17 Burst results for "Molly Chester"

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

11:34 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Films out there. No you don't understand the dog eat dog world but but we're you know we're trying we're going around and doing the thing that you do share a you know Kademi numbers and his season. It's important and I go to the film to to do it. It's hard to put yourself out there and be like please like me again. I thought like I I avoided that once I left. Filmmaking became a farmer but I'm really intrigued by the idea of continuing to make films now especially around the space you know I had a good experience. I lost you know. It's like childbirth right after about nine months you forget the pain you go through and then you have another kid right exactly as a man. So Oh you like. Are you already like the next movie. Yeah I am now. We had to work really hard on the farm to figure out how to get through the process of this this movie and so we now have a structure that enables John to be connected on the visionary level which I absolutely am completely relying upon him for while Oh having our operations not suffer so and storytelling. I mean how many people get to have a master storyteller folded into their mix to be able to tell the importance. Horton right of what you're doing so I think we'd be silly not to have that be fully expressed in whatever it should be. I mean that's that's the archimedes lever that can really move the needle in terms of awareness and education. You know there's what you're doing on the far but how do you scale that people scale it to your storytelling documented. Yeah you know when I visited the farm. You're also like an incredible tour guide like you took a ton of time with us in and showed us everything explained everything and I was like this should just be. You've got to find a way to to provide more of that. I mean I don't know how much of that you do but like this is this is an opportunity. Because of the notoriety in kind of profile you have as a result of the movie to leverage the far beyond. Just what you're doing in the soil to really you know educate future future generations of farmers and just educate people in general so that they can be better equipped to vote with their choices and their dollar's absolutely the ability to have a storyteller there also enables us to maintain the authenticity of what we do because of that scaling piece. If we tried to scale and scale ensconce Gallon Gallon. That was our focus. We would lose. Sleep would lose some of that connection. It's the lower that's been lost. That's that's we don't have the innovation from the past. I don't have one hundred and five year old farmer to talk to and so this generation's job is to capture the stories and mythology is this new lands of seeing in a way that we can pass on and they you know there's nothing wrong with using I think storytelling for that and I do feel a burden of responsibility not to turn my back on the opportunity. I've been given to convey that message. Yeah a big part of the movie he is. You try to figure out stuff on your own you have. What Allen is telling you full of wisdom but there are blind spots there as well and you're kind of stumbling through this this and it occurred to me like why isn't there basically like a rule book for this? That could have told you ahead of time. This is what's going to happen. Here's what you do. Oh and now. You're in an opportunity with the experience that you've had a canonize this and create a roadmap so that other people can mimic what you've done and kind kind of avoid some of the difficulties that you had to weather right and mimic to a degree because it's all like very unique. He's going to be different. But like the lenses like being able to define what the words words like mutual even means or bio. Mimicry or symbiosis. Like those are the three Lens Lenses we put on in the wake of every decision Asian and that suddenly becomes your way of seeing solutions. That don't require an expert. It's crazy right announced. Always say that to me. You don't always need an expert for every problem you just need to think about it in the context of these three different things so yeah I think the storytelling enables visualization of what what that filter looks like. Yeah and the teaching is so basically what I get from. That is that the teaching isn't just about when this happens. Here's what you do is out of way of thinking and about a certain way of problem solving that requires you to think differently. Exactly one size. A one way of parenting is not a fit all approach. Each kid within your family needs a different thing. You just need to have the filter a I hope this kid. I promise I love this kid and then I start to see the opportunities within that love for this child to sort of connect with it. But it's going to be different from your son or your daughter or one son to the next one and the principles are also kind of oddly and curiously applicable to the workplace to manage a team of people. And how do you like. There's all this sort of surrender aspect. There's the allowing there's the be curious. You know all of these things. I think are powerful tools that that that are that have applications nations. You know not just on a farm but in our everyday lives. I'M GONNA say one thing and I want to turn Alex Sierra that she's really I think focused on the first eight years for us was about building the immunology of our land recreating an immune system. That could sort of buffer itself against these epidemics and what we realize is that it was incredibly ably. Reliant upon the cohesive sort of cohesiveness of the team think and the way that the team viewed each other and view the goals calls and that was not something molly and I were good at navigating. And that's where molly has really stepped into this role the next level of immunology for the farm and that is how we how we work our culture. Yeah Yeah Yeah that's pretty much it's just yeah you you so we did going through. The film was really hard on our team and so then as operations had to come Fully early in my court I was able to one look at the whole which is something that as we were co leading. That's you don't get that opportunity as much and then I just just like the coyote like you wrap your arms around the whole thing and kind of find the purpose in each person but then my days are basically spent working with the team to either their help increase assertiveness on one side or increase empathy. It's like each person is just needing one or the other to be able to find connection in communication because ideally they're working as a self sustained ecosystem so they don't need me if I'm most of my job is turning them back on on themselves either individually to find their instincts for the ones that are have challenges with that or turn them together to each other to trust each other to have the hardcover station. So I love that because I'm getting the different version of what we did with the soil and what I do raising a son and what we do in our our relationship and now it's just applying there but ultimately they were GonNa work me out of job in the sense that I'm going to have more time to get my hands in the dirt after I'd go through through this process because they won't be for CA. Harvard Business School case study really. It's really been amazing to watch. It's fun and it's just taken like you know twenty years of therapy for myself but for the bargain price of a house. All right we got to land this plane but I want to kind of ended with final thoughts on on what it is that you most want people to take away from this movie and your experience you WanNa go first or last. I feel like you need to go last. Okay Okay I'll take you take the pressure on. I might just say no. I'm just GonNa keep it really simple that for me. This film is a love story. And it reflects the love of this farm and this piece of nature that we've experienced and so I would love if people walk away inspired aspired to begin to create that connection and some very small way for themselves. That's it yeah and I would say that No political or religious side Owns the conversation around the planet. I I would say all of us in neethling know that. We are dependent upon the finite natural resources of this life-giving blue marble floating through space and allow yourselves to be Sh- made fun of for desiring a vulnerable reconnection connection back to nature. And when someone tries to bring up the ideas or the or the conversation around economics or practicality eh or logic stay focused on that reconnection because I feel ultimately will all starving from starts with that reconnection to nature and then from there to each other. It's a beautiful place to end at my friends beautifully. Put I applaud. Did you for your commitment Not just to the planet but to educating people I think this movie is a remarkable Qabala chief met and it's impacted so many people I know it's going to continue to do that And also for the current vulnerability to share so much of yourselves delve into put so much of your own personality and private lives into into this story I think it allows people to connect with see themselves and reflect on on our own relationship to our environment and our communities and I think it's really cool so really I'm really proud of. How do you guys here today and really really a happy to talk to you? A Cherry message. Incredible human being so easy to speak with. You should do this for a living so the movie is going on Hulu on November this week. Yeah so it's beginning of ever it gets going up in mid to late November the date specifically so by the time this is up it will be on Hulu. That's probably the easiest way for people to see it right or on Amazon prime and all that kind of stuff to Amazon. It's on a google. Play all that stuff Then one thing the There's a live live orchestra scoring of the film. That's going to happen at the Wilburn in La on December fourth which is cool actual conductor who wrote the music It's going to be there scoring the film. Live to picture while audiences get to watch it at the Wilton on December fourth. That's very cool. I'm so excited about that. And Jeff beal who is the composer mazing raising Talented Guy Putting this together. So if you haven't seen the movie great way to see it is. It are still tickets available for that. There might be still tickets available yet. They're just as we're speaking today. They're going on sale this week goal. We'll all find that Lincoln. I'll put it up on so if your check not hopefully we can make it out see right but you guys p plants..

molly Hulu Amazon Gallon Gallon Jeff beal Harvard Business School Horton John Allen Wilton google La Lincoln Alex Sierra Sh Qabala neethling
"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

11:05 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Organic spray accidentally killing bees accidentally killing ladybugs in-intentionally killing ground squirrels so there are fifty to one hundred thousand deaths that happened just to grow Avocados and my point is that none of us are getting out of this without blood God on our hands. It's just at what point and how connected to the process but that doesn't excuse you from the reverend the responsibility for life. Yeah I think there is a missed placed delusion that pervades a certain segment of the community. who have kind of MM trick themselves into believing that because they're not eating animals that they're they've opted out completely from this cycle of life and harm and I think that that's just not the facts facts? Don't don't bear that out and no matter who you are and no matter how delicately you dance on planet earth. We're all contributing to harm in some way and I think it speaks to the broader issue of the complexity Of all of this right which is basically what the movie is about. It's this this is incredibly complex and dynamic and the minute you think you have your your hands on it it it will surprise you a new and different way and you know my allegiance. Allegiance is only. I said this to you. The other day is only the truth and I'm always trying to check dogma as much as I can and I consider myself a compassionate Vegan but I'm not under the misapprehension three -hension that because I only eat you know fruits and vegetables and grains that that is not contributing to in some negative way towards you know these these problems that that we all care about and that we're trying to to reverse and I think having a mature perspective on that is more beneficial than and slinging arrows at people calling people names and I just think you know people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones and the moment that you start to think that you're better than another human being or holier than our Stan from a place of judgment is the minute that we lose that ability to have empathy and empathy is what we need right now that that is what the world is starving for and if we want to see our way forward together collectively we have to figure out how to unite around our shared principles to do what's in the best interest for the preservation of the planet and to do it in the most compassionate way possible with an appreciation for the challenges and nuances onces and complexities of all of this really. Well then very well so molly would we just end the podcast. And it's it's tricky and I will say I said this earlier like it was painful to see those comments because I you know I'm I'm a member of that community and to see them turn against me. As if I betrayed them was was upsetting to me but it also made me think like where what I do things differently I have not visited. You would not be having no. It's like these are conversations that I wanNA have have and if there's certain sector of the population that is unhappy with it then that's an issue that they're going to have to deal with it for you that a lot of courage it does and I I mean we get very occasionally called murderers you know and that's really hard especially given how hard we were to create this regenerative environmentally enhancing farming system. And it's thankless in a Lotta ways But you know it really does beg the question of like where does life start for people like because his start at the ant does it. Start at the cow. Where does it start because this is started the bacteria level? Because you're eating you know on apple like one hundred billion microorganisms microorganisms. That apple in those microorganisms are dying so that you can ultimately digest that apple at some point I think it's like hope for people to become really curious in the vegans. That have come and been very curious have walked away. I think with a maybe not entirely change. I don't want to act like we've changed anyone but they've walked away with an appreciation for the complexity of the thing. We're all here on this planet trying to understand because clearly none of us understand it. We don't know how it works. We don't know how to fully replicate it hilarious to me that we're trying to think about ways to colonize moon the moon and Mars like we're GONNA get up there and like reengineer this beautiful life giving thing that has never received carry out not one day. We received a delivery from another planet for the food that we were given it. They've Newell Newell source of death and life in a sort of infinity symbol and we need to take probation for what that really means before we try to. Do you know evangelize our own ideology. We should all be humble students of this. I think that what's what's interesting is Is that we're all on board with with you know Tariff warming Mars. Because it's sexy like ooh that sounds cool and yet we have so much difficulty difficulty getting people behind the idea of regenerating our soil which is doable. And right in front of us. We would have to do in order to tear for Mars as we have to kill a lot of things in order to make that happen. Because there's I mean we would have to bring death to Mars in some way like it's so much a part of the mean Matt Damon. Eamon grew the potatoes with his poop. That is that is the decomposition of something that was eaten by him. And then you're right so we. It is hilarious red eye. We talked on the hill at the farm from when you visited. I said it's like going up to Mars and the moon and trying to start it all over is like saying to your parents who just gave you a car for free. You're like no. Thanks Mom and Dad. I'M GONNA go build one out of stone and I've never even figured out how to put oil in the one that you gave me so I wonder when they get there if they are not going to look back. ACT This beautiful blue and green marble and be like. Oh Damn maybe maybe that was. That was a better replace. How many how? Many regenerative farms are there right now like in California or nationwide Actually I know from the Biden hamic perspective of the by. There's a couple of hundred I don't know the answer to the regenerative but there are number And larger than ours like in thousands of acres. You Know Gay Brown is one that I'm sure you've talked about on this podcast. We'll Harris of white oaks passer Asher. There's a number of operations that have been doing this far longer than Molly night that we've actually learned a great deal from reading their books and listening to their youtube videos. News and stuff Joel. Salatin is probably the most. Yeah we started late listening to Joel stuff and reading. Joel's Joe's books and you know borrowed from all of these guys is. That's why we never really beat the drum saying we're all by dynamic twenty four seven it just a method that we pull from but I don't believe it's the only way nor do I believe that you now holistic or permaculture anything one right one one right way to do it you borrow from them. Well I've had Zach Doctors Bush on the podcast a bunch of times whose very passionate about this subject podcast favorite regenerate farming farmers footprint? The work that he's doing without organization is incredible riling angle heard is coming up soon. He's got kissed the ground like there are. There's a lot of innovation in the nonprofit sector that's trying to raise awareness ernest and education and kind of promote this way of of of Producing food but what are what are the barriers ears that are out there right now that are preventing more farmers from embracing this way of doing things from from young people or farmers that want actually acquire land. I think there's one barrier there and that just being able to acquire the land do this. That's a huge barrier and The other is at farmers that are in the midst of deep financial risk. You know Dat because of the Alone that they've taken out in order to grow high volume commodity ready. Crops can't just do an about face of very easily and would you argue that point. But here's the thing if if they if if you don't I don't want to see it you certainly can come up with a million reasons why it's not possible what I have seen personally in the last eight years especially in the last last year since the film's cum out is the increasing number of people who own land and are looking for young farmers to partner with to farm their land. The same way that we're doing I've also oh crazy as it is like these organizations these nonprofits that are like land trust groups that go and acquire land preserve it have suddenly only realized that the land that they buy and preserve is better preserved. If put in the hands of regenerative farmer and so these lands acquisitions being made by these land land trust and then they're finding partnerships with regenerative farmers to farm at because they realized that Regenerative AG is one of the best methods of environmentalism and the preservation and rebuilding of the biodiversity of the land meant to be protected. So I see great hope in this dynamic I think for anyone that's looking. Can you do this. It's about talking about it and telling people what you want to do and eventually you will find be connected to those opportunities You know that's that's sort of my best assessment uh-huh landscape what is the. What are the numbers in terms of carbon and water suit sequestration on your farm so like well from from a numbers perspective on like what we sequestered in water this past year how far beneath our allocation? That's okay yes so like one of the things we were told in the beginning of the go. You guys we're going to grow cover crop you're gonNA take a lot. More watering draw all this water from more part and we were like. Oh Man I don't know. Is that true so we start the farm and within a a year and a half. We're like everybody else. In California special specially Ventura County required to reduce our water use by twenty five percent and we get an allocation based for farm based on the crops that we grow not on cover crop so basically the government says this is how much water. We're going to give you the amount you're allowed to use the number of Acre feet that you're allowed to use her year you get you get a penalty and also from us being like wanting to be these eka go regenerative farmers. It's like kind of would be humiliating that we're over using water so we established our cover crops and within two years we never went really over but within two or three years after the twenty five percent. Required reduction were ten to thirty five percent under our water allocation every single angle year and we grow more stuff than any other farm. You know Acre two Acre comparison in terms of biomass so in that time time period we are using less water right Regenerating our aqua..

apple Joel molly California Regenerative AG Stan Newell Newell Matt Damon Acre Eamon youtube Zach Doctors Bush Salatin Gay Brown Ventura County Biden Joe
"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

11:49 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Of that water and create this amazing aquifer yeah and like obvious. sponge-like layer of that was kept in the top twelve inches in whatever it couldn't hold went back into the ground. Deep into the Aquifer. Recharge it so. You're you're building soil your sequestering water and then you're actually these plants that we thought of as weeds but these weeds and grasses and legumes are actually helping to surface and cycle nutrients like person as a weed to people and and we looked at differently. It's when you have an Acre of person that's four hundred pounds of potassium you have living on the top of your soil. And is that decays it's Filters down past route zones and gives plants access to potassium your crop plants. So you're building the fertility right and then you're also creating habitat for Predator editor species of insects that are fighting the pest species of insects so it took us three or four years to see the lady bug population. Come back to such enough that it could override the ant population that was protecting the eighth population right right and that's like to say. Oh I'm just waiting three years while this destruction happens for nature to return is not a conversation you can have with a lot of people. It's a scary proposition. But ecosystem response to these issues. Takes a long time especially when you don't have the habitat in place but now the habitats in place you've got this cover crop. It's part of the habitat equations. Not The only thing and so the next season season when the pest outbreak happens you've got predators that are like damn. I need to have extra babies I see this. I remember going to have more laid more eggs here. Literally the ladybugs will lay their eggs right in the the middle of an eighth amid population and the ants and no one's the wiser. There are running around trying to protect the aphids. They have no idea that in a few weeks hitting me as hatching colony of ladybugs right in the middle of their house. Yeah brilliant I mean it becomes this this like almost game. The three dimensional chess. You're you're sort of Lording over this symphony and trying to figure out how to conduct it and the minute you kind of figure out a natural solution to one of these problems it just creates another problem and the human instinct is to like. Let's crush that problem and and it will go away like this very dualistic sensibility that the way to solve that problem is by doing this without an appreciation for the domino effect that occurs I and it's a journey to understanding that that you know the interconnectedness is so much more profound than you can imagine and the implications of everything are almost impossible to track. Because they're so they're so profuse right so whether it's The lady bugs aphids the I answer the bees or the the birds are now eating all the fruit and then all the snails that come out like it's just a constant learning curve of trying to figure you're out how to like corral all of this get it to work in harmony right and part of that is just patients right and getting out of the way totally and I think you know we all are looking for the right and wrong ways to navigate our lives and try to build identify right. This is right in this is wrong. I believe this I believe that and we tried to oversimplify This thing called life with these right and wrong long perspectives and what nature teaches. You is that it's all about consequences and consequences are are the truth. Truth and consequences are not always going to happen in thirty minutes. They may take thirty years to understand the decisions we make and the consequences of those requires great patients and observation and humility to know that the answer may come in a time that we are not comfortable with and so to begin to realize that nature also does not have a reason necessarily a yes or no reason or a right or wrong reason. Why does something It really truly just works off. This consequential sort of system of events is to free yourself from having to know what's right and wrong and just be Be very disciplined to possess the skills. I think to observe an acknowledge when you've come to that conclusion and and and from there you can say you've got some sort of information to make the next decision with. Yeah Yeah I mean a big thing in the big theme of the movie is is is is Having that humility and investing in curiosity observation as as fuel for innovation right like how can we just stop and really pay attention to what's going on here and get as granular as possible and as curious as possible and and that's kind of that's the pardon the pun like the fertilizer for finding the way forward like the sustainable way forward yeah and being surrounding yourself in a community community a culture that supports that and that and that. and that's the trick. That's that's what we've got to get to because I think we're all there's there's so much fear out there with what's happening even whether you believe in manmade climate change or not. It's it's in denial that we're all a little bit like well. How's that hurricane was a little stronger this year at Winston so he ben ten fires in the last month? I don't know if I'm just going to say I don't know of man created that but I feel right to me so yeah. We're we have to acknowledged together. That is something that is prescribing or signifying an imbalance. And there's a reason for the imbalance. Yes that's what we should get curious about. We had earthquake pretty big one right like not too long ago. Biggest one was twenty years. My son was in the living room and he was freaked out and and he was asked me a million questions. And I'm telling you it's GonNa be okay and I'm like you know. What do you know? What a earthquake is he's like no and I'm like let's watch a little video? Let's learn and what's happening immediately. Thirty seconds later he was completely calm he'd be able to visualize what was happening. It answered enough questions for him to sort of feel connected to to it and I think the things we are afraid of. We can no longer turn away. We must be curious and not confrontational. Yeah in terms terms of surrounding yourself with a supportive community. Molly what was it. What was the reaction of the surrounding farms and and farmers when you guys moved in and started doing things a little bit differently You know it probably could have been more aggressive assertive. People would leave us alone to a certain degree but it definitely wasn't. We were doing something very different and nobody understood what we were doing. And we you have to deal with that feeling of a little bit not embarrassment but you're just kind of on the outside of the situation and you really just have to pull the resources verses from yourself and the community that you find you know in other ways and it's a challenging thing to go about that I mean John and I have always spent different different times not with our people and so you're sort of our island and that's not it's not ideal deal you WanNa. Everyone wants to live in a community but now with the movie out in all of that. You're like youth celebrity like has it changed. I mean they must be especially when they're soil runs off in the rain and yours doesn't like they have to be thinking. Well what does this. What are these guys onto like are they are they? Are they demonstrating that. What kind of curiosity? Now I think got that are a little bit. Give him a little credit. But I think a lot of it was well. You can't feed the world with this way of farming and I'm like well that's an interesting. I wasn't trying to feed the world. I was just trying to feed my community and is that enough in my head. I'm thinking I didn't say that because I was like. Oh well I guess you can't can't feed the world. She's right but they're now. After about six years. They started coming around asking questions. And we never have like looked at lead the way our neighbors grow as like the pointing fingers at them and saying that they're wrong because they're responding to a vote that we have all culturally really supported and that is like I just want food cheap and I wanNA have my blueberries in the wrong time of year and so they're just responding just like Monsanto. It's like it's really easy to point fingers. I don't agree with what Monsanto's doing but they are a product of our own making so we never really preached to our neighbors and our neighbors neighbors now are seeing the health of our plants and realizing we're not having these certain pest issues and they're like so tell me about you know the the ducks and tell me about this. And that's great because that's what we need. We need that open dialogue and that was before the movie so and to give them credit now afternoon they probably just like I don't know what they're imagining But but I will say there has been a transition of of appreciation. Yeah that's cool Well let's talk about. Let's talk about soil. I want to dive deep into that. soil is everything And part of the process of restoring the soil has a lot to do with the composting. The composting tea. And it's kind of a an amazing elaborate thing that you guys constructed Arctic as part of this whole journey so Yeah I think so. Is this a couple of different ways. We build soil one is cover crop the other is straight great compost. Meaning like we'll bring in everything from horse manure to the cow manure on our farm to landscape CRA- scraps and turn that back back into Sort of soil compos and then the third. It's like the top secret ingredient of our farm. Is this vermeer compost operation which is essentially compos where worms are doing the work of breaking down organic matter and the cool thing about worms is that there are knock you relating that soil with the forty eight different types of bacteria. And then from those castings worm poop. We then brew Attiya compost tea which increases the diversity micro microbial count of the of the of the brew and then we literally inject that as a homeopathic sort of level of injection and small dose into the irrigation water. To put all these warriors these microbes back out onto the soil to go to to work. You know creating that flywheel fact of breaking down decaying matter so there's like our three components to sort of helping build an establish diverse microbial soil. We had the opportunity to put our hands in the worm compost and right in actually. Yeah like it smell. It smelled great great. It's like like really good coffee grounds or something like that. Some coffee group that was do we do. We feed the worms coffee because it keeps them working a little bit. Not True Not true anthromorph. Besides you take it has it has a porous bottom to it. This is sort of Carafe raff where you're creating this compost and you take like a couple of inches off the bottom right. Yeah then you put that into this kind of brewing machine that creates the T. giant five hundred gallon to the Tibor. Yes sorry if I oversimplify the steps now but like cooking. Yeah Yeah and yeah exactly and then we. It's a big old Jacuzzi.

Monsanto hurricane Lording Tibor Molly CRA John Winston
"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:41 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Mix of legumes and grasses not only are they rebuilding the soil through that process of feeding micro-organisms. They're creating porosity so allowing water in rain to seep in right there increasing biomass and organic matter which helps to create a sponge like effect with soil like an interesting anecdote. Is We increase soil organic matter between or up to three percent in the seven years one percent increase in soil organic matter per acre has first of all requires twenty-one tons of atmosphere carbon to be drawn down in order to build that but it also has the water water holding capacity that one percent Acre of about sixteen thousand five hundred to about twenty five thousand gallons of water in the top four inches. So you're holding swimming. Pools order everyone of the increase. So sorry to interrupt but that was one of the things I was super impactful when we visited It's a pretty stark contrast. When you're kind of up on a high hill and you can you'd see the surrounding farms and how different they looked to yours? And you were talking about how you know. When the rains came we had heavy rains this past winter? that the whatever topsoil existed on the surrounding farms it's got washed away in our water table or whatever whereas your farm was able to just just hold all of that water and create this amazing aquifer yeah and like obvious. sponge-like layer of that was kept in the top twelve inches in whatever it couldn't hold went back into the ground. Deep into the Aquifer. Recharge it so. You're you're building soil your sequestering water and then you're actually these plants that we thought of.

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

13:50 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"But yeah we so we looked at several farms and then Land this one run real estate and kept telling us that you gotta see as far as like. I've been trying to sell this farm for twelve years and we're like that does not sound like a good farm so we kept ignoring this offer to go see this place and we finally just said. Let's go see this far into Terry's talking about and we drive up to the front gate and we look chairman like we. You have to make this happen. We got him. It was like when you walk into a house. You know you're going to buy. It was just that feeling was overwhelming. And we we thought we saw Steve. We saw bees and we were so we didn't realize how dead the soil was. We didn't we couldn't see past. It just looked like Maryland back. I just we hit it at a good time. Yeah Yeah Rolling Health two hundred acres. Yeah Yeah and and when I visited I was amazed at how I mean desertified soil aside like how much of the structures that I saw. Were there when you first visited. Because it's it's incredibly beautifully and well appointed. It was an relegate from even from the gay like everything about it is like really well done beautiful. The was in a originally. It was a lemon farm and they were breeding Like thoroughbred racehorses sources there so there was a whole nother agenda with this with this place the the the fortunate and unfortunate thing is that have been sitting on the market for so long and it was two thousand was in a coming out of two thousand and nine right right And foreclosed on him. Yeah and and the previous owners was really looking to get rid of it so so there is just the sort of converging sort of moments for us but it was The destructors on it made it appealing for where it could go and ten fifteen years. Yeah definitely made no difference to how healthy the farm is going to be right so say old horse farm Abused pastures and. Yeah so you jump on this thing and I'm just like what's the first day like I mean we didn't even say like you're coming from a filmmaking background frown you worked on nature documentaries and all kinds of different you know sort of cinematic animal nature based projects But you're not coming from You know some kind of regenerative farming background other than growing up on the eastern shore and these are short. Yeah where I've thought because I live near chicken farms drove tractors on a couple full of like corn farms that I knew I knew farming but I didn't know anything if day one was like. Wow there's a lot of Avocados and I remember picking up a lot off the ground going like that was going to end and I was like Oh. We have endless supply of Avocados. But the the idea of like what we were really up against didn't come into focus until we really got allen involved but I I would say there was this feeling almost like it only happens a couple times in life where you literally feel so buzzer really alive like a dream just came you know yes and I can even remember Waking Waking Up. The John couldn't be there yet so many things that were still in irons in the fire. Because we didn't know this was going to happen and I wake up and sitting thing. They're like oh my gosh this feels like a fantasy almost like how the girl in those silly movies out. She's a princess. It's like I found out that I was farmer armor about stoke good and so alive. I remember the Calla Lilies and smells and still. Sometimes I'll smell a smell on on the farm and it brings me back to that very first day. It's so good. Yeah well I mean you maintain that level at least by appearances from watching a movie you maintain that level of enthusiasm awesome pretty much throughout which is kind of like I look at it like your this constant in that regard that that that John has always measuring himself up against ooh in the sense that you're holding that that place of like hope and perhaps you know some mix of idealism naievety. That's the strength that like John needs to kind of keep moving forward fair very fair and I think you know in so in many ways John would. I remember meeting John for the very first time and it was like when my life started. You know it's like I needed his grounding to deepen that nature that is me and without him. I was in culinary school so I had to be away from them for a a period of time and I was up there and I can get so just like into what I'm doing that that's all I do. You know I'll just I was up there as learning about food do food on the weekend. Get all the time. One day I was like. I've lost my sparkle or something. Something's missing I was looking out the window and I remember thinking Oh my sparkle is is John like that's something about the energy that he brings to my space makes it come alive. So yes there's idealism and a lot of in his deepening makes me deep right. Yeah Yeah you're complement each other in that way all right. Well there's that really fun montage early in the movie where you're like we're going to be. It's going to be like that. I just didn't have a child from that. I just take like yeah. You know an optimistic enthusiasm and perhaps some level of idealism so you go into this whole thing with that idealistic streak. Oh we're going to do this differently. Currently we'RE NOT GONNA USE PESTICIDES WE'RE NOT GONNA use chemicals we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA do this strictly in adherence with regenerative principles like what was the mission statement and and you know what was it like to try to hold that line as obstacles started getting thrown in your direction. We started with. Yeah Yeah that one. I think that because of the food there was I as far as idealistic as I can. I can also be extremely stubborn and in that sense. I did no where I wanted us to had. I knew so when we had all of these older farmers telling us that we can't do what we're doing or trying to like tone handed down a little better. Whatever none of that felt right so the compass was locked from the beginning and that's so helpful in any vision? You know that you know from a seed you're not GonNa Change from what your ideals are there and then it gets complicated because we did have the ability to move quickly and that makes you have so much opportunity and nature is so much opportunity when you open Pandora's box zero like in the middle middle of that and then that's when I'll help. Yeah how early on do you bring Alan into it. I mean He. You know in this kind of Hero's journey. Joseph Joseph Cambell architecture. He's definitely like the Yoda any was. We felt like that with a buddy just like a lot more cursing thing so that was like a pretty soon after we got there. Molly scoured of Internet but also got connected acted with Through the organization which is by the organization that there was this great consultant Alan York. Who'd done all this work all over the world on vineyards if we could convince him to Kinda like get involved with this project because it wasn't a vineyard and so it truly was like another like Hero's journey thing where he refuses the the call like three times? You guys want nothing to do with this. You don't know what you're getting into. You have no idea how long it's GonNa take you know. And Molly was her persistent hummingbird itself where she just kept coming back with the same enthusiasm pierce. I would've been like this guy's a groucho deal with this doesn't believe in US find another way you know. And he was. He was amazing. There was definitely just this kindred nature I have so many wonderful memories from the very beginning of mapping things what we mapped olive block out on this big piece of paper. We sat in the middle of the block that had no trees it was all dust and colored it with her drew it out with crayons and came back back in and almost as an exercise colored the whole thing in with different shades and things. I can't find it thing. But there was so much with him him. That was simple and I think that goes back to what we were talking about with John with filmmaking anytime something has got gone through the whole process and come back two simple. It's like how you watch figure skater. And you're like oh I can do that. Because they make it look simple and he was there so he would leave us every time he he left with an outline of what he wanted from us that it was something that we could do and I just that was like the Bible firm me I would go step. Stop by stop through it to make sure we were on track and at that point we had no we had some compass of our own but not really the level of depth of what he was talking talking about was for sure over our head to a certain degree until you experience that but it was him feeding it to us in the way he did it's liked guru who only gives you what you know you can do but it sat us to then finally find our own compass threw out. Yeah I mean I think of him as coming being in with these core tenants which are basically like biodiversity is king. You know soil is everything right. I mean it kind of distills down to that. And then he throws these obscure sort of Zen Koan. Ask like sort of statements that you that confound you but he is kind of that that high watermark that you're you're trying to like live up to the standard that he said and it's the thing that is that is perhaps simple but also very much not easy in my God I mean it's the it becomes like the ultimate whack a mole situation. But Not at first you know and one other thing that he did like spoke to me is a filmmaker and I see it with you. You have a great aesthetic. And I I see that that must motivate you and inspire you and I think thank Allan always would always say regardless of the science of what we talk about. The most important thing is that we make a beautiful because the beauty is what is going to encourage you. You want to be here and look as deeply as you need to look into this to find these solutions. You need create beauty. That cultivation is full of endless possibility posssibility. And I'm like I can get down with that. Yeah and and that was something that made it fun. While trying to build essentially this immune system that was the science in the soil and Alan was never shy about making that as important as anything else that we were to do right and I can remember in that really as valid and John and Alan would be down on the ground Digging in the soil looking at things and I'm looking at the to do less like Kayce we gotta go. We'd have all this stuff to get done. But it was in that moment with yes everything and and that goes back to John being my doubt digging in the dirt going deeper and figuring figuring out everything we needed to really go where we were going. Don't ask Alan so many questions about soil today. I'm like that's all she's like. We talk about the soil up and I'm like well I want to get into the soil but before formula that I I think it would be prudent to get clarity on and what it means to be a regenerative farm. What the differences differences are between Regenerative principles versus inorganic farm versus A biodynamic farm versus conventional farm. Can you kind of break that down. I think it can break down three. Those I think by the enemy can regenerative can be the same in a way but so in like an in industrialized mono-crop farm. It's all about trying to grow high value volume product for as cheaply as possible without any type of reverence for the nutrient density of the food and the health of the soil. So you end up creating this extractive active methods of farming. That's just pulling and robbing you. Know the regenerative power of soil out in order to grow food cheap. But you get this you know Lesser Tasting food that is lower nutrient density how much what is the difference in new in nutritional density between the produce that you grow versus a conventionally grown own Avocado Orange Peach or whatever. Well I mean it's hard to to put a one quantifying number but like our eggs. Have you know three to five times of Vitamin A.. Jairo mega mega six ratio Higher Luton so there is quantifiable nutrient analysis. That would change farm-to-farm soil to soil And then those are all the things that go into helping US fight. Degenerative Diseases Right I'm not sure if I answered the answers. It's also challenging it right now to research really anything with regards to food because one. It's conventional is pumping N. P. and K. and other `nother suite of nutrients into the trees. And those so when you test. That's not where you're really going to be able to see it as clearly what's different but what you can certainly tell is that flavor comes from that difference. So wouldn't you eat. Ah Apple from a farm. That's focused on regeneration. It has a depth of flavour. You can't get anywhere else..

John Alan York US Maryland Molly Steve Terry Joseph Joseph Cambell allen Pandora Bible Apple N. P. Allan
"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:27 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Meaning how much I learned how much I enjoyed the experience. And how much respect the work that John and Molly and their team have done to do. What so many said was impossible to accomplish? Basically everything that environmentalists and health advocates unanimously urged must be done to improve our food system and repair the rapidly vanishing biodiversity of our precious soil the planet's lifeblood to create food security ready and sequester atmospheric carbon by pivoting away from the glyphosate laden chemical based industrial conglomerate owned and Animal Intensive Care Fo- factory farms that dominate our current system to the demise of human animal and ecological health and returning turning to regenerative principles natural rhythms and perhaps most importantly to serve as an example that sustainable practices not only work but work better than conventional methods by increasing yields producing more nutritionally dense fruits and vegetables drawing down carbon and building resilience against things like water and soil erosion. And the thing is if you want to support practical solutions to climate change. These are critical and proof. Positive practices that several past podcast favorites people like sack Bush through his farmers footprint organization and Paul Hawkins through its Project Project Draw Down David Bronner through climate collaborative and also like next week's guest Ryland Engelhardt through kiss the ground all vegans by the way stridently and passionately. These are people who advocate that. This is one of the most important movements that we must embrace if we want to solve climate change change and not just maintained but rebuild and secure the planet's beautiful robust biodiversity in any of that that instagram post was mostly mostly well received but was also met with a very loud. And I think it's fair to say angry response by certain strident members of the Vegan community entity expressing disappointments trail and even calls to cancel me. Because if you're caught farms albeit predominantly an agricultural farm that produces an incredibly wide variety of organic fruits and vegetables also makes use of some animals pigs chickens sheep cattle as as part of the soil regeneration process and that a small number of these animals are later sold for food. So let me first. Say This I get it I hear you. I understand the response and I appreciate and deeply respect your passion. I consider myself a compassionate Vegan. I don't don't like the idea one bit. Any animal is slaughtered no matter how it slaughtered and no matter how much it was loved and cared for during its life. I made the choice to not participate in that cycle over twelve years ago and I would like to think that if I was John or molly that I wouldn't make that choice choice but I'm not them. I'm not a farmer and although yes I am of course aware that there are began farms. I can't say I truly we understand the difficult realities of actually running a farm day to day. What I do know is that as much as we would like to believe that these issues are binary they are not nothing is truly black and white and your perspective is that you cannot or you refuse to learn from somebody who has different different ideas than you? That has an experienced based perspective that differs from yours. Then that's your loss. So I refuse to stand in judgment of these people. In fact I have great empathy for them. People who are not keyboard warriors standing on principle without action or criticizing without doing but instead people on the front lines who are actually living in the solution of climate change reversal every day on the black and white issue as I said I consider myself itself Vegan maybe not Vegan enough for some of you but Vegan on the less but also somebody whose allegiance is to truth over Dogma and the truth is that no matter how Alvi can you are none of us. None of us are exempt or immune from harm or or negative impact..

Molly Vegan community John David Bronner instagram Ryland Engelhardt glyphosate Alvi Paul Hawkins Bush
"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:56 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Products that I purchase because these small changes add up and they can make a big difference over time. And this is why I'm stoked to tell you about a grove collaborative latest offer. There are sustainable. Swap set. Has Everything you need to start reducing your dependence on harmful single use plastics. It comes with a bamboo Straw. Straw set reusable sandwich and snack bags. A Reusable Glass Hand Soap dispenser and a Walnut Scrubbers Punch file you got to do is go to grove dot co slash rich role. And you'll get a free grove sustainable swap set with your purchase along with free shipping and a free sixty day. VIP trial again. That's grove dot at co slash rich role to take advantage of this awesome offer grove dot co slash rich role. Rosser brought to you today by ten thousand. There's there's nothing worse than being an uncomfortable close except trying to work out in uncomfortable close for those of you. That are runners or Jim. Rats shorts that because chafing or just don't fit right are distracting and they can really hold you back. That's why the folks at ten thousand. How created the perfect workout short? Three three premium shorts in fact built for all the ways you trained one for versatility and every workout when for durability and the toughest workouts and one super lightweight pair or designed to feel as if they are fading away. While you train I have the session shorts incredibly light and airy with space for my phone and my keys without going overboard on the pockets no chafing no bunching they are simply the best fitting highest quality and most comfortable shorts. I've worn the folks. Ten thousand are so confident that these will become your your new favourite training shorts that listeners of the show can try any short free for thirty days with their thirty day. Trial Program that means trail runs workouts in the gym long Bike rides whatever you can wear these shorts whenever and wherever you trade for thirty days if you love them pay for them if don't send them back within thirty days and you.

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:32 min | 10 months ago

"molly chester" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Snaggy some sweet gift. Cards is visit meals. DOT RITUAL DOT COM meals dot dot com so about a month ago. I watched this. This documentary called the biggest little far. It's the story of this couple molly and John Chester. Who have this dream of owning a farm? Not just any farm not just an organic farm but a farm based on regenerative principles run conducted in alignment with nature. No pesticides now. GMO's chemical fertilizers and what unfolds over. The period of watching. This movie is the incredible audible and very hard rot eight plus your journey that they undertake to transform this two hundred Acre plot of what is essentially completely desolate land and turn it into a thriving bio diverse ecosystem and I was very moved by the story. It's beautifully shot and chronicled chronicled. It's emotional it's educational. It's super entertaining. This beautiful and it left me about Molly Ali and John and this farm it's called propelled Lane. It's about thirty minutes away from my home but also to learn more about many of of the issues and themes that recur on this show. How a regenerative farm actually works how you actually create foster and maintain biodiverse soil? What is entailed in sequestering carbon and how difficult and complex and nuanced it? All is not from the perspective of a doctor doctor or an academic or scientific researcher but from an actual practitioner. Somebody who lives it up close and very personal every single day so a few weeks ago me and my team including joy. Nick from joy cafe the Vegan restaurant in which a partner we. We spent the better part of essentially an entire day. Touring the farm with John. And I gotTA say The experience exceeded all expectations locations. It was incredible it was eye opening. It was inspiring and then we followed it up with this conversation And I can tell you that I learned a lot and I'm better for having spent time time with these people and their team. I've got quite a few very important prefatory remarks. I want to say about all of this before we dive and mainly because I know there are some hardcore vegans out there who were upset with my decision to visit this farm and I wanted to address it but first let's take care of some business we're brought to you today by Grove collaborative if you don't already grove collaborative is the online marketplace. That makes it easy to go. Green by delivering all natural home beauty beauty and personal care products. Right to your doorstep and they're also key place to visit when it comes to switching out those single use home basics for more ECO friendly options nearly nearly sixty three billion single use sandwich bags are used by American families each year and five hundred million plastic straws used every single day. That's enough to circle the earth with twice its massive kind of terrifying and it's time for us to change. I've made it my goal this past year to eliminate my dependence on plastic plastic and be much more conscious about the products that I purchase because these small changes add up and they can make a big difference over time. And this is why I'm stoked to tell you about a grove collaborative latest offer..

John Chester Molly Ali Nick
"molly chester" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:19 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on KCRW

"Please do your part any amount gets you in as a member of KCRW. And thank you coming up on the program. Why workers at riot games? What off the job yesterday? Also, we'll talk about US's Arnold problem. Yeah. Seem to have one. That's next. Afternoon. And thanks for spending your cloudy to stay with us here at KCRW. It's sixty two degrees here in Santa Monica, sixty three in Torrance that chillier in Santa Clarita with sixty you might be looking at some showers in the Southland around Thursday and Friday this week stay with us for more press play in just a moment on KCRW KCRW sponsors include neon presenting the biggest little farm about a couple of creation of a little farm with a big plan to save the world opens at the landmark and Arclight Hollywood this Friday with opening weekend QNA's with John and Molly, Chester. You're listening to KCRW unle- parole next time on all things considered the women's World Cup. Soccer tournament is coming up in one month. US team has won three World Cup titles while the men's team lags behind plus we trying to make sense of the relationship between airplane maker Boeing and the federal defense department and how one minor league baseball team in Connecticut is leading the way in peanut free. Baseball parks. Plus, local news, weather and traffic to its all. Things considered from NPR and KCRW. It starts at three. This is press. Play I'm Madeline brand more than two hundred employees the video game company, right games. Walked out of work yesterday. In protest, riot games here in Santa Monica, and the employees are protesting the company's handling of cases of sexual harassment and discrimination. And this comes after a series of legal issues for that company last year right faced a class action lawsuit, which accused the company of gender-based discrimination, and of fostering, a sexist workplace that lawsuit was dismissed since then riot has tried to make some changes, for example, in allows employees to opt out of force arbitration. But that does not extend to current employees. Only new ones here to talk about this is right games worker. Jocelyn Monaghan one of the organizers of the walkout yesterday high. Hello. So I understand two hundred and more workers decided to walk off the job, including a bunch of men Reese by that. No, I think that issue of harassment discrimination. Go beyond women, obviously, three organizers who stood up world women, but we had a lot of support from, you know, people who have suffered racial discrimination or people who have suffered discrimination because of their sexuality, and that's not limited to women, and when you say discrimination, are you talking about pay differences. Yeah. I mean, it can be paid for it can just being treated differently or talk to strangely being you know, promoted or not promoted just kind of uneven treatment of anytime. Well, how would you describe the overall culture at riot games? Place. It has a an almost magical feel to it. It's one of those cases where they really want you to feel like a family a community. And in a lot of ways we do. But I think that there's kind of an insidious thing at the middle of that. That's like, okay. Like when you're part of this culture, you have to accept certain values, and they might not be values that you agree with. But in order to enjoy like, the magical fun parts of this. You have to just kind of tolerate those. And I think what's happening now since last year is people are saying, hey, like, we love the parts of riot where we can all get together. Be super smart make super cold things. We love the parts where we make really cool things for our players. And we believe in what we do. But we don't want to tolerate those parts anymore that come out of this like, bro culture is what a lot of people are calling. It. And I think that that this is kind of a big shift. Yeah. So you want an end to force arbitration, correct? Yes. And so they've ended it for new employees. Why didn't they extend that to existing employees? So I can't speak for their reasoning. The reasoning that they gave in the article that they published is because they're in active, litigation and they've committed to commit to a position after active litigation is over for current employees. Okay. And so what else are you demanding? So this current action is just around four Serb attrition. The walkout was targeted specifically at that. And we were asking for an end to star betray Shen for past current and future, employee's, not an often clause just an end to it entirely. We also want to include contractors, and we want to see the use of it in current litigation ended, and this would specifically apply to sexual harassment and discrimination. Discrimination. And do you have people there who claim that they were sexually harassed? Yeah. I mean, I can't talk about this cases. But if you look at the lawsuits that were filed which are publicly available a number of them are by Karenin employees against current please. And they include sexual harassment. So this other lawsuit as I mentioned in the intro was dismissed this class action lawsuit, which brought up many of these issues. Why was dismissed? I actually don't know about any lawsuits being dismissed, I know, a lawsuit that was meant to open a class is currently I think in mediation, but I don't know about any loss that was dismissed if that happened. I don't know about it. And are you worried at all by walking off the job by speaking out by taking this kind of public stance? Are you worried at all that there will be some repercussions for you, professionally at the company? Yeah. I mean riots official stance is that no one's going to be punished for it. A so I think they'll probably stick to that. But for me coming out as an organizer, especially I had a lot of I had a lot of full searching to do this weekend deciding if I was willing to stand up to do that. And it came down to it's the right thing to do. I don't know what the implications will be for my career here. I feel pretty supported. But if I ever want to get a job at another games company. Anyone can just Google me. Right. I don't know what that will look like. But at the end of the day standing up for this is the right thing to do. And if that implodes my career than okay, the general video game company industry is it pretty male dominated. Yeah. It is. Okay. So do that as part of the problem? Yeah. I mean, the deal is that the reason that four-star patrician kind of sparked this powder keg is because stuff it riot has the bad for a while and stuff in games has been bad for a while, especially for women, especially for minorities that came to light with the article last year, there's been a lot of tension around here since done, and I think that we're at the beginning of a really big shift, but historically low like it's a larger issue, right? And so there's obviously been gamer gate and all of that trolling online, really horrible harassment. Online, are you experiencing any of that. So I have been keeping an eye on conversation about myself because frankly that scares me more than any kind of professional retaliation. And the only thing I've been able to find so far no one is doing harassing me. But in one of the places where those folks hang out they were making fun of my job title, saying it sounds made up which is there, which is a socialist strategists. That's your job title. Yes. So nothing worse than not so far. What what is that by the way? Is your job? So what I do it is. I collect. So so it, right. We're really invested and listening to players who play our games. So I work with teams, and I go online, and I collect like thousands or hundreds of thousands of posts that players are saying about our stuff. And then we go through that data, and we get this player feedback at scale, and we help make decisions based on what people are saying. So you would know instantly with people are saying about you and about this action. Yeah. In theory. All right, Jocelyn, Monaghan, social listening strategist at Reich games, one of the organizers of the walkout there. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you..

harassment riot games KCRW US Jocelyn Monaghan Santa Monica Baseball NPR Soccer Chester Arnold Torrance Madeline Boeing Reese Google Santa Clarita Shen
"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Many people have dreamed of leaving the city for the country to live in a way that would reflect their concerns about the environment. Our next guest, John and Molly Chester or a couple who did just that. They left their home in Los Angeles and started and organic farm, but they soon learned about the many ways nature can turn against you. No matter how noble your intentions, the Chester's tried to turn a dry and soil depleted two hundred acre parcel into a lush organic farm. They would determine to tend fruit orchards and raise cows. Pigs and chickens in harmony with nature drought pests windstorms and fire threatened to end the venture. But after eight years their farm apricot lane farms is thriving John Chester who was a filmmaker before he tried farming directed a new documentary called the biggest little farm about the obstacles. He and Molly a. Former private chef faced and overcame, and what their experiences can tell us about the relationship between humans and our environment. The biggest little farm has won several awards at film festivals. And will be in theaters this Friday, Molly, and John Chester spoke with fresh Air's Dave Davies, John Chester, Molly, Chester, welcome to fresh air. Did either of you have an experienced farm? I grew up in my twenties, I worked on a couple of family farms, but they were you know, industrial sort of commercial monocrop operations growing corn soy for essentially Perdue chickens, but no understanding of soil or the importance of biodiversity or how the whole ecosystem went together. In fact, it was all about suppressing the ecosystem, and controlling it and fighting it. So there wasn't really an understanding beyond just driving a tractor building fences and weed whacking. So somehow you manage to find investors and put this thing together. And by a couple hundred acres north of Los Angeles. What was the land? Like when you saw it. It was invention. Run lemon farm monocrop, more or less. There is some avocados as well. But it had been extractive -ly farmed for forty five years, meaning that in order to grow the food cheaply, they were taking out the nutrients from the soil and not regenerating them, and that, you know, that's kind of the basis for conventional hag, it's not looking at the whole system, it's not regenerating soil necessarily. So we essentially had just convinced our partners to purchase a bankrupt piece of land. And we had to figure out a way to jump start that flywheel system of the soil through these regenerative practices. It looks pretty dry ugly in the Phil. We thought it was beautiful at the time. I thought it was the most beautiful place I've ever seen and it felt so magical at that time and looking back at totally was desert. But it's amazing. What happens when you start to think your happiness is in front of you as something it just shields all of the the realities, right? And there's a there's a guy who sort of at the heart of the story. I mean, the muse the Merlin the, you know, the this guy Alan York, who's was an adviser to the project gives us an idea of some of the early advice. He gave us one of the first things he said, you should do Allen was he was big picture. And so he was looking at what do we need to take out to put in what should more naturally grow in this region and to add to that many his goal for us was to maximize the biological diversity of our farm, you know, through the use of plants animals wildlife. And the restoration of wildlife habitat. So he wanted to basically he was encouraging us to start a ten ring circus. We we should note that this wasn't just the two of you on the farm with some advice from Alan you manage to recruit volunteers from all around the world come in help, which was of course, critical..

Molly Chester John Chester Los Angeles Alan York Allen Perdue Dave Davies forty five years two hundred acre hundred acres eight years
"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I don't know what the connection is. But the point that that abstract things can turn you on at that age. And what we really wanted to explore was the shame around it. And how you're never told about it, you kids don't talk about it. I thought I was a complete pervert I thought I was going to go to jail. I thought I was a monster. I had no no knowledge of what I was doing. And yet I instinctually knew how to do it. And so that release and sexually felt wrong about it. Yes. And and so the idea in the episode maya's grandpa haunts her above her bed every time she's about to we were playing on the idea of someone's watching and disapproving. And if I'm under these covers than it's okay? And I would like Lady Macbeth, you know, wash my hands. Religiously like out damn spot of of this. What I? Like, I. Real america. I think that's the great part about this episode is like you're you deal with that feeling of shame like for while maya's not telling and what she's doing like because she's making a lot of time for herself to have free time. Let's just say that right? And so she's kind of lined in about what she's doing an Anna finally confronts her and Maya says something like I'm like a boy, but I'm only grocer because I'm a girl, and I think that's a really great line. Because it could knowledge is like this double standard that exists. There's some sort of tacit acceptance at, you know, we'll, of course, boys are going to do that. But you know, girls doing that. And and you know, there there were movies back then where talked about boys acting that way into kind of normalize dependent not really for girls. No, not at all. And I think too, you know, going back to the icebox Rimmer that went around about me. I mean, there's a monster feeling with it. I mean, they're strenuous for. Me. And I think that there's also an interesting juxtaposition of of experience that Mayan I have had this leg in in Yang thing of I was a super late bloomer sexually with myself. And yet there was this outward public reputation around me that was the opposite. And then you kept this secret an outwardly showed kind of a younger, right? Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. I was very I was a very late bloomer with boys. But by myself, I was you know, level ten experience. How much do you feel like either viewers still carrying around the middle school version of yourself? She's always there. I think and she's a big part of who. I am. And it's I guess about learning to take care of her. What that means? Now, you know, and I have tools now to help her out and get through that moment. Ray? I think a lot of mind securities came from that time. So anytime, I'm dealing with any of those insecurities or anytime, I'm dealing with any conflict with anyone I have to ask myself o. What is twelve year old Maya really want from this moment? What is twelve year old Maya really need? Oh, it's love or it's security or knowing she's okay or notion, she's smart enough, or it's, you know, a lot of it's just being able to tell your child self your enough. Yeah. Which I have to do constantly. Well myers. Can thanks so much for being here today? Thank you for having thinki- so much my Erskine, an Anaconda of the creators and stars of the series Penn. Fifteen all of season one is streaming on Hulu is just been renewed. For season two they spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger after a break. We'll hear from John and Molly Chester who gave up city life to start an organic farm and faced one horrible obstacle after another John directed. A new film documenting their experiences called the biggest little farm. This is fresh air support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the United States postal service every day innovative companies are reinventing the way.

maya Hulu Lady Macbeth United States NPR Penn america John producer Anna Sam brigger Ray Molly Chester twelve year
"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I'm Terry gross with fresh air today, the inescapable awkwardness and extreme emotions that come with puberty and being in middle school. That's the subject of the Hulu comedy series. Penn. Fifteen let's with the show's co creators and co stars Anna cockle and Maya Erskine there in the early thirties but play middle school versions of themselves. They say making the show force them to relive their experiences. Some scarring others baffling sexuality at that age is really bewildering and confusing, and it doesn't make sense. I was turned on by sand dunes. I don't know why apple cores real brought rotten apple cores and sand dunes. Also we hear from. John and Molly Chester who gave up city life to start a sustainable farm. The story of their trials. Errors and successes is the subject of the documentary, the biggest little farm the middle school years have got to be one of the most awkward periods of life. I don't know if many people would want to go back and revisit those years, but that's kind of what our guests Meyer Erskine an-, Anna concl-, did they co created the Hulu comedy series Penn fifteen in which they co star as seventh grade versions of themselves in the year two thousand in reality. They're both in their early thirties. But the rest of the shows middle schoolers are played by actual teens pen fifteen explores what it's like for Maya an-, Anna to deal with puberty mean girls and their first sexual feelings. It's embarrassing poignant and very funny and many of the stories come from Erskine and cockles real tribulations in middle school a heads up to parents. This interview includes a couple of brief non-explicit. Mentions about how they dealt with those kinds of sexual situations. When they were that age pen fifteen has just been renewed for a second season Meyer Erskine an ankle spoke with fresh air producer Sam brigger. They started with a clip from the show Anna and Maya are having a sleepover. After Anna has just had her first kiss with her boyfriend, Brendan, and it's not as she fantasized. It would be my Asir about it. And then like your lips close together when you guys are standing close together. Yeah. Um they touched. Wasn't. It literally wasn't at all. He put his lips like all the way around mine. L and like sucked. It's not funny. And then why was that she just sucked me put his tongue in my mouth any like to like a torpedo cat tongue. Drilled my mouth like. Do that. Yeah. I can't I wish I could your tone. Did you do it back or did it with hin back lake? It was in trouble. You know? Crazy. I know. Awful. But at least you have your first kiss, you know. Which? I really do. Everything's just different. I don't know. I just have to break up with them. So. He is not Brendan that badeah snacks at the bowling alley. You No, know? it's like, the Prenton that Trotha pack throw this. So what's up to you to get the next boyfriend? That's a scene from the hula show. Penn fifteen created and co starring my guess, my Erskine and Anaconda welcome to fresh air tanks. Thanks so much for having us. You know, those early teen years are such a strange time. And you have these bodies that are starting to sprout in adult hood, but you have minds that are probably not ready to handle that yet, and you having to cope with these more adult situations, and the thing that makes us a worse as your emotions are just so intense like everything is just saturated and overwhelming like just the way that that teens respond to music like it's so important in it's like their theme music, so everything feels so consequential, and you know, and then they're talking they're thinking about romance. So like everything is a powder keg. And there's so many misconceptions too. It's like in real life. Anna me, I thought kissing was going to be the ultimate feeling of romance. And that's all I wanted. Like, I was not interested in sexuality at the time. I just wanted to like hold someone's hand and fall in love and kiss like zaken, Kellyanne save by the bell. So when the real when the real version happen, which was just this weird tongue..

Meyer Erskine Brendan Anna Penn Maya Erskine Anna cockle Hulu Terry gross Anna concl apple hin back lake bowling Sam brigger Maya producer John Molly Chester
"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Many people have dreamed of leaving the city for the country to live in a way that would reflect their concerns about the environment. Our next guest, John and Molly Chester or a couple who did just that. They left their home in Los Angeles and started and organic farm, but they soon learned about the many ways nature can turn against you. No matter how noble your intentions, the Chester's tried to turn a dry and soil depleted two hundred acre parcel into a lush organic farm. They were determine to tend fruit orchards and raise cows. Pigs and chickens in harmony with nature drought pests windstorms and fire threatened to end the venture. But after eight years their farm apricot lane farms is thriving John Chester who was a filmmaker before he tried farming directed a new documentary called the biggest little farm about the obstacles he and Molly a former private chef faced and overcame, and what their experiences can tell us about the relationship between unions and our environment. The biggest little farm has won several awards at film festivals. And we'll be in theaters this Friday, Molly, and John Chester spoke with fresh Air's Davies, John Chester, Molly, Chester, welcome to fresh air. Did either of you have an experienced farm? I grew up in my twenties, I worked on a couple of family farms, but they were you know, industrial commercial monocrop operations growing corn. And soy for essentially Perdue chickens, but no understanding of soil or the importance of biodiversity or how the whole ecosystem went together. In fact, it was all about suppressing the ecosystem, and controlling it and fighting it. So there wasn't really an understanding beyond just driving track your building fences and weed whacking. So somehow you manage to find investors and put this thing together and by a couple hundred acres north of Los Angeles. What was the land like when you saw it? It was eventually run lemon farm monocrop, more or less. There was some Qatar's as well. But it had been extractive farmed for forty five years, meaning that in order to grow the food cheaply, they were taking out the nutrients from the soil and not regenerating them, and that's kind of the basis for conventional Ag it's not looking at the. The whole system it's not regenerating soil necessarily. So we essentially just convinced our partners to purchase of bankrupt piece of land. And we had to figure out a way to jump start that flywheel system of the soil through these regenerative practices. It looks pretty dry ugly. Phil. We thought it was beautiful at the time. I thought it was the most beautiful place that ever seen and it felt so magical at that time and looking back at totally was a desert that it's amazing. What happens when you start to think your happiness is in front of you, a something it just shields all of the the realities. Right. And there's a there's a guy who sort of at the heart of the story. I mean, the muse the Merlin the, you know, the guy Alan York, who's was an adviser to the project. Give us an idea of some of the early advice. He gave us one of the first things he said you should do. Allen was he was big picture. And so he was looking at what do we need to take out to put in what should more naturally grow in this region? And to add to that his goal for us was to maximize the biological diversity of our farm through the use of plants animals wildlife and the restoration of wildlife habitat. So he wanted to basically he was encouraging us to start a ten ring circus. We should note that this wasn't just the two of you on the farm with some advice from Alan you manage to recruit volunteers from all around the world to come in help, which was of course, critical. There was a lot of work. You've run animals. I should just say for the audience. I mean, this is just a beautifully photographed film, and it is just absorbing to watch. But you bring animals, I mean, you bring ducks and you bring chickens and you buy a bull at auction. And then that kind of changes the mix of what's happening, so stuff grows the trees grow. And then you discover various pests like to eat the fruit on your trees, everything we everything we did to improve the land calls another problem. Right. You know, we grew cover crops the snails love cover crop in the snails eat. The leaves of our citrus trees, and we grew cover crop in. We created the worst gopher problem in probably Ventura County, if someone could tell me what I could do with gophers. We. We would we would be in the black a lot sooner. So we were really creating new problems with every solution. And so really required a commitment to go a lot deeper than we thought we were going to have to go. You had all kinds of problems with pests helping themselves to the crops that you're raising during the delicious fruit trees that you had among them gophers which were attracted by the cover soil that you put their which holds nutrients and water, and you got a lot of gophers, and they eat the roots of the tree and kill them. Right. Yeah. I mean gophers in small quantities can be good. They're killing your soil. They're they're actually helping transfer inoculate various funguses that are important to soil health and bacteria, but too many and they start eating the roots. So we tried to fight the gopher problem with manpower. You know, and spent you know, thousands and thousands of dollars trapping gophers. But it wasn't until you're five that we realized that there's things in the ecosystem that manage gophers like barn. Owls. So we started put we spent probably six hundred bucks seven hundred bucks on now boxes and by year seven we had about eighty seven bar. Now's come through the farm. Having multiple clutches in each box. You know, and they ate an estimated fifteen to thirty thousand gophers, which was way more than three men full-time could do in a year. And so knowing those kinds of things is what makes this way of farming more forcible, but we've lost our we've lost the connection to the lower. And we've stopped innovating, you know. And this innovation in this type of experimentation is something that, you know, ultimately will make this type of farming, not only ecologically sustainable, but financially sustainable, we're speaking with Molly and John Chester who seven year effort to clear land and create a two hundred acre organic farm is the subject of the documentary the biggest little farm this is fresh air. Hi, this is Dena on Sacramento. And I've been listening to TV for many years now, and I finally decided to donate because the stories really incredible. And I just love this not that I have. Thank you. Thank you. Tina the stories are incredible. Who knew barn? Owls can eat thirty thousand gophers. I just to go for snake? Good afternoon. I'm clear great. I'm here with Dave Freeman. And we're on day one of our spring membership drive. We're having a really wonderful time reminding you that your membership dollars that keep this station going. So if you're able to contribute today, we have a dollar for Dollar Challenge. The day's.

Molly Chester John Chester Chester Los Angeles Alan York Ventura County Qatar Perdue Phil Dave Freeman Allen Davies Dena Tina Sacramento two hundred acre eighty seven bar forty five years hundred acres eight years
"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Like hate that thing. So I just love all the work that Anna's doing there. I'm getting absolutely nothing back like flash forward. Dan, doing all the emotional labor, some relationship down the road. But. Yes. So funny. So like, the cool boys are just so dismissive of an my like it's blunt. It's like these direct rejections. He doesn't even know her name, and you know, that must really hurt, but it's kind of like like tearing off abandoned, right? But with the popular girls, it's it's different. Like, they never outright say things like your loser. I don't wanna hang out with you. It's always like these very strange excuses. Like, oh, there's not enough room in my parents car few sorry or like, oh, I don't. I'm not supposed to loan close to my friends, even though all the girls around her are wearing her clothes, and like it some ways it feels worse than what the boys. Do. It's like more tortuous in part gives my and and hope like it gives them something to hold out for and like, you know, maybe they'll be room in the car next time because in some level like the characters want to accept those excuses. I think. Yeah. I really related to that experience with the popular girls, we were all really close in elementary school. But then once middle school came and people started looking more beautiful or showing their expensive bags and things. I slowly was getting pushed out, but they were always really nice to me and say, oh, Maya Sar, you can't come to the front of the bot mitzvah like but happy birthday. We love you, you know, and they would call me from the brunch and them were there, my mom. Yeah. I remember that moment I started bawling after and my mom, I probably can't say this on air. But she was like those I'm over at no more, and like, my they call me because I was like, no, they're being sweet, they're saying happy birthday mom, and she was like, no, it's not okay. Because I wanted to be included in the if you were you were a best friend. So yeah, it's it's it's the hope that you you nail in the head. Yeah. Not not really excuse the popular kids behavior. But I I imagine they're probably feeling like a lot of the same anxiety. And even though the ways that they're acting out or like babies that are totally hurtful and bullying. But like, I don't think anyone at that age is free from that social anxiety. Oh, no. And I also probably did the same thing to other girls. You know, I think no one is like the food jealous. Yeah. It's all about survival and being accepted. So you'll sometimes do whatever it takes. There's not a lot of heroic acts in middle school. I think we talked about all the Dollhouse by Todd's lawns. And how that character? You know, the bullied becomes the bully. And that's very common. Even if it's just in a moment. You know, you're flexing this muscle that you see is keeping other people safe. And maybe it'll keep you safer. And so, yeah, we we wanted to show that as well. I guess. So just a warning to parents here. The next section we're gonna be talking on graphically about sexual feelings. But one of the episodes about my discovery masturbation, and that's a great example of how these characters are teetering between childhood and adult hood, so she's like sitting in a room, and she's playing with remind little pony toys. And then she like has them start kissing, and then she starts like mashing the together. And then she starts feeling these urges which she acts on after that experience. She becomes obsessed with that. And like everything she sees triggers sexually like like in the classroom. She can't concentrate because she's distracted by like a kid's ear or like a pencil razor like someone's eyebrow finds like well routed sand dunes, really hot. It's Larry, and it feels very honest. So how did you come up with that idea? Well, they saw my real experience. I mean, I. Sexuality at that age is really bewildering and confusing, and it doesn't make sense. I was turned on by like what you said sand dunes. I don't know why apple cores real brought rotten apple cores and sand dunes for some reason came into my head once and I was lack of the racing off off, you know. I don't know. And sexually felt wrong about it. Yes. And and so the idea in the episode maya's grandpa, Hans her above her bed every time she's about to we were playing on the idea of someone's watching and disapproving. And if I'm under these covers than it's okay? And I would like Lady Macbeth wash my hands. Religiously like out damn spot of this. What I? Oh god. Real. Eric. I think that's like the great part about this episode is like you're you deal with that feeling of shame like for while maya's not telling and what she's doing because she's making a lot of time for herself to have free time. Let's just say that right? And so she's kind of lying about what she's doing an Anna finally confronts her and Maya says something like I'm like a boy, but I'm only grocer because I'm a girl, and I think that's a really great line. Because it could knowledge is like this double standard that exists. There's some sort of tacit acceptance that, you know, of course, boys are going to do that. But you know, girls doing that. And there were movies back then where talked about boys acting that way into kind of normalized, not really for girls. No, not at all. And I think too, you know, going back to the icebox rumor that went around about me. I mean, there's a monster feeling with it. I mean, there's Ray was for me. And I think that there's also an. Interesting juxtaposition of of experience that Mayan. I have had this again and Yang thing of I was a super late bloomer sexually with myself. And yet there was this outward public reputation around me that was the opposite. And then you kept this secret and outwardly showed kind of a younger. Right. Yeah. Exactly. I was very I was a very late bloomer with boys. But by myself, I was you know, level ten. Experience. How do you feel like either viewers still carrying around the middle school version of yourself? She's always there. I think and she's a big part of who. I am. And it's I guess about learning to take care of her. What that means? Now, you know, and I have to Owl's now to help her out and get through that moment. Ray? I think a lot of mind securities came from that time. So anytime, I'm dealing with any of those insecurities or anytime, I'm dealing with any conflict with anyone I have to ask myself o. What is twelve year old Maya really want from this moment? What is twelve year old Maya really need? Oh, it's love or it's security are known. She's okay. Or not. She's smart enough. Or it's you know. Yeah. A lot of it's just being able to tell your child self your enough. Yeah. Which I have to do constantly well Myers can nickel. Thanks so much for being here today. Thank you for having me so much my. Erskine and Anna conqueror of the creators and stars of the series. Penn. Fifteen all of season one is streaming on Hulu is just been renewed. For season two. They spoke with fresh air producer, San brigger. After a break. We'll hear from John and Molly Chester who gave up city life to start an organic farm and faced one horrible obstacle after another John directed. A new film documenting their experiences called the biggest little farm. This is fresh air..

Anna conqueror maya Ray Maya Sar Dan John Hulu producer apple Myers Lady Macbeth Penn San brigger Larry Hans Eric Erskine Todd Yang
"molly chester" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on KPCC

"Do what we wanna do quickly. Because the building is not structurally sound we have to go in and be very careful. We can't wrist anybody else getting hurt or killed doing this recovery effort. Certainly we want to do what's best for the families. But we have to do it within reason. Authorities say foul play is not suspected, but they continue to search for the cause prison. Trump's former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen is due to report to prison tomorrow to serve his three or sentence for tax evasion line to congress and campaign finance crimes. The fifty three year old will serve his time at the medium security federal correction institution in New York at the weekend box office marvel studios. Avengers endgame continues to dominate taking the top spot for the second weekend with one hundred forty five million dollars in ticket sales already. The blockbuster has passed the two billion dollar Mark worldwide. Unseating Titanic is the second highest grossing film ever. In the thriller. The intruder with eleven million dollars. Dennis Quaid, Meghan, good film, cost eight million to make and third place. The politically themed romantic comedy longshot with ten million dollars is your markets are trading lower at this hour. The Asia was down one point two percent. The Hang Seng in Hong Kong down nearly two and a half. Percent, US futures contracts are also lower. I'm Janine Herbst. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation, recognizing exceptionally creative individuals. This year's MacArthur, fellows and more information or at macfound dot org and the listeners who support this NPR station. On the next fresh air the Hulu series Penn fifteen is about middle school life and milestones. Like a first kiss. Yeah. We talk with the two creators and stars also John and Molly Chester whose documentary is the biggest little farm. Join us tomorrow at noon on eighty nine.

NPR John D Catherine T MacArthur foundati Dennis Quaid Janine Herbst Hang Seng marvel studios MacArthur Asia Trump US Hong Kong Hulu Michael Cohen Molly Chester New York Washington
"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is fresh air. Our book critic Maureen Corrigan says it's never too early to get a jump on summer reading. She has to good books. She wants to recommend saved the experimental fiction for fall summertime reading all about storytelling. As a preseason teaser. I'm recommending two new very different novels that tell the kind of stories readers can get lost in Sarah, Blake writes in the historical fiction tradition of a Herman woke in her two thousand and nine bestseller, the postmistress and her latest store stopper, the guestbook multifamily dramas intersect with the larger forces of war and social upheaval. The guest book opens with the domestic shocker the years, nineteen thirty five the places New York City kitty, Milton and her husband Ogden are insulated from the exile. These of the great depression by a rock-solid fortification of old money one afternoon. Kitty, enters our families hushed up recite apartment after a pleasant interlude at the philharmonic. She flings open a window in the master bedroom. Remember, this is the pre air conditioning era and proceeds to freshen up when kitty looks in her mirror. She sees that her two sons have entered the room and the rowdy older. One. Nettie age five has climbed onto the window seat stood up and just about to toss. His teddy bear out onto the street. Fourteen stories below kitty calls his name and Nettie falls out the open window that moment. Warps the fate of the Milton family for generations. But in the immediate aftermath Ogden makes a desperate gesture to lift kit. Eighty out of depression. He buys a mansion on a tiny island in Maine. It's there the Milton's and their descendants will summer for decades to come. And it's there that most but not all of the Milton's will find tune the wasp practice of shrouding tragedy and secrets in silence. Blake is an accomplished storyteller. Braiding in a large cast of characters and colorful excursions to places like pre World War, Two Germany and nineteen fifties Greenwich Village. She's also hip to the fact that this kind of lush historical novel tied to the annual visits of a wealthy clan. Gathering to crack lobster tails by the sea absolutely reeks of off-putting privilege and literary mothballs. No matter the guest book, proudly owns the appeal of an old fashioned sweeping story line, and in so doing complicates many of its characters beyond the shallow first impressions, they make in fact, one of the most engaging characters here defense the essential human yearning for a good story kitties granddaughter. Evey is a professor of feminist medieval history, a post modernist EV knows better than to believe that the past has a plot. And yet she admits to herself that she longs against reason for the promise of a pattern for the relief. The unbearable relief of an ommission narrator. The guestbook offers that relief and much more. If the guest book is a kind of Victorian novel with a gloss of contemporary self-consciousness the last by British author Hannah Jameson is an unusual thriller in which Agatha Christie's. And then there were none collides with Stephen king's the shining and Neville, shoots apocalyptic chestnut on the beach. The premise alone is golden and historian named John Keller. Is attending a conference at a grand, but remote hotel in Switzerland. When the world ends, according to news reports that quickly Peter out a nuclear holocaust has wiped out Washington, New York, Berlin, and on and on the twenty survivors left in the hotel. After others have taken off debate the wisdom of walking too far away Zoric or staying put and waiting for the nuclear cloud when the water in the hotel begins to taste, funky. John and some other guests climbed to the roof to investigate the water towers in one they find the corpse of a young girl who's been murdered. The last raises the moral question of whether one isolated murder would still matter given what appears to be the erasure of most of the people on the planet. Jameson presents her story in the form of a diary that John. In rights. So there's a you are there vividness to the events here. For instance, is an entry from day twenty seven of John stay in post-apocalyptic limbo. I'm sure I heard guitar music last night. I went for a walk, which was terrifying. Even by candlelight and tried to locate the room it was coming from. But I couldn't find it. For teen floors almost a thousand rooms, and I didn't see or hear a single person like the guest. Look the last tells a story readers will get lost in. But it's also a story you'll be very relieved to escape from Maureen Corrigan teaches literature at Georgetown University. She reviewed the guest book by Sarah black and the last by Hannah Jameson. On Mondays fresh air. Why would anyone want to revisit the awkwardness of their middle school years? We talk with my Erskine, Anna who do just that in their Hulu series Penn fifteen which they created and in which they star also John and Molly Chester, tell us about creating an environmentally sustainable farm. The subject of their documentary. The biggest little farm hope you can join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and.

John Keller Kitty Hannah Jameson Maureen Corrigan Fresh Air Nettie Blake Sarah black Ogden New York book critic Greenwich Village Herman Agatha Christie Milton Maine Stephen king Switzerland Danny Miller
"molly chester" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

Doug Loves Movies

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"molly chester" Discussed on Doug Loves Movies

"And now, let's go out to apricot lane farms for my chat with John and Molly Chester about their movie. The biggest little farm. Hey, everybody, Iran, more car, California. I can't believe I'm actually at the farm that April lane farms where a great movie, I just saw takes place the movie's called the biggest little farm that's easy to screw up. I could've said those in the wrong order, and I've sitting here with how do you describe your connection to the film two stars? And like you memories. Yeah. We're the subject to subject and stars. And the photographer in I am the filmmaker John Chester and his wife, Molly, Chester. Where were you living when you were in then apartment, Los Angeles. We yeah, we were in Santa Monica Santa Monica and their dog bark too much. So they had to move somewhere. I got the idea. Let's go start our own. Farm because that's a logical. Right. Yeah. Fix super super smart, fix my girlfriend. We're having some issues with some cats. We might do the same thing. It's just moved to her cats can live. Yeah. And it's. So happy that all worked out. And that also you you you do your own way in the idea was he wanted to farm that had everything not just one particular crop one type fan Amal. Yeah. The idea is to essentially real wakened the ecosystem of this land, which meant you had to infuse it with the same level of biological diversity that healthy ecosystem would contain. And that's that's how it goes system work it balances it sell through diversity. So that you don't get epidemics of pest and disease. It's not perfect. But it's. The way to collaborate has anyone else when when the gophers still up in the movies anybody else since you that he should just got Bill Murray to come take care of? He didn't catch. Acacia it's ridiculous in that movie. But then when you see the real thing it's like they kind of raced pretty similar. The dance when the music Bill Murray. Of our first calls. Provin t to cure varmints. Well, that was silly question. I'm asked real questions now. At what point does your decision to start your own farm become documentary 'cause you a documentary shot while wildlife footage that was your thing. And so you obviously have kept getting footage along the way through this process. But at what point to become let's make into a movie once once I thought that I might have something to share to say because we didn't know what we were doing farmers, and we didn't know of actually turning the engine of ecosystem back on was going to work, but around year five we saw the return of so much wildlife that had like this purposeful. Intent that would balance out the issues we were having like ladybugs coming back and abolishing obliterating aided populations. And the return of like barn. Owls to eat gophers, gopher snakes and the coyotes. We're. Starting to kind of work with the system at that point..

Molly Chester Bill Murray John Chester gophers Santa Monica Santa Monica Iran California Los Angeles