34 Burst results for "Moma"

Patients at Colorado Springs Clinic Will Have To Get Revaccinated

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Patients at Colorado Springs Clinic Will Have To Get Revaccinated

"Health. Those who got a covert vaccine to the Colorado Springs clinic will have to be re vaccinated. State health officials say they're unable to verify if the vaccines Minister that the doctor MoMA Health and Wellness Clinic were viable. That's because the provider failed to provide proper documentation of temperature storage, state health officials say through an investigation with the CDC, the unidentified sub standard vaccine handling and storage, vaccine preparation, mass clinic operations and even poor recordkeeping

Colorado Springs Clinic Moma Health And Wellness Clini CDC
Allen Klein: A Jollytologist Shares His Wisdom on Finding Wonder

The Healing Place Podcast

02:13 min | 4 months ago

Allen Klein: A Jollytologist Shares His Wisdom on Finding Wonder

"I'm your host terry. Well brock and so super thrilled to have with me today. Alan klein and alan is an author speaker. And got this word right now. John lee tala gist. So welcome allen. Well thank you for being here I mean me being there are whatever wherever we are in cyberspace right now so thank you. Thank you for having me on your Podcast oh absolutely. I'm so happy we connected Yes it's it's going to be a soul connection. Because i am not person that walks outside and if i see the lady bug crawling i always stop and say oh. Hi little buddy and just appreciate that moment. Yeah i love ladybugs. I also when i grew up I grew up in new york city and we will go to the country. The catskills every summer. And there would be firefly's i don't know if you've seen firefly's in person but oh my god it was like little flashlights. Flying around the air and they were so amazing. And i remember as a kid i wanted to save it so i put some in a jar and they took it into my room and went to bed and watch right before you know watching them. Go around of course by by the morning. They're all dead. I got my all moma deadliest Not so great for the firefly but right. We learned as kids we. I grew up in cincinnati. And so it was. We were on the outskirts of the city. And so but we have firefly's but when my uncle who lived out in the country with his cows and we would sit out there and i was amazed because all of his woods. It was so dark out there in the country without the city lights. It would just look like a. Yeah like just a a light. Show going on with these with these firefly's but we learned when we put them in jars retook a knife and we poke holes in the top on it and then they were able to breathe and instill lived so

Alan Klein John Lee Tala Gist Brock Terry Alan Allen New York City Cincinnati
League of Legends Patch 11.7: What's New?

Four Wards Podcast

01:50 min | 4 months ago

League of Legends Patch 11.7: What's New?

"With that. Let's get to our main topic for tonight. Which is patch eleven point seven. We're going to highlight some of our changes that we want to call out here. I'm going to kick it off. I usually throw it to one of you guys. I'm changed i'm going. I deal with it. My favorite change this by far. Is that a mugabe buffed. And he got buffed in a way that is actually relevant to letting him be a champion again. Because momo got a second cooldown removed off of all ranks of his tantrum his e that is enormous enormous clear. Speed improvement his e refunds. Half a second every time he gets hit by anything. So reducing that base down creates this like feedback loop where you just get more and more tantrums. While you're clearing. That is way more of a clear speed buff than it seems just knocking second off one ability because of how that works with the refunds the sooner it cools down the sooner you can refund start the refunds again on your next casting. You just keep getting more casts. Yeah i recognize that that some single mothers. that's actually good strong. that's specifically the reason. This is such a big deal as this significantly buffs his clear speed. It does almost nothing to his ability to fight champions. Yeah it's pretty scary though. 'cause having a move in the game with that huge. Aol stein is just. It's a little scary for team fights for sure. And i'm highlighting him here because i think our listeners should be playing a moma if you get in the jungle. He's easy to play. He's extremely effective. And just got a massive buff.

Momo Mugabe Stein AOL
Rare Van Gogh masterpiece sells for $15.4 million in Paris

Phil's Gang

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Rare Van Gogh masterpiece sells for $15.4 million in Paris

"Vincent Van Gogh, was sold at auction Thursday by south of Bees in Paris for $15.4 million Sale of street scene in MoMA to was highly anticipated as it was one of the few paintings by the Dutch Impressionist master to still have been in private hands. Here's an analysis a town hall that calm. I'm Keith Peters in Washington.

Vincent Van Gogh Moma Paris Keith Peters Washington
Lady Gaga and Jennifer Lopez deliver moving inauguration performances

TIME's Top Stories

03:20 min | 6 months ago

Lady Gaga and Jennifer Lopez deliver moving inauguration performances

"Inauguration musical performances are tricky but lady gaga jennifer lopez and garth brooks. Did exactly what we needed them to do. By stephanie's jaric when lady gaga the first performer. At the inauguration of president joe biden and vice president kamala harris step toward the podium to sing everything about her that tropical red poof of skirt. The colossal golden dove perched on her shoulder that milk made from moma hairdo. Was celebratory announcement. Welcome to the modern age. Though the road ahead is rocky we no longer need to live and dread gaga living completely in the moment had arrived to point the way toward the future inauguration musical performances in their need to balance solemnity with jubilation are always tricky propositions but the biden harris performances from gaga. Lo and garth brooks performers from disparate backgrounds and different disciplines struck a note. Unlike any we've previously heard let's call it a sigh of relief building to a cheer of exaltation. even the cloud strewn blue of the washington sky seemed key to the moment and to this particular event taking place in a spot where just two weeks ago a bunch of clumsy if dangerous insurrectionist took a run at democracy and failed jennifer lopez was the centerpiece performer. But let's talk about her. First emerging all white chanel. She projected confidence civil woman who has worked her way to the top of her game. White everyone likes to note is one of the colors of the suffragettes. But it's also the color of working people in machine washable cotton and the color of luxury and dry clean only silken wall in this remarkable. Hi lo j. lo outfit replete with snowy gibault possibly a not to the garb of our founding fathers lopez. Saying a remarkable song. This land is your land. It was written in nineteen forty by. Woody guthrie allegedly and shabby hotel room just outside of times square. Not on the six but in close enough for lopez to sing this song a protest anthem but also an irrefutable declaration of belonging with so much conviction and boldness is to bring guthrie's intent and his dream full circle. This is in america. He couldn't have imagined. So terrible in some ways yet so radiant and others here is where woody and his work shirt meets a dazzling latina artists from the bronx who represents not just in terms of any monetary success but in her sheer awesomeness. Everything that an individual is free to strive toward in america. Lopez's version of the song wasn't a reclamation. You can't reclaim something that already belongs to you. And as she segue into the song we sometimes think of as our second national anthem. America the beautiful she reaffirmed that sense of ownership and pride and a breakout moment she shouted out in spanish words that translate into one nation under god indivisible with liberty and justice for all. But you didn't need to speak the language to know what she meant.

Garth Brooks Jaric Jennifer Lopez Biden Harris Gaga Kamala Harris Joe Biden Lady Gaga Snowy Gibault Stephanie Lopez LO Woody Guthrie Washington Times Square America Guthrie Woody Bronx
The 7 mindsets of connectors

Industry Thought Leader Podcast

06:00 min | 8 months ago

The 7 mindsets of connectors

"To another episode of industry thought leader podcast brought to you by industry thought leader kademi stand out the heard and influence on your highest and recross also known as the podcasting quyen. Now my guest today says the simple truth. Is this connectors find. Great success in life. And if you don't realize it yet we are now living in the age of networking. So do you want to increase your influence and impact by becoming a better connector but join no way to start with. Today's guest is going to show you. How join me on the show. Today is michelle letterman. Michelle is an accomplished speaker trainer. Approach an author of four books including the internationally recognized the levin laws of likability She was named by forbes as one of the twenty five professional networking experts to watch and a former ny professor financial executive and recovering cpa. She now works with organizations and individuals to help them build real relationship. The greater results through the company executive essentials now on today show. Michelle is going to share. Why do we need to be connected. The seven levels of connectors as well as the seven mindset of connectors. Welcome to the show. Michelle thanks for having me on. We know and of probably heard through business. That networking is so so important. But i love the way that you've said we're now living in the age of networking. It's so more important than it ever was and so today. We're really going to dive into to connecting. And what is a connector and those seven levels but what interested you. You've got a great background diverse background. What was it specifically around networking and connecting. That attracted you that now. You really specializing in that area. I always say. I teach all the mistakes ever made so that you don't make them too and i used to be that polarizing personality that's where my research started around like ability to understand. What was it that was doing that was causing either them to love me or to hate me but there wasn't a whole lot of in between and really understanding how does connection form and what enables connections to happen but what i started to learn. Was that my results. Drastically changed when. I took a relationship partisan Approach right and that's what a connector is somebody who prioritize relationships in all their interactions professional personal. It doesn't matter the relationship comes. i mean. obviously you're going to talk a little bit about. Why be connected. You've just established. It's so important to do that. Relationships what are some of the things before we dive into the seven levels of connectors. What are the things that you want us to be aware of. That might be because of what's happened in the world now while some of the things that people are still doing that would have been okay and and where you know something that we would do in the past but really moving forward into twenty twenty one. We need to realize that this is not helping us to be that connector. That person who are attracting air ideal clients and stakeholders. What are some things that we need to be aware of. Don't do this moving forward the what not to do. There's one thing in it's really interesting. This book came out in two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred and in two thousand twenty there has been a lot around the the social inequality and social injustice and there's a whole section on the book about diversifying and expanding our connections and it's great to know everybody in a certain fields or everybody a certain geographic region. It's even better when we can go broad. And when we diversify our connections we make better decisions. We have more access to information. We are further up on the connector spectrum. So what other. Things we don't want to do is we. Don't want to call out the differences. We want to call out the similarities because the differences are often obvious between us but the similarities are things that we have to look for and one of the ways to be more inclusive. Connector is to think about focusing on the similarities calling out the larry's it's not about distinguishing or disregarding those differences but that that's not where we need to start. That's not where we need to focus. It's interesting you should say that because there's been a couple of times where i've reached out to someone here in melbourne with. Just come out of area tight lockdown. So the may it's been very intentional in networking linked gin and it's interesting because some people reach and say well actually you'll not my ideal clients keeping that i've been in fray and i'm thinking well i might not your ideal client but i talked to a lot of people around the globe connected to people such as michelle let him and who is a specialist an expert in this area. And so that's the kind of thing you talking about. Is the giant. Just be so focused narrow minded. Because you just don't know who that person is connected to and can you up to a whole new area of people. Yes that's exactly it. I have always been against this networking. I'm like it. Has the word working who wants to do it. And when i was writing the most recent book the connectors advantage. My brother-in-law came into office. And he said well. What's the difference with networking in connector. And i said networking something that you do a connector. That's who you are. And that's the shift. I want people to make rather than doing something and and when we tend to network for need and we network for now and it is very narrowly focused as you said but when we think about just connecting and building relationships because we want to because we get to then we have this really firm and tight community that you can call upon and i gotta tell you it was people. I went to business school. That you got me a client at the moma and my sister's boyfriend from middle school got me into nbc so it isn't about strategic networking. It isn't about well. I don't wanna talk to you because you can't do anything for me. It's being social and curious which is one of the mindsets it's being open and accepting it's enjoying the connection for the sake of connection and knowing that the rest will follow.

Michelle Kademi Michelle Letterman Levin Larry Melbourne Middle School NBC
William Walley on how he started the "World of Walley" podcast

Too Many Podcasts!

03:57 min | 8 months ago

William Walley on how he started the "World of Walley" podcast

"William wiley I am Starbuck podcast world. Wally back around in january. First episode drought January twenty seventh of this year. The question most everybody either. Ask me when i first started our has asked me saying is oh says the pandemic you're looking. You have plenty of time on your hands so you want to start a podcast. Now is not the answer to that question. I actually had had the concept of starting a podcast for the last three or four years. ah just could find time either of job i had or some other obligation kept me from doing it so i had conceptualized the actual podcast theme and and to count what i wanna do for quite a while The sad thing was when i finally convinced myself to do it. let's see my in december of between the wake of christmas and new years. I had a birthday card. Fifty years old. And i thought that'd be perfect time starbuck guests with little fanfare and even less preparation which showed early in my in my efforts us for sure i started a podcast. My i i guess. It was around the fifth or sixth to january. I started looking into executive what it would take to actually start one. And then like i said january twenty seven drama first episode which was a tribute to. I'm green bay packer fan. And it actually was attributive source and an account of a i guess a revelation of a situation that i should have probably handled a little differently after i heard an interview that aaron. The starting quarterback of the green bay packers defeats with his girlfriend. Dan patrick on her gas. So i took that opportunity to craft an episode It's fond from Of national personal interaction. I had with rogers a few years back a certain job. I had a worked in phnom of them of security in staffing stuff. Like that and i was actually over a contract university of mississippi commonly referred to as ole miss. He just happened to show up on on an off week to see his brother who was Join rodgers was playing vanderbilt quarterback and he thought he was just go show up and be a regular fan and that didn't work out too well so i ended up having to make special arrangements farm. Get him away from her. By so the rest of the people could enjoy game. And he ended up on sidelining. He ended up in my office and him and his family for about an hour and a half after the hoopla game kind of died down and people started exiting the stadium. You know it's christmas for me. At depth point. I had an hour and twenty minutes. What a guy that. I've watched on television and using the word idolized in how to use. The term hero used the term hero when it comes to a sports stadium. I don't i don't wanna give him that much. Power heroes are big block Ponders and doctors and help help people and save last. That's heroes was christmas for me. I was thousand key He and i chatted. And if i would have had any idea where his mind was about some stuff that talked about podcast specifically talked about his issue With his faith and and he's got a question in his face and if i would've known that i could step in and you know maybe said something or are provided him information or are just been a good solid ear. Listen to and helped him with that but i had no idea that time. That's kind of the whole premise of that episode was reflection on. If i were null. And what. I heard him saying that podcast. Maybe i could set or done something to have been at moma. That was episode warning. It just took off from there.

William Wiley Wally Starbuck Dan Patrick Green Bay Packers University Of Mississippi Phnom Aaron Rogers Rodgers
A Look At The Pandemic Economy

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:24 min | 8 months ago

A Look At The Pandemic Economy

"While the dow hit a record high so did covid nineteen cases and hospitalizations. According to adobe analytics we spent more than five billion dollars online shopping yesterday up. Twenty two percent from last year even as reports came in from across the country of miles long lines at food banks and food insecurity. The point here is that there's not just one narrative in this pandemic economy. Luckily we've got not just one but two of our favorite folks on deck to help us unpack it. All k- davidson is at the wall street. Journal and city ready is at politico. Hey to hey can relate. Hey kimberly so city. We sort of asked us every friday. But are these numbers about people getting sick and dying and going hungry and possibly going to push congress in the white house any closer to another relief package. You know these are depressing numbers. They're horrifying numbers. And at some point they have to force congress to act of. Unfortunately it seemed like we're going to have to see this. Get much further out of control before they do. You know over the next two weeks. We're gonna see an absolute explosion of virus cases as a result of thanksgiving holiday far worse than the increase we saw after the labor day holiday and after the july fourth holiday you. You'd think we'd learn something after fualaau isn't we don't necessarily do that. But we also have millions of people as we said staring down all the deadlines unemployment aid and infections and all these other. Stopgap measures A month from now And just to throw in into in the middle of a crazy government funding deadline to prevent a shutdown having two weeks from today and then we have a little political theater theater with the electoral college and state certifications All coming up in the next couple of weeks as well and so put it together. We have a whole lot of chaos and confusion that is usually not a good recipe for what's going on but you also have a sense that we might be getting to a really really bad place the country and so maybe that will be. What gets congress. Pay attention kate. Are you seeing any indications any bright spots possibilities. That negotiations are have have a pathway forward. Well i'm not sure. If we see the bright spots yet at kimberly but i think that really the kind of do or die moment if you will is next week. Pelosi mcconnell really have to decide if they're willing to just sit down and and how hard conversation and hash out an agreement because The clock is ticking. On december eleventh is the deadline for funding the government. And we know that they've made some progress on that front But they really haven't had broader discussions about covid relief so they might have to do. Some kind of short term funding extension beyond the eleventh may be like give them an extra week till the seventeenth to get them a little closer to christmas To see if they can work something out but one other thing we haven't talked about his covert cases in congress on capitol hill. You have senators who are having to quarantine and who are getting sick and so will they be able to actually stay in session long enough to do something is another unknown so it's really tricky and city. We had know new unemployment numbers out this week heading in the wrong direction. Is there a chance. Maybe that we get pieces of relief attached to these various funding vehicles. That have to go through. It's it's certainly possible that you may get a little bit of unemployment aid for folks who would see that dry out by the end of the month. It's possible that the the trump administration might extend some of some of its own measures at least until inauguration day so they can pass off the problem to the incoming administration. They're all all these things are possible. But it's just not a situation when you've got the the political cross-currents in the moma and people just like almost paralyzed by By the the fight over the election as it is And that's that's really put them at the in in this Really difficult situation where they know something needs to be done but they're not sure that they're going to be able to do it kate. The fed has been the one stepping in with all of these different measures. While we wait on congress. Do they have anything left in their toolbox. Well we know that. Certainly they've been they've been thinking about that Third latest policy meeting. They released minutes from the meeting on wednesday and and we know that they discussed ways that they could alter their purchases of treasury and mortgage backed securities. That's something they've been doing for months now and they could They could pick pick up the pace of those to to do more to support the economy. They didn't indicate that there any imminent changes. I think that they're kind of waiting to see what What congress is gonna do and hoping as we've heard that chairman jay powell say over and over a congress really should do more. Fiscal support is really needed at this time So i think they. They know that they're the backstop and they know they might have to do something. They're getting ready for that But it's not really clear. How much of a boost day can provide especially the longer this goes on. I think they're worried that You know the the with as long term unemployment continues to rise as we get more into like a traditional type of recession. Their tools are not as effective and That's why they keep saying of fiscal support is is so important right now

Congress Hey Kimberly Fualaau Politico Davidson Adobe Trump Administration White House Kate Mcconnell Kimberly Pelosi Confusion Jay Powell FED
Interview with Jessica Pimentel

The Wisdom Podcast

08:21 min | 10 months ago

Interview with Jessica Pimentel

"Think we should start this bitten style properly by first correcting our motivation why we're here today together knowing that there is immense suffering in the world the knowing that here we're here for each other we're going to help each other get through this. Yeah. She changes in metal trump GW engine, and again bobby some Ashington meter Gordy grundell action ladder barsial. Edema Guru anomalous local. Sanga chewed on. So Joel Non, much android Doniger. Like aging yogi personality from our patients under partial song on. So Casual Moma. Jonjo dynamic usage legitimate soga pursuing on your Partial Dunga Judo's Okay Joan Lama Jonjo it tunnicliffe search. Digital Kepa Solanki. Alah Pension Asanga group. Wow very nice. Is that particular Chin from from your teacher? Is that from? Yeah. That's more melodic tune. Sometimes, we do chanting just very straightforward but I figured I'd do the Little Nicer version for for the rookies out there that may have never heard it. Might enjoy. Doing maybe we start with just a little bit about the meany of starting with like like Mandela for you did this John and you tell us a little bit about that because I'm sure as out there that that very interested in what you're doing with your hands. Right. So it's symbolizing the world you make the world you're purifying the world it a perfect place and you're setting up here. That's four continents floor directions in the mountain meadow the highest mountain, and there you envisioned a perfect pure realm and menu, fill it up with incense and flowers, and every offering that you can think of everything that has ever made you happy you kind of you offer it up to your teachers good Dharma Sanga and also your you know your afflictions things that may be bring you pain suffering you just offer it up, give it away, purify it all in making making everything. The way it should be. Wow. So you're really using your mind in that practice. Of course, you're saying something we'd be voice in you've got your body. You're also really using your mind when you're saying those brands with that digitalization. So absolutely, and I think you know one of the most beautiful offerings I've ever heard was an ocean of flowers you. You could never afford that many. But when you're doing this practice, you can offer things that you don't have. You can walk by you know. The diamond district offer all the jewelry there. Every beautiful thing you've ever seen things that you wanted for yourself that maybe you can't afford at least you can put it in that digitalization offered up to all beings you know in beings. And Use It as a as a release that have been attachment. Fantastic you're using your imagination. You don't necessarily have to own object your for. Only objects that you don't exist that Don exists are objects that are intangible. I can offer the laughter of your children or something like that. So it can really go go wild with your imagination as to what you think are the most beautiful things Yup I think in this case, going wild with your imagination is encouraged, right? Yes. You should. You should absolutely because it it's essential as you as you go on in practice to be able to develop your imagination because you'll you'll have to find yourself. Putting yourself in situations where your imagination is what's going to bring it to the next level of your practice I'm imagining that will imagining didn't mean to years that would I'm imagining? We'll be coming back to this would imagination out quite a bit. Did The Sun Creek you tell us what that is all about going for refuge is a Buddhist yield. You're going for refuge to the Buddha, Dharma, on the song the good is. Being all beings? Dharma. The teachings, the truth with the on Songa the collection, not just monks nuns but everyone around you that is going to help you achieve this goal. By the goodness of the deeds that I do and giving in the rest meaning to six projections of. Giving and morality patients, concentration wisdom giving morality patients, ethics, concentration, and wisdom of by practicing these things. May I become a Buddha not just for myself but for the sake of all living beings South intention. Yes. So Is Interesting. So Buddha dominance sauna. So you know for you before the acting career before the music business which will get to there was Buddhism right that came Beckham before the acting I think and I was wondering you grew up. Christian MRI. And I was wondering growing up Christian what was it that? How'd you end up Madonna breakage what drew you to the Buddha? Question. Is. It still boggles now it doesn't Boggle I. Am very lucky I grew up in a loving Christian household. So wasn't one of those you know fire Brimstone type situations might my grandmother was wonderful Christian? My my aunt is a is A. Wonderful Wonderful Beautiful Lady she is what it sounds like. You know it all intents and purposes and I have many wonderful Christian friends and family that that are amazing. But for me I felt like there was a point in my life maybe was a certain age of coming to being where certain things just didn't make sense to me anymore or or I. Felt that I was being drawn in another way and I wasn't sure what that way was. It wasn't a rejection of something but more a seeking more something else something that that just was sort of calling to say. So I. Couldn't quite out what it was and I remember my mother had this shelves. Books From College. There's one book in Religions of the World Textbook as a as a good place to start as any. and. So it's just kind of like starting through going through all the religions of the world literally starting with animism and and native American religions which brought me back to thinking of my own heritage and things that we learned from our grandmothers are on tees than you know, herbs and prayers that are not in any books or dances, or you know traditions, words that that are that I. Thought were Spanish that are not for example, and I started going to college and learning about that learning about old medicine learning about all different not just my try all the tribes of the Americas and I really was a great and still is a great experience. Great part of my life of the day I was still kept feeling that there was more and in my thirteen fourteen. So. I started going to hardcore shows New York hardcore scene, and there was a big Christian of consciousness movement bands like WanNa wait and shelter and and Chroma is and bad brains singing about this other esoteric type things and and you know the Christian of monks were always there hanging out singing hotter Krishnan and handing out food and stuff. So of course, I was checking it out and and there are some things that kind of you know paying some interest for me but then again, it was a lot of. Things that weren't also clicking. So know go back to the book the Book of the word yet it again. kind of thumbing through it and I see Dow is and I'm like reading through it. It's very logical. It's straightforward. There is no puppet masters like. Extra beings, there's no like get off the pay money you don't have. There's no strings attached. It's cause-effect cause-effect cause-effect that if you do a long enough, be will happen if you one plus one is to the softest thing in the world can cut through the hardest giving with time things like that and that kind of really appealed to me it was very grounded and very focused than. Kind of removed that, which may be I needed for awhile removed that. Mystical magical element at made it more about how to fix yourself now

Joan Lama Jonjo Dharma Sanga Sanga Alah Pension Asanga Group Joel Non Kepa Solanki Bobby Ashington Chin Mandela DOW DON Beckham Americas John New York Krishnan Chroma The Sun Creek
Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:00 min | 11 months ago

Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

"Back, in the spring New York City with the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak. But recently, case numbers there have stayed low and New Yorkers are trying to get back to a life that's as normal as possible during a pandemic the big museums the met the Whitney in the Guggenheim have started reopening. Some people are thrilled but some museum workers are not hear Sally herships on the sidewalk outside the Museum of Modern Art. A slender man is smugly holding the world's tiniest Chihuahua Torres climb out of taxis gazing. At their phones with directions and digital tickets, they're wearing interesting glasses and have not haircuts but everyone is masked. Harry Allen is visiting from upstate New York and he's nervous. This is his first big outing since the pandemic began just seeing goes, but for employees on the inside, it's a bit more complicated some of the turmoil from the pandemic has crept into the museum. Lay says for her the problems began in early. March at the time it was her job to help museum visitors learn about workshops and activities. But coronavirus virus cases were starting to spike and she didn't feel safe at work. They gave us hand sanitizer and it was I could have gloves you ought. She was a contract worker paid around twenty one dollars an hour but her hours were capped at thirty per week. So she didn't get benefits like health insurance. What if she got sick spoke to nearly a dozen contract workers likely who said the problems began long before the pandemic it's called the fissured workplace where you end up having to take multiple jobs in order to support yourself and everything is so contracted and then you don't get any safety net from your employer laces. There's another problem too at Moma diverse workers both contract and paid staff or at the bottom of the pyramid in terms of pay and. Power all the front facing staff, the security, the restaurant workers, customer service, and educators are all very diverse, and then I would then go to the cafeteria where all the staff eight and then like everyone else would be why Lisa's us that meant when financial problems from the pandemic it diverse workers were more likely to be affected in March. The museum laid off eighty four people in an email. The museum said quote we did not have to furlough or layoff a single employee of the museum unquote that means all of those laid off were contract workers like lay the museum said it paid those laid off through March. Or heard from full time employees who are afraid to speak out publicly for fear of losing their jobs they say, they feel under intense pressure to return to the museum when they can do their job safely at home. But moma has told almost all staff they need to be at the museum. Here's museum director Glenn, lowry explaining his thinking during an online staff meeting. We must show solidarity with each other that our place of work is the museum, and while some of US might be able to argue, we never need to be museum to still do our work that's not equity. opposite. A spokesperson from the museum said, it's taking every precaution and workers are only required to be onsite part time but the workers I've heard from say the logic doesn't make sense. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of art is only allowing certain staff to work in person Makita flowers worked with visitor engagement at Moma but as a contractor, she was also laid off in March. She says, lowry is out of touch with workers like her with his multi-million dollar salary. He's the highest paid museum director. In the country I had a chance to speak to Glen I would just feel like. Roll like look at your family look at what you call the family. How are we doing now? Where are we as for on lay she has a new shop working with the city to help other Southeast Asians navigate resources during the pandemic

Museum Of Modern Art United States Metropolitan Museum Of Art New York City Moma Sally Herships Chihuahua Torres Whitney New York Harry Allen Director Lowry Glen Lisa Makita Glenn
Divine Architecture: Our Lady of the Cadore

Monocle 24: Section D

04:43 min | 1 year ago

Divine Architecture: Our Lady of the Cadore

"Monaco's dedicated weekly design program. And I'm Josh Venit each week. We embark on an uphill challenge of an intriguing tale. Somewhere somewhere in the world of design and this week we had to the snow top tips of the Dolomite Mountains in Italy to be exact located in a forest. Not far from the resort town of Cortina. He knows damn pet so in northern Italy the Church of Our Lady of Kadora is a jewel of sacred modern architecture completed in nineteen sixty one. The building was designed by Italian architect of note collar SCARPA. He worked with the former pupil to create a space that continues to attract devote tease design minded and religious like Monaco's Melania correspondent Ivan. Combine Leo made the Pilgrimage to visit the church and he also spoke with a local architectural historian named Michaela. Low about about this. Unique Work of ecclesiastical architecture take it away Ivan one of the most enigmatic doc and underappreciated figures of Twentieth Century Design Carlo SCARPA was an architect and designer best known for his instinctive approach to materials combining time. I'm honored crafts with modern manufacturing techniques. We all live on. Borough fanatical born in one thousand nine six in Venice where I studied architecture. SCARPA would go on to work at the famed. Veneer glassworks in Moreno. Where in the Nineteen Thirties. He was creative director and developed pieces. The today are part of the permanent collection. At New York's Moma as an architect SCARPA worked mostly in around Venice. We're in the nineteen forties. He began to teach drawing and into your decoration. At the local university one of his pupils was architect. Eduardo Goellner who returned in nineteen fifty six to ask his former professor for help on a commission in the dolemite mountains. It Atalanta Kamata Brigitta in the village to record order close to the ski resorts of Cortina. Pitso Gillner was busy building. A holiday village for the employees of ENRICO METAIS head of Italian oil giant any next to two hotels and chalets for workers families to use his vacation homes in summer and winter metairie desire to church to complete his mouth community. You Kill Merlo is an architect and historian who oversees foundation documenting. The work of Goellner who bid like years Care Integrated Tony Goupil down. The chemicals that Merrill explained tells carpers lasting contribution to the interior of the church elevated the any project pick to become a respected work of contemporary Italian architecture. The case will be larger. Costatini solid between a forum. Ano- Naji Lady Eighty Galilee. He said he'd donate any promotional video. Shows the church in all its modernist splendor blender during a festive Christmas mass and the mass full attention to detail that SCARPA brought to the project. Scott up out of the Venezia a Thai the comic receive eight three the Morano carotenoids any Lampe de Mello observes of the austere interior made of concrete beaten would is given a touch of color in the green and Ambert into Chinda. Leers made him Ronald Glass designed by SCARPA his minimalist pews. Mahogany arc matched by flooring that beaches a pattern created by submerging treetrunks into the cement pavement. The main entrance is a grand sliding door and would that opens in summertime. Underneath the churches sixty degree pitched roof and slender belltower. With a high steel steeple there recalls a slender oil rig worshippers find a sequence of trusses braced by asymmetrical steel tyrod and supported by cement pillars. Also remarkable was the high altar and his spinning the reforms of the Second Vatican Council a few years later SCARPA designed stunning sculpture in White Guerrero marble that allow the priest to face the congregation and during the celebration of the mass fans of SCARPA will find it like his later. Work of sacred architecture at the Briones cemetery in the Venuto. It is the subtleties that standout in his designs. At the Church of Our Lady of Kadoorie SCARPA was able to compose

Carlo Scarpa Kadoorie Scarpa Scarpa Cortina Monaco Josh Venit Venice Nineteen Thirties Church Of Our Lady Of Kadora Dolomite Mountains Eduardo Goellner Italy Ano- Naji Lady Eighty Galilee Ivan Merrill Atalanta Kamata Brigitta LEO Pitso Gillner Moreno
"moma" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"moma" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Moma bank account down to ten thousand is on you know when when the gang over the White House they they they look at the numbers of a potential economic numbers for twenty twenty they say it might be better twenty twenty that was this year what everybody spending the way they are small businesses hiring the way they are spending making purchases re shelving restocking inventory free solving all the inventory was looking real good I take his real half because part of this story this great economic report I now folks are investing and buying restocking reselling common factor again to don't make some more stuff and and bring it over by by cargo ship were American factories are in calling Canada Mexico and make some more stuff because the consumer economy is a stop in a stock okay who loves is is West Texas that's where I came from just three days back for the love the care he spent Christmas with my wonderful family and West Texas and nearby that that long well patch of of eagle for makes stabilizer got technology all stable lives in a work force all stabilized and the commodities exchange oil prices it's a three month high it's over sixty one closer to sixty two dollars a barrel right now they haven't seen that number sense I believe was it was the beginning of of the fourth quarter and with the prospect that the price of oil Michael up near future again and as stable as hiring has been in the oil patch system I love watching because from from my neck of the woods Deep South Texas in many parts of Texas we we constantly hear the call for more employment in West Texas more people to answer the call for it for tracking for logistics all piping in fitting and all other types of its involvement all packed they give they can't keep up with that now because the technology they stabilize the demand for employment all I see with this not only.

White House Canada Mexico West Texas Michael Moma bank Texas
Lady Gaga set to star in Ridley Scott's Gucci family murder film

Doug Stephan

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Lady Gaga set to star in Ridley Scott's Gucci family murder film

"Now god yeah has popped up in the movie land again she's landed her next role as she did so well in a star is born she's going to star in an upcoming film from Ridley Scott about the Gucci family member the Gucci Gucci Gucci Gucci in the gritty brand still big I'll yeah yeah god has got to play by treat C. R. IDG I'm ray JI on me with the ex wife moma read CO Gucci who is driving a big hit of organizing her ex-husband's assassination thank served eighteen years in jail right now yes good deal I think this is like a really interesting story yeah memories here I do daughters with that for three D. average yeah and he left his when your dog say the name right now all right do you have any see they had a brain tumor removed her children blinded for her actions the media took a darker view of her during the affair depicting her as a hot blooded woman scorned endeavoring are now Black Widow the twenty nine years got out of jail eighteen years later who's that that badly likes the idea of this movie that was a huge **** off and a really good so the book the movie is based on the book by Serra gave Fortin the house of Gucci a sensational story of murder madness grammar and green Geiger's playing patriot C. R. A. G. on

Ridley Scott Ray Ji Co Gucci Serra Fortin Gucci Geiger C. R. A. G. Murder Eighteen Years Twenty Nine Years
Three landers from three nations head to Mars in 2020

SPACE NEWS POD

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Three landers from three nations head to Mars in 2020

"In twenty twenty three Rovers one from the US want from Europe and one from China will leave earth and depart for the red planet of Mars to look for past in present life. And these Rovers are just going to go to Mars. They have in their mission directorate to bring back samples from the red planet to earth, which is going to be one of the most influential. Botches in landings in science experiments of human history. Parts of Mars directly from the regular of Mars will be returned to the planet earth. So scientists on earth with really sophisticated instruments can study, what's in the ground on Mars. So the Rovers will be sent up in twenty twenty in the land, though do science, and the cash, the, the samples for a return mission for Mars and are from Mars and the return to earth in twenty twenty eight if America in Europe come together and make the mission as success, but a project scientists on the east Rover Exo Mars that will land in twenty twenty one along with the American Chinese Rovers might be worth reconsidering, which samples would actually be the. The best valuable to send back to the scientists waiting on earth. And the scientists said Mars twenty twenty will acquire samples from the surface, where I n ising radiation is likely to have damaged any organic molecules, it is. Excellent Mars with its two meter depth drill in advance organics detection, instrumentation MoMA that has the best chance to make an import discovery regarding the possibility. The Mars may have harbored life in its distant past, if this proves to be the case, perhaps, we may need to rethink where they, we should not think of bringing back. Well selected subsurface samples rather than those collected by Mars twenty twenty in the bars twenty twenty Rover which is a NASA Rover. It has the ability to cash the samples that against, but Exo Mars does not have that capability for a return mission leader on and he goes on to say that requires a complicated. Yup. That weighs allot it would have been impossible to combine our present very capable payload with a sample caching system on the same Rover. In fact, Nasr's twenty twenty Rover his Pete a dear price to include the caching system, and that's compared to curiosities analytical firepower. So what they gave up an analytics and studying the actual surface of the planet Mars. They gained a caching system. So instead of doing the science on Mars itself, what they're doing is putting it away for a little while and they're using that space to harbor though samples, then they're going to return them to earth on the March twenty twenty Rover. And then George Vago goes on to say the point I am trying to make is that bringing back the right samples will make all the difference in this regard, Exo Mars will be super important are the samples collected at depth more interesting and better preserved. We think probably yes, in once we will have investigated this, perhaps it will be time to rethink what samples to bring back to

Mars Twenty Twenty Rovers Twenty Twenty Rover Europe American Chinese Rovers United States George Vago Moma China Nasa Nasr Pete America Two Meter
"moma" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

World News Tonight with David Muir

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on World News Tonight with David Muir

"To get their daughters into USC, posing them as recruits for the crew team. Even though they didn't row. Arrest warrants issued for forty six people around the country, including coaches and wealthy. Parents like Felicity Huffman seen here at the courthouse after she was arrested by agents guns drawn and cuffed tonight. The actress out of jail on two hundred fifty thousand dollars bond. Asking for bribe. He pretending you're above that. I got my checkbook this star of desperate housewives so desperate to land her daughter and a top school. Prosecutors say she paid fifteen thousand dollars to singer to bribe a Proctor who had secretly correct her answers. Prosecutors say the schemes mastermind work with dozens of parents to game the system for every student admitted through fraud. An honest genuinely talented student was rejected today on USC campus. Students told us they feel cheated think for people like us who colluded strive hard day and night. Do this come here. And learn the school firing legendary coach of the number one ranked women's water polo team seen here hiding from cameras. He's facing charges for taking two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in bribes also fired senior associate athletic director, Donna hinal accused of taking a whopping one point three million dollars to push through fake athletic recruits, complete. With photo shopped pictures, so let's get back to Canaan Whitworth on the story again tonight. She's live outside the federal courthouse in Los Angeles. And Qena, we know prosecutors say that most of these young people the students were unaware, but it's believed some might have known a lot of people are asking what's going to happen to some of these students. Well, David USC says they plan to conduct a case by case review of current students and graduates who may be involved with this scheme, and they'll make appropriate decisions UCLA adding that any student involved could face disciplinary action, including cancellation of admission and David we have to keep in mind here that prosecutors are not ruling out additional charges with us again tonight. Thank you Qena next year. A one two punch tonight for Paul Manafort this evening. The president's of former campaign chairman sentenced to additional prison time. A lot of is on that judge in what she would do. This is the second case stemming from the special counsel's investigation, but then just minutes after the sentencing after metaphor learned his fate today. He was then indicted in New York City on sixteen felony counts. State counts. What this could mean for a possible presidential pardon. Here's chief Justice correspondent Pierre Thomas moma's after Paul Manafort was sentenced up with his attorney, Kevin Downey. Disappointed Manafort was wheeled into court today. He read the same prepared statement. But this time telling judge Amy Berman Jackson, I'm sorry for what I've done. I want to apologize. But just Jackson was unmoved. It's hard to overstate the number of lines. She said and the amount of money involved metaphors crimes reigned from money laundering to tax fraud to obstruction of Justice. Still his attorneys argued he was in Robert Muller's crosshairs for one reason his work for President Trump, Paul Manafort has done an amazing job. He's here's someplace where Paul. Full Manafort manafort's lawyer telling the court, but for a short stint as a campaign manager in a national election. I don't think we would be here today. The judge Jackson did not buy it to defend it is not public enemy number one. She said, but he's not a victim either. She sent us to once high flying strategists to just over three and a half years behind bars on top of that roughly four year sentence. He received last week moments later downing went on the attack. It was hostile. And it was totally unnecessary manafort's. Team told the court prosecutors showed no proof the Trump campaign colluded with Russia, but John Jackson pointing out that was never part of the case saying the no collusion refrain is irrelevant to the matter at hand. She suggested manafort's attorney was really putting on a show for someone else. Critics say that person is President Trump speaking to reporters that lawyer appear to mischaracterize the judges words taxing conceded that there was absolutely no evidence of any Russian collusion in this case to cores to points. No evidence of any collusion. You. The White House late today this question pardon. Pardon all have not even given a thought as of this moment. NPR Thomas reporting from Washington tonight in peer, we know..

Manafort manafort Amy Berman Jackson attorney USC President Trump Felicity Huffman fraud Pierre Thomas moma David USC Qena Los Angeles Canaan Whitworth Proctor president Russia special counsel New York City Donna hinal Washington White House
Adults are the only ones who fell for the Momo hoax

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

03:12 min | 2 years ago

Adults are the only ones who fell for the Momo hoax

"Invited. Taylor ends from the Atlantic magazine to come into our offices and watch this video with me. Yeah. I saw this before. Mall gonna kill you. So what happens in this video to physically? There's this little girl. She's really cute. She's swaying back and forth. And she's singing this song. Like mama's gonna kill you. If you see hill in the hallway see will kill you, mama. Momon isu- kill you. That's it. This little girl. She looks like she's in a school uniform. She's clutching a stuffed animal, I think it's a great FOX with the big pink bow on it. This is my six year old almost seven year old daughter. That knows all the words to the song because she has seen it on YouTube. And then the mom kind of filming pulls away, and is basically like this is the warning to all parents, tell your children not to listen. That's right. We know that Momo can't hurt you. Right. That's right. I mean, when I even as I cannot help it role is at this point. I have all these crazy messages from parents this week telling me like Nomo is real she actually hacked my child's Facebook page, and it's like, no, she there's that's not even a thing over the last few months Momo has become a kind of internet boogeyman a creepy face spliced into YouTube videos for kids with bulging eyes, a stretched out smile. Pictured a little girl from the ring with exaggerated features parents in some of these videos, avoid dares kids to harm themselves or harm others. They call it the Momo challenge I've seen these types of videos for over a year since it first went viral over a year and a half ago about you publish an article basically saying MoMA was a hoax. Yeah. Well, it's I mean, it's an urban legend might be a better word for it. It's not real. It's like slender man or something. Tillers Momo's hoax because there isn't any evidence that kids are actually following Momo's instructions just a lot of freaked out. Parents it's crazy. How many people just flat out will not leave it or they not believe that. It's a whole not believe that it's a hoax and not believe that. There aren't you know, hundreds of children committing suicide over this like there's just no way to tell them that it's not real. And they'll say like I have sources inside Google. And I'm like, I actually do have sources I I actually talked to YouTube on regular races. It's my entire beat. And I'm telling you, this isn't real. And by the way, here's the Genesis of it, and they don't wanna hear it. But even though the Momo challenge isn't real Taylor says the fear that animates it that is, you know, it's sort of like it's ten pm where your children, you know, what I mean? But it's like, it's mpm. Like, do you know, what your children are watching on YouTube? It's actually like this evil creature. That's trying to get them to. Commit suicide just a stranger dangerous stranger danger. Exactly. And I think it also kind of explains parents fear of these platforms, which actually aren't affair is in very real tangible ways.

Momo Youtube Moma Taylor Tillers Momo Atlantic Magazine FOX ISU Google Facebook Nomo Seven Year Six Year
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"And we sell them in our stores and other retailers seldom. Let's go interesting. That's a great opportunity for an art school kid essentially or Zion school kid. Yes. And then they get royalties of any sales on products that they designed true. So the sport probably came all likelihood came from a design school. I don't know if the sport came from a design school, but it may have that's my best idea at it. I shouldn't make fun of sport to actually it is really striking. I will say that. It's you go online and check it out. You know, you touched upon the fact that we work with artists you design, really great, Nick, citing products. But we also create products tied to. To museum exhibitions. So we had the items is fashion modern exhibition last October through January, and we created like ten limited edition products specifically for that based on items that were in the exhibition, so it's not always necessarily working with the designer. But sometimes it's worth working with a manufacturer like new era. Their baseball caps were in the exhibition. So we worked with them on a moment. Exclusive baseball cap was the baseball. It was a Yankees cap because we're New York institution. And then it said MoMA on the side, and they performed amazingly for us. And we also worked with champion because there was a red champion hoodie in the exhibition, and we created a MoMA champion hoodie in celebration of it. So one of the interesting things, I you know, you've kind of mentioned and Paul Galloway when I talked to him. He mentioned the design department moments really interested in everyday items as well as the really high end architecture. Gene, you talked about that different price points. But is there ever kind of a worry that by stamping moma's name on something that's sort of inherently is making it a little bit more Bucci that that kind of undermines the point of normal baseball cap. I wouldn't say it's Bucci. But I think it's turning it on its head. Like, you're taking this urban street wear, and you're putting MoMA on it. I don't think it's boozy as much as it is the idea that everyday objects are part of our design collection, right and celebrating that to an extent you mentioned this you take a hit on items is that you're saying it's a lower margin. You don't ever sell anything for a loss? We I mean that that's the worst thing ever. But some items we just don't get as generous of margin on what are the items that you would decide are worth it. Like, what is an example of something? I think if something's exclusive to us, and that you can only find MoMA that's always an area were willing to maybe take a little bit more of a margin hat at tech products are inherently lower margins. Best buy. Yeah. So I think those are probably two examples I think it's also really important to keep in mind that every single purchase made MoMA design store goes back to support the museum's its programming -education programs in conservation. So we operate entirely as a nonprofit and everything that we make goes back into the museum. So it's important to keep those margins. I wasn't going to bring this up. I didn't run disparage another institution. But that's it is interesting that you mention that because the Metropolitan Museum famously has been losing money on its store, which is mind boggling to me like that somehow that you could run a retail operation, which is supposed to actually fund your mission and just like that become a money sink. So I I guess that leads me to another question, which is what happens if you guys don't hit your margin. I mean, you don't have shareholders exactly to get angry. But you do have the museum. Trustees and everyone so what happens they are financial goals and come hell or high water we try and make those so we don't take it lightly. If we're missing our numbers at all. And you know, we are I think at like as far as sales go where the one number one driver of revenue for the museum right before margins. So it's something that is important financial metric for the museum. We we take it really seriously when we operate our business where do you ever spend the majority of your time during the day like you get in on a Monday or Tuesday..

MoMA Metropolitan Museum baseball Paul Galloway Zion school Bucci Yankees Nick Gene New York
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"The press preview and the idea is to get that on like their holiday gift guide, or what are you trying to get them? Excited about the products and understand what we have on offer. So when they're going to write an article about digital alarm clocks. They're thinking about the MoMA alarm clock. Was there press coverage of the piano was s kinds of press. Coverage who was writing about the piano, we had a ton of press hits for the the rob reporter familiar with rob report. Not so rob report featured the piano, the pianist featured in the goop gift guide that must be huge. Yeah. Was that? Like when you got when you got a goop it did that like cease sales, spike or sales been really high for the piano. So they've just continued since the goop gift pick the goop gift pick a lot of right to it. Yeah. But that's just one example of the press that we received on the piano. Okay. So you guys really do you work like normal marketing channels all that stuff at like a retailer retailer would. Yep. We'll give it Levin social media. It'll get a dedicated Email lines. It'll have. I've massive signing in the store talking about it's special benefits and features. It'll I believe that the piano when we launched it was featured in the window. So those are kind of how we treat marketing channels for some of the key products is the normal for a Newseum affiliated retail operation. Does do this does the Guggenheim do this kind of stuff or is that something a little unusual? I have had literally no idea. I actually don't know if the other museums hold press previews, but I think that also goes to like, we're not a traditional gift shop were designed store. So the way we treat. It would.

rob MoMA reporter Levin
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"And you could easily end up in a spot like that. I mean for people who like probably, you know, didn't go to business like it's not so bad. But it does ruin museums for you can't you kind of can't I cannot go to museums Zilly Why's that because you were spoiled like I can walk around moment by myself, literally. And I don't wanna look at art with other people. That's so you when you talk about like the tunnel where someone has their arms around themselves. That's actually, your ideal viewing space. Yeah. You're telling me only for them for you. Whenever I go to museums. I find myself like with my hands behind my back and like staring intently, but I'm like, I feel like I'm sending signals to the security guards in the room. Like, I'm being very responsible. I know I'm one of the good ones. Yeah. You don't have to worry about me. I'm so the opposite. I'm because I'm like, I'm going gonna look at the brushstrokes. Let me I try to do what you're actually paid. Ever. They're staring at me because they know on the guy they worry. But I mean, if you if you really into it, and you're like into the process and the materials like I'm really into print making as well. And like you see print on here. Like, oh my God. Is that lithograph is that silkscreen? I can't wait till it's framed, and he's he's of get really close to it. And you're looking at it at a weird angle. And you're like just waiting for somebody to come yell at you. And in the privacy of MoMA, you are totally entitled to have museums been ruined for you to or are you are you not? I mean, I understand the sentiment sending I can look at like entities. Okay. With other people because you don't have those on some. Yeah. But I can't I can't to contemporary art, or even modern Arna. Can't it's been ruined for been runs. She's nothing's gonna compare to having the Pollick right there that you can. Yeah. Well, there's always the architecture of the other museums that you have to experience like a db can. Where it's like, it's it's as much about the space as it is about the arguments in the space. That's there's some other museums of gotten to go to over the years where you're just like this place is gorgeous. I think actually seeing all the exhibitions coming go. You actually get used to the idea that like it's here, and then it's gone. So it's like, it doesn't really matter. What the art is. Sometimes it's more about going to the police and enjoying like, I'm thinking of the Louisiana museum in Denmark. I think it is. It's just a gorgeous experience to go there. And it's like a Louisiana museum. It's called the Louisiana museum. Like, not by Louisiana. No, that's Louis. We offer very long time like as a registrar. What's like a pet peeve? What is something that? Like, drives you nuts in your job. Let it rip. Someone who deals with a lot of paperwork and a lot of legal stuff and probably lawyers. There have to be I don't know registrars tend to be very specific and like organized types..

Louisiana museum Louisiana Arna MoMA Denmark Louis
"moma" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"Service here. I can tell by the fuck it, take some jumper cables. And all that other bullshit. I never said I was great ASC certified technicians. So how about there with my Budgie court built working on his mother fucker and the Duke goes back out? And he says, hey, man, he goes this wire here's is like flaming hot. And it keeps sparking the wire to the southern oil was hundred motherfucker saw. I said fuck I wouldn't try to bump the motor. It wouldn't make any goddamn noise. And I said well fuck as medicine it's getting hot Libya, hook it. So unhooked cables from the battery that I just bought in Oakland up. And I said, do you know, what fuck it we'll have to call somebody who's a little bit more qualified than I am. I'm going to go down here and just give me some lunch and get the fuck outta here. So I go down. But this this restaurant is called Fisher. Get me to go bills and a MoMA way of fish drive back marina, del Rey. And I said, you know, what I start calling every mechanically clan person that I know Mitch my buddy Scotty, fuck someone else. No one will answer the goddamn phone because then jump on my God damn I thought type in if you reverse to hook up Willett heat up the phone wires. What's your will? So I said, no, no, I said, I can't drive back brainer. Del ray. No one, you know, that you know, this simple of a problem. And I wasn't cognizant enough to just look where the cables were running one to the frame as a ground and the other one over to the southern Noida into starter rush SaaS dude. Should you got to have a little bit of fuck respect and pride? Saw drove my sorry ass back to the parking lot at that. God damn battery up correctly. Well, bingo, the wires weren't hot. And so then took the damn carburetor off. Into air cleaner off put it back on the ground. But when I've been over although wouldn't have button on my pants, my pants fall down because I had a bungee cord for belt..

Fisher Noida Oakland MoMA Mitch Scotty
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Okay. So you guys you guys say this is what we want. You guys go do this. And we have building plans again, there's so the carbon builds the base models for all the galleries. And then we work with the carriers actually build out the model. So it may start with just standardized ten foot walls, and we're taping them together to make twenty foot walls talking about with here. And then eventually will make the kind of we try to finish and finalize the model. So it'd be comes not so easy for the mice to change it in the middle of the night. And so that's yeah. That's our designers do that the actual sort of perimeter model that is the base the base model that is the gallery with no temporary walls in it or built in house but every exhibition gallery that every temporary exhibition gallery, we have about two or three models that we can work on several shows at once how big is one of these things are you talking about fills a whole table or like how like yeah. That has like a fifteen thousand square feet space will be about about sixty five six or seven feet. Okay. So you've got a real war game going at that point. Actually, the logistics of working in the model come into play like depending on the designer and the curator you may need stools around the table. And these things actually become critical. For example. I was working on a show where there was this middle room. You just couldn't read because the model is almost square, and we've just never really laid out that room because no one could reach it. And then finally we had to build a separate little like miniature of just those walls that we could lay out that when you get on top of the table. Reaching over the model their tongue seem like they would come in handy. Another tool. Grabby those claws space fans. Yeah, I love that. When I was a kid a creepy has those like long sticks where you like move the chips dealers now all slash dealers. So I actually did have something to say about also to jump off. With was saying about the designers, the model we also liked to make the my cats. We have the designers make them cats, and we have other staff that make the my cats, but I love the process of making my cat 'cause I think. On my cat is a small version of the artwork at south. Okay. It's a model of the artwork. And we for some reason we call them chips at MoMA. I don't know where that language came from one of these days, we should kind of dig back into history and see how that volved, but it kind of goes with the dealer thing. They had a Matisse whereas because a poker game. And that's what we did a lot more flat cats, and so maybe the looked like little cards or I don't know. So you make those yourselves make that that ourselves. And is that something your personally doing also your firming that out to the team we I I like to make them, but we do farm team. Yeah. I think it depends on the designer. Why do you guys make them? Like what what is there? A specific reason why you like making them. I think it gets you more in touch with with the artwork actually is. And it keeps you connected to making things. And I think that's what's really except sex exceptional about what we do. I know for me making all the chips for the show is how I learned the art work much better than an eighty five page PDF of the checklist, right? Like, we're we're we have the jobs we have because mostly were architects and artists, and we like to make things and so in some ways just that that kind of technology. Learning is important whereas other departments live and die by that PDF of a checklist. And we carry it around we make notes on it. But the way I sort of know all the artwork is through the making of the inches. So you also you personally like to get in there and actually make the chips yourself..

MoMA twenty foot seven feet ten foot
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Okay. So you guys you guys say this is what we want. You guys go do this. And we have building plans again, there's so the carbon builds the base models for all the galleries. And then we work with the carriers actually build out the model. So it may start with just standardized ten foot walls, and we're taping them together to make twenty foot walls talking about with here. And then eventually will make the kind of we try to finish and finalize the model. So it'd be comes not so easy for the mice to change it in the middle of the night. And so that's yeah. Yeah. That's stuff. Our designers do that the actual sort of perimeter model that is the base the base model that is the gallery with no temporary walls in it or built in house but every exhibition gallery that every temporary exhibition gallery, we have about two or three models that we can work on several shows at once how big is one of these things are you talking about fills a whole table or like how like yeah. That has like a fifteen thousand square feet space will be about about sixty five six or seven feet. Okay. So you've got a real war game going at that point. Actually, the logistics of working in the model come into play like depending on the designer and the curator you may need stools around the table. And these things actually become critical. For example. I was working on a show where there was this middle room. You just couldn't read because the model is almost square, and we've just never really laid out that room because no one could reach it. And then finally we had to build a separate little like miniature of just those walls. So that we could lay out that when you get on top of the table. Reaching over the model their tongue seem like they would come in handy. Another tool. Grabby those claws space fans. Yeah, I love that. When I was a kid creepy has those like long sticks where you like move the chips dealers now all slash dealers. So I actually did have something to say about also to jump off. With was saying about the designers, the model we also liked to make the my cats. We have the designers make them cats, and we have other staff that make the my cats, but I love the process of making my cat 'cause I think. On my cat is a small version of the artwork at south. Okay. It's a model of the artwork. And we for some reason we call them chips at MoMA. I don't know where that language came from one of these days, we should kind of dig back into history and see how that volved, but it kind of goes with the dealer thing. They had a Matisse whereas because a poker game. And that's what we did a lot more flat cats, and so maybe the looked like little cards or I don't know. So you make those yourselves make that that ourselves. And is that something your personally doing also your firming that out to the team we I I like to make them, but we do farm team. Yeah. I think it depends on the designer. Why do you guys make them? Like what what is there? A specific reason why you like making them. I think it gets you more in touch with with the artwork actually is. And it keeps you connected to making things. And I think that's what's really except sex exceptional about what we do. I know for me making all the chips for the show is how I learned the art work much better than an eighty five page PDF of the checklist, right? Like, we're we're we have the jobs we have because mostly were architects and artists, and we like to make things and so in some ways just that that kind of technology. Learning is important whereas other departments live and die by that PDF of a checklist. And we carry it around we make notes on it. But the way I sort of know all the artwork is through the making of the inches. So you also you personally like to get in there and actually make the chips yourself..

MoMA twenty foot seven feet ten foot
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"So what's the? Reaction from family in. I mean are these people who live in Rio house Paul or I mean, it's a range. I would say sometimes you're talking to somebody and they've never heard of MoMA, and they couldn't care less. And they you know, it doesn't matter. But that so that's actually a little harder. I was gonna say what's the reaction? When you go to someone say, I'm from a museum in the United St. a large museum United States. And I want to look through your family photos to figure out if they're historically significant and maybe by them, well that sounds pretty daunting. We actually, you know, you try to be conscious of the fact that for those people who have heard of MoMA or no that museums exist, even if they don't know MoMA per se, although most of them do MoMA, you try not to go to them unless you have a pretty good sense that they know why would might be a good thing for a work by their in their family to come to the museum. So you're not, you know, and sometimes I'll go see work in Brazil where all say. This really ought to stay here. Like, this is a piece of your national heritage. It wouldn't even be right to bring it to the museum. You know? So I'm I'm really glad that the their private and public collections in Brazil that are taking care of the same material because we don't want to be taking things where they where they would live an active fertile life in their home country. You don't wanna be pillaging, right? Yeah. I feel we're talking about we've mentioned zone of times. Now, I just want to know a little bit more. Even though this isn't strictly. The nature it. He does tell me a little bit more about this kind of movement photography that you're research short super briefly. I there's a group called the photo Senate club ended on and they were a group of amateurs who are active in Brazil throughout a lot of the twentieth century. But I'm particularly interested in what they were doing between. Let's the mid nineteen forties to the mid nineteen sixties, and they made photographs that they then circulated internationally in these salons, and they salons went to Paris, and Japan and Paris and Tokyo, and they they're incredibly interesting works both in an experimental sense. And speaking to sort of a larger humanist moment, so these pictures circulated an incredible international network, and they were both humanist pictures of their family of the environment of their neighborhoods of their architecture. But they also had these great. Experimental impulses of using negative printing abstraction, and they basically are very well known, and they're very good scholars looking at this work in Brazil. But when I ask any of my other North American colleagues, it's like no one's ever heard of them the way, I was always taught photography in college back when a little time to vote on heard was that it was overwhelmingly Europe in American like west western like, not like Latin America. But it was it was it seemed to be where most of the focus was. So this would kind of counter that narrative, I think partly what the whole museum in the whole world right now, you realize that the narratives that you've been handed or kind of maybe grossly inadequate to think about the way our was made over the course of history. So how you go about filling out those gaps is super interesting, and whether one of the things I love about this photo Senate club group is that these amateurs were made. Making these incredibly experimental important works, but there were also pictures of like kittens and little babies with bows in their hair and cute girls smiling man something. Yeah. And you know, the the fact that these things can coexist side by side in the same group is super interesting to me as well. We've we've been taking pictures of kittens. And we'll always be taking pictures of kittens Cam. Yes. I mean now, I'm a dog person. Yes. Working.

Brazil MoMA Paul United States Paris Senate Senate club Europe Latin America Japan Tokyo
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"How small it is what kind of paper it's printed on what are the stamps and the signatures all of those things tell you something about it. So if you think of a photograph as an object. It's harder to do it. It's harder. To know. What you're looking at when you're looking online that's important when you're collecting for historical purposes, I would say even contemporary purposes, you know, if we work in a museum, so we put things on view, and you're not collecting an idea, you're collecting an object. So it matters. What that object is it doesn't mean that you would discriminate against it. Because it's little or because it was made in Russia after the revolution is on super thin paper, or because it was in the New York Times picture, Morgan, it has tears and stamps and creases on it. So those flaws are that life that's evident in the object. Don't make it less interesting. But it means it matters that you actually see it. I know MoMA does collect pieces of digital design digital art do not collect any digital photos or you do or how does that work for you? We do collect digital things. And it's interesting to see now in the twenty first century like. Sometimes you're collecting digital thing as a record or an artifact or a way of extending the life of something that you know in a different medium. But sometimes also a work might be meant by an artist or maker to live digitally. And so when that's the case, then it still has a matter of like, how is this meant to live. So a digital image still or maybe think of it at an easier example for photography's, let's say a slide a slide still has a materiality. And even if you digitize that slide and you show that projected image. They're still something that you're collecting. And there are you know, really interesting artists who are making things that are digital. But they they still care how you encounter it or they think about that. Yeah. And so so if there is something that is just meant to be seen our screen. That's how you collected printed out, you know, size on a printer. However, then you. It that way. But it's part of you sort of hope that it matters to the maker. So Stephen shore in his retrospective. There were he's an incredible Instagram, and those pictures that he posts on Instagram are meant to be encountered in that way. And so we put ipads in the galleries to allow people to see those it you're not gonna print that out and put on I worry when it's like, oh, it doesn't matter. What scale it is what size, you know, what material takes like. Well, maybe it should once. You've decided you you want something you encounter that Brazilian photo. While traveling or you find that's nap shot. What do you do then? So we then we work on bringing it to the museum. Well, I should say before we work on bringing to the museum. Then I talked to my boss, and I say is this something we're interested in acquisition. Make sure he's on board. A formal like is there a form you fill out say blissfully, blissfully informal. No, it's just popping by his office. I mean, we talk about our priorities enough that if I'm bringing something to him. He we speak the same language, and I say, oh, I found this great opportunity. What do you think? So we we talk so much. It's quite informal at that stage. So if he gives it a green light. And usually, you know, it's a sign of nice department is like when you're enthusiastic about something that enthusiasm is mirrored by others. So once we say, okay, let's propose this for aquisitions. So one of the important things to know about a curator at least curator at MoMA is that we may propose something for acquisition, but it's not approved until the committee on photography approves it, and it won't go into the collection until the committee approves it..

MoMA Stephen shore New York Times Russia Morgan
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Where are you finding work? I guess I'm wondering because you know, you said you're sometimes I mean, you're you're looking for all these different types of photos, and some that might be where where are you going to to find stuff that you might acquire? So we're lucky people bring things to us and we travel a fair amount. And when you travel. Yeah. Brazil or anywhere. I was in Paris last week, and you travel in order to see things that don't come to you that you feel that you should be attentive to. But I know one of my favorite things is to go. There's a snapshot collector downtown, and he scours EBay and the flea markets, and he finds all these incredible snapshots. And then he makes it so easy for me. Because when he finds something really great he says come on down and check this out. And then I only have to go so far as to get on a subway. So that's not so hard. But does he like run a store is? He's he's an incredibly passionate and now seasoned collector who but is really focuses on snapshots. You've got like a secret weapon. A secret anonymous weapon. But you'd have to murder, right? Like, I wouldn't do that. But I would say actually what's great about him. Is that also if any other photography curator is listening to this all of them will know his name because he's very generous to all dementia, museums not just moma's. So so is that is that thing that a lot of photo carriers. Do kind of go looking around the internet firm aeges onto to is that part of it or well, I don't really look on the internet for things to acquire. Because it points to sort of one of the most fundamental things that I think people need to understand about photography, which is that a photographic image. Something that lives on your phone or on your computer screen or projected on wall. That's an image. Whereas photograph is an object. It has a scale materiality Assad and all of those things how big it is..

EBay Assad Brazil moma Paris murder aeges
"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Now, we're talking about you dealing with the emoji. Let's come back to the ice cream cone does that have all the same legal rigamarole. No cone and put that in the that's the nice thing about physical objects. When you have it you have it. So when we acquire things I often love it when we get a drawing because then it's like, okay, I've got this piece of paper. Here's a drawing done. Right. The session number on the back put it in storage. And that's simplifying. There are actually a lot of concerns for those things. So with the ice cream cone, this was part of the humble masterpieces show, and it included as I said post, it notes bandaids Eminem's sugar cubes and the ice cream cone, which is as you can imagine you take an ice cream cone and stick in storage for a few years, it's going to get brittle. So we went to go check on the storage because we periodically check on these things, and it had been smushed inside. It's very carefully packed topic and tissue paper. And but as I scream cones will do when they get seven years old it got smooshed. So we needed a replacement. How did you pick the specific cone what kind of comb was sugar cone or waffle waffle cone? Because all right. So the idea is that the waffle cone is actually one of those design objects whose history is kind of invisible we all sort of accept it is an innovation by Sergio much Uni in the I think it's the late nineteenth century, the kind of famous story runs out of cups and bowls for his ice cream. There's a waffle Dutch waffle maker nearby takes probably mangle in the story, by the way. He takes one twisted into corn like in an emergency. Dammit. I'll just screaming this thing Tada turns into a brilliant invention. So we've found in our research that the closest equivalent currently being made too much ice cream cone is that made by Bennie Jerry's. Oh, interesting. Eric keeping the traditional they're keeping the traditional. It's an extremely close to the original idea. And so your job is to make sure that you can go you can get it put it in sergeant that I mean, I guess most you can you can re I did a little beauty pageant thing. So we. Laid out like ten cones the people behind me in line Lima real thrilled with this. And I was like I don't know co number a 'cause it's got a little bit of malformed bottom. I go at Combe number. See did you explain this to the people in line? Yeah. They thought it was hilarious. This is the Ben and Jerry's people thought this was really fun. So yeah. I mean, I it's better than another scoop. I guess or it's more interesting. So you've got this really vast and varied collection that you're overseeing that you're shining. So I guess you also have to be an expert on actually how to store this stuff. Right. Yeah. We I work with a preparer name, Pamela, pope's, who's her duties ten more toward dealing with the physical nature of the things. How to store them properly how to handle them? I tend to be more than knowledge and thoughts shaman, and she's Oga. So she's actually you've got someone whose job is just to make sure that the car is not scratched that the ice is not smoke. That the that the designs for the building all, you know, kept in perpetuity, and then your jobs to know how I guess that's all being handled. What's going on and how to get it? Yeah. So we really kind of work in tandem on those kind of collection care needs. So you've got the collection care stuff, which you work with partner on you've got the acquisition stuff. And then like, what's the what are the other big buckets again loans? So we have a very rich outgoing loan program. Both exhibitions generated by other museums that they want to borrow something from us and also exhibitions generated in partnership with MoMA weeded to very large ones in the last year and a half or so we did one in Australia last year and also wanna fundation Louis Vitton and Paris, both of which took very large amounts of MoMA art works to these places. And in some cases, involved really complex projects like in Paris at the Louis Vuitton foundation. We for the first time installed a artwork that we acquired twenty fifteen which was a very large chunk..

Bennie Jerry pope MoMA Combe number Eminem Paris Louis Vuitton Lima partner Sergio Eric Louis Vitton Australia Pamela seven years
"moma" Discussed on Bravo TV's Daily Dish

Bravo TV's Daily Dish

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Bravo TV's Daily Dish

"She was always the glass in. Margaret, the air great, it's gone. And then also looking ahead to Daniel's wedding. This is going to be interesting to see how it plays out this season. Because obviously, we know what happens. I mean, we're gonna see signs of trouble in paradise along the way I asked Margaret if she did because she was so close to the situation you'll have to wait one. She so many. Close. All right. Well, I'm gonna do double duty today. Oh, we talk a little bit about some word on the street. So just the other day was Bethany birthday we saw some post from house and other people wishing happy birthday, but the one I want to talk about is Kyle Richards. So she posted a series of pictures with Bethany throwback picture from her wedding. There was MoMA Paris Hilton in it, some kind of hung over saga that they had where they had gone out after one of Bethany is launch parties, and it was like Bethany had no makeup, and she was like, it's all Kyle's fault. But then the other picture that just seemed very random was it was the two of them pretty recently and Rita ORA who. What is she doing there, which one of them is friends with real? I mean, I would imagine just a series of like Kyle. And then Paris at Nick like, I feel like they might be the line. But you know, Rita did also date rob Kardashian back in the day. Right. Right. Right. Right. That's all they're all kind of in the same could've been at a fifty shades red carpet event aura was there. Who knows who knows? I mean, I want to know more. I would love to know more. But I thought it was really cute. I love those throwback pictures of seeing them when they're really young. And how different they look whether it's age or other things that have changed area. They look, but it was great to see, you know. Happy birthday Beth name. Happy birthday. I also want to talk a little bit. You know, we're talking about Andrew pump rules earlier on I think Jack's might have fatherhood on the brain. And I'll tell you why. So he posted a picture on his way to a charity event. And he made this really funny like goal. F- pun. I mean, it wasn't super funny. But it was a golf punt. And he has tagged it dad jokes. And I will say Jax was looking like a snack in this picture. Looking pretty good in the pick. And he made a dad jokes hashtag there to kind of be like, I know I made a silly pun. But this isn't the first time recently he sort of made a dad reference or talked about things. Yeah. He also tweeted not too long ago right around Halloween. I gotta be honest. I can't wait to take my kids trick or treating and or stay home and pass out candy. It's the dream very soon. Okay. I am just going to say this any any listeners out there. Who are like? Yeah. I wanna see Jackson's debt. I'm gonna tell you don't because Jack said in an interview that he will not raise his children in LA. He would move. So if Jack's and Britney decide to have a kid, that's the end. Right. So we have to keep that in mind. We need them to put off this parenthood thing little bit longer..

Margaret Jack Kyle Richards Rita ORA Bethany MoMA Paris Hilton Jackson Daniel Jax Paris golf rob Kardashian Beth Andrew LA Britney
"moma" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"It's just annoying. So I just like with without completes, I'm not trying to be not old. It's completely destroyed the world, but without an actual understanding of how the intricate levels of social economic infrastructure and how it really destroys people's lives. You can't just take something it'd be all that great. Let's add in. I think it could needs to. Got into the country. Obviously, they've got in the MoMA women have this power, put them into the defensive. He's the man printed who's obviously whoever's guarded government. It's the channels to get to these bases woman in impotence. And she finds a way that the woman who kills the male. I can't. When you when you win. Talking to myself. Like, what can they do? You know your book on black radicalism. Facing said ternary? Yeah. If if if a straw ever, basically, if an institution is inherently racist, putting more black people in that eliminate the races. So if institution is inherently sexist, women. Therefore we have to tell the whole thing down. So therefore, if the world, if society is inherently sexist in order to create a new society, you have to just on some things, you have to get rid of everything. To understand the commodification. Sorry, this is episode of black mirror with that sexy man. You know what? He's, he's basically the thing to throw and he's talking about, you know, this talk you for for q. and then to to night of commodified him and he's on selling telling the knives, stuff like that. Therefore, like is easy to commodified pain or Reverend forever aggression. Bob, I think the system commodified that that's what we will break down because the can is cycle. But my only problem is other people pay enough attention to off this destructions done and we have complete hails. What next. That's the most important part because we're very much about yet as break the Simpsons down. Let's tear it down. Okay. Well, you've done that. What next he was going pick up the reins who's going to clear out your mess. And and how do you then blocks? No, no, no. I think to know how to build the blocks, whereas now equality in the society that we're in and just being so much like, okay, how do we tear it down and then destruction, and then it's easy to to if we do what we know. Right. So we'll probably make the same system again. I mean with onto. Going to always get top. I definitely some really interesting. Why did you not like to? Okay. So this is why didn't to. There's a guy in here who's a generalist and his name is tune day. He's my Jaren journalist. He goes around different countries to highlight. The rebellion essentially and how women he goes to Saudi Arabia. He meets this woman couldn't were, and she's like, yeah, women can't drive in this country. So let's blow up these cars. And he's basically journalist who works for CNN. That's. Probably not making that much money. For the for the stuff of the content, given five thousand. Yeah, I know. Yeah, it's actually, he goes around showing the world. Badian and these women. And I didn't like that because. Still like. In a wealth of women are betting its demand of telling the woman's story, and he's the one going around showing the weld and he's writing this massive book, right? And I was like. Perspective in the book this mess, not forget I toward. In order for me to always need rebut. We'll say, I'll have to give something away. Oh, should I have a moment? 'cause wrong. I don't want to because people it's a massive spoiler. Spoiler let me okay. Pay, we'll basically tune. They has his works by women and she takes credit for it..

Bob MoMA Saudi Arabia CNN Badian
No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

Morning Edition

01:24 min | 3 years ago

No current moves on Viacom-CBS merger

"There's new CBS chairman and CEO, les Moonves is leaving NPR's. Steve inskeep. Talks to the New Yorker magazine. Reporter this morning about the newest allegations against moma's CBS says there's no severance package worked out from this pending the results of the investigation, and for CBS the departure has bearing on an ownership battle for the corporate structure of CBS. Marketplace. Nancy Marshall genzer who was Moonves fighting with on the CBS board. He was in a battle with Sherry Redstone over a possible sale of CBS Redstone heads a company called national amusements. She's the daughter of Sumner Redstone Sumner Redstone had controlled CBS. And Viacom they were under one roof. But he split them up Sherri Redstone wanted to reunite them. But Moonves thought that was a bad idea, and why was Moonves against that? Well, Viacom is struggling it owns some cable TV channels that aren't doing well comedy central and MTV moon. Moonves didn't want Viacom to drag down CBS, which has been doing been doing. Well, CBS actually sued the red stones and national amusements national amusements filed a countersuit and on that score. What happens now both sides have dropped their lawsuits. The CBS board has been we shaped with six members stepping down and being quickly replaced share Sherry Redstone in national amusements have promised to wait at least two years before proposing. Merger between CBS and

CBS Sherry Redstone Cbs Redstone Sumner Redstone Sumner Redston Kristen Dickey Viacom IRS Les Moonves Accountant Steve Inskeep Toyota Nancy Marshall Genzer Chairman And Ceo New Yorker Magazine Sherri Redstone James Moonves
"moma" Discussed on Critical Role

Critical Role

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Critical Role

"Let's go still pick the when you want to go with the previous when you don't have to pick the one right. Yeah. So from best you can tell there is nothing contraption here to the cage. It's just kind of come up close and look inside. You can see key tour. Your partner is slumped and the back of the cage, unconscious. You can see it with a little bit of light. Seniors, focus divisions. You can coast through and you can see unconscious face. He still breathing, but there are wounds scrapes. Look and see a Sar who's awake who's currently just holding what looks to be some sort of burn puncture like right, kind of in his abdomen. Just kind of like looks up through sweat to be on his face. I'm not. Clean the cage puts his hand over the of the bar reaches out free with the other hand. Joins us fingers. Moma's here. I wanna heal them in a way. Can I heal them if you ever. Stick. I have healing word. So what's your healing. What's what's the word you say that? Oh, what's the word I say is. Be well. Before. Three, three. I'll take it plus.

Moma partner
American cyclist couple victims in alleged ISIS attack in Tajikistan

Forum

04:57 min | 3 years ago

American cyclist couple victims in alleged ISIS attack in Tajikistan

"Live from. NPR news in Washington on Giles Snyder crews are beginning to make some progress toward containing that deadly, car fire in and around Redding California NPR's Kirk siegler reports on the fire situation out west he says there's lots of reasons why it's worsening wildfires like the car fire happening as many parts of California and the west. Coast or reporting record heat waves, scientists, point to climate change is one. Of the main reasons why fuels in the forest and wildland or at historically dry levels and susceptible to major wildfire admissions during prolonged. Heat spells climate change and rising CO two emissions just one culprit though behind the worsening. Wildfire seasons because natural. Wildfires. Were historically suppressed in many places there's a huge amount of unnatural fuel build up at the same time, forests and wild, lands in states, like California are increasingly suburban is with more homes and property and, infrastructure being built in harm's way Kirk siegler NPR news Culver city State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert says a. US at least for now must. Take North Korean leader Kim Jong UN ete his word about the remains of American war dead we certainly hope that they are what chairman Cam in, the, North Korean government presented them today US officials are. Preparing ceremonies, begin the process of analyzing fifty five boxes North Korea says are the remains of American stating from the Korean war they were handed over last Friday. A repatriation ceremony planned Wednesday at Osan airbase in South Korea than the remains will be flown to, Hawaii where they will undergo forensic analysis a federal judge in Seattle blocking a Texas company from publishing plans for three d printable guns on blind Matt largely of member station k. UT in Austin reports this comes after eight. States and the district of Columbia, sued, the federal government the lawsuit is. Seeking to block the State Department from allowing the Austin based company defense distributed to publish blueprints for the guns the files have already, been public Several, days and have been. Downloaded, thousands of times anyone with, commercially available three d printer can make one of, the guns the State Department overseas arms export rules under the Obama administration. It blocked defense distributed from posting the plans but in April the Trump administration reached an agreement. With the company carving out, an exception in the rules governing arms exports, in granting the, restraining order the judge said these untraceable guns could end. Up in the wrong hands his. Order only temporarily blocks the posting until the merits of the lawsuit can be heard Br NPR news I met largely the first trial stemming, from special counsel Robert Muller's, investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election has gotten off to, a, quick start former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort on. Trial for financial crimes and opening statements Tuesday prosecutors portrayed Manafort as a tax. Cheat who funneled tens of millions he made working for Ukrainian political party with ties to Russia through offshore accounts manafort's lawyers have. Manafort relied on others to keep Track of the money this is NPR ISIS has, claimed responsibility for an attack in Tajikstan that killed four cyclists. Including two Americans State Department is looking into, that claim as, NPR's Michele Keleman reports State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert, is expressing deep condolences to the families of the victims we cannot confirm who was. Responsible for that attack at this time the US government is providing its. Assistance to the government of Tajikistan as they spearhead this investigation and will provide more information, as, we get. A car rammed into the cyclists on a road south, of the capital do Shamba Sunday and local authorities say the driver and several others got out and stabbed the victims among those, killed were j Austin and Lauren Geoghegan who were on. A, year long round the world by trip Michelle Kellerman NPR news the. State Department officials in Mexico say they have confirmed that all passengers and crew. Survived Tuesday's plane crash in the state of Tarango However dozens of people were injured when the jet. Crashed while taking off during a severe storm and. Then catching fire, the jet had nearly one hundred passengers and four crew members on board but they were all able to make it to safety before flames engulfed the plane to Michigan now the state supreme court they're leaving it up to voters to decide whether. To change how the state's congressional and legislative districts are drawn and afford a three decision late Tuesday the Michigan justices rejected a lawsuit that challenged a ballot measure that would put, redistricting in, the hands. Of an independent commission a question will now go to a statewide vote this November I'm, Joel Snyder this is NPR news from Washington Support, for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the vital projects fund supporting the museum of modern art in Manhattan where. Summer in the sculpture garden includes Peter officially and. David vices, snowman more info. And tickets at MoMA dot org.

NPR State Department Paul Manafort Kirk Siegler Heather Nauert California Washington United States Chairman Culver City State Department North Korea Americans State Department Michigan Osan Airbase Giles Snyder Austin Kim Jong Un
Oprah Winfrey enters multi-year partnership with Apple

All Things Considered

02:08 min | 3 years ago

Oprah Winfrey enters multi-year partnership with Apple

"Disease diseases using a prick of blood two years ago homes was temporarily banned from doing any blood testing work this is npr news president trump is distancing himself from attorney michael cohen who's facing an fbi investigation over his business dealings trump says he likes cohen but has not spoken to him in a long time cohen is the man who paid an adult film star not to talk about her allegations of past affair with trump in a court filing yesterday prosecutors in new york's that they're still processing material seized from cohen in april raid including shredded documents stocks recovered from heavy losses early friday but still ended lower steve beck nerve reports the us and other markets are gauging the latest geopolitical and economic news wall street took in stride the federal reserve's much anticipated interest rate hike wednesday chairman jerome powell said the quarterpoint increase was justified by how well the economy is doing but once again a rosy domestic outlook underscored by strong retail sales was overshadowed by escalating trade tensions stocks sold off sharply after the trump administration announced fifty billion dollars of tariffs on chinese imports and china vowed to retaliate despite friday's losses tech shares drove the nasdaq up one on a third percent for the week but the dow lost nine tenths of a percent the s and p was flat for npr news i'm steve beck ner media mogul oprah winfrey has signed a multi year deal with apple to create original entertainment programming under the agreement winfrey will remain chief executive of cable channel own which she launched in two thousand eleven in partnership with discovery i'm shay stevens npr news in washington support for npr comes from npr stations other contributors include vital projects fund supporting the museum of modern art in manhattan where bodus is it came galas city dreams is on view more info and tickets at moma dot org and the annie e casey foundation.

Bodus Manhattan Museum Of Modern Art Washington Chairman Steve Beck FBI Attorney President Trump Disease Annie E Casey Foundation Donald Trump NPR Shay Stevens Chief Executive Apple Oprah Winfrey
"moma" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"I thought moma would win that i didn't do that was something i could win shea to you thank you so my dad's birthday is june fifteenth and you know i try my best to be a great son chance i can and when you are coming up with gifts for your parents sometimes that can be difficult and you know i want to ask you guys get your opinion what was the one gift you got your parent either one that you were for sure like oh yeah they dug this like this one this one worked for me this year okay mine is in it i've given this gift multiple times it's a blue piece of paper with a dollar amount and my signature that is that's my mom wives she calls them thanks for that blue piece of paper collage that's pretty good well my dad is my dad's like a farmer now and he's like you got like his whole orchard he he makes everything he's like oh i just got some i just harvested some cherries i'm gonna make some bourbon cherry liqueur and i'm gonna make some cherry pie and some so mostly good good good well the bourbon cherry liqueur is it's legal so he he usually wants like some kind of farmers thing so i go to the store on ventura boulevard that sells like stuff for people who make their own booze and make their own jellies and make their own all of that kind of feel kind of weird going in there i'm like can i get some of that i don't know the powder that you use it you know it's like something like curator's.

moma shea
"moma" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"moma" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"State rep moma estes from albuquerque mojo introduce h j m nineteen sponsor memorial calling on new mexico state legislature to establish an interim task force to study election reform and a comprehensive way founder of a new mexico pin primaries bob pearl stated we bring needed reforms to the legislature but are told that it is too complex to braun is clear to our board into many observers this is a complex but solvable policy the need some indepth conversation between all stakeholders that would be democrats republicans it don't forget libertarians are now are major party in new mexico and the fastest growing segment of the electorate is independence declined to state category open primaries if necessary of course study it get a right to do a willy nilly don't just no doer make giant mistakes two there could be fraud doer right but do it open up the primary so everybody can book got an opinion on that anything else four to four twelve six fifteen minutes before two o'clock wednesday afternoon last day of january and warmer 56 degrees right now we'll be right back talked wells safety ktar see richard eades the voice saniff we'll be coming back to richard each.

founder braun new mexico richard eades State rep moma estes albuquerque mexico bob pearl fraud four twelve six fifteen minute 56 degrees