3 Burst results for "Mohammed Chiffon"

"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"What's a second? Someone couldn't have just made a moving object look at ticking hand and a and said sixty ticks is one minute and sixty minutes is an hour and so on. So who decided what a second is? Well, before we divided time into seconds. We divided time into days and hours historians credit. The Egyptians with being the first to divide the day into equal parts while the counting system. We're familiar with his base ten you have ten fingers after all the ancient Egyptians had a base twelve system. They counted on their finger joints using their thumbs a pointer, cool, right? As a result, they divided the day into twelve parts and the night into twelve parts, which we know from seeing the sun dials. They left behind the subdivision of each hour into sixty minutes in each minute into sixty seconds started. With the Babylonians who had a base sixty counting system. You are gonna be counting to sixty using body parts, of course, but that's does have mathematical advantages. I don't have time to get into. Anyway, that definition of a second a sixtieth of a sixtieth of twenty fourth of a day or one eighty six thousand four hundred of the average solar day, which is the time. It takes the sun to come back to the same place in the sky continued to be the standard measure of a second until the twentieth century. See the average solar day actually changes length. So this definition wasn't exact enough for science. So in one thousand nine hundred they were like, okay instead of making it a fraction of the average solar day will make it a fraction of the specific solar day on January first nineteen hundred well that didn't really help things. You can't exactly go back and measure the length of that day. Still that definition lasted until nineteen sixty seven when the second got really specific scientists used their knowledge of the atom. To define a second. As get ready. Nine billion one hundred ninety two million six hundred thirty one thousand seven hundred and seventy periods of the radiation for a cesium one thirty three atom wolf that sounds way more complicated than counting to sixty on your body parts, I know, but scientists can make that measurement anywhere anytime, regardless of the amount of daylight this time of year, and that's key for ideal precision. A scientists has to be able to check their measurements in the lab not against some abstract concept like how long the day was in one thousand nine

Adams Ashley Hamer Mohammed chiffon Cody Goff Thatcher Muhammed Westwood One executive producer Lear engineer Mary Yancey executive Gibbs sixty minutes twenty seven hundred years sixty seconds one minute
"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"To hear something trippy? You're almost completely made up of empty space. In fact, a lot of the matter around us is empty space as in ninety nine point nine nine nine nine nine nine nine percents of all the matter around us. It's a lot of nine so wild. Here's the deal. Everything around us is made up of atoms tiny particles with a nucleus surrounded by electrons. These tiny particles are filled with energy, but they are surrounded by quite a bit of empty space. If you took the empty space out of every human on earth, you can compress the entire human population down to an object. Smaller than a sugar cube. Obviously, though things still feel solid right? The headphones you're wearing the car you're driving in the thing. You're standing or sitting in right now. And that's because of what's in that empty space. See Adams aren't stagnant particles. They're filled with energy and surrounded by electrons that are constantly buzzing around in a sort of cloud. No, two electrons can exist in the same space at the same time. That means that if you wanted to try and walk through a wall, which again is mostly empty space. You're electrons and the walls electrons would have to exist in the same space. So that's why it's impossible. Here's another way to think of it picks a fan with rapidly spinning blades, there could still be a lot of empty space between those blades, but it stays the same size the space between the blades doesn't change in volume. But it does change in position. And it does so really quickly. So if you stick your hand in there, you're going to get whacked by the fan Adams work the same way the orb. Getting electrons resist being pushed out of their orbits. That's why the empty space inside atoms can't be filled with other atoms. There's one more reason why you can't fit one atom into another atom though, and that comes down to quantum mechanics, our favorite topic. Here electrons are noticed point sources or a source of energy that has a negligible dimension. This means electrons have no volume, but they do have a wave function whose energy occupies the space, and thanks to the laws of quantum mechanics that wave function doesn't just occupy one point. It's everywhere in the empty space at the same time. Basically that means that if you're gripping your phone or your steering wheel right now, you're not actually touching it. What you're feeling and interpreting as touch is actually just the electromagnetic force from the electrons and your Adams pushing back against the electrons in that objects atoms. And yes, this means you've never actually touched anything in your life. You're actually floating just above the chair you're sitting on thanks to incredibly small. All electromagnetic forces isn't physics fun.

Adams Ashley Hamer Mohammed chiffon Cody Goff Thatcher Muhammed Westwood One executive producer Lear engineer Mary Yancey executive Gibbs sixty minutes twenty seven hundred years sixty seconds one minute
"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"mohammed chiffon" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Hi, curiosity dot com to help you get smarter. And just a few minutes. I'm Cody Goff. And I'm Ashley Hamer today. You'll learn about why you're almost completely made up of empty space and where you can watch the leered meteor shower this Tuesday. We'll also answer a listener question about what defines a second. What's defines them curiosity? Does that make any sense now? Okay. Want to hear something trippy? You're almost completely made up of empty space. In fact, a lot of the matter around us is empty space as in ninety nine point nine nine nine nine nine nine nine percents of all the matter around us. It's a lot of nine so wild. Here's the deal. Everything around us is made up of atoms tiny particles with a nucleus surrounded by electrons. These tiny particles are filled with energy, but they are surrounded by quite a bit of empty space. If you took the empty space out of every human on earth, you can compress the entire human population down to an object. Smaller than a sugar cube. Obviously, though things still feel solid right? The headphones you're wearing the car you're driving in the thing. You're standing or sitting in right now. And that's because of what's in that empty space. See Adams aren't stagnant particles. They're filled with energy and surrounded by electrons that are constantly buzzing around in a sort of cloud. No, two electrons can exist in the same space at the same time. That means that if you wanted to try and walk through a wall, which again is mostly empty space. You're electrons and the walls electrons would have to exist in the same space. So that's why it's impossible. Here's another way to think of it picks a fan with rapidly spinning blades, there could still be a lot of empty space between those blades, but it stays the same size the space between the blades doesn't change in volume. But it does change in position. And it does so really quickly. So if you stick your hand in there, you're going to get whacked by the fan Adams work the same way the orb. Getting electrons resist being pushed out of their orbits. That's why the empty space inside atoms can't be filled with other atoms. There's one more reason why you can't fit one atom into another atom though, and that comes down to quantum mechanics, our favorite topic. Here electrons are noticed point sources or a source of energy that has a negligible dimension. This means electrons have no volume, but they do have a wave function whose energy occupies the space, and thanks to the laws of quantum mechanics that wave function doesn't just occupy one point. It's everywhere in the empty space at the same time. Basically that means that if you're gripping your phone or your steering wheel right now, you're not actually touching it. What you're feeling and interpreting as touch is actually just the electromagnetic force from the electrons and your Adams pushing back against the electrons in that objects atoms. And yes, this means you've never actually touched anything in your life. You're actually floating just above the chair you're sitting on thanks to incredibly small. All electromagnetic forces isn't physics fun. We're gonna listener question from Mohammed chiffon. 'cause if that name sounds familiar that's because he gets an executive producer credit on our show every Sunday. Thanks muhammed. Anyway, here's his question. What's a second? Someone couldn't have just made a moving object look at ticking hand and a and said sixty ticks is one minute and sixty minutes is an hour and so on. So who decided what a second is? Well, before we divided time into seconds. We divided time into days and hours historians credit. The Egyptians with being the first to divide the day into equal parts while the counting system. We're familiar with his base ten you have ten fingers after all the ancient Egyptians had a base twelve system. They counted on their finger joints using their thumbs a pointer, cool, right? As a result, they divided the day into twelve parts and the night into twelve parts, which we know from seeing the sun dials. They left behind the subdivision of each hour into sixty minutes in each minute into sixty seconds started. With the Babylonians who had a base sixty counting system. You are gonna be counting to sixty using body parts, of course, but that's does have mathematical advantages. I don't have time to get into. Anyway, that definition of a second a sixtieth of a sixtieth of twenty fourth of a day or one eighty six thousand four hundred of the average solar day, which is the time. It takes the sun to come back to the same place in the sky continued to be the standard measure of a second until the twentieth century. See the average solar day actually changes length. So this definition wasn't exact enough for science. So in one thousand nine hundred they were like, okay instead of making it a fraction of the average solar day will make it a fraction of the specific solar day on January first nineteen hundred well that didn't really help things. You can't exactly go back and measure the length of that day. Still that definition lasted until nineteen sixty seven when the second got really specific scientists used their knowledge of the atom. To define a second. As get ready. Nine billion one hundred ninety two million six hundred thirty one thousand seven hundred and seventy periods of the radiation for a cesium one thirty three atom wolf that sounds way more complicated than counting to sixty on your body parts, I know, but scientists can make that measurement anywhere anytime, regardless of the amount of daylight this time of year, and that's key for ideal precision. A scientists has to be able to check their measurements in the lab not against some abstract concept like how long the day was in one thousand nine hundred thanks for your question. Muhammed? If you have a question, send it into podcast at curiosity dot com. Today's episode is paid for by nitsa. It can be a little frustrating, especially if you're in a hurry running late to find yourself at a railway crossing waiting for a train. And if the signals are going the trains, not even there yet you can feel a bit tempted to try to sneak across the tracks. Well, don't ever. Yeah. Trains are often going. A lot faster than you, expect them to be and they can't stop even if the engineer hits the brakes right away. It can take a train over a mile to stop by that time. We used to be your car is just a crushed hunk of metal. And what used to be you? Well, let's not even think about that. The point is you can't know how quickly the train will arrive the train can't stop even if it's easy. The result is disaster. If the signals are on the train is on its way, and you just need to remember one thing. Stop trains can't meteor shower alert this Tuesday, keep your eyes to the sky because it's that time again for the Leyritz meteors. Our there are a lot of ways that meteor showers can form, but the most common kinds started their lives as passing comets as a refresher comments or giant chunks of rock and ice that have been orbiting the sun since the early days of the solar system as they hurdle through space. They leave debris behind in their tails and every year, the planet earth passes through chains of comet nuggets, those chunks then. Burn up as the end of the atmosphere, which creates a beautiful shower of Shooting Stars every April we smash straight through the path of comet Thatcher, which takes more than four hundred earth years to orbit the sun, by the way, and comet Thatcher is where we get the leered meteor showers, which get their name from the fact that they appear to originate from the constellation VERA. It's kind of funny that we can see these showers every year since the comment hasn't been anywhere near earth since eighteen sixty one. Anyway, the Lear IDs are going to be at their peak on the morning of this Tuesday, April twenty third the best time to see them. We'll be just before dawn a time. After the moon has said, it will be a winning Gibbs at this point in the month. Which means it'll be bright enough to wash out the fainter streaks without that. Additional late in the sky, though, the longer tails of the meteors will be pretty easy to spot just northeast of the bright star Vega. The Leyritz are some of the oldest known meteor showers on record with sightings dating back about twenty seven hundred years so witness a little history this Tuesday morning. It'll be worth the. Of admission I promise before we wrap up. We want to give a special shout out to doctor Mary Yancey and Mohammed chiffon was who are executive producers for today's episode. Thanks to their generous support on patriot. Thank you so much if you're listening and you want to support curiosity daily, then visit patriot dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out. You can also find the Lincoln today's show notes. Join us again tomorrow for the award winning curiosity daily and learn something new in just a few minutes. I'm Ashley Hamer an Cody gov. Stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Adams Ashley Hamer Mohammed chiffon Cody Goff Thatcher Muhammed Westwood One executive producer Lear engineer Mary Yancey executive Gibbs sixty minutes twenty seven hundred years sixty seconds one minute