17 Burst results for "Molly Schwartz"

"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:23 min | 5 months ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Helps or hurts this planet we live on. I'm Molly Schwartz. A. It makes sense what Molly sang here. There's no one piece of technology. No one silver bullet. That's going to fix the climate crisis. More likely it's going to be the work of all of us in our governments working together and reshaping the economy. If? You've been listening to all twelve episodes of the series. You know that individual choices what we eat, and how we consume energy all of that stuff. It really does matter but fixing the climate crisis getting to a carbon neutral economy. That requires the work of governments in big banks. They have to step in. They have to step up and they have to take responsibility for their massive role in shaping the global energy. Today they continue to subsidize in support fossil fuel projects. There's much to discuss in this area, but one promising development is the creation of the climate investment funds in two thousand eight. Since then this group, which again is F-, peace partner on the show has been making investments that aim to till the playing field in favor of clean energy, so we had objective work with private sector entities work with governments in developing countries in spearhead, different policy and investment decisions. That's my Duarte. She's the director of the funds I spoke with her this spring at the start of the covid nineteen lockdown. You'll probably hear some bird noises other outdoor sounds during the interview. That's only because my father did this recording outside her home in Maryland with me on the phone from Salt, Lake City. So Michaela Duarte welcome to heat of moment. Thank you very much. Shine is a pleasure to be here. I want to start with Tomi and in in our listeners, a little bit of background about the climate investment funds in. They came into existence sure John so these finds the camera finds came into existence in two thousand eight, as we will recall, that was a time of a deep financial economic crisis, so we had both that crisis, and those working in the field of climate change what also understanding that things were not moving internationally, as had been expected and so g eight countries decided that they were going to show leadership, and asked the World Bank and other regional development banks. To get together work together towards supporting developing countries make different investment in policy decisions, and so they stood up these funds. To spearhead in developing countries at a time when you know, capital flows were flowing out of developing countries where private sector was very wary of investing in developing countries in general. Let alone you know in areas where there was little experience where costs of those investments were quite high, so that was the objective is partly recognition that the private sector on its own isn't moving fast enough. To sort of switch away from fossil fuel era in to renewable energy sources. Tell me a little bit about the the need for this to exist in the world. In? The countries where we have invested, we have invested.

Molly Schwartz director Michaela Duarte Maryland Tomi World Bank Lake City John partner
"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

03:49 min | 5 months ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"And Director of the UK, Carbon Capture and storage research. He spent the past eighteen years trying to develop a technology that actually captures and removes carbon from the environment. John had his lightbulb moment back in two thousand and two was. Capture and storage conference in Kyoto. On capturing. Co To. Effectively. And what you could do it. Plead easily from conventional sources than people thought to understand what John's talking about you. I have to understand what? Is, it stands for Carbon Capture Utilization and storage and basically. CCUS is a range of technologies that are focused on removing carbon from the biosphere and storing it or using it for something else. It's a concept that's been around for nearly a century. The first capture technologies about nineteen thirty actually, and that was for people who wanted to to use for things a chemical reactions. Of Fizzy drinks actually. And it's quite effective the method used more or less than methods using now. With with very very minor changes, but just because the technology is available doesn't mean the public is willing to invest in it. So in addition to being a scientist, John's also had to become a public advocate for see us. He's authored over sixty five papers and one hundred articles and reports on CCS and related topics. Despite the technologies promise getting people to consider. CCS has been. An uphill battle. One of the challenges is converting people who are opposed to fossil fuels full. Stop the multi move to a post fossil economy. Which is fine, but we probably don't want to bet the plan on doing it within two years oddly enough. Another opposition group are other green energy initiatives since developing and deploying CCUS technology's really isn't viable without investments which come in the form of subsidies. They're competing with other green tech for those subsidies. The. Competition subsidy that's just just live what you expecting the you talking about multibillion dollar in the space? Of course they want to preserve that. Their income straight in the UK John Labs an independent group called the committee on Climate Change Powder report in two thousand nineteen that includes a commitment to get to net zero emissions by the year twenty fifty, and they've specifically listed CCS as a necessary tool for getting their John Hopes that by committing to CCS technologies, the UK will set a political example for the world to follow. Actually doesn't care how much energy humans have deployment and he cares about how much fossil calvin goes into the atmosphere. And Carbon Capture and storage. Is the other thing that addresses that really directly? It goes to the root of the problem. And it breaks this million year habit of just dumping fossil cubbon. Any comb duck sightings, the atmosphere and letting nation sort it out. Oh Whether? It's wind energy, implementing smart growth for cities or CCUS a lot of the technology. We need to make serious dense and our Global Co. two emissions is already available today. One could argue that it's technology that got us into a climate mess. In the first place, the machines we rely on to live our lives to move around and farmer food and light our homes. It's all energy intensive, but this technology has created by people in used by people in the end will be people who decide whether use technology in a way that helps or hurts this planet we live on. I'm Molly Schwartz..

CCUS technology John UK Kyoto UK John Labs Director Molly Schwartz Global Co. scientist
"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

02:56 min | 5 months ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Energy in slow deforestation, all that good stuff that we know would help with the climate crisis. The father will explain how tricky this can be, but also how promising. Her groups is not only to give loans for solar farms, but really to help tip the scales in favor of a clean energy revolution. I though we're GONNA learn a little bit more about green technology today. WHO's working on this. And where's it headed? Reporter Molly Schwartz brings us three stories of how a greener future is closer than you might think. Our first stop is New York where we meet Marguerite Wells. She's a director of renewables at energy, a clean energy company. Her career and renewable energy started fifteen years ago when she was working on her organic farm in upstate New York. Her neighbor proposed building a community owned wind farm in their town, and I thought that sounded like a great idea. But there was a problem. Margaret's neighbor wasn't very good with computers, and he couldn't figure out how to open up the PDF documents for the permiting. They need, so he recruited marguerite help, he said. Can you open a PDF? And I said yes, and he said can you print one? And I said Yes from printing that PDF, Margaret found herself increasingly involved. She started going to meetings spilling out permits building support for the project. And just like that. Marguerite became the wind farms project manager. She took it on raised three million dollars in community equity from local families in God all the permits. But, then a wealthy new landowner moved into the neighborhood. WHO OPPOSED THE WIND FARM? She created legal problems and convinced others to oppose it to the wind farm never got bill, but at that point Margaret had become a self taught expert in navigating New York State's regulatory bureaucracy, so she decided to take her knowledge and make a career out of it. She got a job working at in Benerjee a company that builds green energy projects around the world at Energy Margaret's leading a build on her fifth wind farm in third large solar farm. She's working on big wind projects that power tens of thousands of homes. But the fundamental technology has actually been around for hundreds of years. Originally, they were mills, literally windmills, milling grain and things. WHO's one of the first? Sources of power for electricity. And the technology has fundamentally changed. Really it's been improved upon certainly and the turbines that we see today. The modern generation of turbines are really about twenty five years old, so the innovation here is not the wind farms themselves, but that Margaret has figured out how to get them built. She's become an expert of figuring out permiting cutting through the red tape and teaching others how to get wind farms in their own communities. Here New York the challenges is primarily the regulatory one. If you're developing projects in the mid West. The permanent regime is easier, and the wind is much better, but you don't have.

Energy Margaret Marguerite Wells New York Molly Schwartz Reporter project manager Benerjee
"molly schwartz" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on The Pulse

"They don't have to be scared of DEF- fe okay because it it. It probably existed even before you heard the word fake. You just didn't know it at least now you know it exists. I know you you shouldn't believe that story was reported by Liz. They we're talking about fakes. What's fake what's real and weather and how it makes a difference? Sometimes we have to question and what's real or how real something is. Our next story is about a man who grew up in a very tight knit religious community everything you knew about out life or how to live came from his religious. Leaders outside information was not permitted the only real world was within the faith but then a piece of information started to unravel his beliefs. Molly Schwartz brings us the story Austin Lane Hurts Howard grew up as a Jehovah's witness in a small mall city outside of Vancouver and he says it was a bit like being in the movie the Truman Show Good Morning Oh and in case. I don't see you good afternoon after noon. Good evening and good night. Jim Carey lives this fake world. That's actually a TV show on a trauma warning Spencer. No he won't get jail. Will it felt like everything was too good to be true perfect to obnoxious amount and everything that you did was monitored everywhere that you went was monitored all your conversations where most of them felt scripted. Austin went to public school with the other kids his age but he was told to keep himself separate from them. People that I went to school with worldly people we were to be no part of this world so I couldn't be friends with others at school a lunch in the band room by myself by the Tambourines Austin knew that there was another another world out there separate from the one that he lived in. He just can be part of it. We had to wear specific type of wardrobe nothing trendy. If anything was trendy you couldn't got it. The men had to have specific haircuts so no facial hair. Your hair had to be shorter. We'd have to make sure that everything is looking a certain way because that's the way that Jehovah Would WanNa and woods glorify God's name and then on top of that the things that we were allowed to watch as far as entertainment goes if it featured any other religion weren't allowed to watch it so star wars was a no because it had the force and the force wasn't in God like the Harry Potter was obvious no instead Austin read books about his religious community he read Jehovah's Witness pamphlets and books from his mom's library abry. He learned that nineteen seventy five was a big year Jehovah's Witness History. This was the year that they had predicted the world was going to end it was a huge deal breaker think they're reach out for and it just seems given all about so much more energy and power in his final versus speed but if he's line and that's at the year nineteen seventy five alive seventy five. Let's of people joined the Jehovah's Witness Church. Some people even sold their houses in quit their jobs because they thought the world was going to end of course the world didn't end in nineteen eighteen seventy five this failed prediction didn't look good for Jehovah's Witnesses. Austin knew about the history but it didn't bother him. At first he accepted that it was just a mistake but then in two thousand seventeen when Austin was twenty three years old he went to the annual Jehovah's Witness Convention like he did every year. He sat in an auditorium Ram with hundreds of other Jehovah's Witnesses in a video started to play on the big screen. When years later another task came our way you see back then some were looking to a certain date as signifying the end of this old system of things..

Austin Spencer Liz facial hair Jim Carey Molly Schwartz Vancouver Harry Potter Truman Howard twenty three years
"molly schwartz" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

Museum Archipelago

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on Museum Archipelago

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Everything is in a constant state of decay in the past human heritage that decayed, slowly enough on stone, valium, bamboo, silk, or paper could be put in the museum still decaying, but at least visible and today, human heritage is rotting on hard drives, the entire internet, everything from social media to Wikipedia is stored on hard drives on an honest computers, waiting for the inevitable, and not too distant day when they will just wear down, and stop working human heritage lost forever to the sands of time. But there is one potentially beneficial loophole to digital heritage as compared to non digital heritage digital files can be copied, they can be copied again, and again, and again perfectly every time the path between past and future for a digital file is too. Hop from one storage to another every few years in an unbroken chain saying, one step ahead of digital decay. Digital copies aren't like Xerox of Xerox, which just become unreadable over time. And best of all, making a digital copy doesn't destroy the original with lack cylinders, there, you can only do it so many times or then the grooves will be inaccurate after playing it. But then within the digital interface because it's so easy to pick up and throw away. That's where it becomes even a higher risk of deterioration and loss within the file. This is Sarah new Ian, the project coordinator of preserve this podcast, a project that proposes solutions to fight against the threats of digital decay for podcasts. She cautions that preserving cultural digitally while having some advantages over other mediums comes with its own set of pitfalls high. So my name is Sarah new, Ian. I am the project coordinator for preserve this podcast along. Inside the two archivists airy kid and Dana, Gerber Margie, and our producer, Molly Schwartz. Currently I am an MLS student at university of Washington. So I get to bring in kind of the current readings of what people are talking about within, preservation, or within file formats. Preserve. This podcast is a tiny and delightfully meta podcast called preserve this podcast, and it is accompanied by an equally delightful Zine detailing what you can do to prevent digital decay. Podcasts are notorious for being DIY people who are independent story makers audio creators, who don't have an institutional backing usually, we kinda see as preserve this podcast as supporting what we call personal digital archiving. So PDA is the acronym for it. We want to make it so that podcasters are able to be Todd Humous and have the agency to control their content outside of the digital decay as we call it. Personal digital archiving is the idea that today individuals who history might call normal people have the opportunity to preserve via digital methods in the past. It was only the rulers or the vastly wealthy, who could take control of their own data. This is the first time in human history that your data have a good chance to be archived. That's why this whole sub program of personal digital preservation has been this movement. And I think it's like once a year twice a year. There is like a PDA conference host various institutions around the US, we're kind of just talks about, like, what are low barrier to entry practices that people can use to archive their own work because in like how real world works when you don't have the luxury of your job, being archiving any sort of digital files because you have to create these things, and make sure that there is a return on investment, artists, and creators, aren't really looking to save their work at the moment in time when you're creating something. It's a disruption to actually have to think about how do I back up and save things because you're on like a, a wave. And you kind of just want to make it make it happen. One of my other part time jobs outside of preserve this podcast is with the dance company, and when you like, just like creating a piece of work, or choreographing, a piece, while you're in the dance studio, you're not also making sure that your file is backed up off this camera off your ipod or iphone, you know, I will admit it here. I'm a hobbyist PDA, or I've systems that automatically log everything I can about my activity and health to custom, spreadsheets, I built, a private server that my phone automatically updates my location to several times a minute, so that I can always knew every museum I've ever visited you can be sure that the file, you're listening to right now will be transcribed and backed up in multiple locations for the Cording to noon. Automatically backing up is only half of what properly archiving actually means automatic backup. And automatic transcriptions are in some ways making it easier to preserve but proper archiving is also about contextualising. So it's not enough to just record podcasts or my locations, as individual entities, I need to contextualized them, too, and that's one of the bigger bottlenecks of archiving is, like, are you contextualising that object that file correctly, so that it's represented in the correct way? So I think that in certain processing like the manual side of it potentially is becoming easier, but the more intellectual side of representation, and identity of thing is becoming more difficult because especially with podcast or almost anything on the internet, YouTube videos, whatever things are being created at a much faster rate. Many, many hours of video are being uploaded to YouTube every second of every day. And each video is analyzed by machines looking for patterns expecting the machines to conceptualize all. Those hours of content is only going to lock in bias sees either Mirroring societies. Or introducing new ones the way that people have perceived, libraries museums and archives is an educational place space. Right. They think that it's all fun fun and interesting in educational versus like having a specific opinionated point of view. The whole point of podcast is that you have a story you, as an individual have this idea of how the world works, and you want to share it. That's what makes it even more important to be able to assign your own descriptive texts to it. So that you ensure that people know what you're trying to say to them. So like in our most recent episode with Caitlin Bailey who does the oldest pro podcast, she talks about, basically, the oldest profession, which is sex work, and like for her to say, you know, specific words within her podcast, it can be misinterpreted completely by Google algorithm. And that's when then her podcasts could potentially be taken down just because the automatic flagging. They'll misinterpreted as she's trying to promote sex work. It strikes me that we are in the middle of a big shift from archiving tools of the past. Now archiving is in control of the individual you instead of being left to a third party like a museum or library, but changes the Valence of collections if everyone can take over their own story, whether any of this data are going to be useful or interesting to the future is beside the point by reducing the role of chance and eliminating the institutional gatekeeper who determines which data in stories are worth preserving anyone. And everyone's data has a chance to inform future history. We put this under the guise of a PD personal digital archive. Right. So it is up to you, if you want to, and you feel the need, and, and the just want to save your own work for the future. It's. Under your responsibility. I kind of that's kind of where we're putting it at. It's kind of, like if you want to share your story, then you will go as far to preserve it versus just handing it off to someone who might preserve it under the wrong context. So I think that it's important to the point where you as a creator believe it's important. And so if we can give you all the tools and a step by step guide to do as necessary. We would love for anyone to be able to do it in the past museums, and libraries, would control who got to be collected the best way, forward might not just be to force these institutions to open up, but also bypass them altogether by making the archiving tools, accessible to all in, in libraries and archives. There is this whole debate about the archives and libraries are not neutral. We're not neutral because there is that idea that, like, yes, we want to give you the options to have access to all different types of materials. Even if it is racist. Or can be hurtful to someone but should we because are we actually neutral in that way? Like, is it going to actually help? Or is it misinformation at that point? So we wanna make sure that within your podcast when you're creating it, you're able to control so that someone doesn't misinterpreted in a way. That's why we want to give the agency to the creator themselves not to put it under the onus of someone else. And if this does take off, which we kind of hope it does that like someone will be able to fund actual server or institution where people will be able to submit it for the long term versus in the generalize in an archive, first steps are just kind of making it in an accessible way. Zena podcast workshops where people can kind of dip into the waters on feel, if it's important to them, and if they want to do it, and then if not, we're totally fine with that to preserve this podcast can be found wherever podcasts are available for now in the final episode new Aeon and the other hosts acknowledged that. Guessing their podcasts into the future depends on the three one redirect and remembering to pay their server bills. The project is funded by a grant from the Andrew w Mellon foundation and is hosted by the metropolitan New York library council. Preserve. This podcast is also travelling to various workshops and conferences, take podcasters producers, and audio archivists through their curriculum of archiving podcasts, you can find a full list of where they're going at preserve this podcast dot org. Museum.

Ian Elsner coordinator Sarah new YouTube Xerox US Wikipedia MLS Todd Humous Cording Andrew w Mellon foundation Google university of Washington Caitlin Bailey New York Molly Schwartz Dana
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People took to the streets as the orange revolution. Unfolded in Ukraine. There were massive protests in Kiev against the Russian-backed presidential candidate many of these rallies were organized online, eventually Putin and his deputies took notice. Putin's administration needed more people to be pro-kremlin voices on the internet and to drown out the anti-kremlin voices. They needed people who understood how to make information attract attention and go viral enter Constantine recall of the technically independent he had direct ties to the executive branch of the Russian government. He was especially close with Putin's deputy chief of staff Vladislav Surkov. Smell. It says that the situation was like this on one hand recall had his own commercial entity that was nominally independent. But in reality, of course, it worked in partnership with the president ministration received a lot of orders from. Did each smell of says that sometimes there were situations where they would publish something. Circus's assistant would call and say, no, please replace this article, or at least publish something about this issue. In two thousand seven Surkov the deputy chief of staff started organizing fundraising events for recovery projects that same year recovers elected to the Russian parliament for the pro-kremlin United Russia party, and then in two thousand and eight Russia annexed region in Georgia called south Setia, the Russian government had a stake in making it look like the people living in South Korea were overwhelmingly in support of seceding and joining Russia artificially, boosting an online presence people who wanted to join Russia seemed like a challenge it wasn't clear to smell of where they would get these Kremlin backers. But recall figured out a way to boost the numbers Schultz. But I've been watching smell of explains that recall, the new people into social political conversations on the internet people who weren't there in the first place, for example, by advertising, his articles on entertainment websites sites with jokes porn sites. And so on. So that people who weren't interested in politics like youngsters who were just browsing naked women would see a link. Interested click on it in gradually. They joined this community of supporters for the government for Alexander smell of this kind of blatant manipulation was too much. He left records website in two thousand eight but recove- stayed the course and has loyalty paid off in a very literal sense in two thousand six he was making four hundred thousand rubles by running this glad by two thousand ten he was reportedly earning over eight million rubles per year recover also made a play to influence audiences outside of Russia. He got active on Twitter where now he has over a quarter million followers. Eventually he caught the notice of the US government. Of course. I remember right cough. Michael McFaul served as US ambassador to Russia from two thousand twelve to two thousand fourteen we spent a lot of time thinking about him and his colleagues in terms of what were their objectives? He was very active in talking about foreign policy in particular was he paid coordinated. These are the fuzzy lines that the Putin government delivered. Keeps fuzzy also a bit fuzzy it's recovered role in helping Donald Trump in the White House back in two thousand fifteen record built a website called Trump 2016 dot argue he began actively supporting Trump online, the impact of recaps campaigning is unknown. But Chanel of explains that record had his reasons for boasting about helping Trump. Smell and says that in this way on the one hand he raises his sniff, and everybody's eyes and on the other end he intimidates them by showing that he can create a media event out of nothing. It seems unlikely that one man could effectively sway in election. The recall was a pioneer in developing a new tactic for the Russian government. He helped the Kremlin figure out how they could enlist trolls to shift the media narratives, or at least create confusion about what's true, and what's fake and with the troll template in place. They were about to enlist a lot more of them for America abroad. I'm Molly Schwartz..

Russian government Vladislav Surkov Russia Donald Trump Schultz Michael McFaul deputy chief of staff US Kiev Putin Ukraine Russian parliament United Russia Trump Molly Schwartz Circus president South Korea Kremlin Constantine
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's been reports of the GRE which is Russian military intelligence creating fake comments on news sites creating fake social media profiles Russian forces attempt to seize and control internet access on the Crimean peninsula. Russia drummed up support in Crimea. And then went in militarily move forces towards the border with Ukraine where they had in previous. Sleep been stationed and very quickly seizes the territory of Crimea, initially Russia denied it had troops in Crimea. The soldiers had no insignia on their uniforms, but they carried Russian weapons. Vladimir Putin said they were quote, local Self Defense Forces and Russia, then annexes Crimea, effectively admitting all of the things that they've done there that there was Russia acting Russia didn't just lie and it didn't just put out propaganda. It's subterfuge. In Crimea went deeper. Russia is undermining sort of objective reality. They are putting out messages that make it seem like there's no objective truth. It wasn't long before. American State Department officials in Ukraine started picking up on all this disinformation. Molly Schwartz brings us the story. when Russia annexed Crimea, it sent the US State Department, scrambling SRI, Preston Carney was working there as a foreign service officer. He remembers how things unfolded next. The State Department actually tried to bring together a collection of Russia experts and public diplomacy experts to try and do a counter messaging task force. She was tapped to be the campaign director for this new Ukraine communications task force. He began to notice some strange things about the way that the conflict was being described on Russian media. I saw people claiming that the CIA had put dead bodies inside a plane, and then purposely shot it down in order to create propaganda against the Russian government people were repeating that story again, and again, and I realize we had gone through the looking glass at that point that if people could believe that they could believe almost anything SRI and his task force were responding in real time. They noticed that. There are a few influential. Names who are driving the narrative on the Russian side. We would have certain actors who would pop up again. And again number one on that list was Constantine recalled he was active on Twitter and a lot of other social media like live journal contact you an no class, Nikki he was fluent in the language of the Russian internet culture. He had helped invent it. Here's Alexander smell of. He says that starting in the mid nineties recalled started to be actively involved in the development of Russian internet ball. He was still a teenager. Budrus smell of used to work with recall at a propaganda online news site. It's called the add ons and produces it says that was at the roots of something called the Donut culture. But these were young people who are coming onto the internet in inventing their own language there and generally making a mockery of everything. Having fun in creating a sort of subculture soaps smell of remembers that in those days, the political discussions on the internet were mostly anti-putin. The internet was one of the few places where the opposition movement could communicate freely through school. When Putin first came to power in the year, two thousand he wasn't paying much attention to this kind of activity online. Here reportedly didn't use a computer, and he was busy tightening control over Russian newspapers and TV news channels, but then in two thousand five things changed..

Crimea Russia Vladimir Putin Constantine Ukraine Preston Carney US State Department director American State Department Self Defense Forces CIA Molly Schwartz Twitter Alexander officer Nikki
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:28 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The start of the Meydani on protests in late twenty thirteen that eventually escalate and lead to kovic leaving power Yanukovych was replaced by petro, Porsche Anco who is more pro Europe for Russia. That was a big problem. So Moscow took advantage of that east west split that already existed in Ukraine. There's been reports of the GRU which is Russian military intelligence creating fake comments on news sites creating fake social media profiles Russian forces attempt to seize and control internet access on the Crimean peninsula. Russia drummed up support in Crimea. And then went in militarily move forces towards the border with Ukraine where they had in previous. Sleep been stationed and very quickly seizes the territory of Crimea, initially Russia denied it had troops in Crimea. The soldiers had no insignia on their uniforms, but they carried Russian weapons. Vladimir Putin said they were quote, local Self Defense Forces and Russia, then annexes Crimea, effectively admitting all of the things that they've done there. There was Russia acting Russia didn't just lie and it didn't just put out propaganda. It's subterfuge. In Crimea went deeper. Russia is undermining sort of objective reality. They are putting out messages that make it seem like there's no objective truth. It wasn't long before. American State Department officials in Ukraine started picking up on all this disinformation. Molly Schwartz brings us the story. When Russia annexed Crimea, it sent the US State Department, scrambling SRI Preston, cool Carney was working there as a foreign service officer here members how things unfolded next. The State Department actually tried to bring together a collection of Russia experts and public diplomacy experts to try and do a counter messaging taskforce SRI was tapped to be the campaign director for this new Ukraine communications task force. He began to notice some strange things about the way that the conflict was being described on Russian media. I saw people claiming that the CIA had put dead bodies inside a plane, and then purposely shot it down in order to create propaganda against the Russian government people were repeating that story again, and again, and I realize we'd gone through the looking glass at that point. And that if people could believe that they can believe almost anything SRI and his task force were responding in real time. They noticed that. There are a few influential. Names who are driving the narrative on the Russian side. We would have certain actors who would pop up again. And again number one on that list was Constantine recall. He was active on Twitter in a lot of other social media like live journal, the contact you and on no class, Nikki he was fluent in the language of the Russian internet culture. He helped invent it. Here's Alexander smell of. Starting in the mid nineties recalled started to be actively involved in the development of Russian internet, and he was still a teenager. Smell of used to work with recove- at a propaganda online news site. It's called physically add ons and produces it says that was at the roots of something called the culture. But these were young people who are coming onto the internet in inventing their own language there and generally making a mockery of everything. Having fun in creating a sort of subculture soaps smell remember is that in those days with the political discussions on the internet were mostly anti Putin? The internet was one of the few places where the opposition movement could communicate freely through. When Putin first came to power in the year, two thousand he wasn't paying much attention to this kind of activity online. Here reportedly didn't use a computer, and he was busy tightening control over Russian newspapers and TV news channels, but then in two thousand five things changed. People took to the streets as the orange revolution. Unfolded in Ukraine. There were massive protests in Kiev against the Russian-backed presidential candidate many of these rallies were organized online, eventually Putin and his deputies took notice. Putin's administration needed more people to be pro-kremlin voices on the internet and to drown out the anti-kremlin voices. They needed people who understood how to make information attract attention and go viral enter Constantine recall of technically independent, he had direct ties to the executive branch of the Russian government. He was especially close with Putin's deputy chief of staff Vladislav Surkov. Smell. It says that the situation was like this on one hand recover had his own commercial entity that was nominally independent. But in reality, of course, it worked in partnership with the president's administration been received a lot of orders from them. As each smell of says that sometimes there were situations where they would publish something coughs assistant would call and say, no, please replace this article. At least publish something about this issue. When you the associate in two thousand and seven Surkov, the deputy chief-of-staff started organizing fundraising events for recovery projects that same year recovery was elected to the Russian parliament for the pro-kremlin United Russia party, and then in two thousand and eight Russia annexed region in Georgia called south of Setia, the Russian government had a stake in making it look like the people living in south of Secchia were overwhelmingly in support of seceding and joining Russia artificially, boosting an online presence of people who wanted to join Russia seemed like a challenge it wasn't clear to smell of where they would get these Kremlin backers. But recall figured out a way to boost the numbers Schultz. But I've want you smell of explains that we call the new people into social political conversations on the internet people who weren't there in the first place, for example, by advertising, his articles on entertainment websites sites with jokes porn sites. And so on that people who weren't interested in politics. Like youngsters who were just browsing naked women with ceiling. Get interested click on it and gradually. They joined this community of supporters for the government for Alexander smell of this kind of blatant manipulation was too much. He left records website in two thousand eight but recove- stayed the course and his loyalty paid off in a very literal sense in two thousand six he was making four hundred thousand rubles by running by two thousand ten he was reportedly earning over eight million rubles per year, recall semitic, plate influence audiences outside of Russia. He got active on Twitter where now he has over a quarter million followers. Eventually he caught the notice of the US government. Of course. I remember I cough. Michael McFaul served as US ambassador to Russia from two thousand twelve to two thousand fourteen we spent a lot of time thinking about him and his colleagues in terms of what were their objectives? He was very active in talking about foreign policy in particular was he paid coordinated. These are the fuzzy lines that the Putin government deliberately keeps fuzzy also a bit fuzzy Israel comes role in helping Donald Trump win the White House back in two thousand fifteen record built a website called Trump 2016 dot argue he began actively supporting Trump online. The impact of recalls campaigning is unknown. But Chanel of explains that recap had his reasons for boasting about helping Trump. Of smell and says that in this way on the one hand he raises the significance, and everybody's eyes. And on the other end, he intimidates them by showing that he can create a media event out of nothing. It seems unlikely that one man could effectively sway in election. But recall was a pioneer in developing a new tactic for the Russian government. He helped the Kremlin figure out how they could enlist trolls to shift the media narratives, or at least create confusion about what's true, and what's fake and with a troll template in place. They were about to enlist a lot more of them for America abroad. I'm Molly Schwartz. For the past few years reports have surfaced of buildings in Saint Petersburg and Moscow teaming with trolls who produced blog posts comments and memes designed to influence opinions so confusion online, the most well known of these is the internet research agency. That's a troll farm in Saint Petersburg. It's been recently sanctioned and indicted by the US the internet research agency is a shadowy organization much of what we know about. It comes from a handful of Russian journalists who went undercover the troll factory reporter, Charles Maine's recently met with one of them Ludmila sobbed juke, I got wind of the troll farm back in twenty fourteen we which local activists and journalists in Saint Petersburg subject started noticing websites and social media accounts that attack Russia's opposition with a frequency and viciousness. She hadn't seen before she wondered who is doing this. Why? And so when she later heard that the rumored organization behind the campaign. Pain a company called the internet research agency was hiring writers sobbed Chook jumped at the chance. Tell us I wanted to get in there to see how it works. Of course, the most important thing was to see if there was some way to stop it. Once on the inside south took says, she was struck by the size of the IRA's operation in a four storey office building on salvage street. Hundreds of trolls worked around the clock and rotating shifts. There were the social media cedars commentators on one floor on another visuals team cranking out videos in a seemingly endless supply of jokey. Political picture means known as de motivators and subject says fake news websites. Also served as soldiers in the IRA digital army, computer, snow Spitzer on their computers is a list of topics that they work on every day things. Like, the US you Vladimir Putin the Russian military opposition the achievements by Russia each worker has their daily quota to fill or nightly. The factory never stopped. Not for a second. Celtics own contribution to the IRA was as a paid blogger with an unusual. Beep, she was tasked with pretending to be a fortune teller mixing musings on astrology. And rare gemstones with the -cational pro-kremlin talking point it was subtle stuff. Admit sop, schuch and proof that the IRA's mission was to reach as much of the Russian audience as possible. Internet. You knew the trolling was aimed at Russians who don't watch state television because you need to capture every mind in Russia, and the trolls went after people of all tastes and all levels of education. In total subject spent two and a half months at the IRA before she published an expose in a local newspaper by the time. She left she had zero doubt the IRA's work was coordinated with the Kremlin and with state media. Because of those ties she says the trolls acted with impunity. Several opposition activists friends of hers were beaten by unknown assailants after the trolls published their home addresses when police refused to file charges soft yolk took the IRA to court. She even want a symbolic one ruble victory. Over the troll farm back in two thousand fifteen over its labor practices. For this reason south cheek applauds the decision by special counsel, Robert Muller, last February to indict thirteen employees of the IRA as part of his ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen presidential elections, and you manage the propaganda propaganda is a giant machine that has no beginning, and no end and even know state boundaries. But we forget that real people make this propaganda. Sometimes their neighbors, sometimes are friends and sometimes even our colleagues clinic, ultimately she argues naming and shaming is the best way to stop. Russia's troll army, and there are risks to her safety involved. Saab? Check knows that to Justice. She knows that when it comes to expose the trolls, she's just getting started for America abroad. I'm Charles Manson, Saint Petersburg. Coming up after the break. It's not just Russian trolls who are causing headaches for the west will look at how Russian state media creates chaos and confusion, Disney, no difference between facts and conspiracy theory or between.

Russia Vladimir Putin Russian government IRA Crimea Ukraine US Twitter Russian parliament Molly Schwartz Moscow Constantine recove Alexander Putin government US State Department America
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is Wednesday today the twenty fourth day of October good as always to have you along everybody. We will give the merest of nods a glance perhaps to the market events of this Wednesday. Yes, it was ugly in equities as far as down the S and P five hundred Arkansas whatever they gains they made from New Year's yesterday might as well never have existed. Both of those indices are negative for the year. But two things one that is what markets do people. They go down to also there is something more structural that. We wanted to talk to you about new home sales fell five and a half percent last month. That's according to numbers out from Commerce Department this morning, a sluggishness not seen in two years. Also sales of existing homes are at their slowest in nearly three years. So with prices going up and interest rates go up as well. We asked marketplace's Justin ho to talk to some homebuyers about how they are navigating the biggest purchases. Most Americans ever make browsing through online real estate listings in Brooklyn, Molly, Schwartz realized her five hundred thousand dollar budget for a new place wasn't giving her a lot of options in less. You have a ton of money to spend. There's not a lot out there. High home prices are by no means only a New York thing. Prices are high economists say because inventories are low and that means competition for the homes that are on the market is fierce, Alison Wray is house hunting and Duluth Minnesota in a realtor has been sending her updates twice a week everything. We've liked thus far, maybe the exception of one or two houses is off the list within a couple of days Ray, currently lives in Connecticut. She wants to sell her home there. But she's worried that buyers might be priced out as mortgage rates continue to rise. I think that'll affect fires decisions on on this end. And then we might not be able to get as much money out of the house as we put into it in Florida. John Castro has been watching interest rates rise since last year back in February. He decided it was time to put it down. Payment on a new home that hadn't been built yet. I'm like man, we'd better do something and lock it in. And I didn't know we'd have to wait and to get a closing date to lock it in. He still hasn't closed to lock in a mortgage rate because the house still isn't finished. And he's nervously watching is interest rates rise even more in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. The technology. News of this Wednesday comes to us from Cupertino, California via big data privacy conference in Brussels Belgium. Apple CEO, Tim cook did not hold a whole lot back today blasting and think about this for a minute his colleagues in Silicon Valley as and this is a quote, a data industrial complex selling profiting from your private information and mine coke even called for federal data privacy regulations in this country, which is audience data privacy friendly Europe, applauded one is obliged to ask though why coq decided to speak up now. And also not for nothing because it is business. What's in this whole thing for apple from Washington? Marketplace's Scott Tong has that one. Tim cook said are. Data are being weaponized against us with military efficiency. The warning comes at a convenient time for apple Facebook and Google face embarrassing data breaches, so the iphone maker can say, we're different. We don't sell data. We want rules to protect it. That's how venture capitalist gene Munster at loop ventures sees it. It's great branding opportunity for apple really to position themselves. As unique amongst the big tech companies in that they make money off of selling a device a device rather than your digital secrets mine, but not all their money Google, which does sell user data shares a hefty penny with apple explains Roger enter at recon analytics eight billion dollars to become the preferred search engine on apple devices. So apple wants to have the cake and eat it too. After cook spoke, Google and Facebook exempts endorsed US rules on data privacy that could industry get ahead of regulators and help shape. What? The rules will be Molly land teaches law at the university of Connecticut companies do want to have a seat at the table and a voice for them to wait and try to resist. I.

apple Tim cook New York Justin ho Google Ray Alison Wray Commerce Department US Arkansas John Castro Facebook Cupertino university of Connecticut Duluth Minnesota Scott Tong Schwartz
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today the twenty four th day, October get as always to have you along everybody. We will give the merest of nods a glance perhaps to the market events of this Wednesday. Yes, it was ugly in equities as far as down the S and P five hundred Arkansas whatever they gains they made from New Year's to yesterday might as well never have existed. Both of those indices are negative for the year. But two things one that is what markets do people. They go down to also there is something more structural that. We wanted to talk to you about new home sales fell five and a half percent last month. That's according to numbers out from the Commerce Department this morning, a sluggishness not seen in two years. Also sales of existing homes are at their slowest in nearly three years. So with prices going up and interest rates going up as well. We asked marketplace's Justin ho to talk to some home buyers about how they are navigating the biggest purchases. Most Americans ever make browsing through online real estate listings in Brooklyn, Molly, Schwartz realized her five hundred thousand dollar budget for a new place wasn't giving her a lot of options in less. You have a ton of money to spend. There's not a lot out there. High home prices are by no means only a New York thing. Prices are high economists say because inventories are low and that means competition for the homes that are on the market is fierce, Alison Wray is house hunting in Duluth Minnesota in a realtor has been sending your updates twice a week everything. We've liked thus far, maybe the exception of one or two houses is off the list within a couple of days Ray, currently lives in Connecticut. She wants to sell her home there. But she's worried that buyers might be priced out is mortgage rates continue to rise. I think that'll affect buyers decisions on on this end. And then we might not be able to get as much money out of the house as we put into it in Florida. John Castro has been watching interest rates rise since last year back in February. He decided it was time to put it down. Payment on a new home that hadn't been built yet. I'm like man, we'd better do something and lock it in. And I didn't know we'd have to wait and to get a closing date to lock it in. He still hasn't closed to lock in a mortgage rate because the house still isn't finished. And he's nervously watching interest rates rise even more in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. The technology. News of this Wednesday comes to us from Cupertino, California via big data privacy conference in Brussels Belgium. Apple CEO, Tim cook, did not hold a whole lot back today blasting and think about this for a minute his colleagues in Silicon Valley as and this is a quote, a data industrial complex selling profiting from your private information and mine coke even called for federal data privacy regulations in this country, which is audience in data privacy, friendly Europe. Applauded one is obliged to ask though, why coq decided to speak up now. And also not for nothing because it is business. What's in this whole thing for apple from Washington? Marketplace's Scott Tong has that one. Tim cook said are. Data are being weaponized against us with military efficiency. The warning comes at a convenient time for apple Facebook and Google face embarrassing data breaches, so the iphone maker can say, we're different. We don't sell data. We want rules to protect it. That's how venture capitalists, gene, Munster at loop ventures sees it. It's a great branding opportunity for apple really to position themselves. As unique amongst the big tech companies in that they make money off of selling the device a device rather than your digital secrets in mine, but not all their money Google, which does sell user data shares a hefty penny with apple explains Roger enter at recon analytics eight billion dollars to become the preferred search engine on apple devices. So apple wants to have the cake and eat it too. After cook spoke, Google and Facebook exacts endorsed US rules on data privacy that could let industry get ahead of regulators and help shape what the rule. Rules will be Molly land teaches law at the university of Connecticut companies do want to have a seat at the table and a voice for them to wait and try to resist. I think is probably becoming less and less viable. The regulators are coming fast new privacy rules in Europe, imposts defines on tech companies that don't comply and now California allows users to sue companies after a data breach. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. We're told you a month or so ago, I think that the company formerly known as Dunkin donuts would henceforth drop, the doughnuts and work on building. It's brand as a beverage. I company we learned today. The Dunkin is going to be brewing. Lots as cappuccinos and americanos at it's ninety two hundred stores by the holidays, so from W ESA in Pittsburgh. Marketplace's Eric embarrass has the pivot to coffee Dunkin franchises have had to put in a lot of work in the company's pivot to fancier coffee Dunkin already makes Expresso Bresso drinks. But makes opponents had to train and -ployees at forty nine Dunkin restaurants in the. The Pittsburgh area. It's a blend drinks and steam milk with new Swiss Espresso machines. It hasn't been as difficult as it would seem and mainly because for the most part, we're just really changing a couple of steps in the process earlier this year, the company invested one hundred million dollars into its business much of that improving Espresso drinks says Scott Murphy chief operating officer at Dunkin and I'd say our franchisees are actually investing even more than that number hafi already accounts for more than fifty percent of sales at some Dunkin locations Spencer an analyst who follows the coffee industry says Duncan is going for an even bigger piece of the growing coffee business Duncan has always been viewed as kind of the every day every man's coffee where Starbucks has been viewed more of an upscale destination as Dunkin prepares to take on Starbucks step. One was dropping the word doughnuts from its name says Peter boat right at Carnegie Mellon. You're still gonna sell donuts. But this allows them to emphasize. Cise a new direction for a new era Dunkin has a lot of room to grow it recorded eight hundred sixty million dollars in sales last year Laos Starbucks reported twenty two billion I'm Erica Harris for marketplace on Wall Street today, which seems very very far from those bombs and bomb scares on the east coast it was bad. But let me say this again, it was normal. We'll have the details when we do the numbers..

apple Dunkin Tim cook Dunkin donuts New York Scott Tong Justin ho Google Starbucks Europe Dunkin franchises California Facebook Alison Wray Commerce Department Pittsburgh Arkansas
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KCRW

"Wednesday today the twenty four th day of October good as always to have you along everybody. We will give the merest of nods a glance perhaps to the market events of this Wednesday. Yes, it was ugly in equities as far as down the S and P five hundred Arkansas whatever they gains they made from New Year's day yesterday might as well never have existed. Both of those indices are negative for the year. But two things one that is what markets do people. They go down to also there is something more structural that. We wanted to talk to you about new home sales fell five and a half percent last month. That's according to numbers out from Commerce Department this morning, a sluggishness not seen in two years. Also sales of existing homes are at their slowest in nearly three years. So with prices going up an interest rates going up as well. We asked marketplace's Justin ho to talk to some home buyers about how they are navigating the biggest purchases. Most Americans ever make browsing through online real estate listings in Brooklyn, Molly, Schwartz realized her five hundred thousand dollar budget for a new place wasn't giving her a lot of options in less. You have a ton of money to spend. There's not a lot out there. High home prices are by no means only a New York thing. Prices are high economists say because inventories are low and that means competition for the homes that are on the market is fierce, Alison Wray is house hunting and Duluth Minnesota in a realtor has been sending her updates twice a week everything. We've liked thus far, maybe the exception of one or two houses is, you know, off the list within a couple of days Ray, currently lives in Connecticut. She wants to sell her home there. But she's worried that buyers might be priced out is mortgage rates continue to rise. I think that'll affect buyers decisions on on this end. And then we might not be able to get as much money out of the house as we put into it in Florida. John Castro has been watching interest rates rise since last year back in February. He decided it was time to put it down. Payment on a new home that hadn't been built yet. I'm like, man, we'd better do something. And and lock it in. And I didn't know we'd have to wait and to get a closing date to lock it in. He still hasn't closed to lock in a mortgage rate because the house still isn't finished. And he's nervously watching is interest rates rise even more in New York. I'm Justin ho for marketplace. The technology news of this Wednesday comes to us from Cupertino California via a big data privacy conference in Brussels Belgium, apple CEO, Tim cook did not hold a whole lot back today blasting and think about this for a minute his colleagues in Silicon Valley as and this is a quote, a data industrial complex selling profiting from your private information and mine coke even called for federal data privacy regulations in this country, which is audience in data privacy, friendly Europe. Applauded one is obliged to ask though, why coq decided to speak up now. And also not for nothing because it is business. What's in this whole thing for apple from Washington? Marketplace's Scott Tong has that one. Tim cook said are. Data are being weaponized against us with military efficiency. The warning comes at a convenient time for apple Facebook and Google face embarrassing data breaches, so the iphone maker can say, we're different. We don't sell data. We want rules to protect it. That's how venture capitalist gene Munster at loop ventures sees it. It's a great branding opportunity for apple really to position themselves. As unique amongst the big tech companies, and that they make money off of selling a device a device rather than your digital secrets in mine, but not all their money Google, which does sell user data shares a hefty penny with apple explains Roger enter at recon analytics eight billion dollars to become the preferred search engine on apple devices. So apple wants to have the cake and eat it too. After cook spoke, Google and Facebook exempts endorsed US rules data privacy that could let industry get ahead of regulators and help shape what the rule. Will be Molly land teaches law at the university of Connecticut companies do want to have a seat at the table and a voice for them to wait and try to resist. I think is probably a becoming less and less viable. The regulators are coming fast new privacy rules in Europe imposed stiff fines on tech companies that don't comply and now California allows users to sue companies after a data breach. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. We're told you a month or so ago, I think that the company formerly known as Dunkin donuts would henceforth drop, the doughnuts and work on building. It's brand as a beverage. I company will learn today the Duncan is going to be brewing and cappuccinos and americanos at it's ninety two hundred stores by the holidays so from ESA in Pittsburgh. Marketplace's Eric embarrass has the pivot to coffee Dunkin franchises have had to put in a lot of work in the company's pivots fancier coffee. Dunkin already makes this Bresso drinks. But makes opponents had to train employees at forty nine Dunkin restaurants in the. Pittsburgh area. It's a blend drinks and steamed milk with new Swiss Espresso machines. It hasn't been as difficult as it would seem and mainly because for the most part, we're just really changing a couple of steps in the process earlier this year, the company invested one hundred million dollars into its business much of that on improving Espresso drinks says Scott Murphy chief operating officer at Dunkin and I'd.

apple Tim cook New York Justin ho Scott Tong Google Dunkin donuts Dunkin Europe Dunkin franchises Facebook Alison Wray Commerce Department Arkansas Pittsburgh Scott Murphy Swiss Espresso
"molly schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot com. In Los Angeles. It is Wednesday today. The twenty four th day of October. Good is always to have you along everybody. We will give the merest of nods a glance perhaps to the market events of this Wednesday. Yes, it was ugly in equities as far as the down this and five hundred Arkansas whatever they gains they made from New Year's day yesterday might as well never have existed. Both of those indices are negative for the year. But two things one that is what markets do people. They go down to also there is something more structural that. We wanted to talk to you about new home sales fell five and a half percent last month. That's according to numbers out from Commerce Department this morning, a sluggishness not seen in two years. Also sales of existing homes are at their slowest in nearly three years. So with prices going up and interest rates going up as well. We asked marketplace's Justin ho to talk to some homebuyers about how they are navigating the biggest purchases. Most Americans ever make browsing through online real estate listings in Brooklyn, Molly, Schwartz realized her five hundred thousand dollar budget for a new place wasn't giving her a lot of options unless you have a ton of money to spend. There's not a lot out there. High home prices are by no means only a New York thing. Prices are high economists say because inventories are low and that means competition for the homes that are on the market is fierce, Alison Wray is house hunting and Duluth. Minnesota in a realtor has been sending your updates twice a week everything. We've liked thus far, maybe the exception of one or two houses, as you know, off the list within a couple of days Ray, currently lives in Connecticut. She wants to sell her home there. But she's worried that buyers might be priced out is mortgage rates continue to rise. I think that'll affect fires decisions on on this end. And then we might not be able to get as much money out of the house as we put into it in Florida. John Castro has been watching interest rates rise since last year back in February. He decided it was time to put it down. Payment on a new home that hadn't been built yet. I'm like man, we'd better do something and lock it in. And I didn't know we'd have to wait to get a closing date to lock it in. He still hasn't closed to lock in a mortgage rate because the house still isn't finished. And he's nervously watching is interest rates rise even more in New York. I'm Justin how for marketplace. The technology. News of this Wednesday comes to us from Cupertino, California, a big data privacy conference in Brussels Belgium. Apple CEO, Tim cook did not hold a whole lot back today blasting and think about this for a minute his colleagues in Silicon Valley as and this is a quote, a data industrial complex selling profiting from your private information and mine coke even called for federal data privacy regulations in this country, which is audience in data privacy friendly Europe, applauded one is obliged to ask though why cook decided to speak up now. And also not for nothing because it is business. What's in this whole thing for apple from Washington? Marketplace's Scott Tong has that one. Tim cook said. Our data are being weaponized against us with military efficiency. The warning comes at a convenient time for apple Facebook and Google face embarrassing data breaches, so the iphone maker can say, we're different. We don't sell data. We want rules to protect it. That's a venture capitalist, gene Munster at loop ventures. Sees it. It's a great branding opportunity for apple really to position themselves. As unique amongst the big tech companies in that they make money off of selling a divide a device rather than your digital secrets in mind, but not all their money Google, which does sell user data shares a hefty penny with apple explains Roger enter at recon analytics it billion dollars to become the preferred search engine on apple devices. So apple wants to have the cake and eat it too. After cook spoke, Google and Facebook exempts endorsed US rules on data privacy that could let industry get ahead of regulators and help shape what the. Rules will be Molly land teaches law at the university of Connecticut companies do want to have a seat at the table and a voice for them to wait and try to resist. I think is probably becoming less and less viable. The regulators are coming fast new privacy rules in Europe in post defines on tech companies that don't comply and now California allows users to sue companies after a data breach. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. We're told you a month or so ago, I think that the company formerly known as Dunkin donuts would henceforth drop, the doughnuts and work on building brand as a beverage. I company we learned today the Dunkin is going to be brewing. Lots.

apple Tim cook New York Scott Tong Justin ho Google Europe Los Angeles Dunkin donuts California Ray Facebook Dunkin Alison Wray Commerce Department John Castro US
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Groups started staging, demonstrations, on, the, border where. The refugees arrived people, called on the government to close the border they waited finish flags and chanted. Finland is for Finns after the refugee crisis anti immigrant activities in Finland got more. Organized in more violent white. Nationalist groups started popping up according to police reports. Racially motivated hate crimes spiked by thirty percent after the refugee crisis, some of the violence. Was caused by a group called the soldiers of Odin The group, was founded in a town. Next, tornado in October two thousand fifteen just a month after high arrived. The soldiers voted founder is a self proclaimed Neo Nazi and its members wear matching black jackets with a skull in a Viking helmet on the, back they've threatened Tom and his friends. If they see someone like this reviewed you hit too much or. They hit with knife or laid it these incidents were discouraging so. Was the police's lack of action to protect the refugees says hyphen still Finland felt a lot safer than Iraq but to. Stay in Finland hi thumb needed to prove that he had valid reasons to, seek asylum then he could, get a residence permit in a residence permit is what he needed to get permanent housing, enroll in school and, get a job which is what I wanted. To do but hyphen was only one of many asylum-seekers in two thousand fifteen Total of thirty two thousand applicants so we got ten times, more asylum-seekers than we normally did this is Yana warrior the director general of the Finnish. Immigration service she explains the immigration, service wasn't prepared for the massive influx of refugees that, summer we had only three thousand five hundred places in reception centres in Finland. In June two, thousand fifteen but by the end. Of that year we need it places, for thirty five thousand applicants hyphen application was one in twenty thousand. Submitted by Iraqis it. Was caught up in a massive backlog for a long time he, didn't. Get, a response but then after a little, over a year it came. Asylum, not granted they can do like I can't live here on they. Can't leave Iraq where I go hi Tom story is far from unique he came to Finland because he heard it was a good country Iraqis, there's been an Iraqi DASS Brin Finland. Since the nineteen ninety s but when hyphen was applying Finland was Rejecting Iraqi. Asylum applications at a, percentage rate that was twice as high as. The average recognition rate is around forty percent and rejection is around sixty. Percent the. Finish immigration service grants permits based on international agreements and on the Finnish immigration law if finish immigration. Laws became stricter after the refugee crisis, we used to have a national protection category it. Was called humanitarian protection category so that was abolished from. Our law also previously if an asylum seeker didn't want to return. Voluntarily but the police was, unable to return him in a short period, of time so, also a temporary permit could be granted so those were removed. From our law so it means more. Applicants, were refused under that also has. Of course cost frustration as Mara Fiji's came in there was more political. Pressure to tighten the immigration laws the same tensions that were making people March on the border, and tornado Were playing out. In Finnish, politics in two thousand fifteen and nationalist populist political. Party called the Finns party gained seventeen point seven percent of the vote that. Was enough to become part of the majority. Coalition in the Finnish parliament my name. Is another member of parliament and I represent. The fame spot, I've been, member of the parliament in villa now, for four years defense party campaign on a platform of. Limiting immigration we welcome immigration as long as it's beneficial for them and The people. Who are coming here they they really want. To go by the Finnish rules and they are willing to work or study. We don't really want to have any like free present just will just come. Here and enjoy or a pretty good social services. Ratchet kinda doesn't believe that all the recent. Immigrants deserve legitimate refugee status we, have a lot of asylum-seekers while really not entitled to? Get the placing Finland because the so-called real asylum-seekers they have some other agendas why they're here. And that's why quite the field of them I returned back them. When the fence party became part of the majority coalition they were able to get pieces of their agenda into the government's strategic. Program this included tightening the flow of immigrants into Finland we have made it a little bit stricter so. Now fewer refugees are arriving but what happens to the refugees who are. Already there some of them have returned back to Iraq because the war is more or less over there the Finnish. Government has declared Iraq safe enough for refugees to return there Paying two five Fiji's back to Baghdad about five thousand. Iraqis who came to Finland during the crisis have now returned to Iraq While many have left voluntarily after getting. Rejected others are being deported there's, about five hundred now awaiting deportation to, the police so that leaves over. Ten, thousand Iraqi refugees Horlick high thumb still in Finland. But without status and without. A permit it's a weird state of, limbo hi Tom is living now in Ola with his girlfriend a Finnish, woman named Sato we wait too much stress for us and it's. Coming little bit bad has applied a second time, for asylum but he is an optimistic everyone he knows. Who applied for asylum a second. Time has received a second. Negative, response but this time there's something different about high thumbs application. He's converted from Islam to Christianity changing his religion. Might help hi Tom, get a residence permit when he was a Shia Muslim he was part of the religious majority. In Iraq but as a Christian he, would be in the religious minority in, that would, make him at risk of religious persecution if he were to return to Iraq this could help them qualify for asylum So despite the rise in hate crimes high thumbs sees a future for himself here in. Finland and he hopes that Finland will, soon feel the same way about him For America abroad I'm Molly Schwartz.

Finland Iraq Tom Brin Finland Mara Fiji Yana founder religious persecution Fiji Ratchet director general Baghdad Molly Schwartz America Ola Sato thirty percent forty percent
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From PRI it's America abroad. I'm Madeleine brand tornado is a small town in northern. Finland just inside the Arctic circle it's right on the border with. Sweden, in, the summer the sunsets after. Midnight the population, is tiny. Just about twenty thousand people it's a quiet place. With lots of pine trees but in the summer of two. Thousand, fifteen word spread that Finland was a. Good place for refugees from Iraq so hundreds of Iraqis started arriving in. Tornado every day they crossed the border, from Sweden by bus by car by foot. Now though tornadoes hospitality is wearing thin Molly Schwartz reports hide him Dogar grew up in Iraq surrounded by sectarian fighting, he thought the Iraqi government was only making the violence, worse hi Tom knew it was time to leave he sold his car and used. The money. To get out of Baghdad. He made his way by boat bus Car and. Train through Turkey Macedonia Serbia Austria Germany and Sweden he. Kept going north and then I think is is with country in. September, of, two thousand fifteen he finally. Crossed the border, into Finland. To tornado just twenty or on my bucket I. Can go anywhere anymore I have this day like influence and. So, high Tom got started trying to make. A life for himself in tornado but there were challenges some people weren't. Happy that so many refugees were arriving The small town of tornado turned into a hotbed of political tension anti immigrant.

Tom Finland Sweden Iraq Madeleine America Baghdad Iraqi government Molly Schwartz Turkey Macedonia Dogar Serbia Austria Germany
"molly schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The majority coalition they were able to get pieces of their agenda into the government's strategic program this included tightening the flow of immigrants into finland we have made it a little bit stricter so now fewer refugees are arriving for what happens to the refugees who are already there some of them have returned back to iraq because the more or less over there the finnish government has declared iraq safe enough for refugees to return they're paying to five refugees back to baghdad about five thousand iraqis who came to finland during the crisis have now returned to iraq while many have left voluntarily after getting rejected others are being deported there's about five hundred waiting deportation equity the police so that leaves over ten thousand iraqi refugees horlick high thumb still in finland but without status and without a permit it's a weird state of limbo hi tom is living now in with his girlfriend a finnish woman named sato we wait to make stress for us and it's coming a little bit bad some has applied a second time for asylum but he is an optimistic everyone he knows who applied for asylum second time has received a second negative response but this time there's something different about high thumbs application he's converted from islam to christianity changing his religion might help hi tom get a residence permit when he was a shia muslim he was part of the religious majority in iraq but as a christian he would be in the religious minority in that would make him at risk of religious persecution if he were to return to iraq this could help them qualify for asylum so despite the rise in hate crimes high thumbs sees a future for himself here in finland and he hopes that finland will soon feel the same way about him for america abroad i'm molly schwartz all this hour we've been looking into the rise of nationalism and the effect that it's had on muslim communities in europe vikram singh is a senior fellow at the center for american progress he's here to tell us more about this idea of nationalism welcome to the program thanks glad to be with you great to have you okay you're organization that has put out a report that uses the term a thorough tarian populism and i'm just wondering if i you can define what you mean by that what is a thawra tarian populism so one of the reasons we focus on this and this was a joint project between the center for american progress which is a left of center progressive organization and the american enterprise institute which is a big conservative think tank here in washington we cooperate on this together because we are basically concerned not about populism this word gets thrown around a lot populism itself may be good or maybe bad i mean it's about appealing to the desires of the citizens in the constituents but authoritarian populism was the phrase we chose for populous who tend to move in an antidemocratic direction and it's a phenomenon that we've been seeing across europe the united states really across democracies worldwide we see it as an area in.

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The fuzzy lines that the putin government deliberately keeps fuzzy also a bit fuzzy it's becomes role in helping donald trump when the white house back in two thousand fifteen record built a website called trump 2016 dot argue he began actively supporting trump online the impact of recaps campaigning is unknown but shinoda explains that recove had his reasons for boasting about helping trump smell and says that in this way on the one hand he raises his nificant and everybody's eyes and on the other end he intimidates them by showing that he can create a media event out of nothing it seems unlikely that one man could effectively sway in election but recall was a pioneer in developing a new tactic for the russian government he helped the kremlin figure out how they could enlist trolls to shift the media narratives or at least create confusion about what's true and what's fake and with the troll template in place they were about to enlist a lot more of them for america abroad i'm molly schwartz ooh two years reports have surfaced of buildings in saint petersburg and moscow teaming with trolls who produce blog posts comments and memes designed to influence opinions and so confusion online the most well known of these is the internet research agency that's a troll farm in saint petersburg it's been recently sanctioned and indicted by the us the internet research agency is a shadowy organization much of what we know about it comes from a handful of russian journalists who went undercover at the troll factory reporter charles maine's recently met with one of them ludmila sobbed juke i got wind of the troll farm back in twenty fourteen which local activists and journalists in saint petersburg subject started noticing websites and social media accounts that attacked russia's opposition with the frequency and viciousness she hadn't seen before she wondered who is doing this why and so when she later heard that the rumored organization behind the campaign a company called the internet research agency was hiring writers sobbed chook jumped at the chance i wanted to get in there to see how it works of course the most important thing was to see if there was some way to stop it once on the inside south chook says she was struck by the size of the ira's operation in a four storey office building on salvage street hundreds of trolls worked around.

putin government donald trump recove saint petersburg reporter russia ira shinoda kremlin america molly schwartz moscow charles maine ludmila two years one hand
"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"molly schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Might on protests in in late twenty thirteen that eventually escalate and lead to the unaccomplished leaving power yanukovych was replaced by petro portion co who is more pro europe for russia that was a big problem so moscow took advantage of that east west split that already existed in ukraine there's been reports of the gru which is russian military intelligence creating fake comments on news sites creating thick social media profiles russian forces attempt to seize and control internet access on the crimean peninsula russia drummed up support in crimea and then went in militarily move forces towards the border with ukraine where they had in previous sleep been stationed and very quickly seizes the territory of crimea initially russia denied it had troops in crimea the soldiers had no insignia on their uniforms but they carried russian weapons vladimir putin said they were quote local self defense forces in russia than annexes crimea effectively admitting all of the things that they've done there there was russia acting russia didn't just lie and it didn't just put out propaganda it's subterfuge in crimea went deeper russia is undermining sort of objective reality they are putting out messages that make it seem like there's no objective truth it wasn't long before american state department officials in ukraine started picking up on all this disinformation molly schwartz brings us the story ooh when russia annexed crimea it sent the us state department scrambling sri preston cool carney was working there as foreign service officer he remembers how things unfolded next the state department actually tried to bring together a collection of russia experts and public diplomacy experts to try and do a counter messaging taskforce she was tapped to be the campaign director for this new ukraine communications taskforce he began to notice some strange things about the way that the conflict was being described on russian media i saw people claiming that the cia had put dead bodies inside a plane and then purposely shot it down in order to create propaganda against the russian government people were repeating that story again and again and i realize we had gone through the looking glass at that point and that if people could believe that they could believe almost anything sri and his task force were responding in real time they notice that there are a few influential names who are driving the.

officer vladimir putin russia europe petro portion co cia director yanukovych carney molly schwartz crimea crimean peninsula russia ukraine moscow