17 Burst results for "Molly Webster"

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | Last month

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Time on Freakonomics radio woke and are you ready for Freakonomics? It comes up at three. Tonight. Partly cloudy in the evening Mostly cloudy overnight with lows in the mid fifties Wednesday, creasing after midnight and tomorrow it will be mostly cloudy in the morning, clearing out with sunny skies high seventies to the lower eighties and temperatures going to warm up Through Tuesday and then we'll have some slight cooling later on in the week. Could I ask when this might air? Yeah. I'm four months pregnant today, and I just gotta Yeah. No, it's super exciting and I was Diagnosed with Hashimoto's, Uh Oh, uh, six months ago. So it was just like wait is is Hashimoto's an autoimmune disorder? It is, huh? I'm Molly Webster. And I'm Lulu Miller. This is radio lab. And today we are looking into one of the biggest medical mysteries, which is why bodies sometimes turns on itself. Um and miles. You're going to lead us through this one. Yeah, And it's something I got pulled into when I first was working on Go, Nads, go nads. For anyone who hasn't listened. Is.

Lulu Miller Molly Webster tomorrow today four months six months ago first Tuesday one Hashimoto Tonight mid fifties Wednesday Go three seventies after midnight go nads Nads Freakonomics eighties
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 10 months ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sent us an email and we'll consider it I and I and I just thought who has the right like who has a right to be for gotten or who doesn't have the right to be forgotten? Who's making those decisions? What are the kinds of things that they're thinking about when they're deciding who did delete and who not to delete? And so when I was talking to Chris, I was asking him all of this. And for reasons I don't entirely understand. He just said. I mean, you're welcome Toe. Listen in, you know, why don't you just come see for yourself Way? Talk it out. Just acknowledging this continues to be very much an experiment s o. That brings me into the room. I'm Molly Webster High. It's lovely to meet you. So they meet about once a month. When I visited. There were seven people in the room. Molly pretty Standard issue Conference room. There was the special projects manager. Social media editor, the public advocacy manager crimes editor who have Mike and Mark a former rock critic who is now the head of the culture desk. Mark Mike and sports editor. You're Okay, Okay, but we all sit around a long table. Chris outlines the rules of engagement. We're not going to name the people's. We talked about him. We'll just use the numbers for the cases well, and everyone has in front of them. This document that's about 50 pages. It has 12 different cases outlined in each case has got the articles attached to it. The statement of the person about what they want removed. Is it a name or a mug shot and a personal plea for why they want it taken down? Yeah, Yeah. Cool already. Sorry. Yes. All right. So this is in attorney that mean there's one sentence really about him caught up in another case. Um, did plead to a misdemeanor and did have it expunged. I mean, this would seem to me to be a no brainer. And but he's an attorney charged with obstruction of justice. You pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice, Mr Arena charge of obstructing justice. Quick note for a morass of legal and ethical reasons. We're going to try to keep all the people we talk about anonymous, so you're going to hear a number of beliefs Korea's case he was a minor figure in it. The other tour Tammy's.

Chris attorney Molly Webster High Um Mark Mike editor special projects manager Toe Korea Tammy Mr Arena
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 11 months ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're talking about vaccines. And before the break we heard about Maurice Hilleman, the remarkable man responsible for 40 vaccines. Guy who literally changed the course of human health but who also understood The deep cost of creating those vaccines, the lives that have to be put on the line in order to test their efficacy. And for the last bit of the show, we want to meet some of the people who Voluntarily putting themselves in harm's way now to test different covert vaccines. And to do that, I'm going to bring on board our senior correspondent Molly Webster, That's me. Hello. Okay, So so now we We've got vaccines. We've got the big three that are out there. Darrin. A AstraZeneca. Fizer. What? So, yeah, Take it from there, So they take it from there is that there are eight million people in the world. And we want all of them as many of them as possible. At least 70% of them. Some say to get a vaccine, which means we want multiple covert band. We're gonna need more than three. If we're going to need more than 31 guy I talked to estimated, like 5 to 7 would be great. We need multiple vaccines and one of the ways you could test vaccines is you can wait for people to just naturally get infected with SARS Cov two and then see if your vaccine works on them. The other thing that you can do is you can actually purposely infect them with the novel coronavirus so that they get Covad 19, and you give them a vaccine at the same time, and you can see Does it work? Wow. And so my question was, there's a list out there off almost 40,000 people who have volunteered. And so my question and the question of co reporter and producer who we worked with on this piece, Laura Ross brought Tellem Woz. Who are these people? And why would they want to get infected with Cove? It? So we called a bunch of them are s O s So Lauren. I have on the phone with with a few of them. And the first one that we talked to was this woman Estefania? Yes, I am Estefania. There you go. I am a photography student. I live in Bristol and I am from Caracas, Venezuela. So what point did you bump into the notion of a challenge trial? Well, I do. Night shift at a petrol station. I've been there three nights a week for the past two years Now I'm a student. And I did this like Really implant in my mind where I was gonna gonna go work at night and then study during the daytime and I didn't veterans sleeping time. What? What is that? Like? Like what? Air that the ebbs and flow at the petrol station during Cove it like were there moments when I just was dead Quiet with no one. Or does the petrol station always stay busy? It was kind of like this dystopian reality going out Well, everyone was saying in Everything was deserted. I have Tonto travel by bus, and it's like a 40 minute bus drive. It was just me and the driver. And she told me those nights at the petrol station were like living on a planet of one. She'd be out there for hours. Just her nobody else. And so she would listen to podcasts to pass the time. Yes, I I actually learned about the campaign through a podcast. So I heard about one day sooner. And I went on the website while I was listening to the podcast. And you can see messages from people that have already signed in. The reasons to do it. Do you remember any of the things that you read.

Maurice Hilleman Molly Webster Covad Darrin Venezuela Caracas Bristol Laura Ross reporter Tellem Woz producer
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now It's like things that I thought were just like immutable biological truths can be Changed in some way. A lot of these kinds of questions came up for Molly while she was working on a Siri's called Goan. ADDS. Episode three I'm Ali Webster for the show radio land listening to radio lab. When they found these chromosomes. It was clear that if you had x to X chroma songs would develop a female girl anatomic female. And if you had a Y chromosome, so your ex wife, you develop a zone anatomic meal. That's right. Ah, boy, that was the thinking. So you see Roger and Susan. That is not wrong. But I think what I became very fascinated in was all the ways in which there is so much more to the story. Then just Egg and sperm maker like in connection to X and Y, which then raised one really big question. Why do we have such a simplistic view of biological sex? It's a specific way of thinking about things from a certain moment in history that we are potentially starting to re think. I think it's helpful to see sort of the history of how we understand. Sex in a longer time frame. And that takes us to the turn of the 20th century when scientists first discovered that the last that 23rd pair of chromosomes decides our sex for me. The true story of accent. Why starts with their name? Here's Molly Webster on the Ted stage, along with some voices of scientists she taped while reporting on her Siri's, So Within years of being discovered, these two little chromosomes had acquired more than 10 different names. There was.

Molly Webster Ali Webster Roger Siri Susan
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I was like things that I thought were just like immutable biological truths can be Changed in some way. A lot of these kinds of questions came up for Molly while she was working on a Siri's called Go Nads. Episode three I'm Molly Webster for the show radio land listening to radio lab. When they found these chromosomes. It was clear that if you have x x two x chroma songs would develop is a female girl anatomic female. And if you had a Y chromosome, so your X Y you develop is an anatomic meal. That's right. Ah, boy, that was the thinking. So you see Roger and soon That is not wrong. But I think what I became very fascinated in was all the ways in which there's so much more to the story. Then just Egg and sperm maker like in connection to X and Y, which then raised one really big question. Why do we have such a simplistic view of biological sex? It's a specific way of thinking about things from a certain moment in history that we are potentially starting to rethink. I think it's helpful to see sort of the history of how we understand sex in a longer time frame. And that takes us to the turn of the 20th century, when scientists first discovered that the last that 23rd pair of chromosomes decides our sex for me. The true story of accent. Why starts with their name? Here's Molly Webster on the Ted stage, along with some voices of scientists she taped while reporting on her Siri's, So Within years of being discovered, these two little chromosomes had acquired more than 10 different names. There was.

Molly Webster Roger Siri
"molly webster" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House. But some big devise amongst that block and some serious ambivalence could determine who is elected. President November. Listen now on the coast which podcasts from NPR. From, NPR. I'm NEWSOM Rhody. And on the show today, the biology of sex because it's more complicated than just female or male x x or X Y. One of the things that I was super surprised about was finding out the spectrum of biological sex. You know we say female wise male or ex-exits female and ex wise mail. I mean that's how we share someone if they're having a boy or they're having a girl when they announced that they're pregnant. People love those gender reveal party. He's. Yeah. This is radio journalist Molly Webster. and. What I came to find out was that you can be a whole compilation of XS unwise. So you can be x x y the X. Y. Y can be ex oh I mean it just goes on. Now. It's like things that I thought were just like immutable biological truths can be. Changed in some way. A lot of these kinds of questions came up molly while she was working on a series called gonads episode three. Webster for the show radio, or listening to radio lab. Win They found these chromosomes whose clear that if you had x x two x chromosomes who would develop as a female? Him Atomic Female, and if you had a y chromosome x y you develop as an anatomic. Boy. That was the thinking. So you see Roger. That is not wrong but I think what I became very fascinated in was all the ways in which there's so much more to the story than just egg and sperm maker like in connection to x and Y, which then raised one really big question. Why do we have such a simplistic view of biological sex? It's a specific way of thinking about things from a certain moment in history that we are potentially starting to rethink. I think it's helpful to see sort of. The history of how we understand sex in a longer timeframe and that takes us to the turn of the twentieth century when scientists first discovered that the last that twenty-third pair of chromosomes decides are sex. For me, the true story of accent wide. Starts, with their names. Years Molly Webster on the Ted Stage blog with some voices of scientists she taped while reporting on her series. So within years of being discovered, these two little chromosomes had acquired more than ten different names. There was diploam and Hetero, chromosome chromosome, and most of the names had to do with their structure, their shape, their size. And then there was sex chromosome. which they had been given because of the fact that we had started seeing that the X. would go with the females and the why would often go with the males but scientists were like. Do we really want to call them sex chromosomes. And scientists in Sarah, Richardson is the one who told me the story. For three decades, scientists were like you should not call them the sex chromosomes the X and Y have many functions, homes and You know you wouldn't assume that a single chromosome controls a single trait imagine calling one chromosome, the urogenital chromosome or. The liver chromosome. They ended up getting sex chromosome. But. In the one, hundred year history since we settled on that name. You can see it start to get a little complicated. X Y. Their discovery in our understanding of them are actually super foundational crucial to the field of genetics. But even within that field was just very very nascent. There was even a hesitation at that moment to assign a total identification of sex to these chromosomes and there were warnings of like sexes or really really powerful word that has all these connotations and traits associated with it culturally socially and attaching that to something biological can be pretty sticky and it's something we can played a lot with gender too right. Yeah, you know there's gender which is how we identify in. That's a personal identification on top of our physiology, and so when I'm talking about sex I'm talking really our biology and physiology. So I'm feeling like a rising sense of foreboding here based on what you mentioned earlier about why the scientists were concerned about naming it the sex chromosomes like what were the implications of calling them sex chromosomes? Yeah. There have been a number sort of ETA scientific level and at a social and cultural level. So in my talk, I ended up just stepping through a couple of moments that just jumped out at me while I was doing research is like Ooh. There's an implication, there's an implication, and so my first stop was discovering X Y Y which it becomes known as something called the super male wait a super mail. Yeah. So the theory goes if at that time or even today for really believing that why is male and female than what quickly follows behind that belief is the idea that traits that we associate with males and traits that we associate with females could in some way be coded in our DNA. So a few years after they realized that you can be X. Y Y researchers go to prison in Scotland and they do genetic analysis of a bunch of a male prisoners and they find a number of people who are X. Y.. And according to Sarah. They just rushed to publish a theory suggesting that this extra y chromosome could explain criminality in some men. So. The logic goes like this. By this point, we're thinking why is male we think male is aggressive. So why must be aggression? If you've got an extra Y, you must be crazy and like we went nuts with this theory, we call it the Super Mail, they started scanning more prisoners, serial killers. Boys, and in all seriousness there actually a suggestion that we consider a boarding X Y Y fetuses. So in nineteen eighty this theory pretty much toppled for a number of reasons one. There had been this really large study that basically show there was no connection between why and violence. and. Then there was one other thing. Going back and looking at those original findings in that high security psychiatric institution. They had also found a high number of individuals with an extra x chromosome. So these are x x Y as opposed to X. Y. Y. Now, they never claimed that the individuals with an extra x chromosome where super females they never investigated whether they had higher rates of.

Molly Webster NPR Sarah NEWSOM Rhody White House molly President Molly Webster. radio journalist Roger Scotland Richardson
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hey, Janet, you moron. This is radio lab today We're discussing the aftermath of the 1918 flew. How it very quietly, very invisibly. Changed the course of human history and rounding things out. Molly Webster. So, So far, we've done a lot of stories about human history and human experience. But my 1918 thing, wass What happened to the virus. I mean, at the time. We couldn't see it. We didn't have the technology to see it. We didn't even know it was a virus that we didn't know that much about viruses is there really was an unseen force. Fight. That all changed in 1997. Thanks in a big way to a guy named Johan Houlton. Johan Houlton. Yeah, he is like a legend as a science adventurer, And so basically the story goes, is like CEO Han got very interested in trying to see if they could get a sample of the 1918 flew and learn about it. So you went to Brevig Mission, Alaska, which is very, very cold place where bodies would be preserved, and there was a known flu outbreak there, late in the pandemic that killed most of the village, and so He dug down into the permafrost where there was essentially this mass grave. Went into bodies took out portions of the lungs, then sent the samples to a lab in Washington, D. C. Run by this guy, Jeff number. Hey, Jeff, It's Molly Webster. How are you? Good. How are you? Dr Jeffrey Taliban Burger..

Johan Houlton Molly Webster Jeff number Dr Jeffrey Taliban Burger Han Janet Brevig Mission Washington CEO Alaska flu
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The show today the biology of sex and just as Molly Webster said our chromosomes carry our genes in DNA molecules in our DNA tells our bodies how to express themselves physically whether we have ovaries or testes whether we have a **** or **** but what about our brains there are many theories on how women's brains differ from men's brains that's Nero scientists Lisa Mosconi on the Ted stage I've been looking upgrade for twenty years pink and blue Barbie and lego those are all inventions that have nothing to do with the way our brains are built that's sad that women's brains differ from men's brains in some respect Lisa studies the connections between neuroscience and biological sex specifically when it comes to women's health and hormones are a big part of that a lot of people working in my field like in the drain field to know all the the the work at home that much we don't think about the different active organs to something that could potentially affect the brain in the OBGYN said not equally prepared perhaps to talk about the brain hormones allow the brain and the reproductive organs to talk to each other and that conversation is crucial the from a scientific perspective and biological perspective DNA really dictates what kind the hormones your body's producing thirsty during the premiums have faith when you're visiting Andrea developing these common sense really dictate what kind of four nine three six relating your bloodstream and then inside your brain so if you have an expense to start with your brain's going to develop in such a way that optimizes for estrogen investors very early Thomas three months into the station with the baby bangs is born and then it's going to grow more than more than reading them there are growth factors to really promote brain development and development of the body of the child Indian media the start populating the baby brain with estrogen receptors whereas if you have an ex wine in the Y. chromosome contains genes that will make your body produce androgens like testosterone and that means that your brain is going to optimize for androgen receptors since in the very moment you're born you're going to have a brain is really loaded with estrogen and estrogen receptors or with androgens and androgen receptors so structurally brains on the different biochemically ain't that a little bit different from the monitor born most people think of the brain is some kind of black box isolated from the rest of the body but the reality of brain setting constant interaction with the rest of us these interactions are mediated by your hormones and we know the Hormuz differ Hey my testosterone women have more estrogen the brain is connected to the reproductive systems via and networked it discontinuities are part of the noodle and the current system is part of the system the brain talks to the overseas in the overseas talk back to the brain every day of their life as women so they handed the ovaries is linked to the health of the brain in the other way around at the same time four nine six estrogen I'm not only involved in the production but also in brain function in estrogen in particular estradiol is really keen for energy production in the brain I think it's interesting to know how it worked a little bit like key they need to open fifty feet long yeah in these locks the conference sectors for example in the female brain there are very specific parts of their brains they're very with receptors and that's where the hormones go the buying two defectors being taken to turn them on in that generates a million different things they bring energy is power you have morning me when you see that movie ceiling fans against disease you have more plus the city you have more groves in all these women's together are responsible for the master cycle in women in their connected to the ovaries the Clinton system any man obviously they're they're connected to the Texas three D. systems available for ten and is different structures are connected to each other via the Hornets the flow back and forth every day of their lives there is not just the production the real difference so many things on the need to happen inside the brain did a really facilitated by these appointments more from Lisa stony on help our brains develop differently we're talking about the biology of sex I'm a new summer roadie and you're listening to the Ted radio hour from NPR Steve oil companies in the U. S. are pumping a million fewer barrels a day than they were just two months ago airplanes fly there's no cars driving revoked three ships proving with demand plummeting one county in West Texas that depends on the oil industry is struggling I just have faith and just believing that it's all going to come back together on the next morning edition from NPR news morning edition will start at three o'clock this morning continue all the way till night I'm Jeremy Hobson if you're one of the many who decided to get a quarantine copy don't forget the dogs are supposed to socialize when they're young and it's very very important because what we know that later in life dogs can develop behavior problems we'll have pet care tips and the latest news next time on you're now coming up at eleven o'clock this morning on KQED public radio tue thirty nine support for the Ted radio hour comes from the Doris Duke charitable foundation whose building bridges program works with U. S. Muslims to increase mutual understanding and well being among diverse populations for the benefit of building stronger more.

Molly Webster
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As Molly Webster said our chromosomes carry our genes in DNA molecules in our DNA tells our bodies how to express themselves physically whether we have ovaries or testes whether we have a **** or **** but what about our brains there are many theories on how women's brains differ from men's brains that's neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi on the Ted stage I've been looking a brace for twenty years pink and blue Barbie and lego those are all the inventions that have nothing to do with the way our brains that said that women's brains differ from men's brains in some respect Lisa studies the connections between neuroscience and biological sex specifically when it comes to women's health and hormones are a big part of that a lot of people working in my field I can the brain field to not V. in the the work at home that much we don't think about the productive organs to something that could potentially affect the brain in the OBGYN said not equally prepared perhaps to talk about the brain hormones allow the brain and the reproductive organs to talk to each other and that conversation is crucial the firm assigned to the perspective and biological perspective DNA really dictates what kind the hormones your body's producing thirsty during the premiums have faith when you're visiting Andrea developing these common sense really dictate all kind of four nine six three two eight in your blood stream and then inside your brain so if you have an expense to start with your brain is going to develop in such a way that optimizes for estrogen in that sense very early it's almost three months into the station with the baby brains is born and then it's going to grow more and more than reading them there are growth factors to really promote brain development and development of the body of the child Indian media the start populating the baby brain with estrogen receptors whereas if you have an X. Y. E. N. D. Y. chromosome contains genes that will make your body produce androgens like testosterone and that means that your brain is going to optimize for androgen receptors since in the very moment you're born you're going to have a brain this is really loaded with estrogen and estrogen receptors or with androgens an androgen receptors so structurally this brings me to the different or biochemical this brings it in the end of the difference from the monitor born most people think of the brain is some kind of black box isolated from the rest of the body but the reality of brain setting constant interaction with the rest of us these interactions are mediated by your hormones and we know the Hormuz differ men have more testosterone women have more estrogen the brain is connected to the reproductive systems via and network discontinuities are part of the new don't endocrine system is part of the system the brain talks to the overseas in the overseas talk back to the brain every day of their life as women the old ladies is linked to the health of the brain in the other way around at the same time four nine six estrogen I not only involved in pre production but also in brain function in estrogen in particular estradiol is really keen for energy production in the brain I think it's interesting to know how it worked a little bit like key they need to open specific law yeah India's locks conference centers for example in the female brain very specific parts of their brains they're very dense with receptors and that's where the hormones go the bind to the receptors being taken.

Molly Webster
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Our black box our yes in a black box is it's a thing that's left the box that was something goes in you can see what that is comes out which is different you can see that but you do not know what's going on in the middle it's a mystery I love it is there a shall we go inside and our next and final black box comes from our producers Molly Webster and it begins into the butterfly rainforest so that you can see the butterflies that the flying in fact so a few days ago I was in Gainesville Florida at the Florida museum of natural history where they have rainforests it's what about three stories tall things like a top that's all wrapped in a net and then it was covered in butterflies oh my gosh there's so many thousands so the secular going is the bottom line that's Andre circle I thought of looking at butterflies when I was six years old and I have never grew up he was my guide here under the sleeve you can see all of the people one wing is like the size of my home so there were red ones left in the yellow one blue one zebra stripes one is that is that a monarch yeah helpful step on this but the flight was like good doctors to see in land of butterflies but I was there to look at the moment right before they become butterflies which remains one of the most mysterious black boxes in nature what I'm talking about is something called the chrysalis the chrysalis just back up here at a certain point in all caterpillars lives after they've eaten a lot of leaves they had a certain weight that this call have been bad gene as their final wait some hormones start pumping some genetics turned on and it starts growing a little shell that's the chrysalis and inside that chrysalis as we know a caterpillar becomes a butterfly and moth and.

Florida Molly Webster Gainesville Florida museum of natural
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:22 min | 1 year ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Quite a good driver set up right now but are you in your closet under a blanket yeah got a desk Mike from the station after my Mike that I ordered got stolen off my front porch when you do one thing I'm gonna take off my hat give me a second Mike down think of in general this is radio lab that voice of course is Molly Webster great okay so I'm recording on this sense so we've gotta back up all right Webster are you did you get your to our PhD during my thirty five minutes the H. T. okay we are in the class where in the just helter skelter mayhem of the last two weeks did you bump into this idea it was thinking about treatments basically because like the holy grail that everyone keeps talking about is a vaccine I'm thinking about how that vaccine you know the estimates are twelve to eighteen months and even in vaccine land that's pretty generous like as far as the fast time scale goes so like what happens in the interim time there are options on the table where they're like Hey there's this drugs that we've seen in the lab do well against corona viruses in mice maybe we grab that drug and we try it here they're re purposing like rheumatoid arthritis drug treatments and their re purposing drugs that they tried in the a bowler crisis but didn't work but maybe they'll work here so there's actual stuff like that happening but the thing that jumped out at me the most probably because of its like a media C. and the potential for like now of using it now is blood transfusions and transfusions I don't even know what that means right what does what does that mean because it has one more word it's blood plasma transfusions so suddenly you're like what what what is a blood transfusion the like what's plasma maybe this is something you seen mention in the press in the past couple of days to my mind when I hear the word blood transfusion I think of those medical drawings from the seventeen hundreds where you see a two running from one person's arm directly into another person's arm the idea in this case in brief is that were you know standing in this tragic gap right this way talk about last dispatch we know a little bit about this virus but not nearly enough to be able to fight it effectively and we need to do something now all the while we do notice this difference that some people on their own seem to fight off the virus just fine they have very mild symptoms others get very very sick we don't yet understand why there's that difference but maybe we could use it the thought is okay if there's a corona virus first if there's someone who had corona virus and may survive they survive because of some reason like their body did something well the end scared off this virus and crushed it and they lived and so maybe if we tap into that body as a resource and take from it the thing the part of it that fights off viruses literally get it out of the survivor into a sick person maybe we can save the sick person and so it was very rude it's super exciting super medieval of a sudden the way that you said I know I know like what century are we living is really know why this works but it kind of works to just get that in there like and we know that it's you know faith in the sense that that blood was in another person like it's almost like you've already done a human trial like if you take my blood from me it didn't hurt me so I'm giving it to someone else and we have the blood can there be like couldn't be bad stuff okay over at let me explain how it works so you would take somebody who has survived corona virus you would stick them in a chair you would stick a needle in their arm and then you would take their blood you would filter out the blood plasma leaving behind the red blood cells the white blood cells you would take that last month and you would put it into a patient who currently has corona virus No Way what is plasma so you know plasma is the part of the blood that doesn't contain any living cells so doesn't have white blood cells it doesn't have red blood cells but it has the other stuff that makes up your blood the thought is that the blood plasma is the part of the blood that holds anything that might have fought against an illness like the antibodies right and so antibodies are the things that your body makes to fight an intruder so virus comes in and we make an antibody to attack that virus and then you had it's almost like your body makes its own drug I see so if I have survived the corona virus that means that it reasons that we don't really understand I have some special drug in my blood plasma that can maybe help someone else fight it off too yeah if you look at the different options that are out there this hi a good likelihood of working this is our Turrell Cassidy of all he's an immunologist at Johns Hopkins University and he was really the first person in the states to say we should start doing this hi I have been working on antibodies for my entire academic life and I like history in my letter I read a lot about the history of how long the bodies were used this is not the first time we've thought about doing something like this we've actually been doing it since the eighteen nineties what we use for initially like in the eighteen nineties what what was it like the regular season Sir the first user for diphtheria are not sure I know what that is well here it looks like I I don't I couldn't actually dipped Syria can actually explain what the deep there is an infection caused by a bacterium diphtheria causes a thick covering in the back of the throat it can lead to difficulty breathing heart failure paralysis and so the used on that yeah and in that case the serum been calls from people who came from horses yes did that work I did it did work but then they realize you could do with human blood too high by the way he was using nineteen eighteen during the influenza epidemic I wonder why they got that idea then because he was known at the time that people who recover from infectious diseases made antibody that was known are the interpersonal price by the way in nineteen oh one was giving to end the loan bearing for this cut for this discovery yeah you could transfer immunity transferring serum well you know they use it in the twenties first scarlet fever they did it in a measles outbreak in Pennsylvania in the thirties seem to seem to stop an outbreak so people got better yeah however that practice was largely abandoned after nineteen fifty for two reasons one backing came on board and the other thing was that they discovered died log in in in some circumstances could carry virtual diseases then you have an interesting thing where like the aids epidemic you know if you think about HIV that's definitely pathogen and blood you see you see a bit of a pause and it is any blood story you see a pause around the aids crisis but then technology improves we have so many ways of screening blood in screening blood really quickly you start seeing them using it and the sars epidemic it's been used in murders that that act that respiratory infection which is a corona virus it's been used on other coronaviruses basically so when I saw that this was happening in the in the structure of the world I knew bad days could potentially use this could provide an option obviously you know like any therapy it needs to be tested and I reinforce that over and over again that one needs to look at this is an experimental therapy as president this week which is you know the second to last week in March the FDA has given like a virgin see approval just to both start investigating like the plasma transfers you know with clinical trials and sort of you know scientific protocol but then they've also located for compassionate use which is that like if you have a case and they seem like they're failing can you just can you use it you can now use that that's what the FDA saying in you now can you say this is happening in New York right these are just starting yes so Mount Sinai in New York and Albert Einstein medical college have said they hope to start using it in patients on the ground the very beginning of April essentially and Arturo and the other scientists involved in this for saying one of the amazing things about doing the plasma transfers if you're gonna find out really quick if it works if using that every one of those trials that requires years to be completed on Sunday I think that there is a good likelihood that we the ones you deployed is that you will know what it is working in a few weeks this is something that can can be tried today okay wow okay so let's get getting back too soon okay wait a second wait wait a second wait yeah my P. T. L. chillout chillout I. P. C. O. okay let me look at mine we're good we're OK we're doing good okay so we were at why why isn't it been like like like ramped up the scale I mean there's no way for you know this answer because there's not really a scale like it's like you have to find people who have the illness you have to take their blood from them and you have to make sure that blood is healthy then if it is you take their plasma from them and then you give it to someone else that's really kind of like a one to one but that is interesting Molly because it's like maybe this is the I mean okay I'm just gonna keep go wild with conjecture for a moment this is the scale moment because you have so many people who in fact many and they're all in the same place and some of them are getting better magically in some of them aren't and so you have like the ability to do like a massive it is yeah natural experiment you know but the other thing is is that so China has actually been doing this I think since January for their outbreak with with this cove at nineteen and they've been doing transfusions they've been doing this serum transfusion yeah and so and and the reports are that it's going well though nothing's published yet I mean I guess I don't quite understand why it wouldn't work it's like you six someone's blood that defeated the virus and you give to someone else and it seems like we wouldn't do the same thing so one of the problems with this type of therapy is that it works best early I'm ninety bodies work best early in the course of disease and the question is when is earlier and with covert nineteen that's a tricky question because often you have a viral count that's a growing before you have symptoms and so so a lot of times people aren't even seen people until it's like really bad so it makes it like a big difference between really bad and and the sense of care unit sh okay okay I may be missing for that week I'm again I stress the days will be a clinical trial this is a hypothesis that needs to be tested the administration of the old school class my dad going to be you may may Opry band progression of the disease so so people don't get into such trouble up there have to be a respirator and so it looks like in the states they're gonna break it down like in New York they're gonna target like these three different groups so they're going to target severe patients who really need help and are at risk of dying they're gonna target early patients who are just showing symptoms and they're also they also want to use it prophylactic Lee so actually giving it to doctors and nurses who have no viral count to our corona virus negative and see if it can actually be a preventative work yeah and that's pretty cool I mean that's really cool that feels to me like wow that feels to me like if they could do that they should just do that yeah I mean I would take it now total and I'm in my closet no I know I mean I think it's a sister in law who is a nurse who is treating covered patients and man is there something I could help her it's like wolf yeah I mean there's something kind of like just a pan out for second I think as a paradigm it's such an interesting.

Mike Molly Webster
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Name deleted or something send us an email and we'll consider it I and I and I just thought who has the right like who has a right to be forgotten or who doesn't have the right to be forgotten who's making those decisions what are the kinds of things that they're thinking about when they're deciding who to delete and who not to delete and so when I was talking to Chris I was asking him all of this and for reasons I don't entirely understand he just said I mean you're welcome to to listen in you know why don't you just come see for yourself we we talk it out just acknowledging this continues to be very much an experiment so that brings me into the room I'm Molly Webster highs of me to meet you so they meet about once a month when I visited there were seven people in the room hi I'm sorry hi Molly hi the standard issue conference room there was the special projects manager the social media editor the public advocacy manager crimes editor with Mike and mark a former rock critic who is now the head of the culture desk Mike mark Mike and sports editor here okay okay we all sit around a long table Chris outlines the rules of engagement we're not going to name the people as we talk about and we'll just use the numbers for the cases and the number well yeah and everyone has in front of them this document that's about fifty pages it has twelve different cases outlined in each case has got the articles attached to it the statement of the person about what they want removed his name on mug shot and a personal plea for why they want it taken down yeah right yeah cool ready Sir yes right so this is an attorney that I mean there's one sentence really about him caught up in and in another case it didn't plead to a misdemeanor and it did have the expungement this would seem to me to be a no brainer and you charged with obstruction of justice he pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice a misdemeanor charge of obstruction of justice quick note for a morass of legal and ethical reasons we are going to try to keep all the people we talk about and not a miss so you're going to hear a number of police.

special projects manager editor attorney Chris I Molly Webster Mike mark Mike
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live music capital of the world eighty proof Tito's handmade vodka is distilled and bottled in Austin Texas and the listeners of KQED some of the high temperatures today eighty seven degrees in Santa Rosa that's going to turn into ninety eight degrees tomorrow big jump there eighty two in napa today will turn into ninety one degrees tomorrow sixty seven degrees will be the high in San Francisco today to seventy three tomorrow and it'll be ninety one in Concord today one oh five tomorrow this is science Friday hi Molly Webster I roughly does away later in the hour we'll be talking about how online communication has changed the way we write it's a topic the new book because internet but first summer means it's time for ice cream have you ever had one favorite flavor you keep ordering and then you thought to yourself you know what I could probably make this admittedly I've never had that thought that if you were the person that had that thought you got home you mixed all the ingredients together and then you kind of got like a frozen vanilla ice cube or chocolate chunk that was just like a chunk of chocolate ice cream and all frozen desserts are not just delicious they're very complicated chemically their mix of ice crystals and emulsifiers and a lot of air bubbles so my next guests are here to tell us about the science behind these frozen treats and to help you get the perfect homemade scoop each time so I would like to welcome to the table Matt Harding's.

Tito Austin Texas KQED Santa Rosa napa San Francisco Concord Molly Webster Matt Harding eighty seven degrees ninety eight degrees sixty seven degrees ninety one degrees
"molly webster" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on Science Friday

"If you wanted to study females you had to figure out how to how to control for the hormones, and whether that meant tracking the hormonal cycle or removing the ovaries altogether so that they didn't have any circulating hormones and, you know, in my graduate work in, in my post doc work. I completely bought into that, that perspective that the female hormones were something that needed to be dealt with. And I think I've changed since you know, since I started. My own lab. And have, you know, really started to think about, you know what are we? We're trying to understand how the brain works, and in a female animal hormones are part of how the female brain works. And so, like, why are we trying to change that? We should be, you know, working within that you know that that structure. So, yeah. So I think it's, it's not really unsurprising, but I hope that with this piece it will sort of bring some of these things a little bit more to the surface, and people can think a little bit better, how to be unbiased in their research, in it's interesting in the perspective, you're sort of balancing to things, which is saying at some level, the really is. No difference in variability of hormone levels between males and females. But that at another level there, actually is are there cases in which accentuating those differences or? No just staring hard at them can actually add into gender stereotypes. I, I mean, there's always a. Danger, I guess, when you report research showing sex differences, and I think that the, the thing that scientists who do study sex differences need to be careful about is the way that you communicate your data to the public and the way that those things are written up. And you know, in try to, to think about where about the interpretations that, that can come out of your data, you know, so we a lot of the in my field in behavioral neuroscience a lot of the behavioral tasks that we use have been developed in male animals, and we have, you know, kind of standard ways that we interpret what the animal's behavior is to mean in terms of, you know, more, like human level psychological contracts. And what I think that we're going to start learning as more and more people start bringing females into these paradigms is, is that females may be using different strategies to, to work their way through these paradigms weather. It's a learning. Ask or tasks? That's trying to tap into some sort of emotional dimension. So I think that we need to be open minded about how we interpret some of our data, especially when the, you know, sort of the metrics were developed all in males. Thank my guest, this hour, Rebecca, Shansi neuroscientist and associate professor at Northeastern University in Boston, you can read her paper at science Friday dot com slash gender. Of course. My co pilot, Molly Webster, producer and guest host of radio lab and creator of the podcast series. Go. It's thank you, mulling chance giving today Charles Burke, with his are director senior producer because different tally at, and our producers are Alexa, limb Christy Taylor in Katie feather. We also had production

producer Alexa Molly Webster Charles Burke Christy Taylor Boston Rebecca Northeastern University associate professor director
"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Molly Webster. The last. I don't know. I'd take three years. It's too much for me. I've been it's too. Doing a lot of reporting about how humans make more of themselves, and we've taken that reporting and put it together in one series and the name of the series is. Go nats. I know you're thinking why I'm gonna ask you a question you say now, what do you think about the word gonads? That's crazy question. It's almost like that word moist. Like a little. Yes. That worked does have certain connotations. What do you think? Go nuts nuts. It's term for balls balls. Kessels definitely boss, Houston like stupid boy humor. Almost like toxic masculinity situation. You just think like sweaty balls jokes pretty much like kick you in the nabs. Great. Would you think it has anything to do with ladies? No, no, no, no. Did you know that ladies actually have gone ads? Also. Really? I did not know that. I did not know that did not know that. Ninety percent of the people. I talked to didn't know that they didn't know who would have thought women and men both have gone ads culture, they've stolen the word invaded mail. And I think it's time we reclaim this word. Okay. So this is episode one.

Molly Webster Kessels Houston Ninety percent three years
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm john. I'm robert. I'm sworn okay. This is radio lab. Today. We're breaking bad news bears. Okay. So everybody went out from that meeting. And again, the task was to reiterate, the breaking news story. Breaking news story bears or bears week one week to do everything. Yeah. You gotta go out. You got to get the tape. You gotta come back. Put it in the computer cut it up music. Right. The thing we have eight producers. So that retraite fat check check. In fact, Jake producers means four team. So that means we end up in the grand total of four stories. Yes. Starting who we start how about Molly Webster and Simon Adler? Well, I will say that we have check both boxes here. We have a story that is both about bears and breaking news. You're kidding. You do get extra points. So all right. You there? Matt I am great last week. We give this guy a call. My name is Matt Montaigne. And I am the director of public works for the city of words, and you've got quite the task ahead of you. Yeah. Destruction. Hurricane point is making landfall devastating flooding and damaging winds we've had hurricane hurricane Florence come through last week. One of the hardest hit areas is Newburgh in new Bern, new Bern, North Carolina. This is a live look in new Bern as the water has really overtaken this, relentless rain and wind. It's rotten down trees. If you've been watching the news at all over the past couple of weeks eaten you've probably seen Newburn on TV as you just heard. It was one of the towns that was hardest hit by hurricane. Florence homes were destroyed.

new Bern Matt Montaigne Florence Molly Webster Jake director Simon Adler North Carolina Newburgh one week
"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"molly webster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm john. I'm robert. I'm sorry. Okay. This is radio lab. Today. We're breaking bad news bears. Okay. So everybody went out from that meeting. And again, the task was reiterate, the breaking news story news story or bears or bears week when we do everything. Yeah. You go out. You got to get the tape. You gotta come back. Put it in the computer cut it up at a music, right? The thing we have eight producers to that retreat back. Check check at eight producers means four teams. So that means we end up in the grand total of four stories. Yes. Starting who we start with how about Molly Webster, Simon Adler do. Well, I will say that we have check both boxes here. We have a story that is both about bears and breaking news. You're kidding. Extra. Get extra points. So all right. You there Matt I am great last week. We give this guy a call. My name is Matt Montaigne. And I am the director of public works for the city of newborn, and you've got quite the task ahead of you. Destruction hurricane point is making landfall devastating flooding and damaging winds we've had hurricane hurricane Florence come through last week. One of the hardest. Hit areas is new bird in new Bern Newburgh, North Carolina. This is a live look in new Bern as the water has really overtaken as there's relentless rain and wind. It's brought down trees if you've been watching the news at all over the past couple of weeks, you've probably seen Newburn on TV as you just heard. It was one of the towns that was hardest hit by hurricane. Florence homes were destroyed tens of millions of.

Matt Montaigne new Bern Florence Bern Newburgh Molly Webster North Carolina director Simon Adler