn't actually declared that he is running for election yet. And in France, it's quite funny. And we were all waiting for him to do that. So he's not officially on the campaign. And in fact, his team made very clear that it was it wouldn't have been possible for him to go to Moscow at least not in their view as a candidate. He needed to go as president of France and that he's delayed that announcement because of it. As a sort of more broader point, I don't think that the French judge an election or vote according to foreign policy no, that's not true. On the other hand, it won't have hurt him to have been seen on all the French TV channels sitting at the table with Putin looking like a statesman who has a role although on the world stage. And sort of participating in diplomatic efforts to resolve this tension over the border with you with Ukraine. So I think that in the sense of projecting the image of someone who's standing up for France and defending French interests or European interests or even western interests, that certainly won't harm him. Sophie peder, thank you, as always for joining us. That was the Paris based author and journalist Sophie peder, and this is the briefing on monocle 24. Japan might be one of the world's biggest economies, a global leader in everything from architecture to food, and a country whose brands have flourished around the world, but it remains a bit of a mystery. Published by Thames and Hudson, the monocle book of Japan is the culmination of years of reporting across the country by monocle,.

Macron Beirut France Monaco magazine Putin President Biden gerardo Donald Trump Lebanon UN Baltic states Boris Johnson Russia U.S. NATO Sophie peder Moscow Ukraine Paris Japan
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:09 min | 4 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Towards 22 minutes past 1 million 300,000 Zürich 20 minutes approximately here in London and a new issue of Monica magazine hits newsstands and hopefully possibly doormats as well around the world today our editor in chief Andrew tuck. He's not the punchline to a joke. He's the boss, and he joins me in the studio right now, and Andrew, we gathered around this table exactly a week ago today and we talked a little bit. I think it was on the global list about the need for some levity in challenging times. But that's very much isn't it at the heart of the new February issue of Monaco magazine. So dives into the world of comedy. And comedy and cartooning and satire and why we need it and why it's good to have the right poke fun at your kind of leaders and your better supposedly in society. So it looks all of these people. But I think it also throws back a question to us in a way, which is oddly when we spoke to many comedians, we thought that maybe this notion of wokeness would be kind of curtailing what they felt they could say on stage. And actually, some people said, look, it's more just tastes of changing and no comedian wants to die on stage. So you use material that you think will just work and make people funny. But really that bothered about testing these boundaries that much. What was more interesting was it kind of threw it back on the readers and us as individuals, whether we've outsourced the right to be funny to professionals. And it's just us that's a bit more nervous about telling jokes and I don't know maybe that whole world has vanished a bit like going to big dinners and dinner parties and having a joke and all these things. We live in a slightly different age. So it's about our sense of humor and need to have a sense of humor. Well, that's really interesting. I know obviously we canvas quite a few in a very common serious people to tell us a joke is what demonstrate how they look on the lighter side of life. And actually, a lot of captains of industry types and people in very, very public facing figures were in some cases Andrew reluctant even to enter the discussion. I wonder that's perhaps because of a perception or a misperception that to be shown to be laughing in tough times. Insensitive or shows that might show that you didn't care about or people or you weren't serious about your work, but as an editor and also as someone who runs a big team of people, it's always important even in the darkest moments, isn't it? So retain it helps you retain a sense of perspective. Well, the funny thing is here in the UK and I don't think we see it much at the moment, but there used to be a kind of a tradition of humor being seen as a skill set in a way. So some of the best, for example, MPs questions questions rather, you would hear MPs towering with a prime minister. And there would be a lot of humor in the chamber and somehow people landed their points better slightly making a laugh run around the room. And I think that's the same whether you are in business, whether you're in politics, even now, somebody who can change the mood in a room by having a bit of levity by being funny, it's a good thing. So we want our diplomats and business leaders all earnest fools, but to be people with more depth to them, in a way. There's a playful twinkling energy talk. So I listen as I can tell you. And you're just very briefly the mag is out now. People must go and get a copy. It's about the power of humor with comedy. But there's the usual heft in there as well. It's not all it's not all glib and amazing what you've heard of obviously across multiple 24 this week is we have page and Chris chamak down in Kyiv. And actually the big lead piece, the big long read is by a Ukrainian writer Artem check, talking about his view on society, but also he's been a conscript. He went out to the front and Don bass a few years ago. He's a reserve is still and him talking about how you navigate every single day in Kyiv, trying to go to work, do your job when you know that there's this threat of war all the time. And there's just this tiny detail and then he says that him all his friends they all have a bag packed just in case something does happen and they have to flee with their families and head westwards towards the rest of Europe. Amazing stuff, light and shade. That's what we like, isn't it Andrew? That is Andrew tuck. That's the new issue of Monaco out right now. Get yourself a copy. Right now though, get ready for Fernando. He.

Andrew tuck Zürich Monica magazine Monaco magazine Andrew London Chris chamak Kyiv Don bass UK Artem Europe Monaco Fernando
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:43 min | 7 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"8 31 in Milan 7 31 here in London, with a globalist with me, Emma Nelson. Let's turn now to the chiefs. This week, Monaco's editorial director Tyler brule is joined by Marco petare, the CEO of the Italian luxury brand Gucci. On the brand centenary, they talk about everything from the enduring importance of brand Italy and we're embracing change is crucial to any brand strategy. Bizarrely started by talking about the brand's evolution and what kind of moments they're in right now. You know, I always start from the fact that nobody has a crystal ball. The thing that I had in my mind together was Alessandro and I joined Gucci back in 2015 is like I was seeing a little bit faster like kind of an old lady that is getting a little bit bought. And that was a kind of a detachment, especially from the young generation to this industry. Because if you go back 7 years ago, we were talking about millennia materiality, this business was not certainly fueled by them. There was certainly a big opportunity for a brain like ours, which has been up and down in the last 30 years. There were moments extremely booming and solid in the first year and then there was a moment where you almost went bankrupt where investors came in and then domenico and Tom and they were able to do the renaissance or Gucci at the end of the 90s beginning with the 2000. And then there was a kind of stabilization of the business and then we start again. I think this brand has this kind of characteristic of our inventing itself, very, very often. It's very different. If you want from other players in the industry, that will be more consistent throughout the years. But I think this could be either a weakness or as well as great opportunity because this kind of flexibility that Gucci has allows you to really think in a different way or invent yourself whenever you want. It doesn't mean necessarily going to be successful but certainly there's a possibility. And this is very much in the mind of the people working in Gucci. So back in 2015, with Alessandro we really wanted to make a kind of a big change a bit back on the static and on the business model, and we were successful. And we continue to avoid that. The evolution of the brand made Alessandro statically has been quite dramatic, always with references to the past, but always thinking about the presence. So the kind of contamination that you had the chance to have from the previous year from Tom from damn now from everything that has been done previously Gucci, we saw the reference to the iconic signs of et cetera revisited by lesandro usually in a very contemporary way to make sure that the present matters gave a new for me a new impulse to the story Gucci to the life of Gucci that will shape the next the next year for sure. We are always on our doors in this brand that we can not certainly be complacent. And I think the results are giving us a good support to continue to do in this way for the future. Marco can you just maybe take us back to this moment that you did identify and you talked about maybe the slightly older lady who was a little bit bored was looking for new areas of distraction and of course this was also maybe at the old lady finding her youth identifying youth as a market. And this is something which you've done incredibly well. Do you think of a core core consumer and in that youth space? So when you're sitting down with your CEO hat, which you're wearing every day and when you are looking at communication plans when you're of course looking at obviously where collections are going, et cetera, that there is this one core customer who might be 27 31, 19 in your mind. How do you look at it? Because the stewardship that you've had as a CEO is really remarkable within this space. It goes back to the moment in which we start with Alessandro, this journey. I think, our core customer is laugh about that. It's the human being. It's not a matter of age, it's not a matter of mindset. It's not a matter of gender circular preferences, geographical prominence. It's very much someone that is want to be himself or herself. I mean, in his own way, being enhancing the surface that is in everybody else. So that there is a why we were able to resonate to a different segment at the beginning, the ship was quite dramatic because we were able to intercept this trend of the young generation that was able to see in what Alessandro was doing going to authenticity and the passion that was behind that. But frankly, I need to be extremely genuine. We didn't really plan to address Gen Z or millennia when we started. We didn't want to do something that was not present in being extremely consistent with the value of seeing through the eyes of Alessandro and putting together what was happening outside in the streets. I decided to the other day was saying something that was for me extremely interesting to listen for me is that Alessandro starting point reintroduced the message of gently fluidity, especially in the first show in general in 15. And what he said, I didn't invent anything. I was just walking the streets and I was watching what was happening with people that I mean they don't want to be framed in any kind of rule or whatever they can buy men right to what is the main women who are independent from the gender they come from. It wasn't as satisfying was happening. It was not inventing anything. And the fact that he's able to match the values of the company together with what's happening outside is what in the past, all the marketing guru writes in books that were called positioning. This is coming in a more and more natural way. But it's exactly what happened in the mind of Alessandro and they decided to go in that direction aesthetically back in 2015. And it's continued to do so in the chain that is doing now with aria with the static of aria. It is reflecting exactly the same kind of thought. Not too much. Focus group, not too much asking consumer what they want. For the most part, consumer, they don't know exactly what is going to happen, what they want in the future. Something that you need to in a way propel yourself and try to intercept in advance to get this competitive advantage that of course encompass a little bit of risk for sure because I mean, you'll do something that maybe nobody has done in the past. But if the bat is good, the reward is very, very high. That was Monaco's editorial director Tyler brule in conversation with the CEO of Gucci Marco pizza. To hear the full interview head to Monaco dot com slash radio. Or if you'd like to read it in print, pick up a copy of the latest edition of Monaco magazine, which is on new stands.

Gucci Alessandro Tyler brule Emma Nelson Marco petare Italian luxury brand Gucci Monaco Tom domenico chiefs Milan Italy London Marco Focus group Gucci Marco pizza Monaco magazine
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:17 min | 11 months ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Andrew young and catherine garcia did team up and appear campaign event at together to support each other a couple of days ago. But unfortunately that's that catalyze and it reached from. Eric adams the front runner who was invited to the party. Who clearly felt threatened by that. Now eric adams is is black and he attacked both garcia and yang saying that both they're kind of gain up on him so to speak and in fact the ranked choice system itself amounts to racially targeted voter suppression now. He didn't substantiate that claim. To be completely clear. There is no evidence that there is any voter suppression going. On in fact several election officials spoke out extremely strongly against yang's assertion but this this dynamic that was created by ranked choice. Voting seems to have really riled adams up perhaps understandably yesterday on the final. Full day of campaigning. He called young a liar and a fraud. Quite strong language in the context of the was meant to be a democratic party primary anywhere. These people were to from same party so another effect of ranked choice voting is if we don't get an outright winner in the first round which is likely given the size of the field and how close the races. We might not know who won the race for quite a while. They may not be an official winner until the week of july twelfth. But we will know at least information before that. Did we win. Leave there henry ba- now words literally who's going to roll out the winner right at the end of this turgid process who is going to be the winner in one word yes. I believe adams that was three words. Henry adams that's henry. Reshare it in these maps as well and really love me. Speak view as ever on new york correspondent henry reassured in there joining us on the briefing finally on today's program. It's time for fashion and retail. Roundup on joined now by monica fashion expert. It says here jamie. Walters get off jamie good afternoon talk funny. Isn't it. well you. You'll be the thing to talk about and i guess we should start actually in milan. Shouldn't we men's fashion week. Just wrapped up. Give us a few of the main takeaways from your well trained i yes it finished with the georgia armani show which was kind of a fitting way to end because if we throw back to february twenty twenty. I'm amani was one of the designers who decided to close off his physical. Shaw close closed off to the audience. In only and basically he he streamed the show that was kind of as the pandemic was kind of keying off or there were murmurings of milan so now. He hosted a physical show to close milan fashion week so he was kind of this idea of like the opening up of physical shows again. He hosted in his garden. Which is what he used to doing. The ninety s and early two thousands so it was much more intimate than he shows had become recently. What was interesting in milan. Is this idea of you. Know what the future of i guess. Formal dressing untiring lou site. Because that's what milan is known for and there were some some interesting collections. That were like. There's a sense of occasion in terms of the clause in the the outfits but it comes through in in the kind of matching it's matching paces. Shirts and trousers really soft jackets. Even work where jackets there were some coins style. Jackets and trousers From i'm sorry we're talking about brands. Like zenya armani brands that are really known for the tailoring in their search. But they weren't that want former suits like we know it so someone send yeah. There was a lot of really soft really quite casual paces when you have like a shirt trousers combination in the same color. There's a sense of almost formality. But it's but it's quite casual as well and and this idea that you can make a lot of the different pieces in the collection in a really easy way rather than having like full looks if we then look to paris which is of course just about to kick off. I don't know where we see variations on that same theme. Do you think because there is again. This this inescapable feeling about reopening of everything. How will that manifest itself Paris do you think. I think one of the interesting things with power that paper looking to his is decided of fashion weeks will look why can and physical showers versus digital shows so impacts. I think that six designers that are doing physical shows so you still a very small minority and at the moment. It's the big houses deals doing doing fiscal. You're measuring physical. Show a lot and not showing son laurent's not doing not showing during fashion wait gucci not showing during fashion week so and then a lot of doing digital so. I think what's interesting. i mean. We have power men's this week and then and then i think the and then could true awake is in july so those designers where we think how the fiscal shows. How did they physical go. So i think it's through this process of figuring out do is a physical shore the way forward. I and i think the big brands at i think that's over the past year a hasn't been know what kind of come up with a better option. There's been some interesting in an increasingly convincing digital options. But i think no basically it seems as though physical for brands that have that money that wanna make a route cut through. That will be the solution and it's funny because they still have to measure the mary up the kind of the theater with maybe. There's an unease about people striking said about money that it's still quite small. Scale quite intimate. Because i guess people aren't really maybe ready for like the mega mega production value. Then used to being around people so they still go to kind of balance. Those things together and i would come to this in the second other designers are also looking at maybe not pretty checking mobile kind of piggybacking on other events to kind of make an impression which were two a second but if we just stay in paris for second Readers of monaco magazine looking back to the june issue. I will have read and seen some absolutely sumptuous photographs about Less samaritan or as those in the know refer to it on parade jamie legendary department store of course owned by lvmh an incredible scale super expensive refurbishment And it's reopening now finally. Yes this is a this really kind of confident reopening. That's an an symbolic value for fifth power and it sort of like the he's reopening Emmanuel macron was was there the kind of reopening the ribbon cussing. And it's this really kind of i guess it's a couple of things the idea that powered opening up to the again. It's also decide you know department store which is obviously these traditional rachel.

eric adams garcia Eric adams Emmanuel macron milan adams laurent yesterday february twenty twenty jamie six designers yang first round catherine garcia gucci new york today Henry adams one word two
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Services magazine offers so perhaps there's a new a new clarity. Certainly in the mind of the folks at clove magazine, you talk a little bit in the briefing notes about clove being a welcome look away from the US and a welcome back away from Europe, we can focus on journeys again, though for you next magazine pick, which is cool to migrant micro Odysseys, and I have to admit this is an extremely extremely intriguing choice. Not one I've come across before slightly smaller than a four format with a lot of use of kind of Flora's text heavy in some places, but then amazing expressive photography full bleed images. An illustration who are enough is this magazine about holy. Well, I'm quite late to the party on this as well. So it's a six part magazine, which is interesting that it sets lifespan. It's kind of what it says. So it's devoted to looking at my Gration. I think what it's trying to do is open up the ways we think of migration so it looking at migrations of peoples all of infrastructure data flows. Flora and fauna. So each issue has lightly different theme. The most recent one which is number five is looking at the world of micro and flow of very small things. It's still very new to me as well. But I just find it very intriguing magazine, it's taking a very serious topic. And I think it topic that could do with a little bit more nuance and could do with some more depth to other time when debates about migration at become very polarized. And I think quite shallow and superficial and aggressive. So I quit my what they're doing looking through. It's kind of serious. Highly researched writing it's academic. But I think has that nice trick of wearing it's not mere quite lightly as he says for beautiful they're already pops of this sort of flora coral running through, and then this kind of metallic goal to has this very well defined color. Palette? That's quite poppy and fun and brings you in. So I think it's clever design job of taking something that could be very of putting in heavy and just giving it that level of injury to make you want to dive in and make you want to engage with that topic. We do have enough time to delve into another title, which is the London review of books. Now. Can I give you a compassion herald? I've never read the London review of books, the New York review books older sibling on which this is based while they're both great cities. Yeah. Both great public relations. But won't draws you to the the unabashed text, heavy newspaper esque stylings under review of books. I think London review of books everyone at Tucson you on their to'real stuff is subscribed to it. It's just the most fantastic research results. So it's extremely long form journalism book reviews. So it takes a topic, and then just delve into essays about that book and engaging with its content, and it kind of shows what you can do if you support long form journalism, and if writers at the time to research, a topic and really get to grips with it. So you get these huge often, very stylishly written all the time. So some quite drawing, but that's kind of what I admire about it. But it's unafraid to take on topics which on the surface could be very dry. They're often quite nation often quite historical. But through the strength of the writing in just the kind of classical journalism that has gone into it really draws you in becomes very gripping. And you you get into topics sort of like about seventeenth century diarist working in. I don't know Dr just writing endlessly about wool prices. But because. The way it's being dealt with it becomes fascinating and my sincere. Thanks to all these travel only. We'll be back to join us in April for the next issue is then you suddenly hype side. Thank you very much. And sadly, that's always have time for today. Next week. We sit down with Spencer Bailey. The charismatic new editor in chief a book publisher fighting and don't forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or our sister podcast Monaco on design Xtra which is available. Each thursday. You could also pick up leaf through a copy of Monaco magazine at your leisure or peruse on library books or travel goods for bit of inspiration monocle on design was produced by definitely Condie's an edited by the ever patient Christie Evans on Josh Harnett, underplay us out its craft work with computer.

clove magazine London review of books services magazine Flora Monaco magazine US Europe Gration Spencer Bailey New York review editor in chief Josh Harnett Condie Tucson Christie Evans publisher
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

12:49 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Today. We dig deeper into what men were in the new publication from the team behind fantastic, man. And if we're talking about men's fashion, let's hear from the editor in chief of letty cats, a new magazine on the theme from FRANZ all that and more on this week's always stylish addition of the stack. From adobe house in London. This is the stack thirty minutes of print industry analysis with me Tom Edwards and joining me in studio this week the Stax producer Augusta per Shakoor fail. You look a little different. You look, oh, my slightly more Parisian than when I lost spoke to you could be me. I just came back from France doing some things from one twenty four that should be reviewed very soon. But of course, I like magazine soya's enjoyed my time. And I try to meet a couple of editors of our favorite magazines, including the editor in chief of lettuce cat. Well, let's so we're going to do a bit of a kind of a view around the prison stand little later, but let's start with with let tell us about this one. It's a new magazine as we were hearing. What's the what's the what's the offering? Well, it's interesting because I was talking to DIA tune chief goatee Bossasso, and he was telling me that, you know, even though FRANZ they do have some kind of man's fashion publications. But there was something missing though, something, you know, like a unique and very French kind of man's publication. So it's a BI annual tied to and they're quite embellishes with the first issue which was released late last year, nothing they had a print run of more than one hundred thousand copies, but he's been a tremendous success. And now they're working on issues too as well. I'm a big fan beautiful design. Fine and good. Here's a very interesting guy loves his vintage clothes. I have to say, well that might be a thing that keeps cropping up in this program. Let's hear little more from Goethe editor and chief of lettuce as says fake out with him in Paris earlier. First of all, congratulations, felit cats, a wonderful men's title. How was the reaction? I mean, the magazine believe is out of the new stands. You're preparing issue to was the reaction you expect it from the from Frenchman. We didn't expect the Russian we got and it was really positive, and we got a lot of people saying, I'm really happy. Because what I seen your magazine I wanted and I wanna buy I wanted to look like the guy your shooting. So that was the goal. We didn't want to be to fashion into something. That's not real bowl. And we want to give the envy to everyone to improve their style into move award in maybe to consumer it be better, and it'll be less. So that's the key message is everybody can dress. Well, and it's not a question of money or budget. So we tried to give some keys to the people who are not. Visionaries? They are not really interested in fashion, and we try to take the hands and into say it's not that it's for you too. And it's for your happiness. And if you feel good in your clothes, you can fit more free new life. I think it's kind of important in clothing is. It's a culture is not only a nego thing or is not something just about looking good. It's about feeding good into Koreans with your life and your lifestyle. So it's to me super important in always say everybody on earth get dressed every morning. So I think they something assurance superstrong in the clothing. And I try in litigate with Mark Mark Boucher to put some intelligence in culture in the clothing, and if he's very fresh, I'm a reader of men's titles, and I can see not just a copy and paste of the latest collections. There is kind of sounds like there's also intellectual part of clothing you explain where they come from was that what you wanted to achieve as well. Exactly. The thing is when you when you want. Sweater at you. Call in the sweater. What I try to do to to say that this winter has history as a legitimate e e comes from some things some somewhere, and if you buy these a good guy producing somewhere in the world, yet just to culture, and every piece of clothing and to make people understand that when you wear something you bring a message. You have a message on new and some people don't know this novel because it's not their job. My job is to explain to people. What is the message carrying with them and not imposing style. I don't want to say this is good style. And this is good looking and just giving some keys to understand what the message bring morning when you get dress and go a clear can see very interested in clothes and very knowledgeable about it. What was your experience before let the cat used to be a professional musician double bass player at capital the truth. And then I spent a year at the varies, and that was my professional life and really. Job and I left everything by passion for clothing in vintage clothing. And I used to be the vintage specialist at Raffarin. They hired me to take care of the vintage in the original flagship garage, and I loved it. And a lot of things with Doug Meyer, the principal vintage by in the world for raff, and I learned a lot when I've been collecting vintage for almost twenty years that it was I was ten eleven with media. And I love these always because my father is not collector and appliqued is collecting antiques is always taught me like if you look at an object. You have to understand how it's made when it was made in what fabric it was made. And I wanted to put this way of thinking into clothing because it was my passion. So everytime. I see a movie or something. Oh, these shirt is from the sixties is been this category of people at that time to say these kind of things, you know, and and more and more passionate about it. You're in the middle. You're preparing to the moment. Thanks for for. For doing this interview, by the way, because I know you're busy. Are you? How are you feeling issue? One was a success in terms of CEOs as well. The magazine has a high circulation or feeling relaxed. You confident about issue to house the mood super confidence excited, I'm super confident because I'm surrounded with amazing people. Of course, I'm thinking about Frank dron about my about Loic, Gino mass all my crew, you know, I mean the people are working with their saga where they do. No one stressed because we all interest. You know? So we're providing the looks and the ideas for two of months now with Martin Louis for the looks. We can know what we want and we're looking for them right now. And I know even though I cannot find in contemporary collection. I can find it in my life, and I do the mixed I want so that's the key. But we try to put as much as possible of new close because I don't want it to be a vintage catalog, and so people cannot buy anything in it. So that's not the point. And I'm really excited on this leeway shooting this weekend. It's like my. Cindy, you know, it's the moment we do the looks on the floor with the before that I really love. And finally that we discussed briefly, I like the fact that you say, this is a magazine for Frenchman 'cause I was going to ask what about the English version? But but I like that you once the French DNA be the magazine defying that's still the case. And that's very important for you. I think today everybody talks English Instagram. Everybody has the same parliament because of our BNB. Everybody is dressed the same in sale in Tokyo in Paris and Milan. And I'm a bit sad about it. And I hope I'm going to, you know, push the French style and the fresh lifestyle to in a positive way because I'm not against the other culture. Of course, I am I want to show the world that French has something to say, and that's why I hope we never translate the ticket magazine because I want to talk to the French people, and I want to take too old French people everywhere, not original and other people, but everyone, and if I do it in English if we do it in English we're going to at the end talk to. Fashion guys, New York fashion guys to kill the fashion guys in London. And that's not what I want. So I want to first of all to the French. And there's a lot of French not speaking English so mating lease that would be, you know, putting them aside, and I don't want. So it's not a national leafing is the patriotic theme, you know, at the different nationalities is the hate of the others and the protein is the love of our country. So I love my country. And I love the culture that goes with it. And I just want to do a magazine that looks as French. The way I from my country, even in the food of lifestyle of the French or something to say, and I'm really happy that we did a French magazine that was box from etiquette issue should be out on newsstands soon. And you able to read a little more about letting it in next month's Monaco magazine, which has sort of French focused finance just that. Clearly, you agree that they've managed to fill that niche. That was then it's funny how the best magazines perfectly fill niche that maybe you didn't even really realize there. We've had that conversation before. But they just seem to know. I don't know they got the balance. Just right, exactly. And again, you can see the like fashion. They're very interested is not just kind of a press release of the latest collections. There's some thinking behind and I think that's what the best fashion publications do including upcoming one. Well, exactly stay squarely in world finally talked about that. And I think that's a relenting point about where the passion for the subject really comes through. Not certainly the case for fantastic manner. Long favorite the stack the fantastic man team just published a book investigating male dressing habits. What men were is name? It was edited by Eliot Howarth and hit Yonkers unfair. You spoke to Ellie we're going to hear from him in just a second. But I guess regulates this year will be. Millea with sort of fantastic man, take maybe not what men were and you really are very much invested in this because you're one of the men features and is your love shots, which qualified you. I guess I think it's a wonderful to series. They did in the website called questionnaire where they spoke to different men from different kind of from deejays to journalists saying, and they have to choose one item of clothing and explain why it's so important in their lives and became such a success. They decided to compile like fifty of those questionnaires and make these interesting book. So even though it was telling me in it's as more format, but there's so much to read about it. And yes, you can have Charlie faith in his Hawaiian shirts. And he has indeed you can hear me talking about my short shorts, and I've been immortalized your shows entail form exactly available bronze and presumably relatively limited edition, of course. But go there very quickly very very highly sought after object. Let's have. From Elliot what what kind of things did you get into him talking about how the power of the fantastic man brand to spread of a wider? We talking about the idea again being really passionate about covering men's fashion. Seems did you get into the main thing here which similar to let the cat is the study of clothing as well as just well, there's no pictures in the book woman woman wear, so it's very much kind of if you like to read about close Wyman where certain pieces and even for some inspiration. I totally recounted. I think we started about three years ago as an online feature way are predominantly a print publication. However, we wanted something to do a bit more regularly some online, and we were trying to think of a format that would interest us enough to continue doing it on a regular basis. And we settled upon this idea of clothing question as being magazine that focuses predominantly on men's clothing style seemed to. Make sense, and we sat down and Saddam and Hamid list of questions, which require full mall, quite precise. Details of questions that we would send two men to fill out. That's basically what started and it grew and snowballed and became a kind of very regular series. We adapted it from being filled in Email questionnaire into something that we'd like to face to face now. So it's kind of morphed and grown. And we realized we have a fifty in the summer and decided to do something special to commemorate that in a way because that's something that I miss especially the men's fashion, president of discussion about clothing instead of just like cool. This is the new suit draft wear does new trainers. Whatever fantastic. Does that very well. You know, you kind of

being magazine editor in chief adobe London DIA Paris France FRANZ Mark Mark Boucher Tom Edwards goatee Bossasso letty producer Monaco magazine editor Raffarin Wyman president Martin Louis
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Find one no matter where you are. He says there's something amazingly grounding and healing about being in a church, even during wartime amid to the horrors of conflict churches, have always been places of repose. She tells me that during the nineteen Ninety-four massacres in Rwanda, people hidden churches, seeking sanctuary from the genocide only to be murdered. In two thousand sixteen the country's Catholic church apologized for its role in the violence. Did Giovanni is reporting has been formed by her experiences in churches during the reign of Saddam Hussein. She spent time worshipping alongside Syrian Christians in Mozell who were praying to stop the US invasion of Iraq. Traditionally Christians in the Middle East side with the caters like Hussein who offer them protection, she says when the dictators full it often leaves them vulnerable in recent years, she's spoken to Syrian Christians who support Al Assad for the same reason, New York's hectic pace has spawned avast and sophisticated relaxation industry and industry that the Giovanni is only too happy to ignore. People. Spend thousands of dollars to go to spas in retreats. She tells me, but the every corner of the church or temple or mosque will you can find the same thing. Very simply her. Attachment to church is is less about religious observance and more about being able to always find a home, even a strange land. No matter how alone you are you go to church, and you feel that the other people. There are also looking for something. She tells me that quest is an is being the quest. My whole life. Thank you very much. Indeed, Henry daylight is issue of Monaco magazine is out on all good news stands this week. Let's continue with a look at some newspapers unsurprisingly as we heard from Lawrence earlier. I guess Brexit is front and center. Making sense of it for us Markle's page Reynolds is hair is Brexit. The only story in town in the British papers, at least in the British papers. It certainly is the lead story on pretty much all the papers. I've got with me in the studio right now that all the coverage is almost quite unanimous for once. And they're just said that may is pretty much in for an almighty defeats. The question isn't whether she's gonna lose the phone. It's how much she's going to lose that vote by most of the papers have got that figure about two hundred votes. Anil of them relating to war next may and also what next for the labor party. So you know, how soon is Corbin going to potentially cool this vote of confidence in the government. The times are putting on her sort of even vote pitch yesterday. We're only half the conservative party members turned up one MP present said her last-ditch attempts were competent, but not transformative. And they've said that missus Michael is about one hundred eighty votes. There's a slightly more dramatic turn from the telegraph out of allies out of time. And they lied initially. And they say Theresa May will be expected to stand down. If she loses the vote by a heavy margin. And they've said the Coburn would cool the no confidence vote in a matter of minutes and they're also predictions. They'll be further resignation from maize party before this evening. So what a lot of drama coin from the telegraph on their financial times. Again, they're saying that she's definitely going to lose by about one hundred votes, but Downing Street preparing for about two hundred and also said that may is going to be under a lot of pressure to promise Britain will leave without a deal and to extend the article fifty divorce process, I'm if you open the first page, the third page also has a lot of coverage devoted to the. Brexit turmoil. And there's quite nice infra graphic that sort of details how NPS are expected to vote sort of pitting best and worst case scenarios against each other. Quite an interesting angle from the international New York Times, they have liberal column on a front page that said in Britain, and US a shed paralysis. I'm so they're making parallels between the US government shutdown and the and the Brexit. This Brexit meaningful happening at the same time. And it is really interesting. They say rarely have British and American politics in quite so synchronized so three years after the victory is Brexit and Trump we see a quote to governments paralyzed to populous project stalled and two venerable democracies in crisis, and they sort of go through all the.

Brexit Catholic church Giovanni US Saddam Hussein Reynolds Corbin Rwanda Britain New York Times Middle East Al Assad Coburn Mozell labor party Lawrence Iraq Anil Henry Monaco magazine
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"And if he didn't he's initiated this sort of consultation, which on one hand, you can kind of understand because precise that difficult cutting identifying who the key stakeholders other he could or his government could actually engage with what are his critics saying he should have done differently. If at all because one of his criticisms is that he's been a little too lofty. He's not engaged with a public. The let's not forget not that long ago. Voted him rather enthusiast ikley into office. What's the suggestion that he should be doing differently? Do the opposition have to suggest something else? And they just have to Chrissy to get some critics, and that's all well, let's that's what's happening anyway. So what what they say is that you know, is that what you should have done before. Which is of course, not helpful. But what she should should you. Now, they said that he should have listened to you the people earlier than you should be more respectful to the people a few days ago your ear against president micro against that. Frankly, Paul lost the sense of effort, which of course, didn't go. Well, so they're saying what you should do is try to be some try to be so not so scornful anymore to the French people. But I don't say that's what you should. Absolutely. That's the solution. I think you should think about there's no I mean, the debate is not as intelligent as a start. I guess at the moment. It's more the French people the year of s than the others were trying to say something to the president the prime is as you said, there's no no career directory in a way in this yellow. Vast movement some say, they are presentative. But when they just put the head above the parapet they just being taken off because they did universe. Don't want to have representatives. Meaning that the message and the way the thing that they would want the president. Did you do doesn't basically reach the executive? So it's a bit of a mishmash of everything position is in disarray is no official position. You don't know if it's the right the left or the centre riders the opposition to the to the president that doesn't help. Because of course, when you're your position the best thing to do is not to be precise. So you should you have as much as you can and the universe movement. Even have a, you know, a voice to say what they want. So at the moment America McCall is evolving in void in a way and trying to do the best c-can, and it's very very important moment for for him. Because if he fails in that he might be used the word very in very interesting. He might. Impotant meaning that he could be an impotent president and not being able to do anything much for the rest of his mandate. So it's very very important and doesn't really help that there's no clear feedback coming from the population woman frustating stuff Marie? Thanks for joining us. That was our friend Mary beyond joining us hair on the briefing. Now, let's take a look at what else is making news today. Canadian national convicted of attempting to smuggle drugs out of China has been sentenced to death Robert Lloyd Schellenberg received the sentence following an appeal against his previous fifteen year. Custodial term observers have linked the increased penalty to going dispute between China and Canada relations have been frosty since Canadian authorities arrested Mang when Joo chief financial officer at telecom giant Huawei last month. Meanwhile, a Saudi Arabian teenager who took to social media to plead her case for asylum from Bangkok hotel room last week has arrived in Canada Ralph half Mohammed Al Cunanan fed fled Saudi Arabia barricading himself in our toll room in Thailand. Following a ruling from the U N High Commissioner of refugees, she's been granted refugee status and with the United States government shutdown in its twenty four day. US President Donald Trump was forced to order in for -ception, welcoming the national college football champions, the president ordered more than three hundred burgers as well as pizza and fries. Is blaming the partial government shutdown for the lack of catering staff at the White House. This is the briefing a monocle twenty four. The new February edition of Monaco magazine is out of this very week. It's how fit lean.

president Chrissy White House US Monaco magazine Donald Trump Saudi Arabia Paul Huawei Canada Mohammed Al Cunanan China executive U N High America McCall Marie Robert Lloyd Schellenberg official Mary Commissioner
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:15 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Josh the drama just finished with one of the report, you'll find in the latest issue of Monaco magazine, which is out on newsstands. This week. Continuing. Now with some printed information on the page before us we have eluding in the studio with today's newspapers Bill what have you found high? Bam was dying in the financial times on the opinion pages. An interesting take not necessarily agree with but worth discussing is by both gang moon. Chow who see me as chairman, and it says, the e you should kill off a Brexit reversal. Sipho stayed out of the UK's internal compilations. I've Brexit for good reason. It's easier for continental Europe. To learn the rules of cricket than to make sense of what the hell is going on in the house of Commons. But he's suggesting they actively interfere by taking the the kind of idea of Brexit reversal completely off the table saying maze tactic Saif off to by remain as and Brexit is into backing head Dale, but it's not really working. So what he's saying is if MP's impose no Dale than e you take on second if as opposed. No, Dale, and the EU takes no Brexit off the table, then you're can have to have a deal. So what you're saying? Is if they say, right. You can't have any extra time, and there's no extension, and when you can't renegotiate the only option is to take the deal, otherwise we're going to descend into chaos, and nobody wants that to happen. Yeah. I'm not sure that he's really fooled through perhaps he's a. Renting this really to try and stir the politics and get a female readers bit of attention, perhaps. But it doesn't sound like a very sensible idea given the criticism that's going to come from the other side of the Brexit debate the levers saying, the E U is religious too big bunch of bullies not going to let us leaving in good faith. I think that would surely just I it would make those accusations even worse yet. But what he's saying is that what may that was in this country? But as far as the EU is concerned of forced the hand when people here upset by that because you know, they have to they've kind of got self-preservation in mind, and and if kind of this just goes on and on, and that's a second referendum. And then the remain is due way. Not ready when you know, it's just going to kind of blur the line more and go on and on no shortage of takes on that Bill. Let's turn to some of the other pages in the paper. What else have you got? This is a fun story from the New York Times. But it's about Europe the making of Italy's popular strongman at lots of Natella story about matai, Sal. Vini we how we know he likes to spread Mattel Arana's bread. He winds down with a glass of Barral. I am and he drinks Moretti bay. We know all of this because he posts literally everything on social media and his parents of a carefully studied and remarkably successful strategy to sell his common mom brand in an empty elitist era. So this is. Mataz any kind of making the most of his Facebook page and his Instagram and his Twitter apparently the right of engagement on his Facebook page is higher than tunneled Trump's which is kind of incredible. And it's OPA of this thing to make him look like an everyday guy, you know, he poses topless, and he's got like, he's not the, you know, the skinniest or the most muscular managed, so he's like every day. You know, this is saying he's got a little bit of extra flab around unsurprising. If he's got an attempt. I've got to say those those Facebook metrics of engagement are probably just as questionable as pairing Parola with Natella. But I I digress. Bill. Unfortunately, we are out of time on that. So if you're still curious about Matteo Silva's Natella habits, you'll have to visit his Facebook page there that is an not necessarily instruction or a recommendation from me ability. Thank you for taking us through today's newspapers here on the briefing that brings us to the end of today's program. It was produced by Malcolm sippy, and researched by your linga phone at Nikola niece of studio manager was Kenya. Scarlet the briefing returns at the very same time tomorrow do join Juliette foster for today's edition of the Dory house. He's going live at eighteen hundred here in London thirty nine hundred if you're listening in New York City, I'm Ben Ryland. That's the briefing.

Facebook Dale Brexit EU Europe Bam Matteo Silva Josh Monaco magazine Juliette foster New York Times Mattel Arana Moretti bay Dory house chairman Chow Sipho UK Malcolm sippy
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Just after nineteen minutes past the Albany edition of Monaco magazine is out this week. It's our fit lean and shop special filled with speedy deliveries. Very fast running retail and everything you need to be primed charged up and ready for action in twenty nine nineteen. It's also where you'll find Monaco's executive editor Josh venit, performing a hospitality health check. Specifically. He's wondering whether it's checkout time for hotel gimmicks. I'm staying at the Grand Hotel. It's the most expensive hotel in Berlin yet all the best people. Stay. The best hotels can ensconce us in the neighborhood. They can winus they can diners, and they can even take lighters. They can tell us tall tales insurance sports. Unfortunately, the overblown millennial minded Martin pump for and some new openings peddling, a cosmos, garish gimmicks to transport somewhere father entirely. A recent press release for hotel at mentioned, the kind of increasingly automated teas that our editors of cult recently days into the potential to sponsor a V T quarter bottles sparkly hot pants intimacy kit, so interesting, they named him twice in the excitement and tight available in black or caramel, even an adjustable emergency engagement ring on offer, though, if anyone proposes to your hair, I'd suggest you run this particularly short on irony. Promotion also noted that the hotels itself dubbed at trendy vending options would include alcohol which was planned for the coming weeks. Right. We'll need a snifter after all that hotels can change communities that these trivialities undermine the mission. But I'm being unkind apps PO faced even perhaps it's all just a bit of fun. The broader point is the everything within a hotel is a sentence in a wider story. An artfully node light switch rather than a cheap. Plastic one sheds lights on the designers attention to detail and investment in the. Experience. The fact that the in room crockery comes from a local maker is in short a commitment to the community and an on premises. Shop can showcase hotels values for all his fans, fullness sponsoring a B is a harmless diversion that said missing.

Grand Hotel Josh venit Monaco magazine Monaco Albany executive editor Berlin Martin nineteen minutes
"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

10:07 min | 3 years ago

"monaco magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Above sea level is a beautiful journal edited by Amy Hartley that has as its founding mission starting different conversation around wine, Amy from whom you might have heard or more accurately read in the pages of Monaco magazine. Join me a little earlier to tell me more about it. I think traditionally wine journalism has has been quite mild pick its focus very much on elaborate flavor. Descriptors and details about soil and rocks and things that people find quite difficult to engage with unless you're ready have a certain amount of kind of finis knowledge, obviously for me wine is very much about people and place and the relationship between the two, and and I felt that wind journalism could could really do with a bit of a refresh not taking away from any of the authenticity of of wine itself. But just offering fresh perspective, which is highly I've managed to do with about Seattle nothing. I've myself folded into the trap of thinking those a traditional way of ROY. Writing about one talking about wine all considering y journalism. But I think that even the things that we think are the traditional approach is themselves not that award. It's a storied history. But actually, it's relatively recently written d-, do you think one of the key risks? Whether it's about one or one is that people just make sumptious that don't borne out by by fact, is that a problem is is it a whole sector a theme that for whatever reason draws people into jumping to inaccurate conclusions about things, I think this kind of accuracy versus inaccuracy is is really interesting in it self because taste is so subjective my role as a as a wind journalist icy is is not to tell people what I think they should like it's inspire them to drink better. And and to experiment, and and I think experimenting is something that people traditionally find quite difficult with wine because they feel like they need to know about it before they can really get into it. And I think traditional wine journalism is. Interesting and it self because really flavor descriptors and point system, which white spectator and Cantabria around and Robert Parker, who's a very big wine critic, they really only have happened since sixties and seventies. So the way that we've kind of talked about wine for this period of time. As is really quite limited the full that we can look back to literature. We about to poetry and people waxing lyrical about the amazing aspects of wine and using metaphors and it being decadent and then even reaching back to ancient Greece Socrates used to prescribe different styles of wine for different ailments. I think it's it's really fascinating to see actually the wind journalism now is almost more limiting than it's ever been. I do think in the last few years has been changing with publications like raw alchemy, and Pat, and I think that people are are more receptive to to hearing about wine and people playing around a little bit more with with how. How that's done and tell me about the approach because I think leafing through these volumes. We have here of pages where there are some bottles of wine, but there's a lot of just beautiful photography assoc- beautifully designed pace at a quick browser. You could be forgiven for not even being able to immediately divine that it is a wine magazine how committed where you to bringing sense. You must have a great love for independent publishing and for some of those principles that may be defined some of your phone favorite magazines of balancing passion for wine with a passion for for print as well. Is it a question of marrying this to they natural bedfellows? I I definitely think they are in winus such a tactile thing for me. It's it's an experience, you know, when I meet winemakers. I I try and have dinner with them. I sit with their my awesome questions. I I learned something more than just about the wine making. And that's what makes it really interesting, but above sea level. Also looks at wine in context of food and design and people in place, and and really I think that's where I'm personally interested in, and I really hope kind of resonates with readers because working with people like stack magazine on this issue was really exciting for me because the magazine went out to three thousand eight hundred people that might have pick up wine magazine, and I very specifically have chosen talk about wine in the context of other things and use it more as thread than a kind of focus, and I think an hope that that means that wine kind of resonates with more people as a result. I wonder what about the pressure that you put on yourself? Do you have a sort of a selection of cuttings or maps of places you want to go that is growing exponentially? Because I guess you could probably real off fifty practically additions of the magazine that you'd like to start commissioning and reporting yourself tomorrow. What's that process? Like, it is fun. But it's kind of restrictive in some ways, or do you just think look, it's a it's the whole gloat tension look at so once defer time, it's it's interesting because I'm changing every single time. I make an issue. So my learnings from each you are also valuable in terms of, you know, why even started to do this in the first place, and I think when I choose an issue or a country or region, it's because I feel like there's this really lovely balanced between relevance for that moment. The timing is right. But also the sense of timelessness. So for me, California was my first issue. I I lived in San Francisco for two years ten years ago. And it's a bit of a love letter to California because it was where my love of wind began. And it's you know, as a place, it's very four thinking, it's very experimental. And and it really shaped the way that I think about wine today, and then Portugal was interesting for me and very different because I hadn't spent much time there. But I knew that Portugal is becoming creatively. Very interesting. And I thought that there must be a different story to tell about the wines weren't just rooted in their fortified which were poor Madeira. I spent a long time going back and forth in Portugal, and and trying to find these people and find out why they were making this kind of freshest olive wine, and how they're working with really really old vineyards and going back to kind of pre industrialization and the way that they're working fields and working very gently with our wines is is something that is really interesting to me and the Portuguese are very quiet. Very humble people. You know, you can go to America and somebody can chat forever about what makes them excited. You have to spend time with the Portuguese. To understand them. And and for them to trust you and for them to share things with you. And and it really forced me to slow down. And take my time. I didn't really have another choice in how to make this issue. I find that really in itself and really supporting those winemakers, and and photographers and writers and talent, you know, that that is one of the most exciting things for me is how can I kind of push those people out there into the spotlight. So they got a bit more kind of celebration for they're doing just took a little bit about the future little bear. And I wanted from each about the learnings for inch issue in this thing. I wonder they against generals slightly they editorial encourage they journalistic in character, although about storytelling or they lessons about hard world of the business of of independent publishing. I imagine it's probably a bit of everything. Have you been surprised about how much of a business hat you've had to wear much the time is that balance K is it what you foresaw the balance has definitely not. Doesn't feel okay right now. If if I'm really honest about it, and I do think you have to be honest about that when you're running independent magazines. There is a lot of romanticism around an lot of hard work that goes into it, which I guess is why in part people love them. I think I have to become more focused with feature issues in terms of funding and making it a little bit more straightforward that doesn't mean they come out more frequently. It just means I'm able to kind of balanced doing the magazine with with areas of my work life. And I think, you know, I often tell people that like, oh, wow. You work on this predominately by yourself. And as I he asked that I say. But it's interesting because as you mentioned, you know, their times where it's has me on my knees. And then there are other times where I'm so excited about it. And I feel like I have something to say and to share with people, and and it needs to come out. It's like a vehicle for that. I think I have a few different countries. I'm exploring at the moment. I think some places I'm really interested in is Greece. I think Greece, you know, it's not near a peaceful country steeped in a lot of wine history, and culture, obviously commercially who's had many problems too. But there's a kind of third generation of winemakers who are coming through. And and ca- tightly redefining what we would perceive Greek wine to be so that those types of countries are really interesting to me and not to dimissed even dismiss places like England. We had our best ever vintage last year, the English Weinstein. Is is growing all the time. And I'm quite intrigued to see what happens kind of post Brexit. Well, I think Richard winemakers amongst probably British. Everybody's aware and say what the post Brexit. Let's become session for another day. Amy, so great to speak. If this has picked the interest of our listeners, how should they find out more and support above sea level? So I do distribute myself madly. It is available internationally in London. You can pick it up and places like my culture, but you can also order it directly from my website as well. I mean, it's not so delighted to chat with you. And I do hope wherever you alight next that you'll come back and tell us about it. I would love to thanks so much.

wine magazine Amy Hartley Greece Portugal California Seattle Monaco magazine stack magazine Robert Parker London Cantabria Pat winus America England Richard San Francisco ten years two years