17 Burst results for "Moisy"

"moisy" Discussed on FinTech Insider

FinTech Insider

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on FinTech Insider

"Banks decreased consolidated home, more than fifty two less than ten and in the last six. Seven years, the number of banks such as a dude studying monds, again, to more than twenty so they are because it's Moisy because it's easier to build new stuff. Thanks to newly concerns and to better rails. You have a lot of solutions that may be considered as niche, but a company heavily for million a year. So it's not it's not a smallish. And so I think that what we are going to see in the next few years that you're going to have a lot of intakes trying to innovate trying to find niche markets and then find traction on it. And then I've consideration process where large banks should be focused on the rails should be focused on building regulatory stability. And then you're Ingle skating do best to on the on the needs that. Yeah. Resting that, you know, that proliferation of, of started to the focusing on one particular thing, then creates innovation, not only within the company, but within networks and Suresh. I mean your hair at many twenty twenty with an announcement about partnering with union pay as part of that. Chinese giants push into Europe. So these almost innovation in fact of connecting different people together in different places. Yeah. So we've actually launched a new platform..

Ingle Moisy Europe Seven years
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. The militia ski your the founder and CEO of intricately welcomed software engineering daily. Thanks, Jeff happy to be here. You map the internet. Why would you wanna do something like that? He have right. So, you know, it's interesting. I kinda I stumbled upon the opportunity or the idea while I was at Alkali, and I was actually working with apple to help them scale the ride tunes infrastructure end at the time the sales team at optimized like rushed over to the engineering side of the house and were preparing for a sales conversation with apple trying to get reconnaissance on what infrastructure providers they were using in southeast Asia. And so I thought, wow, this is pretty cool. Okay. Like, let's see if we can figure that out and next week this same question came up at this time, they wanted to understand, you know, who was powering the same. You know, I tunes cloud in Australia. And as the years went by this just kept happening sales marketing appear to be so heavily reliant on engineering to give them that visibility and prepare them for customer conversations. And I thought well. No someone's building this. This has got to be a better way to get that kind of visibility in a more consistent and repeatable fashion and ensure enough no one was or at least knowing that I could see in. So I thought what interesting engineering challenge, you know..

founder and CEO Moisy Eretz KE apple Jeff co founder southeast Asia Australia
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being a sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Rune christianson. You're the CEO at maker Dow welcome to software engineering daily. Thanks glad to be here. I want to start with the subject of stable coins. Because this is not necessarily an intuitive subject to most of the listenership, what is a stable coin. And why is it important? Well, in very simple terms, a stable coin is a cryptocurrency like bitcoin, except that it has a stable value in stable value is defined the s being picked or being stable reference to an external asset like the US dollar. Why is that important? Well, so I mean blockchain has existed for ten years now. Right. But so far to allow to extend mostly what has been seen as things like speculation. And you know, is ios and a lot of stuff that's really related to kind of like the hype and the the future potential clutching. Right. But what stable towards enable is to finally get past this speculation. And the volatility into the, you know, this very immaterial kind of use cases of the technology and gets us into efface where we because we now have stability. We can actually build solutions that just saw real. World problems. I mean, really the fundamental problem is that if you're a small business, or if you are a person, but doesn't have access to a Bank account or something like that you already in a situation where you can't accept this extra externally of high volatility to use some new technology. Right. If you're going to adopt new technology, it's going to need to be percentage you in a way where it's very easy choice to switch over. There are no obvious drawbacks. So stable coins really way to in a sense make blockchain more invisible, right? Megan more like what you already used to using one perfect example of this that comes to mind.

Moisy Eretz KE Rune christianson Dow co founder US CEO Megan ten years
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being a sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his interview is really inspirational for me, so I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspiration. Company. So thank you digital ocean. Sits branchy welcome to software engineering daily. Thanks for having me. Before we discuss get lab, I want to start with the topic of get itself. So get was initially just this version control system built for Lennox. But it's evolved to become a tool that's Daesh. It'll for software engineering why his get had such a big impact on the world of software. I think it because it was first distributed version control system or almost shares down onto it material that that was open source, and when people hear distributed, maybe it doesn't resonate why that's important. I think that the reason that's important is before you could fork off a protect, but you can never bring them back together. And be because get was made from the ground up to be forked off and be merged back together. It became much easier to collaborate before if you wanted to collaborate you had to get invited. So it was like, okay. I want to contribute to yourself. What can I please have access? On your SVN serve. And then there was like they said, oh while you're good enough to so much friction. We'd get it was like as soon as you can read the software you can make an improvement to it and only then people have to decide whether they want to incorporate that so it from having to be invited to party to everyone is welcome. And I think that's why revolutionized software development, and now even infrastructure yet people saying that that get ups version control, your your changes in infrastructures one of the best things that happened. And I think it's going to revolutionize more book riding. But even see we see a future where old digital culture goes from read only to read, right? When you now if you movie, you get a binary, you get the end of results, why not give people access to older raw camera feats and all the editing information so people can improve upon it. Anything get is the medium for that for now. It's looking like it has a lot of. And and there's a lot of companies investing in make sure that get can ever grow more capable and deal with large files and love afoul. So I think it has a shot at to get could potentially be the underlying medium for managing art projects and design specs and blueprints and music files. I do think so what are the different business models that people have built around get. So there's there's different things. I think we have a a famous competitor called kit. Hop and a set look Gatiss Ghraib. It is hard to us. We'll make an easier interface in on top of it and everything get built on top of it, not everything. But to a large extent, was proprietary. We came after them, and we said even stuff we built on top of it to us extend that's going to be open, so more open core business model. But of course, there's also a lot of companies that just use get as a part of their day to day. And they're not know for for that. But it it's helping them be more effective. Get labs. Core. Business is the self managed get why is the market for self managed, get increasing. Yeah. I was kind of puzzled by that. I started with Gatland dot com. I fought a SaaS system is to future that will make all the money. And today we have a great SAS offering getting Advil comb, its use by millions of users. But a lot of companies especially larger ones d prefer to run their own installation of get lamp, and we made that super simple. So maybe that's one of the reasons is popular. But also where your data is getting much more important in integrating with all the tools tend to be easier. If you gonna for yourself, many of the.

Moisy Eretz KE Gatiss Ghraib co founder Advil Daesh Gatland dot
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being a sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Could you describe why this cannot be done on the main chain? Why do you need to do this? At the second layer. We'll take a theorem, for instance, theorem has a gas cost. Limit of eight million guests per block now settling a single trade is roughly two hundred thousand guests, and this means that you can at most settle forty trades on a block, right? A million divided by two hundred thousand that should be forty traits. Hey, you can't do anything more. It said there's linear costs the number of trades times. Two hundred thousand guests. That's the you know, that must be less than eight million now with stark dex, we already showed the Stanford blockchain conference about two weeks ago while of any showed in our demo that we can settle something that corresponds to a batch of five hundred. Trades will be low the gas cost and this is because of the experiential speedup of Stark's. So we're already one order of magnitude better than what you can settle directly on the chain. I think will even improve things further kind of software. Do you have to build in order to implement this? And what's the deployment process for that software? Yeah. That's a great question. So we have all proof systems, including ours has two parts there is the proof and the verifier the verifier is going to be sitting on the Athenian blockchain. So it is going to be a smart contract written in solidity and a little bit of theory assembly. So it's going to be some Therion smart contract and were developing that and a lot of effort is going into reducing the gas cost of of this specific contract. In also, integrating it with other parts of the decentralized exchange world, and we're. Working on this closely with the zero exit team in a will Warren's team and closely with them co one of their core, developers there minore to integrate stark Dick's with the zero exa platform for decentralized exchanges. Now, the other part is the prove or node the approver node. It doesn't sit on chain. So it's not being written and solidity. It's a very heavy piece of codes pretty heavy computation. And that part is being written mostly in C, plus plus a little bit in assembly, but it doesn't sit on the on chain. So you know, it doesn't be doesn't have to be written in solidity just approver node shit on on decks infrastructure, or does it sit on client devices where where does that stuff? Sit. Exactly, the nice thing about the whole, you know, using a stark proof system is that from the point of view of the main chain, and it's computational integrity. It doesn't really matter where the prove or node. Sits. I mean, it's a heavy computation. But as long as the verifier is happy with the proofs, it means that the prove her operated correctly. So it could sit on a big Amazon machine could sit on some strong server. It could be distributed in a number of ways. I mean, it's definitely a heavy computation. So typically won't run it for scaling you won't run it on a smartphone. But it could be running on a laptop or a strong server or on the cloud. What's the state of deployment process? How much of this software have you built in intestine production? So none of it is production yet. So our plan is to put the smart contract and approver alpha out there by the end of Q one which is roughly in our little little over at one month. But we will put it first on theorems tests net. So won't yet. Be you know, production were in the final phases of new finalizing the code, and then we wanna. Live leave a few weeks for testing in auditing that sort of stuff before we put it on the test net. And then we hope that within half a year will be ready for moving it into production..

Moisy Eretz KE Stark co founder Therion Warren Amazon Dick one month two weeks
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Because you are one of the actually I think I'll be completely honest. I think you are the best journalist at covering this topic just because of the depth that you have have crawled down into the muck of this stuff. And I've tried to cover it in in the podcast and just like people don't really seem to care where they don't really seem to understand that just the ramifications of what this suggests about the realities of our internet. But because because you have crawled down those depths, I want to break out the tin foil hats, a little bit earlier in this episode than than I would normally what role. Do you think Facebook and Google have in this ad tech world? Yeah. Well, I mean, these are the eight hundred pound gorillas or whoever you want to talk about it. Now, they have slightly different roles. I mean, let's let's start with Google here. So Google is Google is d- most dominant player in all of digital advertising in every single part of you think about the text. Stack of digital advertising. Google is a player in basically all of them. If you wanna make inventory available for other people to buy it. You can do that through Google if you wanna go to by a mentor, you can do that through Google if you wanna place ads you can do I mean is just non stop. It's n even goes into the mobile world were of course, Google created the Android operating system and Google has the dominant Android app store the play store. Google also has a dominant mobile ads, you know, SDK where if you wanna get ads in your mobile app..

Google Moisy Eretz ski co founder Facebook eight hundred pound
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed and his interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspir-. Operational company. So thank you digital ocean. Dirk die. Louis. You are the VP of AWS IOT. Welcome to software engineering daily. Jeff, thanks for being. So you've said that if users were able to know the state of every device that they are working with across their infrastructure. They will be able to reason on top of that state data, and they will be able to solve many more problems than we can solve today. What does that mean to know the state of our devices, I think it's very simple. It's just to understand more about the realities of your assets. Think about ineffectually today if you want to understand whether a conveyor belt is stuck typically you have to be there and look at it. What if you knew this automatically in the dashboard, if you're at home and want to understand, whether you're nice little room robot is doing its job? You don't have to be in the room to understand. Whether it's actually doing is vacuuming. You can open nap. It's just very simple examples off if you have the meaningfulness off getting. Information gathered in an application that you don't have to be physically present. Or you don't have to be an expert. And of course, you can think if you do this on a much broader scale, you can solve much more difficult problems. And they can talk about some of them you feel like definitely we'll get into that. But talking more broadly, what are the challenges of gathering this state data when we're talking about a conveyor belt or a light switch or a dishwasher, an electric guitar. What are the challenges of gathering the state? I think the first challenge is first of all, of course, to say do actually have a means to sense an information on a device, if you talk about a guitar guitar most likely it was never meant to just figure out in. What state it is? And then send us information meaningful over the internet, and then you have the connectivity problems. So that's the first challenges, and you could argue the advent of the internet of things came because now it is cheap and affordable for almost everybody to actually connect your devices. That was I'm always joking. I t. Sporran when you had come together from the internet revolution. But you created if you're like, the cloud and the powerful off of data centers, and what we call the mobile revolution. Where you had the advent of this very cheap little tiny, micro controllers connectivity. Modules that you connect everything. Because now it's a foldable that you can connect a light bulb or you can connect guitar because if you had to add additional.

Moisy Eretz ski co founder VP Dirk Jeff Louis
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed and his interview is really it's for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you. Dilution. So as we start to talk about scaling premisses. What are we talking about scaling? We're starting talking about scaling Theus to handle more things that it scraping. Or are we just storing more data for a longer period of time? What exactly are we scaling when we talked to any of those dimensions more things in more detail stored over a longer time, you might want to scale any of those dimensions. I think permit ius premisses is very efficient one permit. Ius instance, can scrape many things without really taking a lot of resorts. But the compression and storage and serving queries adds to that burden. So you reach a point where where you just can't concentrate anymore with one premisses, so yes, scaling a few. Imagine, you know, you could you could have one permit ius scraping hundred services. Receiving million times series. Every fifteen seconds that usually that have worked. Great bought. There are quite a lot of people who a bigger scale than that. And as you get bigger room on. That's kinda why we built cortex because you can just carry on scaling one instance of cortex too big as you like got it. So if you're some gigantic coober Netease cluster like one of the ones that JD dot com runs, and you wanna monitor it with two different patterns..

Moisy Eretz ski co founder fifteen seconds
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For being a sponsor, the co founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his interview is really it's for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you. Dilution. So as we start to talk about scaling premisses. What are we talking about scaling? We're starting talking about scaling Theus to handle more things that it scraping. Or are we just storing more data for a longer period of time? What exactly are we scaling when we talked to any of those dimensions more things in more detail stored over a longer time, you might want to scale any of those dimensions. I think premisses premisses is very fishing one permit, ius instance, can scrape many things without really taking a lot of resorts. But the compression and storage and serving queries adds to that burden. So you reach a point where where you just can't concentrate anymore with one premisses, so yes, scaling if you magin, you know, you could you could have one permit use scraping hundred services. Receiving million times series. Every fifteen seconds that usually that of work. Great bought. There are quite a lot of people who a bigger scale than that. And as you get bigger room on that's kind of why we cortex because you can just carry on scaling one instance of cortex too because you like got it. So if you're some gigantic Cooper Netease cluster like one of the ones that JD dot com runs, and you wanna monitor it with premier.

Moisy Eretz KE Cooper Netease co founder fifteen seconds
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Daily and thanks to digital ocean for being a sponsor, the co, founder of digital ocean Moisy Eretz. KE was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. So when I was in college, I learned about t.f ID avenues. Really one of the most mind blowing things that I learned in in just all of my computer science education, and it was like the just the idea that you can enter in a query, and then you could turn that query into a vector, and then you have all of your documents also modeled as vectors. And then you have a mathematical relationship that you can define between your search query and each of those documents and you can. You can model them in space and then find how the query differs from all of those documents in space, and then you, you have a ranking, and it turns out to be really, really good. Of course, you know, if we think about the history of of search engines on the internet, what we found that is that there's also a lot of latent information beyond just, you know, text distancing and, for example, you know, this is all. Page rank, pay drink was all about how the pages were referencing each other, which in contrast to a static text document search engine, the pages are getting updated all the time. There's new pages getting added, and then you have this this, this real time management problem of all these documents. And then you can have additional intelligence that you could add to the search engine over time based on you know, okay. So you have this linking relationship, and then people are clicking on stuff and like, oh, maybe something had the most references, but people still don't click on it in response to this query. So maybe there's something wrong with that query relative to the document. And so we can maybe add in this other layer of scoring based on how people are actually clicking on stuff. And so you just get into layers and layers and layers of intelligence that you can layer onto a search engine. It's really a bottomless problem. Yeah, you're right. And you know you're getting into some interesting areas because. He f- idea is absolutely amazing. Like you said in, there's a reason why it's been around for so long because it's so affected by that. But what people quickly realizing what our customers found as well as that is one thing to to use t.f idea. But some of the other examples are, you know what happens when you have synonymous words, people search for this one word, but it it's not referred to it that way in the content. How'd you Matt those things? How do you do these things such as of, I think you're talking about feedback loops. Whereas actually, you know, learning from what users are doing and trying to optimize the results based on interaction patterns or maybe things just change. You know, there's news articles, maybe what was relevant a month ago is not relevant now. So taking all those things, he's actually harp to bring into that in. So one of the things that were trying to do is try to see if there's things that we can do from Microsoft to bring in these capabilities so you don't have to do. Do quite as much work. One of the things that we did do is through being we have this ability to handle more of a natural language processing where there's not an all paeans. It's more understanding. Different variations of words. Sometimes there is concept of stems which is to look at a word like run- runner running search engines can reduce it down to its stem, but through being in his, you know, it's worth that we've done..

ocean Moisy Eretz Matt founder Microsoft
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Daily and thanks to digital ocean for being sponsor the co, founder of digital ocean Moisy Eretz. KE was one of the first people I interviewed, and his interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. What gives the simplicity for me is the FX panel. I honestly, I haven't tweaked synthesizers enough to be a really well versed in what is a simple user interface versus a complex user interface. I am the kind of person that is a broad swath of the target market for these kinds of synthesizers because I'm like, I'm not a professional musician. I'm somebody who does it in their spare time. And so Cal can I be productive in shorter span of time and productive to me, means finishing songs and that. So that means like being effective in the synthesizer and the FX panel in serum, it has like larger panels and whereas in massive, I feel like I have to like click on this little dropdown menu, scroll to this little thing, and I can't really visualize what this new thing is going to give me. Whereas in serum, you've got this FX panel with distortion and Reverve and delay, and it's almost like I've got a mixer right in serum itself. Alf on one of the panels. Do you think that if you're putting yourself in the shoes of of synthesizer designer, do you wanna make it so that the sound designer the musician doesn't ever have to assign this synthesizer to a mixer panel or like theoretically, you could do all the mixing that you needed to do at the sense level and never have to go to the mixer? Yes on, no. I think we have reached a stage where a lot of synth developers Nive starting to almost over engineer the software. Interesting. You mentioned native instruments a used the machine vision one. When that came out and you know, I've got to be honest, I hated it or longtime and still do to an extent because what they tried doing was essentially as it's a piece of how connected via USB the sixteen trigger pads on there appears as though it should be fairly simple as some infinite ro ro. Reviles on the this eight till nine of those. And that's essentially it. And it came with a software package that you could run inside another software package or as a standalone, an allowed you to drag and drop. You know, samples from, you know, kick drums Nasr what, whatever drums, percussion signs, or even apply notation on piano rolls and things on that. But unfortunately, that built the software as an entire workstation within its own right. So those rotary dials became useful for dragging and dropping different effects and things like that..

ocean Moisy Eretz Cal Alf founder Nasr engineer
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The co, founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed, and his interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Okay. So when I go to an apparel company and I purchase something through Clark, what's happening on the back end when I'm making that purchase, what's going on in chlorinate infrastructure. So basically what happens is that we, let's say it's checkup solution. So we own the Java scripts that this low, that the basically the whole checkup that is loaded on the motion site though, is owned by Kona because we for regulatory reasons needs to provide the terms and conditions, and we need to prove that you actually had the chance to to you when except those stores condition. So we come put full immersion sense. So the scripted load to us when it comes to the beckoned we sorta, I identify you who you are as a person, and then we decided with payment method to offered you. So let's say you, we, we find you very credibility than we will offer you all the different the credit options pay late third, slice it. If we find that you perhaps it's not the most creditworthy person because we took the town of thousand dollar loan than having three the paid it back then we would probably all Neil. For you to pay with direct payment methods like Bank transfer credit card or something like that. Okay. So let's say I click to pay later, and so this then some kind of Email get sent to me and what are the other things that are happening on your back end? Yeah. So like pay done that is usually depends on on the, it's a payoff to deliver like a four day credit. So we at that point, we, yes, the entered authority in in our system, and then we don't actually do anything for a while until the motion Texas tells us with through their sort of integration, their post bushes, integration tell us, hey, we've we ship the goods, so and then we actually issued a the death in our systems. And then we also when we send the first sort of payment information, Email, where we tell you, hey, a your goods are on his way to receive them any day on the heater. How use subtle your set the urine in your invoice or took Lana. So that payment is waiting. Like a database entry or a cue or something. And then we, we internally coal are issuing systems basically what we have several different fishing systems depending on country, and then it sits there and basic waits for your payment, which you the majority of our consumers due to our app in their phone. And are there any unique database requirements for that? Like what are you using like mongo or dynamo DB or something? So it depends. Oldest issuing systems are different about the. You can say that all our order management actually lies in in dynamo. So we use a w relies heavily on dynamo DB. So that's where we restore when it comes to the actual issuing systems. They run on both pulse crests on also on the the works on the oracle database. So the it's a bit different ages. Is it the same data that's sitting in in dynamo, an yes and no..

Moisy Eretz ski Kona founder oracle Texas Clark Lana thousand dollar four day
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The co, founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed, and his interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Okay. So when I go to an apparel company and I purchase something through Clark, what's happening on the back end when I'm making that purchase, what's going on in chlorinate infrastructure. So basically what happens is that we, let's say it's checkup solution. So we own the Java scripts that this low, that the basically the whole checkup that is loaded on the motion site though, is owned by Kona because we for regulatory reasons needs to provide the terms and conditions, and we need to prove that you actually had the chance to to you when except those stores condition. So we come put full immersion sense. So the scripted load to us when it comes to the beckoned we sorta, I identify you who you are as a person, and then we decided with payment method to offered you. So let's say you, we, we find you very credibility than we will offer you all the different the credit options pay late third, slice it. If we find that you perhaps it's not the most creditworthy person because we took the town of thousand dollar loan than having three the paid it back then we would probably all Neil. For you to pay with direct payment methods like Bank transfer credit card or something like that. Okay. So let's say I click to pay later, and so this then some kind of Email get sent to me and what are the other things that are happening on your back end? Yeah. So like pay done that is usually depends on on the, it's a payoff to deliver like a four day credit. So we at that point, we, yes, the entered authority in in our system, and then we don't actually do anything for a while until the motion Texas tells us with through their sort of integration, their post bushes, integration tell us, hey, we've we ship the goods, so and then we actually issued a the death in our systems. And then we also when we send the first sort of payment information, Email, where we tell you, hey, a your goods are on his way to receive them any day on the heater. How use subtle your set the urine in your invoice or took Lana. So that payment is waiting. Like a database entry or a cue or something. And then we, we internally coal are issuing systems basically what we have several different fishing systems depending on country, and then it sits there and basic waits for your payment, which you the majority of our consumers due to our app in their phone. And are there any unique database requirements for that? Like what are you using like mongo or dynamo DB or something? So it depends. Oldest issuing systems are different about the. You can say that all our order management actually lies in in dynamo. So we use a w relies heavily on dynamo DB. So that's where we restore when it comes to the actual issuing systems. They run on both pulse crests on also on the the works on the oracle database. So the it's a bit different ages. Is it the same data that's sitting in in dynamo, an yes and no..

Moisy Eretz ski Kona founder oracle Texas Clark Lana thousand dollar four day
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Daily and thanks to digital ocean for being sponsor the co, founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Help people understand what the software does. So if I'm a researcher, I've maybe I've got a computer in my medical research room and it's running caster ADC in the patient comes into my room. And then the patient starts telling me stuff about how they're reacting to the drug, and we go through a back and forth, and I'm just injuring this data into castaway is that the typical workflow maybe could give me some descriptions for prototypical ways that people are using Castro DC as is one of the ways. So the first step is to have a protocol for the study. So what am I going to research? What data do I need to run the typical notices? So they're going to define what data points that need from that they will be built. They're studying Custer's. They define their own forms. We have about twenty five feel types. So he can imagine a form builder type of interface that you'll see in Google forms, for instance, but then way more elaborate with Oakland's affilitation you know, possibilities to to make sure all the data. It goes in is of the highest possible quality. So I did a final their forms, and once that's done, they start their study, divide their colleagues from all around the world to at bishops from older hospitals. So that speeds up the recruitment time or actually lowers the recruitment times piece up through Krugman, but also ensures that you have a nice simple, right? So if you just based from home from the hospital, there could be potential by. So it's always nicer to include a larger population. So then you have multiple people multiple spills had using these forms or easier. As gold electronic case report forms. And sometimes they will see dependent in the outpatient clinic, for instance, and then we'll type straight into the into easier Fs. Sometimes they would just go through the patient file and copy data. We actually also provide an HR importer using, yes, h seven to fire, which is distended as way of exchanging medical information. It's quite cool use now in the US as well. So what we do is we take Beijing directly from the digital patient file and imported into study. So that of typing, obviously. And then finally, we also allow people to send surveys to their patients. So then Sebatian actually entering the data on there. I bet for instance, from home, I'm so there's basically three ways to to get data to platform, and then there's the obvious CSV imports. So if you have some older data source, I can generate a ceasefire you follow, you can also import that. So basically using all these sources of data you can. You can build your data sets. Oh, Annan forgot to mention our API. So we have a restful API that could be used to connect to pick to say mobile app or some other platform. So I guess there's really sort of the hub for all the data comes together and helps you sort of define a structured, hopefully standardized data sets and you can easily analyze once you've included, say five hundred patients, and then do people want to do the analysis inside of castor or do they want to export it to some other tool for analysis right now, we don't really provide a lot of possibilities for analysis in the platform. We are adding our and our shiny to our platform. So people who are comfortable with our, we'll be able to just stay in the platform right now. A lot of people would export. It's so people wanna use SPSS or saucers Tanta and we just provide a standardized exports take an import directly. And we provide libraries for our to connect straight to the FBI who can actually basically run your analysis in your own our environment and his balloon, the data from our API potentially..

Moisy Eretz ski Custer founder FBI US Beijing researcher Krugman SPSS Google Annan Sebatian Oakland
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Daily and thanks to digital ocean for being sponsor the co, founder of digital ocean. Moisy Eretz ski was one of the first people I interviewed and his. Interview is really inspirational for me. So I've always thought of digital ocean as a pretty inspirational company. So thank you digital ocean. Help people understand what the software does. So if I'm a researcher, I've maybe I've got a computer in my medical research room and it's running caster ADC in the patient comes into my room. And then the patient starts telling me stuff about how they're reacting to the drug, and we go through a back and forth, and I'm just injuring this data into castaway is that the typical workflow maybe could give me some descriptions for prototypical ways that people are using Castro DC as is one of the ways. So the first step is to have a protocol for the study. So what am I going to research? What data do I need to run the typical notices? So they're going to define what data points that need from that they will be built. They're studying Custer's. They define their own forms. We have about twenty five feel types. So he can imagine a form builder type of interface that you'll see in Google forms, for instance, but then way more elaborate with Oakland's affilitation you know, possibilities to to make sure all the data. It goes in is of the highest possible quality. So I did a final their forms, and once that's done, they start their study, divide their colleagues from all around the world to at bishops from older hospitals. So that speeds up the recruitment time or actually lowers the recruitment times piece up through Krugman, but also ensures that you have a nice simple, right? So if you just based from home from the hospital, there could be potential by. So it's always nicer to include a larger population. So then you have multiple people multiple spills had using these forms or easier. As gold electronic case report forms. And sometimes they will see dependent in the outpatient clinic, for instance, and then we'll type straight into the into easier Fs. Sometimes they would just go through the patient file and copy data. We actually also provide an HR importer using, yes, h seven to fire, which is distended as way of exchanging medical information. It's quite cool use now in the US as well. So what we do is we take Beijing directly from the digital patient file and imported into study. So that of typing, obviously. And then finally, we also allow people to send surveys to their patients. So then Sebatian actually entering the data on there. I bet for instance, from home, I'm so there's basically three ways to to get data to platform, and then there's the obvious CSV imports. So if you have some older data source, I can generate a ceasefire you follow, you can also import that. So basically using all these sources of data you can. You can build your data sets. Oh, Annan forgot to mention our API. So we have a restful API that could be used to connect to pick to say mobile app or some other platform. So I guess there's really sort of the hub for all the data comes together and helps you sort of define a structured, hopefully standardized data sets and you can easily analyze once you've included, say five hundred patients, and then do people want to do the analysis inside of castor or do they want to export it to some other tool for analysis right now, we don't really provide a lot of possibilities for analysis in the platform. We are adding our and our shiny to our platform. So people who are comfortable with our, we'll be able to just stay in the platform right now. A lot of people would export. It's so people wanna use SPSS or saucers Tanta and we just provide a standardized exports take an import directly. And we provide libraries for our to connect straight to the FBI who can actually basically run your analysis in your own our environment and his balloon, the data from our API potentially..

Moisy Eretz ski Custer founder FBI US Beijing researcher Krugman SPSS Google Annan Sebatian Oakland
"moisy" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"Okay adam gates well so tell me what you like about josh rosen i gotta hear this i'm out i'm down everybody i'm not i'm not on baker mayfield and sam i like sam darnold i just don't like all the turnovers last year scares me a normal when guys turned the ball over in cali what they bring with getting that ability to turn the ball over in fail see james wins yes james winston yeah but i think josh allen better coaching better skill players rounding who work it i mean you can't t i know he can throw it seventy yards in the air we can throw it ex mile nobody throws it farther harder than josh allen he watch the tape all i know is i watch tv at iowa at moisy first half of the senior bowl go back and watch it and tell me what you see you see inaccurate you see lack of noise you got it i'm gonna be revealed for the game with the first time i gone nfl did not play quarterback i'm saying you nervous just natural and then at the while you realize you loan i'm like you i'm hoping you loan what do you like about josh rosen watching him go head to head with aren't darnold he looked like the better player with the less talented team and he can spend now all that other stuff about humanitarian you know there other extracurricular activities fee i i don't know anything about that but i would i watch and play.

baker mayfield cali josh allen iowa adam gates josh rosen james winston moisy nfl seventy yards
"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"moisy" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Digital ocean is a reliable easy to use cloud provider i've used digital ocean for years whenever i want to get an application off the ground too quickly and i've always loved the focus on user experience the great documentation and the simple user interface more and more people are finding out about digital ocean and realizing that digital ocean is perfect for their application workloads this year digital ocean is making that even easier with new node types of fifteen dollar flexible droplet that can mix and match different configurations of cpu and ram to get the perfect amount of resources for your application there are also cpu optimized droplets perfect for highly active frontend servers or see i cd workloads and running on the cloud can get expensive which is why digital ocean makes it easy to choose the right size instance and the prices on standard instances have gone down too you can check out all their new deal by going to dow ceo slash s e daily end as a bonus to our listeners you'll get a hundred dollars in credit to use over sixty days that's a lot of money to experiment with you can make a hundred dollars go pretty far on digital ocean you can use the credit for hosting or infrastructure and that includes load balance hers object storage digital ocean spaces is a great new product that provides object storage and of course computation get your free one hundred dollars credit at d o c o slash s e daily and thanks to digital ocean for being a sponsor the cofounder of digital ocean moisy eretz ski was one of the first people i interviewed and his.

user interface ceo ocean moisy eretz ski dow hundred dollars one hundred dollars fifteen dollar sixty days