25 Burst results for "Molly Peterson"

California Extends Vaccine Access to People With Disabilities

All Things Considered

02:37 min | 7 months ago

California Extends Vaccine Access to People With Disabilities

"Starting March. 15th younger Californian to have disabilities or severe underlying health conditions will be next in line for vaccinations against covert 19. State health officials say the plan will open access to vaccines to another 4 to 6 million people. Joining me now to talk about this is KQED science reporter Molly Peterson. And Molly. What health conditions is the state listing that will make people eligible for vaccinations. And do they have any idea how long it will take to get through this next group? Let's start with the health conditions. The state's new directive to providers lists cancer, chronic kidney disease, It's stage four or higher. Chronic lung disease Down syndrome, having a weakened immune condition from an organ transplant, sickle cell, some heart conditions, severe obesity and very high type two diabetes as The health conditions that will make people eligible for vaccinations and as for how long it will take to get this next group vaccinated literally. The state does not know in part because the states as it could only see supplies three weeks into the future with federal partners. So far, state and federal data show. There have been 5.5 Million doses given 7.9 million doses have been have arrived in the state. But we've had some hiccups with that Napa in Los Angeles this week paused first doses to make sure that they had enough second doses for everyone who had gotten the first dose earlier. Counties and their health officials also speak often about being on wait list to get more vaccine Now, Disability rights advocates have been pushing really hard for people with underlying conditions. To be moved. Moved up in line. How are they responding to this announcement? Well, some people say they are happy. Just go lame and talk to one of our KQED colleagues. She's with San Francisco Senior and Disability Action group. And she says Essentially the march 15th is too late and that countless people will die needlessly and will make it hard for people with disabilities who aren't on this list, and people who don't have regular medical care to access the vaccine. I should say they don't know exactly how many people there. Adding 4 to 6 Million people is the range and that's because some folks with disabilities or severe health conditions are already in groups, including job specified groups and age specified groups. That are already eligible. There are a lot of questions left to answer, like Will people be able to do this at mass vaccination sites or will verify and things that like a mass vaccination site? Slow Everything

Molly Peterson Chronic Lung Disease Down Synd Kqed Chronic Kidney Disease Sickle Cell Molly San Francisco Senior And Disab Obesity Diabetes Cancer Napa Los Angeles
Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

Here & Now

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to two women

"A biochemist from UC Berkeley is sharing the Nobel Prize for chemistry this year. Jennifer Donna has one for breakthrough work on genetic editing committee science reporter Molly Peterson has more Doubt. Niko invented a tool called CRISPR Cast nine What the Nobel Committee called Genetic Scissors. This year's prize is about rewriting the code of life down, and French researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier discovered a way to cut into broken genetic material, Remove it and replace it. Scissors, Concetta DNA of people, plants and animals, creating cancer therapies and curing genetic diseases. As Donna told Ladies Forum these are all things that are within the realm of possibility now, and so we have to really start thinking about how do we use this technology responsibly down and sharpen today are the first women ever to share the chemistry prize? I'm Molly Peterson. The

Nobel Prize Molly Peterson Jennifer Donna Nobel Committee Uc Berkeley Emmanuelle Charpentier Niko Reporter Ladies Forum Researcher
Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for developing a method for genome editing

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Nobel Prize in chemistry goes to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for developing a method for genome editing

"Berkeley is sharing the Nobel Prize for chemistry this year. Jennifer Donna has one for breakthrough work on genetic editing. Science reporter Molly Peterson has more doubt Niko invented a tool called CRISPR Cast nine with the Nobel Committee called Genetic Scissors. This Year's prize is about Rewriting the code of life down, and French researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier discovered a way to cut into broken genetic material, remove it and replace it. The scissors can change DNA of people, plants and animals, creating cancer therapies and curing genetic diseases. As Donna told Cooties Forum. These are all things that are within the realm. Of possibility now and so we have to really start thinking about what? How do we use this technology Responsibly, Donna and sharpen today are the first women ever to share the chemistry prize. I'm Molly Peterson. The

Jennifer Donna Nobel Prize Molly Peterson Nobel Committee Emmanuelle Charpentier Berkeley Crispr Cast Reporter Niko Researcher
"molly peterson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KCRW

"When the winds weaken, that'll let the smoke drop even further and make the skies darker and air quality worse. The National Weather Service is saying This is beyond the scope of their models in Southern California. Evacuation orders air hanging over several foothill communities just east of the city of Los Angeles, including in Pasadena. And that fire like some others, it's uncontained Molly Peterson to K qd. Thank you. You're welcome. When the Corona virus surged in hot spots across the country, hospitals got ready. Most canceled elective surgeries, and many doctors told sick patients to try to recuperate at home unless symptoms Scott really severe. Now. A new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard's Th Chan's School of Public Health finds out about one in every five Americans in major cities nationwide say they were unable to get needed medical care for a serious problem. NPR's Patty name and reports when 28 year old Katie Kinsey moved from Washington, D C to Los Angeles in early March. She needed to find a new doctor. Then she got sick with symptoms frighteningly similar to covert 19 had a sore throat. I had a debilitating cough when I say debilitating. I mean, I couldn't talk without coughing. I couldn't lay down at night without coughing. Kinsey's of federal consultant, she was coughing through phone meetings. She got very fatigued and knew she needed to see a doctor soon. I took my insurance card, and I called every single number on it started with primary cares, and all of them are books. Eventually, she went to urgent care, got an X ray and a diagnosis of severe bronchitis, but not Cove it. She says she might have avoided months of illness. Had she been able to see a doctor sooner in our poll, a majority of households in New York, Chicago, Houston and Los Angeles. Say they had negative health consequences when they had to delay medical care for serious problems in Kentucky. Your Dr Ryan Stanton saw this a lot. So we have people come in with heart attacks after having chest pain for three or four days or stroke patients who'd and loss of function for several days. If not a week or so, and I'd ask him why they hadn't come in. And they would say, almost universally. They were afraid of Cove it despite hospital officials telling patients to come to the hospital with true emergencies. In Los Angeles Doctor Anisha Mahajan with Harbour Use L. A Medical center says there have been worrisome reports from the county coroner's office. The number of people who have died at home in the last few months is much higher than the average number of people who die at home prior to the pandemic. Something is going on where patients are not coming in for care, and those folks who died at home may have died. From Cove it, but they may also have died from other conditions that they did not come in to get cared for. Like many hospitals nationwide harbor use, Eli canceled elective surgeries to make room for Corona virus patients and our survey about one third of households in Chicago and Los Angeles with anyone unable to have surgery or elective procedures. And more than half of households in Houston in New York.

Los Angeles Katie Kinsey Dr Ryan Stanton NPR Molly Peterson New York Doctor Anisha Mahajan Houston National Weather Service cough sore throat Southern California Chicago Pasadena Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scott Th Chan Eli Washington
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Custody. Litigation throughout the Bay Area. Learn more at S f l g dot com It's 5 30. It's the news. I'm terrorist. Seiler. A punishing heat wave is forecast for the Bay Area this weekend, with inland temperatures expected to jump above 110 degrees in some areas. This level of heat presents an increased danger for fire and for people's health. That's an issue that is Molly Peterson follows closely and Molly exactly who's at risk in this extreme heat. Well, we know people who are very old people who were very young people with chronic heart and lung problems. People with asthma with diabetes people who are overweight pets, really, though everyone, we're not acclimated to high temperatures That takes time up to two weeks, say public health officials and people who live in temperate climates like the Bay Area can get heat sick at lower temperatures, partly because they can't adjust quickly. Over years in central and Northern California nighttime temperatures have been rising because of climate change. And when it's more warm at night that makes it harder for people to cool down. And what do we know from past heat waves? I mean about how many people actually do get sick and die. Well, public health officials and doctors know that heat sickness and deaths attributable to heat our undercounted. Sometimes they catch cases later on that they don't catch at first. We also know that housing is a risk factor for health during periods of extreme heat, so We counted the suffocate the last time the Bay area had a major major heatwave in 2017 79% of people killed by he had begun to get sick at home. We measured temperatures inside houses in Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties. They got hotter inside than out. They held onto heat longer and at night, these houses might be 15 to 20 degrees warmer than outside, and that's a problem for people who can't afford air conditioning or don't have it. Molly. We have some overlapping emergency is going on here. We have the extreme heat. Many of us don't have air conditioning like you just said, And we may have smoky air from wildfires. So opening a window doesn't seem like such a good idea. Yeah, that's a problem on. That's a choice that people.

Bay Area Molly Peterson Seiler Contra Costa Northern California Santa Clara
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Perry in neonatal care UCSF health dot org slash Moran health sunny warm to hot Sacramento Valley highs in ninety six to one oh three today cooler with areas of fog along the coast of the North Bay in the bay area sixties to the low nineties inland good morning I'm Dave Freeman on KQ we do have the time now seven thirty live from KQED news I'm Brian white in Oakland the latest state numbers continue to show about half of coded nineteen deaths in California are happening among residents of long term care homes from KQED science Molly Peterson has more in last week's skilled nursing facilities alone have reported more than eight hundred positive cases of corona virus the latest federal guidelines say that homes can allow visitors again when all workers and residents test negative for the virus for a period of four weeks it's not clear who would pay for that testing industry estimates put the cost of frequent covert nineteen testing in nursing homes at one point eight billion a year just in California federal and state lawmakers have allocated some money for nursing home tests but nothing yet for the state's assisted living facilities deaths of residents and workers in long term care around the state now total nearly two thousand people I'm Molly Peterson KQED news in Santa Clara county officials say they're in need of more people to volunteer to work his contact tracers as the county begins to lift its shelter in place orders humiliation and Lynn has more county officials announced last week that they wanted one thousand unpaid volunteers to help track people who may have been exposed to cove in nineteen currently only fifty people have signed up according to the county's chief executive Dr Jeff Smith that's in addition to county staff who have been.

Perry North Bay Dave Freeman Oakland California Molly Peterson Lynn UCSF Sacramento Valley KQED Brian white Santa Clara chief executive Dr Jeff Smith
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Shannon Lynn KQED news the latest state numbers continue to show about half of code nineteen deaths in California are happening in the residents of long term care homes from KQED science Molly Peterson has more in last week's skilled nursing facilities alone have reported more than eight hundred positive cases of coronavirus the latest federal guidelines say that homes can allow visitors again when all workers and residents test negative for the virus for a period of four weeks it's not clear who would pay for that testing industry estimates put the cost of frequent covert nineteen testing in nursing homes at one point eight billion a year just in California federal and state lawmakers have allocated some money for nursing home tests but nothing yet for the state's assisted living facilities deaths of residents and workers and long term care around the state now total nearly two thousand people I Molly Peterson KQED news several bay area school districts are considering routine temperature checks for students and staff whenever campuses reopen kicking these Julia McEvoy reports guidelines for how schools can safely reopen we'll be out in early June according to state schools chief Tony Thurman who says prevention of the spread of covert nineteen will be key so that means that at schools there will be individuals who will be taking temperatures of students face coverings for students and staff physical distancing on buses and on school campuses are also expected Thurman did not address who would pick up the costs for these measures at a time when districts are facing budget cuts in the economic fallout from the pandemic in west Contra Costa unified a spokesperson for the teachers union said temperature checks are part of several demands teachers will be presenting to the district I'm Julia McEvoy KQED news the California academy of sciences in San Francisco is planning layoffs or furloughs for nearly half of its five hundred employees and pay cuts for others executive director Scott Sampson told staff at a virtual meeting this week at the academy predicts a twelve million dollar revenue loss from the cove in nineteen pandemic and resulting shelter in place orders it's a sad moment for the academy there is no doubt about it you can use that around for a hundred and sixty seven years and it has survived earthquakes and fires in world wars and pandemic and it will survive this said it will come back even stronger and more impactful the museum will remain closed through the end of June but Sampson is hopeful for a.

California Molly Peterson Julia McEvoy teachers union San Francisco Scott Sampson Shannon Lynn KQED KQED Tony Thurman California academy of sciences executive director
"molly peterson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KCRW

"The state is locked down nursing homes to most visitors with a few exceptions from KQED science Molly Peterson has a story about one woman trying to see her mom Betty dad has a sweet tooth she's ninety six and living in the Astoria nursing and rehabilitation center in the San Fernando Valley so back in March her daughter Randy tried to bring her a milkshake state and county orders stopped Randy at the door I care aid let the milkshake M. so I said well what about can you bring this to our area and the girl said yes ma'am by April the coronavirus crept into the facility in early may Astoria reported nineteen workers sick then a couple of weeks ago the nursing home reported fifty two residents had tested positive including Betty dad and Randy still couldn't get in that said basically every index door you know seven now stroke or what are they gonna die that day that night that's a call Randy fears because she got it about a month ago one Saturday around three AM her mother's blood pressure had plummeted Astoria care workers called to ask about end of life plans as our guardian Randy asked to come in night shift told her to call back in the day it took a few calls so finally I mean I was a little bit frustration and they tell me okay are you ready to go in today you know we got y'all guard up whatever I said yes and then internet is all tomorrow tomorrow and I'll call you and we'll set a time trial came no call by that called on twelve and they said no many Ruiz is the home's administrator he told me it was against doctor's orders to permit Randy inside Ruiz said doctors are worried about liability for spreading covert nineteen beyond a story as walls Betty's doctor works for Kaiser Permanente a a Kaiser spokesman wouldn't discuss liability Kaiser says it's Ruiz's call when and how visitors can enter the facility they.

Molly Peterson Betty dad San Fernando Valley Randy Ruiz Kaiser Permanente Kaiser KQED Astoria administrator
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The area as long term care homes in coming weeks winds are filet O. did not provide comment I'm Molly Peterson KQED news your traffic caps are starting to show green highways turned to yellow and orange and red traffic statistics back up what you're seeing on your cell phone KQED's Dan brekkie explains thank you very S. streets and highways emptied overnight when coronavirus shelter in place orders were imposed two months ago the low point for traffic came in early April when total miles traveled and most bay area counties fell by eighty percent or more from January levels but statistics from streetlight data show that the cars are coming back KQ weedy analysis of Friday traffic over the last five weeks fine said miles traveled have increased sixty percent since the April low point one sign that more of us are hitting the road Caltrans activated the bay bridge metering lights on Monday for the first time in two months other indicators show that people appear to prefer driving rather than transit as they begin to travel again ridership on bart and other agencies is still down ninety percent or more from pre pandemic levels I am damn Breaky KQED news many experimental treatments for coded nineteen focus on seriously ill hospitalized patients but most people with the disease don't end up in hospitals now there's a new Stanford study this treating people on an outpatient basis KQED's Peter R. Cooney explains well roughly eighty percent of people who test positive for the virus have mild to moderate symptoms can still spread it they have their nose and they're shedding virus into the environment Stanford professor Dr we'll be seeing is Colina controlled clinical trial testing whether a drug called interferon lambda used to treat hepatitis can help people recently diagnosed with COPD nineteen we think it's really important to find drugs that we hope can prevent them getting sicker but almost as importantly can prevent transmission something she says will be key as the country reopens I'm Peter Cooney KQED news more on the corona virus in the bay area and beyond at KQED dot org in Oakland I'm Brian what good cove in nineteen is making it hard to prepare for natural disasters across the U. S. in fact everything that we do to prepare for disasters that requires people to be in close proximity to one another from wildfires to hurricanes and Beyonce getting ready while staying safe in the era of the nineteen that's next time and take away from W. NYC NPR racks take away on the schedule again today the noon hour noon to one.

KQED Dan brekkie Caltrans Peter R. Cooney professor Colina COPD Oakland Beyonce Molly Peterson Stanford interferon NYC NPR
House to vote on Democrats' $3T aid package

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

House to vote on Democrats' $3T aid package

"In Washington the house of representatives will vote on a corona virus relief package today it'll include a proposed half a billion dollars specifically for nursing homes KQED science reporter Molly Peterson has more on that around forty five percent of California's covert nineteen deaths have happened at skilled nursing facilities the state department of public health traded up hundreds of additional nurses to work with these homes on controlling infections that's why congressman Jimmy Panetta a Democrat from Monterey says he's proposing to boost the budget of the federal department of health and Human Services we should be supporting the state when it comes to those types of efforts to create and have available these type of strike forces federally funded state mandated locally executed a third of the overall package the house is voting on includes aid for state local and tribal governments Republicans say it's unlikely to pass or even be considered in the

Washington Molly Peterson California Congressman Jimmy Panetta Monterey Kqed Reporter Department Of Health And Human
Climate change in the era of coronavirus

Morning Edition

04:17 min | 1 year ago

Climate change in the era of coronavirus

"Kevin as we sheltered home scientists are finding the behavioral changes like telecommuting can significantly reduce emissions but how much good can these changes ultimately make if we're not making them together Naomi arrest kiss is a professor of the history of science at Harvard her books like why trust science explore climate change denial she says climate change in covered nineteen are examples of problems that can't be solved at the local level air pollution doesn't respect state boundaries you put the motion throughout this year it moves because of virus is comparable to this thing didn't stay in China and then we got to America didn't stay in Washington state the rest this is the principle of limited government or leaving it to the states breaks down in the face of these issues and now is the time to remind people the government's role is to solve problems that individuals or states can't solve alone it took federal action she says to abolish slavery and leadership on the federal level to bring us out of the Great Depression it's true government is not the solution to all our problems but it clearly is the solution to many of our biggest problems like public health environmental health which will be most effectively solves all the states can work together rescue since the pandemic proves that Americans are willing to make sacrifices for the greater good and that bodes well for fighting climate change and now my colleague Molly Peterson takes a look at another way that climate change and covert nineteen are connected thanks Peter Riana gun right directs climate policy at the Roosevelt institute is a think tank she says the pandemic has made existing and equities worse if you are low income black and Latino you are far more likely to live near toxic fumes to be exposed to higher levels of toxic pollution which in turn creates a ton of background conditions you're talking about cancers heart disease respiratory issues all of which are linked to higher likelihood having serious complications from corona virus for Andres Soto an organizer with communities for a better environment that vulnerability is always apparent bay area skies are bluer with more people off the road but in Richmond we also see the refinery is still operating apparently a full capacity and there's been absolutely no indication that chevron is going to be cutting back on its pollution while everybody else has to shelter in place he also points out the corona virus has made it harder to pay the rent because of the lack of an efficient social safety net we now find ourselves having to address people's personal needs as our lives have become destabilised by the goal with nineteen and then set us as the pandemic offers a glimpse of what it would look like if the whole planet works together for big solutions here's my friend Danielle vet and she talked to someone with a view about doing that for climate change thanks Molly okay let's get something out of the way while carbon emissions and pollution have plummeted during this pandemic shut down this is not a gift for the earth or any sort of meaningful Denton are carbon output because we got there the wrong way and this can't last we can't have everybody staying in their homes we can't have people thrown out of work we can't have people unable to feed their families Katharine Hayhoe a climate scientist at Texas Tech University says we can however use this as an opportunity to learn this shows is that we do have the power to act and we can't affect incredible change when we do act in the corona virus we recognized a common problem that threatens ourselves our loved ones our communities we want people to be able to live in safety and that's exactly what climate change threatens to we don't know yet Hey ho says if this crisis will spur stronger clean energy and climate policies or make us retreat will this be an opportunity for a Marshall Plan after World War two or the new D. hello or will people use it as an opportunity to return to the past even more strongly rolling back environmental protections as we're seeing today to shore up feeling industries like the coal industry the question is what will we

Kevin
What the Coronavirus Means for Climate Change

Morning Edition

04:22 min | 1 year ago

What the Coronavirus Means for Climate Change

"As we sheltered home scientists are finding that behavioral changes like telecommuting can significantly reduce emissions but how much good can these changes ultimately make if we're not making them together Naomi arrest kiss is a professor of the history of science at Harvard her books like why trust science explore climate change denial she says climate change in covered nineteen are examples of problems that can't be solved at the local level air pollution doesn't respect state boundaries put pollution throughout this year it moves because of virus is comparable to this thing didn't stay in China and then we got to America didn't stand Washington state the rest this is the principle of limited government or leading into the state's breaks down in the face of these issues and now is the time to remind people the government's role is to solve problems that individuals for states can't solve alone it took federal action she says to abolish slavery and leadership on the federal level to bring us out of the Great Depression it's true government is not the solution to all our problems but it clearly is the solution to many of our biggest problems like public health environmental health which will be most effectively solves if all the states can work together rescue since the pandemic proves that Americans are willing to make sacrifices for the greater good and that bodes well for fighting climate change and now my colleague Molly Peterson takes a look at another way that climate change in covert nineteen are connected thanks Peter Riana gun right directs climate policy at the Roosevelt institute is a think tank she says the pandemic has made existing and equities worse if you are low income black and Latino you are far more likely to live near toxic fumes to be exposed to higher levels of toxic pollution which in turn creates a ton of background conditions you're talking about cancers heart disease respiratory issues all of which are linked to higher likelihood of having serious complications from corona virus for Andres Soto an organizer with communities for a better environment that vulnerability is always apparent bay area skies are bluer with more people off the road but in Richmond we also see the refinery is still operating apparently a full capacity and there's been absolutely no indication that chevron is going to be cutting back on its pollution while everybody else has to shelter in place he also points out the corona virus has made it harder to pay the rent because of the lack of an efficient social safety net we now find ourselves having dressed people's personal needs as our lives have become destabilized by recorded nineteen MM set us as the pandemic offers a glimpse of what it would look like if the whole planet works together for big solutions here's my friend Danielle van she talked to someone with a view about doing that for climate change thanks Molly okay let's get something out of the way while carbon emissions and pollution have plummeted during this pandemic shut down this is not a gift for the earth or any sort of meaningful Denton are carbon output because we got there the wrong way and this can't last we can't have everybody staying in their homes we can't have people thrown out of work we can't have people unable to feed their families Katharine Hayhoe a climate scientist at Texas Tech University says we can however use this as an opportunity to learn this shows is that we do have have the power to act and we can't affect incredible change when we do act in the corona virus we recognized a common problem that threatens ourselves our loved ones our communities we want people to be able to live in safety and that's exactly what climate change threatens to we don't know yet Hey ho says if this crisis will spur stronger clean energy and climate policies or make us retreat will this be an opportunity for a Marshall Plan after World War two or the new deal or will people use it as an opportunity to return to the past even more strongly rolling back environmental protections as we're seeing today to shore up feeling industries like the coal industry the question is what will we do that part of history is yet to be written we all will be writing it

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The news comes as an outbreak at nearby are in the care center has expanded to more than fifty people I Molly Peterson KQED news five San Francisco supervisors have introduced emergency legislation to house more homeless people in hotel rooms during the corona virus pandemic KQED's Molly Solomon reports under the order is seven hundred fifty rooms would be set aside for health care workers another seven thousand would be for people living in city shelters or on the streets supervisor Matt Haney hands the city's current approach of only providing rooms for homeless people who are more vulnerable because of age or illness have already tested positive or been exposed to the virus we cannot wait for people to get sick before we moved into a private room people have to be prevented from getting sick in the first place I being able to be physically and socially distant from others and protect themselves the board of supervisors could vote on the emergency legislation it next week if it passes the city would be required to place people in hotels by the end of April hi Molly Solomon KQED news state officials say that while Californians need to continue staying home to staunch the spread of cove in eighteen they have help for many of us having a tough time stuck inside KQV politics correspondent Marissa Lagos explains California Surgeon General Dr Nadine Burke Harris says that millions of Californians who aren't sick with cove in nineteen are still managing a ton of stress and not stress can manifest in real physical pain the health impacts of coronavirus go beyond infection and covert disease it's important to note that these changes aren't just in your head and to begin to identify how stress shows up for you physically emotionally and behaviorally at the request of the governor has created a series.

Molly Solomon Matt Haney Marissa Lagos Dr Nadine Burke Harris Molly Peterson KQED San Francisco supervisor KQV California
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The listeners like you the listeners members and sustaining members of KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM eight twenty two it's morning edition on KQED I'm Brian white eight million plant and animal species share the planet with people in the news about this bio diversity in the past decade wasn't all bad yes climate change your race its first animal but some brand new species dropped in KQED science reporter Molly Peterson has more serendipity introduced humans to more animal neighbors in the last ten years we met a frog the size of a staple in Madagascar when it fell on a scientist cutting down one tree in the Solomon Islands revealed a two foot long rant that lives on coconuts just knowing in animal exists doesn't mean we know how many there are National Geographic animals editor Rachel bail loves as scaly sort of anti called a pangolin hang on their solitary they are really shots there always hiding and not just from scientists bail says poachers chase them across Asia and Africa for use in traditional medicine and fancy menus so we know more than a million a year being taken out of the wild but we actually have no idea how many there are in the wild get away and that's the complication last year United Nations report concluded that extinction threatens up to a million over its plants and animals climate change is part of the picture on a remote Australian beach rising seas made a tiny rat like creature called the bramble Kate Malo mis disappear on late night TV Stephen Cole bear joked about it climate change is officially killed off its first mammal species Ono was it mattered.

Molly Peterson Madagascar scientist Solomon Islands Asia Africa Kate Malo KQED Brian white reporter editor Rachel United Nations Stephen Cole
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Science reporter Molly Peterson here and Molly is San Francisco really doing a bad job of keeping its water clean I mean the way the EPA made it sound San Francisco is just putting sewage and storm water into the bay **** nilly and it's true that San Francisco has an older water system that combines storm water in sewage and releases them into the bay but mostly there's two treatment plants for removing the solids everything from like dog poop in Greece and foreign objects like the needles the president is scared of and then on top of that there's these high quality secondary treatments that meet federal standards to filter out pollutants the problem is when there's a heavy rain San Francisco has a permit to release storm water into the bay after it settled out solid materials but without the extra secondary treatments and the city can do that eight times a year usually it stays under the cap so the senators comelec Harrison Dianne Feinstein are calling for the EPA's inspector general to investigate whether the agency is abusing its authority here and they seem to be implying that this is all political I mean just because it's politicized doesn't mean there aren't real problems but even active critics of San Francisco like the nonprofit beekeeper which watchdogs how they pollute into the bay they say this is politicizing real issues and even critics of the cities like San Francisco that aren't prepared for more storm water say there are other places in the country that have my. much bigger problems that are not getting the kind of attention EPA's giving San Francisco all right that's KQED science reporter Molly Peterson and I'm Jeremy Siegel this is Katie readiness support come some personal capital offering online money tools to give users a three hundred sixty degree view of their money personal capital dot com support for NPR comes from noon whose yellow green and red approach to categorizing food is designed to help people make improve meal choices.

Molly Peterson San Francisco EPA Greece president Harrison Dianne Feinstein Jeremy Siegel NPR reporter KQED Katie three hundred sixty degree
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"KQED science reporter Molly Peterson here and Molly is San Francisco really doing a bad job of keeping its water clean I mean the way the EPA made it sound San Francisco is just putting sewage and storm water into the bay **** nilly and it's true that San Francisco has an older water system that combines storm water in sewage and releases them into the bay but mostly there's two treatment plants for removing the solids everything from like dog poop in Greece and foreign objects like the needles the president is scared of and then on top of that there's these high quality secondary treatments that meet federal standards to filter out pollutants the problem is when there's a heavy rain San Francisco has a permit to release storm water into the bay after it settled out solid materials but without the extra secondary treatments and the city can do that eight times a year usually it stays under the cap so senators comelec Harrison Dianne Feinstein are calling for the EPA's inspector general to investigate whether the agency's abusing its authority here and they seem to be implying that this is all political I mean just because it's politicized doesn't mean there aren't real problems but even active critics of San Francisco like the nonprofit beekeeper which watchdogs how they pollute into the bay they say this is politicizing real issues and even critics of the cities like San Francisco that aren't prepared for more storm water say there are other places in the country that have much bigger problems that are not getting the kind of attention EPA's giving San Francisco all right that's KQED science for. order Molly Peterson and I'm Jeremy Siegel this is Katie beginners. support comes from. no capital offering online money tools to give users at three hundred and sixty degree of view all their money personal capital dot com support for NPR comes from Saint Martin's press publisher of soccer's journey a novel by heather Morris author of the tattoo.

Molly Peterson San Francisco EPA Greece president Jeremy Siegel NPR Saint Martin publisher soccer KQED reporter comelec Harrison Dianne Feinst Katie heather Morris sixty degree
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By thanksgiving KQED science reporter Molly Peterson thanks you're welcome the wild fires that because those water problems are perhaps the most destructive symptom of the warming that California is experiencing all over from its reverse to which mountain tops but scientists are finding that some places are warming slightly less than others those places are called climate refugia and they could be important safe havens for native ecosystems KQED science correspondent Lawrence summer has more. it was pretty cold the morning I met Deanna do lead which was weird because it was the middle of a summer heat wave you definitely need your winter coat with you was the one I came up this morning I had the sweater and the vast doing the superintendent of devils post pile national monument it's a steep mountain valley just outside of mammoth lakes in the Sierra Nevada. enjoying the cold are about a hundred violet green swallows feasting on bugs hatching out of the river in this meadow it's really cool on their rounds are the most dazzling emerald green color amethyst purples this family stays colder than the ten thousand foot peaks around us doing first noticed that when she started working here almost twenty years ago that's the opposite of what you expect was even colder than I ever anticipated it would be so she started working with scientists who install dozens of temperature sensors and they figured out that something special is happening here it's called cold here pulling basically a giant mass of cool air just sits here thanks to the valley shape these high walls and east and west side actually limit the amount of sun the mountains above cast a huge shadow on us preventing the air from heating up in the morning and not air is trapped here because the valley has a very narrow opening at one end or the granite walls come together and so essentially that cold air bottle necks up into this meadow and makes it even cooler as much as eighteen degrees cooler in the morning compare to land a few thousand feet above it Dylan says that means this valley could be buffered shielded from a warming climate it'll still be affected but even a few degrees of difference could help the ecosystem survive doesn't mean it will survive forever but it's given us time to look at additional conservation strategies due in says the park service is already looking at giving this valley extra protection.

Molly Peterson California Lawrence summer Deanna superintendent Sierra Nevada. Dylan KQED reporter ten thousand foot eighteen degrees thousand feet twenty years
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Test by thanksgiving KQED science reporter Molly Peterson thanks you're welcome. wildfires that because those water problems are perhaps the most destructive symptom of the warming the California is experiencing all over from its reverse to its mountain tops but scientists are finding that some places are warming slightly less than others those places are called climate refugia and they could be important safe havens for native ecosystems KQED science correspondent Lawrence summer tells us more. it was pretty cold the morning I met Deanna do lead which was weird because it was the middle of a summer heat wave you definitely need your winter coat with you was the one I came up this morning I had the sweater and the vast doing the superintendent of devils post pile national monument it's a steep mountain valley just outside of mammoth lakes in the Sierra Nevada. enjoying the cold are about a hundred violet green swallows feasting on bugs hatching out of the river in this meadow it's really cool on their rumps are the most dazzling emerald green color amethyst purples this family stays colder than the ten thousand foot peaks around us Dylan first noticed that when she started working here almost twenty years ago that's the opposite of what you expect it was even colder than I ever anticipated it would be so she started working with scientists who installed dozens of temperature sensors and they figured out that something special is happening here it's called cold here pulling basically a giant mass of cool air just sits here thanks to the valley shape these high walls and east and west side actually limit the amount of sun the mountains above cast a huge shadow on us preventing the air from heating up in the morning and not air is trapped here because the valley has a very narrow opening at one end or the granite walls come together and so essentially that cold air bottle necks up into this meadow and makes it even cooler as much as eighteen degrees cooler in the morning compare to land a few thousand feet above it Dylan says that means this valley could be buffered shielded from a warming climate it'll still be affected but even a few degrees of difference could help the ecosystem survive doesn't mean it will survive forever but it's given us time to look at additional conservation strategies due in says the park service is already looking at giving this valley extra protection.

Molly Peterson California Lawrence summer Deanna superintendent Sierra Nevada. Dylan KQED reporter ten thousand foot eighteen degrees thousand feet twenty years
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From kqed news, I'm Michelle Wiley, an alum. Ada County jury has a worded more than two billion dollars to a couple who blame the popular weed killer roundup for their cancer cake. You science reporter Molly Peterson has more for years. Livermore residents Albert and Albert Pilat sprayed around by the gallon all over several properties they owned they now both have serious forms. Of cancer. They argue the weed killer caused it. And they say they were misled by its manufacturer Monsanto which promoted the product as safe jurors decided to award the Pilate's fifty five million dollars in actual damages. They also gave the couple in additional billion dollars each as punitive damages figure Monsanto and its parent company. Bayer call excessive and unjustifiable the verdict is the third in a row against the makers around up and the largest award yet all cases decided in the bay area. Bayer says it will appeal the judgment. I'm Molly Peterson news. Facebook is increasing how much it pays you as contractors do some of its most taxing work including watching violent and other objectionable material for possible removal from the service Facebook will pay at least eighteen dollars an hour for these jobs while those in the bay area New York City and Washington DC we'll get twenty two per hour. Facebook hasn't said yet what it was paying them before the content review jobs are psychologically taxing Facebook has been criticized for not paying the. The workers enough and not providing enough support six months after the campfire many of the people who once called the town of paradise home are trying to get the money. They were promised by insurers with claims totalling at least eight billion dollars more than any wildfire in the state cake UD's. Jeremy Siegel reports getting insurance money can be hard for the people who didn't lose their homes in the fire after misty way. And her family were forced to flee from the flames last November. She heard some good news her home. Unlike the majority of town had survived all my gosh. I'm I'm the lucky one. But now she thinks differently. I wish it would have burned. And I hate to say that, but the nightmare and the stress and the agony that my insurance has caused me these last six months. I I'm reliving the trauma every day the home next to her did burn in the flames reclose causing damage outside and in I smoke, all the way through my home, broken glass everywhere. My to burn and. I was told to their at away says her insurance provider mercury told her she didn't qualify for payouts because her home was standing after weeks of fighting. She got them to cover some temporary living expenses through June, but not the extensive damages to roof and water damage and mold caused by intense. Rainfall after the fire, unfortunately, people in her situation have sometimes an even harder challenge. Getting a fair payout from their insurance than somebody. Who's home has been completely destroyed? Amy Bach is the executive director of the consumer advocacy group. United policyholders which helps people navigate claims she says atas situation isn't unusual especially after the large number of destructive wildfires the state seen in recent years. Obviously should not be that way. Actually, it shouldn't be that way for anyone. I mean people invested insurance. So that when something bad happens, they won't have to worry as much mercury insurance. Didn't respond to requests for. Comment as for Atta wave she was raised in paradise and lived there for decades. So she'd like to move back, but says her home is unlimited and with the insurance money that pays her rent ending next month in the difficulty of working two jobs to cover expenses outweigh says she doesn't know where to begin..

Facebook Molly Peterson Bayer Monsanto Amy Bach Albert Pilat Ada County kqed Livermore UD Michelle Wiley Jeremy Siegel reporter Atta New York City Washington United executive director
"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The time is now seven thirty live from NPR news in washing. Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly. The White House isn't saying if President Trump will sign a border security agreement reached by house and Senate negotiators. It includes nearly one point four billion dollars for physical barriers far less than the five point seven billion the president's been asking for here's NPR's, Scott Horsely, even if Trump had gotten all the money he wanted we would have been talking about walling off maybe ten percent of the two thousand mile border as it is going to get fifty five miles congress in the White House or facing a Friday night deadline to pass a border security deal or risk. Another partial government shutdown as Virginia's top three elected officials faced calls to resign. The city council in Richmond his renaming a historic street for the late Arthur ash, the city native aids activists was the first black tennis player to win three grand slam titles, including Wimbledon Roberto role Dan with member station W C V E reports Richmond's historic street known simply as boulevard. Will now be Arthur Ashe boulevard. One city council member says the name chain serves as a rebuttal to the reputation. The state has received following revelations that the governor and attorney general both appeared in blackface in the nineteen. Eighties Virginia's Lieutenant governor, Justin. Fairfax has facing calls to resign amid allegations of sexual assault being made by two women. They date back to two thousand and two thousand four this is NPR news from K Q E D news. I'm Brian watt. The drought may be over. But California's toll of dying trees continues to mount more than eighteen million trees died last year, according to newly released surveys science reporter, Molly Peterson explains wetter weather has slowed the body count for California's thirsty pines and fir-trees gets better news than the previous few years. That's Randy more the regional forester for the US forest service. He's as a five year drought had weakened trees against a mortal enemy hungry. Bark beetles vulgar out there. They never gone. Away. Biggest opportunistic. But more says the Beatles. Big advantage has withered since two thousand sixteen as more rain and snow has fallen when there's more in the ground. The trees can make enough speed. The bugs out the trees are better able to defend itself against these types of bugs still the more than one hundred and forty seven million trees that have died over eight years remain fire hazard and a stressor on the forest ecosystems. I'm Molly Peterson news Oakland has.

Trump NPR Molly Peterson White House Virginia president Arthur Ashe boulevard Dave Mattingly Richmond Washington Arthur ash Brian watt California Randy Senate tennis assault Fairfax
"molly peterson" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on Science Friday

"Well, I mean in the bay area right now, there's measurements for particular matter. And that's south of where the fires are burning a northern California. There's measurements for particular matter five times what we have in Los Angeles on a bad day here because there's an inversion layer over the greater bay area. Kind of holding that smoke in. Uncontrolled fires are responsible for something. Like fifty million metric tons of pollution at least a year in California. That's you know, up to a sixth of our states overall emissions. You talked to Cal fire the department that's in charge of fire prevention, and how do they plan on expanding these prescribed fires? What do they need for the stamp? Yeah. When I talked to Ken Pimlott back in the spring. He was saying by the way at the time, you is saying that they needed to stay out of trouble on mega fires in order to really transition to this world where they can do these prescribed burns the idea is to sort of establish teams that are ready at all times. For the purpose of prescribed burning. But that's hard to do when you've got to deploy all these guys to various fires that are burning around the state. And at the time he was saying, look, we have a problem that grass you call it. If you're a firefighter you call it flashy. It look flashy because of drought, and so this isn't a forest fire problem entirely. It's also this dry grasslands that burns quickly as well. I'm sure the these fires are happening on on a mix a landing at private you have stage if federal areas, how do you coordinate all of that? I mean, I think these guys are together. Yeah. I mean, I think there's not meetings. But you're right. The federal government controls something like forty six percent of California's land. There's also a lot of interest in private land. Particularly in the northern part of the state not just in more burning days, but also in logging for thinning purposes is something some conservative lawmakers have been pushing as well and his cO this climate change fit in here. How does that fit in does that fit into this picture? I mean, this is one of those ones where sometimes people wanna make it sound like it's all one thing or all one another thing. And it's not it climate change is part of what's happening here. But it's a fallacy that frankly, the president played into with his tweet that that it's all one thing or another. There's also huge amounts of planning that needs to be done to get entirely areas around the wildland urban interface into some sort of a code that's responsible about how people develop on those lands the management in the vegetation stuff. That's just how we've budgeted for decades in California that has nothing to do with climate change. So there's a lot of causes for the problem. We're in no easy way out. Molly Peterson reporter for K Q E D science. We're gonna take a break and talk more about our wildfires. It's going to continue our coverage at least, and as we talk about how to protect housing developments and high fire risk areas and how we can strengthen the electrical grid to prevent sparking future. Fires is some speculation that there might be a spark that set off some of these fires. We right back after this break. So stay with us. Hello science Friday listeners are you hungry for an extra helping of science? Of course, you.

California Ken Pimlott K Q E D science Los Angeles federal government Cal Molly Peterson president reporter fifty million metric tons forty six percent
There are more suicides in US and Mexico when the temperature rises

Morning Edition

03:50 min | 3 years ago

There are more suicides in US and Mexico when the temperature rises

"Policy might help Sanchez especially if Democrats failed to take back the house November the job opened up after the current caucus. Chair congressman Joe Crowley from New York lost to a twenty eight year old, Latino activists in. A primary. Election upset last, month for the California report I'm Scott Schafer the warming climate make, Harry a, snow Leaky effect on mental health that's according to researchers at two bay, area universities who. Say hotter temperatures raise the risk of suicide here's QB's Molly Peterson going back to the eighteen hundred scientists sociologists and. Poets all noticed, more people die by suicide in spring that's caused other researchers to wonder if. Warmer. Temperatures are the reason why Stanford's Marshall Burke studies earth system sciences he and colleagues. At UC Berkeley mast decades of temperature records and death records for the US and Mexico they found that when temperatures rose about two degrees Fahrenheit deaths by suicide rose by about one percent even a one percent. Effective multiplied across many people, in in the United States implies a very large, additional health burden from increasing temperature the study doesn't suggest, that, hot temperatures cause people to harm themselves and Burke stresses that suicide, has other larger and well documented risk factors but based on this data. And on global models this team projects that of climate Change continues unchecked until the middle of this century hotter temperatures, could cause at least twenty thousand additional deaths, that sounds like an abstract. Statistic but which you think of that as. Individuals in individual, families that are going to be fundamentally. Affected by this if, temperatures increase Burke says air conditioning and, wealth don't seem to limit the link between hotter temperatures and suicide. So as climate changes he expects the risks of heat to human health will keep rising for the California report I'm Molly Peterson let's continue to consider heat but look at someone who thrives in it last night fifty. Seven year old Shannon Farrar grief started running bad water this is the punishing one hundred thirty five, mile Oltra marathon that goes from bad water basin in death valley to Mount Whitney the temperatures can get as high as one hundred. And twenty degrees and it's not just the run for our grief was diagnosed with MS in two thousand six she spoke with Polly Stryker. People don't know what they're capable mentally and I, think people are afraid of failure So they don't attempt to. Go out and see what they're made up like I always say, at mile eighty when everything's falling apart okay Shannon let's see what you're. Made of and that's when I have to tap into my. Soul And pulled out every little. Bit of strength I have whether it's emotional or physical or mental or all, of the, expect I feel blessed to be here three years. Ago when I was on treatment you know on a. On a? Respirator machine in the hospital I think I would be ear marked here valley here how? How what, do you tap into mentally when when you feel like you just can't. Go on I honestly I run for several charities and up, until I was diagnosed with MS I was running for children with cancer in children with autism and they're always beat at one kid that would come up to, me and one time when I, the two hundred ninety two miles sibling comes up to me she. Lost a leg to cancer, and. He had this little superman shirt. On his name was Michael and here this little crunchers Shannon still, running those crazy races those fifty hundred. Mile races I said yeah he said where they always asked where do you, go to, like where were you and they're like where do. You have age along the way he goes when do. You see? We sleep when you're kind of what's hardest part like usually mile eighty 'cause I am? Telling this, little boy lots of right to cancer mile eight echo everything hurts going..

Shannon Farrar Marshall Burke Polly Stryker Molly Peterson California Chair Congressman Joe Crowley United States Cancer Sanchez Scott Schafer Mount Whitney Uc Berkeley Stanford New York Harry Mexico Oltra Michael
Republican Report Is Cover-Up Trump

02:08 min | 3 years ago

Republican Report Is Cover-Up Trump

"Against low education funding driver jared linear was honking his hornets support and make a living stay stay in the city that they work in and so much need a raise because the ones that are sending the future of karelians is an elementary school teacher in colorado we're going to fight for kids governor john hickenlooper addressed the crowd briefly he promised that the state ultimately would restore the roughly one billion dollars borrow during the recession from education funds but he didn't say when the governor of arizona doug ducey is promising striking teachers there that he has a deal with the state legislature to raise teacher pay by twenty percent by the year twenty twenty teachers rejected a previous offer on wall street the dow closed down eleven points the nasdaq was up one point this is npr news and from news i'm tiffany cam high a bay area member of the house intelligence committee is calling the report on russian election interference released by committee republicans a cover up east bay congressman eric swallow says the committee's findings that there was no evidence of collusion by the trump campaign is incomplete because they were never willing to look for collusion democrats tried with the the limited resources republicans gave us to investigate alleged collusion between the trump campaign and russians however we were essentially obstructed at almost every request we made swallow is continuing to call for legislation to create an independent bipartisan commission to investigate the matter president trump tweeted after the release saying the investigation should end and he called it a witch hunt a federal proposal may push california one step closer to a legal fight with the trump administration over whether the state can force cars to be more fuelefficient kiki dee science reporter molly peterson explains for about six years now regulators have been pushing auto manufacturers towards more fuel efficient.

Hornets School Teacher Colorado Doug Ducey House Intelligence Committee Eric Swallow President Trump Reporter Jared Linear John Hickenlooper Arizona NPR Congressman Donald Trump California Molly Peterson One Billion Dollars Twenty Percent Six Years
"molly peterson" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Support for this mpr podcast comes from casper if you're dreaming of a mattress with just the right sink and bounce try casper heads a casper dot com slash npr and use offer code npr to receive fifty dollars toward any mattress purchase terms and conditions apply live from npr news in washington on core of a coleman at least forty people have died in the last week following devastating wildfires in northern california authorities say they're gaining on the blazes from member station kqed molly peterson says that means some people are beginning to return home in mendocino county and parts of napa valley cal fire has lifted evacuation orders and advisories for the first time in days still those counties are warning thousands of returning people to stay cautious hot weather and dry conditions mean active fire still pose a risk so did chartier utility poles and trees that may be burning underground in nearby cinema county where fires were especially deadly local officials say they'll lift evacuation orders in stages the plan is to prioritize neighborhoods that suffered less damage insurance companies and public health officials are telling people coming back not to clean up hazardous ash and debris themselves counties and towns are still working on plans to do so for npr news i'm molly peterson in santa rosa president trump and senator rand paul say they had a productive gulf meaning at one of trump's courses on sunday npr's vanessa romo reports paul has come around to support the president on tax reform and healthcare trump and paul have been at odds over the president's proposed tax cuts.

washington coleman california mendocino county insurance companies molly peterson senator rand paul trump vanessa romo president npr kqed napa valley public health fifty dollars
"molly peterson" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"molly peterson" Discussed on Science Friday

"When you're on your vacation engines here last day before you go back home consider washing your clothes another because when you put closing the wash on the heat from the drier at will kill bedbugs and bedbugs eggs so this is a good way of making sure that you're not bringing any back with you and also that you're making your clothes lhasa nicesmelling for the benefit less attractive on i'm going on vacation next week so i will take that advice before a for a hit from thank you so pete welcome sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science and now it's time to check in on the state of science is king he are wwl st louis how the great island of the media news this is a segment where we highlight science stories from communities around the nation and today story comes to us from the public radio station w w n o in louisiana we are a usda programme might pay whole neighborhoods of people to move out of their floodprone houses and settled down in see for ground molly peterson reported that story for louisiana public radio partnership and she she's here with us now welcome back to science friday molly thank you so set the scene for us we are are these neighborhoods in louisiana we'll last year in early august m fifty doesn't sixteen there is a massive flood in louisiana en covered many parishes thirteen people died and there is about two point four billion dollars in flight insurance claims these neighborhoods are near baton rich m one of them is northwest of baton rouge that's i'm point coppee parish anti point coupet perish and the other one is in the town of gonzalez which is an ascension perish on a street called silver relief and some of these residents have witness some pretty devastating floods i know you interviewed one resident ethel's stewart out at about a big flood there in 2016 early 2016 we have a clip of that.

senior editor louisiana molly peterson gonzalez ethel sophie bushwick usda insurance claims coppee four billion dollars