26 Burst results for "Mohammed Al"

Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

The Dennis Prager Show

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

"A senior Al Qaeda operative in Iran. Early this year. A bold intelligence operation by the two allied nations that came is the Trump Administration was wrapping up pressure on Tehran. For current and former U. S. Officials said Abu Mohammed al Masri. Al Qaeda's number two was killed by assassins and the Iranian capital in August. Or the story's a town hall dot com on Patrick Pause.

Trump Administration Al Qaeda U. S. Abu Mohammed Al Masri Iran Tehran Patrick Pause
Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

BBC World Service

00:15 sec | 9 months ago

Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

"Has denied a report in the New York Times that Israeli agents killed the number to figure in Al Qaeda on the streets of Tehran. Baber says Abu Mohammed al Masri was shot dead in August by two men on a motorbike at the behest of the United States.

Abu Mohammed Al Masri The New York Times Baber Al Qaeda Tehran United States
Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

The California Report Magazine

00:16 sec | 9 months ago

Al Qaeda's Abu Muhammad al-Masri Secretly Killed in Iran

"Has denied report in the New York Times that Israeli agents killed the number to figure in Al Qaeda on the streets of Tehran. Newspaper says Abu Mohammed al Masri were shot dead in August by two men on a motorbike at the behest of the United States.

Abu Mohammed Al Masri The New York Times Al Qaeda Tehran United States
"mohammed al" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Possible because until people feel confident in their ability to go out and go back to their day to day resume some sort of normalcy. They're going to be limits to how much revenues Khun grow. You know expectations as I mentioned on the earnings front And the revenue front were too low this quarter. I think that's because you're still not seeing companies really provide any sort of material guidance. But when it comes to getting that revenue growth back on par with where, you know it wasn't the beginning of 2020 in the end of 2019 I think that you're just going to need to see people more confident in the idea that there's some sort of solution if they do, in fact, get sick. David. If you do believe in the fiscal element here, and you do believe that it is forthcoming imminently. Do you also believe that you are throwing your money away, essentially by going into 10 year Treasury yields, given the fact they're essentially losing money based on a real yield basis. So I think that you know the conversation around portfolio construction and asset allocation has really changed here because it Treasuries do still provide a good heads Relatives to the equity market. The problem is, you're no longer getting paid to hold that head. You are now paying told that hedge and I think when we talk to particularly are larger clients about the way their they're allocating portfolios. You know, they're increasingly thinking about things like core real assets, infrastructure real estate, both on the private side. As ways of generating income without adding equity volatility to their portfolio, So it's challenging to get too excited about owning duration here. But there really is no better hedge relatives to tack when he's in our view it's ever recorded with BankAmerica yesterday and they said to me, it's the end of the 60 40 portfolio. They've been saying it for a while. What you do with the 40 now? So I think that you take some of that credit exposure again redeployed in alternative investments if you're able, or at least think about a broader array of investment strategies, even for investors who focus on traditional liquid, the more traditional liquid side of the equation, you option based equity strategies, commodity strategies. There are ways of further diversify your portfolio and protecting against some of these risks that we see on the horizon, whether it be equity market volatility, whether it be inflation. But you know the idea that you can own 60% s and P 540% Barclays AG and generate sufficient returns. It is just not realistic in the current environment, David, I love what you've done with your house. I know that's not a fair one ball color behind you. That is the Williams College purple. I can tell that from here radio job, David John. David. Thank you. Thank you. I didn't think I'd have to say thank you for your patience. Come on. William. Six patients. David David Morgan Duck. CASS said to us yesterday that whenever Tom brings up soccer nonsense with May it means he doesn't want to talk about the reds up there tonight. A certain Mohammed Al Arian dropped its a quick E mail and all it said at the top in a subject column was post game for the minutes that the Red Sox really lose. Sort of met yesterday. Tom what on Earth is going on with your baseball team? It was the edge of 1986. I expect Lenny Dykstra to come back and launch the ball over the monster like you did against oil. Can Boyd season over? Yeah, but if they knew that a week ago later, Bram is back in the building with us very happy to say that is the case looking at the price action this morning equities bouncing off the bottom equity futures right now down 2/10 of 1% Negative. Just six points. What a week. We've got coming up for you. A Fed decision tomorrow. That meeting begins today. Tech Kerry's tomorrow alongside tech earnings on first day US GDP in the mix. That is one for the economic historians that's for sure isn't one for the market will debate that in the next couple of days, you're taller by single basis 10.0 point 61% euro dollar On a mission of the last week, it settles down at 1 17 42 The dollar snapping back just a little bit in today's session that brings gold level by 6/10 of 1% spoke out 1930 on New York's economy. One re opening looking for to the conversation later with New York Lieutenant governor Kathy Ho called up next on the program will take you down to Washington D. C. For the mess that is emerging in the fiscal debate from New York City this morning. Good morning. This is blowing back..

David David Morgan Duck Tom Red Sox David John New York Lenny Dykstra BankAmerica Williams College Barclays AG Mohammed Al Arian Fed New York City Kerry baseball Kathy Ho soccer CASS Washington
FBI: Pensacola gunman prodded by al Qaeda to attack

Ron St. Pierre

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

FBI: Pensacola gunman prodded by al Qaeda to attack

"FBI director Chris Wray says they found a connection between al Qaeda and Mohammed al sham runny the Saudi Air Force pilot accused in a deadly attack at Pensacola Naval Air Station the new evidence shows that awesome Ronnie had radicalized not after training here in the United States but at least as far back as two thousand fifteen the suspected gunman was killed by a sheriff's

Chris Wray Pensacola Naval Air Station Ronnie United States FBI Director Saudi Air Force
Bureaucracy to brutality: New evidence reveals IS hierarchy

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Bureaucracy to brutality: New evidence reveals IS hierarchy

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting documents detail how the Islamic state group ruled the territories it controlled a Washington based Syrian rights group says it has documents produced by the Islamic state group itself that could help identify individuals responsible for atrocities during the group's four year reign of terror the Syria justice and accountability center has released a twenty four page report called judge jury and executioner the report is based on dozens of documents obtained from inside Syria and collected by a local activist from abandoned Islamic state group offices in rock a province Mohammed al Abdullah the S. J. A. C. is executive director says the documents could help establish responsibility for war crimes genocide and crimes against humanity

Mike Rossi Washington Syria S. J. A. C. Executive Director Mohammed Al Abdullah
"mohammed al" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Mohammed Elsa me steam's Mohammed al Sani and is an anti semite has numerous all posts showing he was a vicious yet the semite he celebrated the deaths of Jewish pigs in terrorist attacks this is CNN and there's there's all kinds of stuff with without here's another one Israel is the main enemy of the people of Egypt and shall always remain despite rulers who lick Jewish lex that's nice you see he works for CNN every did work for CNN until very recently but here's you know CNN though what despite having all the CNN and The New York Times they have these anti Semites work and forming all this but the New York times they that they know racism when they see it The New York Times is out with a new expose on how lawn care is a symbol of racism did you know this this is apparently a seven minute video on The New York Times website David Baki B. O. T. T. I says lawns are part of the colonizing of America which transformed the landscape from pristine wilderness into identical rows of manicured nature by the eighteen seventies we see American culture slowly start to embrace lawns for the privileged masses but you didn't know this ones are for the privilege masses the times also refers to the work of historian Ted Steinberg who calls launched the outdoor expression of fifties conformism this is me there were no laws before the knife I thought loans were a form of socialism you think that lawn mower out every week and cut every blade down to the same height yeah it's like a ninety percent tax rate that Elizabeth ward Bernie Sanders water impose on everybody don you're next with how we car go ahead don why do Republicans have to be so nice why are we search way up I don't know don I we will just try it we just tried to live our lives and let everybody else live their lives bought isn't that right I mean it would get a week we have no I have most of us have no particular desire to impose our beliefs on our or shot in other people we can you imagine yeah a group of Republicans or conservatives ever doing to what a left wing contestant on dancing with the stars with they're trying to do to Sean Spicer it's weird they it would never happen that's what port why do we let these groups balls even I just don't understand why we don't stand up for herself more we looks like we we ourselves and run away thank you read the old why clean or Haiti whatever Donald Trump stands up to yeah those dot dot I mean do you do you really want to get get all of the tether about all these anti semitic rantings of The New York Times and someone mentioned to this woman on the editorial board the the Korean American woman Sherrod Yang who talks about how much she hates white white man with there's another one I'd forgotten all about her but I mean I don't want to spend my life you know eight in raged and grinding my teeth and us you know good tweeting out stuff that we have to what destroy a of the the New York times do you don't want to do that though yeah don I think this about all the box sometimes I get tired of being called white privilege that down there races there's races that everything that comes out of their mouth is your races races you're right sometimes it's yes and you just get tired listed all this garbage yeah I know I I I certainly do even even in three minutes blouse with the cold air in the us to poop I get that I I get tired of it you know it's really funny my legs and my body is getting frozen in my head is so hot it's getting ready to explode at the same time as I'm watching Lawrence o'donnell or Anderson Cooper we have run into a dead Williams said while you're there I haven't run at the time I I'm gonna I you know I'm a big Ted Williams guy I'm in a fight I'm gonna give the big number nine solo if I see a met the at the at yeah I fi CS had at the cryogenics place I'm how a car.

Mohammed Elsa Mohammed al Sani ninety percent three minutes seven minute
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Now, let's come back to the co evolution innovation that was made in twenty eleven twenty twelve how is that a useful factoid or understanding scientific understanding to these deep learning hackers that are trying to figure out protein structure prediction that so so the method I described earlier the twenty eleven twenty twelve one effectively all provides are constraints. It doesn't completely solve the problem. All tells you are is our to me no acids in proximity to another as I've been perfect. So sometimes the prediction actually incorrect, but providing sort of high level constraints, and what typically was done in two thousand twelve and twenty eleven was to take these kind of constraints then feed them through the conventional pipelines. I was describing these seemingly lines of code pipelines, which then use this additional information and physical simulations and some on to try to fill the protein. So so the president was not. Fundamentally altered in terms of how you simulate. And so on you just provided more information to help this process along where do you planning helps is to basically the fine these predictions? So instead of like, I said earlier these predictions are kind of very close gained they saying to as zone puck somebody to one another. And then mate may may. Or may not be accurate. What deep learning at least up to say two thousand eighteen had done is basically take these kind of rob predictions. A raw calculations rather from the cove Aleutian set and turn them into more accurate predictions of contact. So tell me if I if I understand it correctly with the co evolution understanding, you basically get to inflate the amount of data that you have available for these deep learning techniques, which which we know by now are unreasonably effective on large data sets. Well, it's actually interesting. It hasn't really been used in that way that you just proposed that is not a bad idea, and it way what one could use this information as outputs instead of say, okay. We're going to predict these things, but that's not typically how they used. They gotta use his inputs. So they don't really increase them of data points because we still stuck with those fifty thousand or what have you? But they added this show inflammation, put it appoints. So they make your input modality richer. If that makes sense, so so just having sequences you also have these these evolutionary contacts. Okay. So not not to bury the lead here. But you had this this really detailed blog post that was a retrospect on casper. Thirteen cash thirteen was a was one of these competitions. These these protein structure prediction competitions. And what was what was unusual about this competition is that it was won by deep mind? Deep mind is the company that was acquired by Google. And there are an innovator in deep learning techniques. They were able to create the first system that was able to beat every human or. The best humans at go. For example, that was alpha go they later innovated upon that with alpha zero, and then they at cast thirteen managed to decimate the competition with something called alpha fold, explain why this is significant event of sure so I I would say maybe significant as one is the fact that they did. Well, I don't think it's the improvements is probably on the order. I mentioned this in the blog on the auto of like two x Ray. So if you look historically how much cast has been has been improving from UT year, this sort of doubled expectation for improvement. So so the guy they had between them, and the the second closest competitor was was much higher than usual. So that's you know, they simply didn't solve the problem, but they made substantial progress, and for that was significant the maybe perhaps was more kind of sociological is that it's a company and this this field is dominated by voice entirety. There's not to my knowledge been any. Choir and Trent from industry. So so this is the first time that associates can industrial lab this stand tend to the space in computer science, we've been watching. How would you say, I guess the the Evelyn of the dynamics between academia and industry for a while. Now, I mean, you look at like, I think the the map reduce paper comes to mind, you know, the Google map produce paper this thing that came out of Google that totally turned computer science on its head in some ways..

Google cove Aleutian inflammation president casper rob Trent Ray
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"You could ask for effective cousins, you could ask you can you give me a list of one hundred thousand other proteins and other organs? Looking at the human cookie and say look at analogous proteins in other organisms that are very similar to this protein but slightly different either. Volition? Delated but some distance between them. So that allows is building what are called multiple sequence alignments way. You take you say a hundred thousand proteins related and line them up. So that you can compare how each position in this protein that have changes over time and the key pieces a following the key pieces that in some cases, what we observe is that as one position changes as when acid mutates, it's pitas at another. I mean acid in a different location, but in the same protein changes soon after so there's sort of coupling where one position accused to sponsor another physician. And the the notion is what what happens inside the protein is because these things are in close spatial proximity. They actually close in three D space if one of them there's a substitution where a small becomes a big amino acid then suddenly going to clash with neighborhood. And so if there was a new by I mean, also big suddenly, it has to shrink. You have to substitute at this mall acid, and so they sort of come to centauri mutations indicate proximity and CD specs. So we're taking a Volusia inflammation, converting into information. And that allows one this kind of flee coupling of things being close in space allies went to go and say allows them to sort of provide based on constraints on what the structure looks like which enables us to predict the structure. Okay. Let's let's now talk a little bit about deep learning. And then let's come back to that co evolution point. And because I think it's worth exploring deep learning a little bit before we get into why the coalition point is so useful for deep learning based protein structure, prediction approaches. Okay. I guess speaking broadly. Why is protein structure prediction, a good candidate problem for the techniques of deep learning? So on one level. It's a well defined problem. Right. So you have inputs outputs is very much supervised machine. Learning problem. The inputs being the sequences Auschwitz, bingo structure and typically it's a one to one map, but not all the noise and kind of unpredictability that characterizes so many other areas of biology say, so so at least in the physical sciences, it's the closest thing to something that's canonical machine. Linen problem? You could say that there isn't that much data typically on the order of about fifty thousand proteins that we really have to quantum structures. So that data have somewhat limited relative to conventional deep cleaning, applications domains. But but in general amenable to that kind of kind of analysis show that lack of data can you talk a little bit more about why this is a lack of data, and I guess just describe a little bit more like, okay? So I mean, we've done all these shows about kind of what supervised learning is. But maybe you could give like describe how how supervised learning works at least in in the most naive strategies of protein structure, prediction, light. So so supervise laying the ideas that you have some models. Function could be a Newell mental could be something else. But that function effectively relate to your inputs your outputs. So the simplest case if you're trying to predict whether how much a car costs guy the emphasis, maybe the model of the car, which you it's made whatever that sort of thing that kind of features it has and then based on those inputs you have you have a number which is the cost of the car. And then typically you have these parameters he sort of weight in the function that you don't fix ahead of time the free parameters and with a machine learning with us is lending algorithm..

Volusia Newell
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Putting doctrine of crystallize once it's crystallizes phones, basically regular lactose. Right. And so once that happens, then we basically used to xrays to deflect through this crystal and by getting the diffraction pattern where able to look back and got give actual structure, but the limiting step to my understanding at least it's really the Kosovisation stuff that I'm getting getting a big enough. Crystal is the hawk Bart. Okay. Sounds brutal. So let's get into the computation side of things there is this community wide experiment called casper CAS critical assessment of techniques for protein structure, prediction, explain what this organization is. And give me a brief history of it. Yes show. So this is very important problem. Putting such predictions been going on for over half a century and people have been trying to sell it for a long time. And there was a period of probably on the ninety s maybe where a lot of these. False false alarms where people can acclaimed. They solve the problem made love sort of headlines in the scientific community only to realize that. In fact, they had not it wasn't a sound like fraud or anything. We're just people people got little too excited. So I think it was on ninety four when when this cast sort of process got formalized, the idea was to say, okay. Let's let's let's try to get this very rigorously. And so so we're going to do is we're going to have this sort of biennial competition or assessment where we set aside, a small subset of proteins whose structures. We OD now because someone someone has had gone Krista lights them, but not yet publicly available. So they're not, you know, people don't know. What broadly speaking people don't know. What it let's just a handful of people know what they look like. And what we're going to do is. We're going to give the sequences of those proteins to predictors to people who claim they can predict a structure without giving them the structure, and then we'll we'll have him go out for a few months try to make these predictions and then once. Does this thing? Then by the end of the the typically happens in December everyone gets together. And then compare those predicted structures to the ones we know are are true. And then see how how how everyone else has done. We'll why has this been arranged in in this competition worldwide is this a useful construct for the academic world. I guess now for the industrial world, which we will get into or maybe it's been a part of the world for a while. Give me a little bit more context for how this organization or this. This competition is useful to the world. Yeah. Well, it's useless useless precisely because it allows assessment in a blind fashion. The issue before is when when you know, the answer is easy to pretend like you You give. people have also by season. So what was going on evidently because people had access to the true structure their predictions affectively cheated in a way that they knew why they tried to get to. And so so they could get to it by forcing the predictions to be completely blind. It provides us level of rigor that no one can afford others awful that full themselves and thinking their predictions are working because they don't they can't compare to the truth. And so so it's really about providing that kind of installation between data and sort of think. Think of the Michelle Linden context is providing perfect insulation between training sets and test sets and that obviously happens in machine learning as well like an image. And so on that drove deep learning and all that. So it's perfectly analogous..

Crystal Michelle Linden fraud
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And then you you do so like a physical simulation where you're trying these different fragments from your database while the same time trying to minimize the energy of your protein based on sort of what's known about the physics, and you do this over and over and over again for a long time. And the hope is that by by the time you've done you end up with something that looks like he'll he'll structure. So that's one version in that version that you just discussed is that a purely computational process or their wet lab procedures that you need to do physical world procedures you need to do. So the process is purely computational. I mean it. Mean the objective is to try to computational predict the structure of a protein. They are of course, X mental ways to do this and the data to the data that sort of forms a basis for doing this procedure comes from experiments by the procedure itself as computational. There are these other methods for doing protein structure analysis, there are things like cry. Oh, electron microscopy. X Ray crystallography these are real world engagements, can you I guess contrast or describe how these computational methods compare and can be used in concert perhaps with with these physical world procedures. Yeah. I mean, I mean, suffice it to say that for the time being at least the golden standard remains experiments, particularly crystal law, goofy, and Kyle EM sort of Cincinnati, what technology that that's that's really sleeping through the field. But maybe not quite as the visiting accurate Iska slog Affi. So the these experiments that quite laborious are that's the issue. So the. Often it could take a long time to to get a protein structure months to years and the cost estimates vary. But on average, let's say on the order of fifty thousand dollars to get to get a structure, but that doesn't really really illustrate the reality. Because what happens some structure that just very difficult, and so you can spend millions and because he will be never give the structure some structures Mogadishu lease a obtainable, and they wouldn't cost so much. But in general, the mail boy is process costs money. It's not it doesn't always work. But when when it does work it gives you the truth typically after some some bias, but gives you something that we think is truth. The computational approaches vary. So the stuff that I was just describing earlier these complicated seemingly lines of type EPA things. They did to maybe on the order of if you do kind of the full type line on the audit of say ten thousand CPU hours. So generally speaking, not not that bad. This is an expensive. Of course, the problem is that there's still not very good. So maybe they will quickly, but they don't necessarily give you. Dancer, and just so we don't lose the lead here before we start to get into the details of the computational stuff talking about the purely a physical world experimentation side of things the fifty grand per deriving, a protein structure experimentation process like cry OEM or x Ray crystallography as far as I know the process, it looks something like you get like some Pira fide DNA. And then you basically put this purified DNA into water, and then you watch the the protein develop into it's fully realized form. And then you use these microscopy or crystallography techniques to understand what the outcome was told me tell me where I'm wrong or any clarifications. It will be worth making the details. Depend a lot on the approach of actually these approaches quite definitive. How does them by for example, it with Kaz log affiliates. Say so the multiple steps maybe the hottest thing is Dr got the protein too. Crystallize quote, unquote. So you guys that you have to take you have to get these proteins. You have to make them. I that's doable. You have to buy them. So you have to get them instead of in a fairly Pugh farm. But then the trick is that you have to get them to actually foam, crystal and that process for the most bars, I'm not an expert in this. But it tends to be a lot of black magic while of trial and error blessed different conditions that you have to try to different solutions. And so on to get the posting..

Mogadishu Kyle EM Pugh EPA Kaz Cincinnati Dr fifty thousand dollars
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So just to go a little bit into the physics. And by the way, I failed physics in. In high school. So, you know, this baby really tortured, but I think like as it kinda works you had. And I think I got a see in chemistry, but you have you know, DNA, which is deoxyribonucleic acid, and and that's like these, you know, these amino acids, the Gs and they're situated in in these the base. I mean, I thought what makeup protein? Oh, sorry. Yeah. Oh, okay. Right. All right. So so you have. So what are what are the again, they make up the DNA, right? And just make up the DNA the acids make up the proteins. Okay. And then there's four the letters if you may and our twenty protein letters. Okay. So may actually, I should I shouldn't be the one explaining this. Maybe you could just give me a little bit more of the outline of the structure of this DNA like string. I think you've described as a thread that's like floating around. And it's like, let's say this. This DNA threat has been manifested in the cell somehow like some some other protein is perhaps produced it or it's gotten created somehow. I don't remember how it gets created. And then you've got this thread, and this thread has different physical forces pushing on it in different directions that cause it to fold into something useful. Can can you just describe it a little bit more detail? All those pressures on the folding truth. Let me just back moment. So does that. Sure. Yeah. In some ways to threats here. So one of the DNA he may, and that's the full size of the full thing is I would Gino right? There's actually multiple sets in the human genome. But basically, you could think of our genome as one long said of the NA, okay? And that's one particular chemical structure, and it's sort of made out of these these four different letters that are repeated in a non April yada Kway. That's one piece and that's affected like an instruction manual that describes it entirety of Gino. Now, there are small stretches of the DNA that sort of quote unquote, code for proteins. So the a small stretch of the effectively gets read off and then us as as a basis to make protein and now the protein is a different set of a different kind of threat. Right. The chemistry is completely different. And in particular. It's made out of those one. You know, it's it's made a chain of twin of one of twenty possible letters in this chain is well, I mean, the the one is our p. Heated in an April attic way, so different probes will have different sequences of these amino acids. Does that makes them so far it does? Yes. Okay. So the DNA has has interesting structure, but that's not really sort of our consumed today, and it's not it's not maybe it's not that interesting. People will take me for saying that proteins have a lot more interesting structure that the forces that operate them proteins are sort of much richer in a way. So the question of structure really kind of comes into play on proteins and not so much DNA so many forces that that player goal..

Gino NA
"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What are the areas of biology that have become easier to innovate within thanks to modern computation? Suddenly genetics genomics, I mean, those those are the big ones that whether they data to and we have just so much data that we could we could lavish computation, but I would like to think as well that the things I will molecular modeling molecular biology trying to understand how biological molecules do things that's definitely benefited in the last decade. And I think we're going to see a lot more changes proven in the coming few years. Are there any other areas that maybe they're not quite ready yet to be approachable through computational biology? But maybe there around the corner like there's some cool stuff going on in the labs and promising experiments what's around the corner. Yeah. That's interesting question. So people have been talking about systems biology for a long time, the idea there is that your only modeling sort of individual things, you modeling systems of things like how many molecules or even how many cells come together to do to do stuff. And I would say that's hasn't quite yet reached the level of maturity to be useful broadly. But, but I think that's something at the moment. I would say out outside the each of computation, but I think that may well beyond the corner five to ten years and one thing that strikes me as being hard about biology, any biology's like computer science in that we're looking at these large complex systems with these different levels of abstraction, and these different high level abstractions that get composed together in useful ways. But the stark difference between biology and computer science is that with computer science or software architecture, we can abstract away from the area. That were less. Sure of like physics. We kind of have these low level corrective mechanisms to bend physics into being in states like one zero, you know, at a lower level, obviously, it's it's a much more of a granular system. But you know, at the level that that we get to operate at. It's the one zero level, which is such a profound breakthrough in technology. But in biology again, there's so much. We don't know it is this analog system in some sense. And there's so many different pathways and chemical relationships that we don't understand how is the systems as a systems biologist. How can you gain any confidence in your theories when there are so many confounding variables? Yes. There's a lot down there. Right. So few things to say in some ways genetic information is still right? So at least it's level of genetics sort of life has figured out a way to encode things using four instead of two bits guys with AC GT. Which is interesting. I mean, you know, April, maybe that was an obvious that that would be the case. And I think that's in some ways that's due to biology actually, do this digital to it looks it looks a lot like computer science, but you quite in that it's different than in many other ways, including the fact that at least some aspects of the computation done by Balaji is analog, and maybe more I to me personally what I think is actually the biggest difference between a computer science and biology is the fact that the that the former is human engineered, so they're they're human artifacts. While biology is not and so the kind of design principles or the tuition that we have a high abstractions ought to be built in computer science, don't really show up at all or at least shop in a very different way in biology because they they also have evolved organically, they had this sort of to Jackie that that's very kind of cumulative in iterative quite different than than computer science or than into software programs as that to me is the biggest biggest cap between those two the two things or the the two worlds. So when I was in college. I studied biology for a little bit. And then I switched to computer science. And in that transition point there were a couple of books that I looked at I didn't make it through either of them in their entirety. I read like probably five to fifteen pages in each of these books and kind of skimmed them, but it stood out to me as as some kind of gap bridges between the fields of computer science and biology and one of them was the selfish, gene, which it takes this kind of bottoms up or or bottom to top evolutionary..

Balaji Jackie ten years two bits
Academy Awards Nominations Announced

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Academy Awards Nominations Announced

"A lot of those questions are answered in the longer video that is available out there. You can see it. It's about two hours worth it shows what was happening before this little showdown between these two the high school student in the native American and different group. Also, the black Hebrew Israelites. In fact, it's one member of that group whose video sort of a more complete picture of what was happening there. Nathan Phillips was the elder with the Mahad tried and he was there with a drum as part of the end digital indigenous peoples demonstration was happening outside the Lincoln Memorial. Nick Sanmen with Covington Catholic high school. Was there waiting for a bus with his classmates? They had been at the national right to life March show was going on. And then the black Hebrew Israelites rolling protests there outside the Lincoln Memorial to. So those three groups kinda came together at one moment on Friday that snap picture that came out on social media on Saturday morning that showed Nathan Phillips in Nick Sanmen. Locked in a stair is. The one that generated so much controversy, but it doesn't necessarily told the whole story. Greg. Let's say there's extra security at Covington Catholic high in Kentucky have there been specific threats. Well, we don't know if they've been specific threats, but the prosecutor and the police there in Covington are looking at them, very carefully and they do intend to have extra security there on campus. There are protests planned there at the school as well. Native American groups two of them from Kentucky and elsewhere are planning a demonstration there at the school. Jim thanks for filling us in on the latest on this involving story. ABC's Jim Ryan with us on the KOMO morning news, the other development in this is that Twitter has now suspended the account that I posted the viral video of that encounter because it discovered that the account used a profile image. That was actually from a Brazilian blogger not the teacher that the count had claimed and Egyptian TV host will spend a year in jail after he interviewed a gay man on his show. Mohammed Al was sentenced to one year of hard labour for promoting homosexuality on his privately owned LT. See TV channel the host interviewed us. Sex worker who expressed regret over his sexuality and career. We tell you just to Minnesota. We told you about the best actor nominees. There were just announced for the Academy Awards. Now, we have the list of best actress nominees and the clued Ulitsa operates yo for Roma Glenn Close in the wife. Olivia Colman in the favourite lady Gaga for a star is born and Melissa McCarthy for can you ever?

Covington Catholic High School Lincoln Memorial Nathan Phillips Nick Sanmen Kentucky Covington Catholic Jim Ryan Covington Olivia Colman Academy Awards Melissa Mccarthy Mahad Ulitsa Mohammed Al Prosecutor Greg ABC Twitter Komo
Saudi teen set to be fully integrated in Canadian society: UNHCR

UN News

05:58 min | 2 years ago

Saudi teen set to be fully integrated in Canadian society: UNHCR

"This is Matt wells at US news RA half. Mohammed Al Coon who arrived in Canada on Friday wants to go back to school as soon as possible said the UN refugee agency's Representative in Canada, Monday, Canadian government in its partners will help miss L canoeing to improve language skills, continue education, and successfully integrates into Canadian society, your Nikola booze told you news and interview the social media savvy teenager was granted asylum after fleeing her own family in Kuwait fearing, she would be killed an emergency resettlements like hers represent just a fraction of the world's twenty five point four million refugee cases, speaking by phone from Canada mister booze explained how her case it'd be resolved. So quickly we have few place for resettlement and therefore not only they'll point five percent of all their twenty five million refugees to be resettled to set country like Canada in the case of Iraq. For were with the west arrived in Thailand, the thirty tease grunted access that you initially to to assess claims that she was going to be a tweak if she was being sent back to Saudi Arabia, and therefore we have put different countries to see whether we could find a doable vision once when each other university edge, and the I says that she was a refrigerant cannot responded way thrifty, and if he shouldn't Lee and offer the solution of bringing to Canada where now she can stop and unite the mechanism by which miss alkhanov has been accepted by candidates to be available only for a fraction of the world's twenty five point four million refugees. Could you tell us about more about this? And how this process where the re sentiments program is is alive. Intervention that attack at the most vulnerable of the risky when refugees arrive in I control five at some of them will be able to resume life in exile. But some of them have specific Renard teas and will not be able really to. To maintain that their wellbeing and and their life. The you control fight for those in need to find a durable solution in third country. And that the program that you're nature diaries out which is called the resettlement program. We speaking about women are trees were speaking about and she Q minorities. We speaking about people who may be at risk of being time back to their country of origin or people who have medical. Content. That cannot be addressed in the first contract five only they'll point five percent of the twenty five million refugees. We live be resettled to third-country, and you energize as I Don t five close to one point four million of those twenty five million while in need of these solutions. This is vais avai occupancies, and and one which gets really only the most renewable energy talking about Canada, these company if you have any recent statistics on the number of individuals offered status in candidate specially the health of their relented CR. So this scene in two thousand nineteen Canada will reset till the close to eleven thousand refugees, which will come from different parts of the world, the Middle East Africa and Asia wall Central America. In addition to that, can I also will process a number of cases of Ivanovic people will come continously to Kenner die and seek as I loom in Canada last year, we have seen a fifty thousand dollars and more than half of them. I've been recognized as refugees by the Canadian immigration and refugee board. You. When's UNHCR's office in Canada role now towards the Saudi cities in the citizen in Canada? How how is your office helping her as a new refugee, so you any savage on refugee does not have integration program of seventies in Canada because they the government is in charge of making sure that refugees are resettled or cares? Why we could not have expertise receive all the suport which is necessary for them to integrate fully into Kennedy and society to become members that society to become economic agents. Find jobs go back to school be able to establish themselves in in Canada. So the the government of Canada's a number of partners in in the case of a half. A we have an agency. Yes, cost he told to that will be taking care of all the ferry fees as. In her to learn English going back to school which have as indicated she would like to do rapidly. Finding a binding an apartment and eventually be on the all as a venue. Permanent residents of Canada. And just to mention that we we know from the different senses that refugees receptive Canada. Do extremely well. In of integration. He takes a few years for them to be able to find a job to regain control over the life and to become vape predictive and positive member of the Canadian society.

Canada America Saudi Arabia Kennedy Mohammed Al Coon Matt Wells Iraq UN Kuwait Representative Nikola Thailand Renard Unhcr Alkhanov Third-Country LEE Asia Ivanovic
News in Brief 7 January 2019

UN News

03:35 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 7 January 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations drawing on information from one hundred forty two countries. A new report by the UN office on drugs and crime U N ODBC revealed on Monday that Uman trafficking is on the rise, especially when it comes to children U N O D C executive director Yuri Fedotov, presented the report, which examined trafficking, trends and patterns worldwide child soldiers forced labor, sexual slavery, human trafficking has taken on horrific. Dimensions said Mr. Fedotov, adding that armed groups and terrorists use the elicit trade to spread fear and gain victims to offer as incentives to recruit new fighters. The global report on trafficking in persons spelled out that there is an increase in the number of children being trafficked who now account for thirty percent of all victims, mostly girl. Calls. Some fifty nine percent of trafficking also involve sexual exploitation, the Thai authorities have granted the UN refugee agency UNHCR access to Rehoboth Mohammed, Al Conan, an eighteen year old Saudi woman who fled her family in Kuwait hoping to seek asylum in Australia, miss, Al Kanoun, told human rights groups, and the media that she was stopped at Bangkok airport in transit from Kuwait where her passport was confiscated UNHCR consistently advocates that refugees and asylum seekers who have been confirmed or claim to need international protection cannot be returned to their countries of origin. According to the principle of nonrefoulement, an international principle that prevents states from returning people to territories where they are under threat. According to Cecil Palae, you win HCR global spokesperson. On gender issues who spoke to you n news miss connection has now reached safety. I'm piece to confirm that we've been granted access to has Mohammed Al Quran Saudi national. She's now in a state of emotional distress. When she needs to be given a little bit of breathing space. But in the coming days, we keep on meeting with hurts tried to assess protection he also on migration the UN Environment Program pointed on Monday to a new category of involuntary migrants that has been emerging in recent years environmentally displaced people. These are people who have been forced to move because climate change has caused natural disasters or degraded resources that have rented their livelihoods unsustainable. According to a study co founded by UNHCR, the university of Oxford and the governments of Norway and Switzerland. Climate change is expected to display. Case between fifty and two hundred million people by twenty fifty while the New York declaration for refugees and migrants states. That migration should be a choice. Not an assessing. There are countless groups of involuntary migrants, including refugees stateless persons people who are trafficked and those internally displaced by disasters and conflict, and now environmental change threatens to become one of the most potentially significant generators of new displacement Liska, Fiji, U N news.

Unhcr UN Yuri Fedotov Cecil Palae Mohammed Al Kuwait United Nations Al Kanoun Al Conan Executive Director Bangkok Fiji New York Australia Norway University Of Oxford Switzerland
"mohammed al" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"I mean, don't they don't are being set up every single time. It's I mean, how stupid well, it's like the US corporate corporations in the managers of US corporations people who borrow the money feel. They may not be around. When when the when the problems occur. They'll did bonuses. And they'll get out they hope before the before the bottom drops out. So when the dollar gets strong are commodity prices, go down the candidate backed alone. They can't pay back those, and there's no offset that because prices are down they're going to produce more. Right. That doesn't offset. No, generally. I mean, it's to some perhaps to some small extent. But when you have a very big drought in the price. It's hard to increase the volume of these things enough to make up for you said something before went on air about this trade. You know, it was L Aryan Mohammed Al Arian who says watched the trade between NAFTA, which was Canada and Mexico Mexico. And you said something that was shocking. So what did you what do you hear about this NAFTA deal that we don't hear about? And he said it specifically relating to China and China will be affected according to what happens with Mexico and Canada. You're so it appears that there is a poison pill as it's been told by commerce secretary Wilbur Ross in these deals with Mexico and Canada whereby if either of those countries strikes, bilateral trade deal with China. United States can pull out of these new trade deals with Mexico or China with Mexico or Canada. So in other words, it prevents these countries from entering trade deals with China. And so this explains a lot about Trump's trade policies, also not only with Mexico and Canada. But also the European Union and Japan and Korea, it appears that he's going to apply the same tactic to all of our trading partners. So that he forces them to choose between China or the United States once they've all chosen to trade with the US because the US is the biggest fire then it makes it easier for 'em. Who? Caused China's economy to go into crisis and prevent China's economy from overtaking the economy anytime in the near future. I mean, the most important thing that I've heard in recent weeks was the the the speech that vice president Pence made it was a forty minute policy speech in which he attacked China across the board on numerous numerous reasons. Everything from trade policy to repressing infernal religions it within China to meddling in US elections. It seemed to be that's H historians will probably back on that speech as a declaration of the Cold War between the United States China. This is not just about bringing trade back into balance. I I it seems increasingly clear this is about stopping China's rise. But if they do that, then it really threatens not only to damage China's economy or throw it into crisis. But it by driving up US interest rates threatens to. Throw the US into crisis in by reducing Chinese demands for goods from all the other countries in the world, it has the potential to topple the whole world, Jordan, great depression, so Richard. You know, this has nothing to do with economics. This really is about war. This is really about nothing. This is war. This is a power play. Well, I'm sure they hope that it doesn't turn into a hot war right field that they had the advantage now because the United States size five hundred billion dollars worth of goods from China every year where it's trying to lay bys one hundred and thirty billion dollars worth of goods from the US every so this is a trade war. I think they can win the trade war and by winning the trade war. They think they contain can contain China's growth last China a threat to the US in the future. This is the last question because when I was in Bangkok Kim was in Russia..

China US Mexico Canada Mexico Mexico Aryan Mohammed Al Arian Wilbur Ross NAFTA Bangkok Kim Trump European Union vice president Pence Japan Russia Korea
"mohammed al" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At end extinction dot org it is not that am here in singapore on juliette solly and i'm doug krizner at bloomberg world headquarters in new york we are looking at a risk on session in the pac rim the nikkei is up one percent after a recordsetting day here in the states where the nasdaq one hundred check that nasdaq composite and the russell two thousand finished at all time highs interestingly were seeing a backup in long term interest rates you've got the ten year treasury in the tokyo session just under two ninety eight in yield terms closer look at markets some moment away with bryan curtis right now this hour's top business stories well next week's meeting of bay policymakers could be a turning point the central bank's chief economist peter praet is signaling that the talks on when to stop the massive bond buying is imminent it's clear that next week the governing council will have to make this assessment on whether the progress so far has been sufficient to warrant a gradual unwinding of or net asset purchases market expectations that bond by we'll be tapered two zero by the end of the year and in the emerging market space it was first argentina we know that then turkey got hit here's the question could brazil be next bloomberg's ramy inocencio tells us noted economist mohammed al arian is now warning brazil may be the new domino to fall as contagion spreads l aryan says brazilian policymakers are in a tricky position and there's little room for error that's even after the nation's central bank offered one and a half billion dollars in extra swap contracts to keep its currency above water argentina turkey and brazil have seen some of.

bloomberg mohammed al arian peter praet chief economist tokyo russell bloomberg world juliette solly brazil singapore argentina bryan curtis new york doug krizner billion dollars one percent ten year
Human Rights Watch asks Dubai's ruler about runaway daughter

02:51 min | 3 years ago

Human Rights Watch asks Dubai's ruler about runaway daughter

"Wbz newsradio ten thirty and wbz news time seven twenty six new court filings reveal a plot to execute a former new england mafia boss using a remote control plane rigged with explosives that was during the nineteen nineties documents filed ahead of the may ninth murder trial of francis cadillac frank salami included 2016 sixteen fbi report detailing the alleged scheme the report says mob enforcer kevin hanrahan plan to fly in explosiveladen plane into salam as home in sharon he also wanted to detonate a suitcase with explosives at a restaurant in providence frequented by rhode island mobster luigi baby shacks manako saw salomon codefendant paul redick are accused of killing boston nightclub owner and federal witness stephen dasaro whose remains were found in providence in two thousand sixteen there are new details about the abduction of a newborn at a florida hospital decades ago at her sentencing hearing friday gloria williams testifying that you put baby kamara in a bag and worried that she would be caught she's also begging for the parents forgiveness abc's eva pilgrim tells us what's next rank can't take a baby gloria williams claims he was in an abusive relationship depressed after a miscarriage when he walked out of that maternity ward with chameleon mobely now get caught the new it that secret would catch up with williams nearly two decades later told us last year she still loved williams he loved me for eighteen years prosecutors arguing the abduction was a selfish act williams told her true identity shortly before her arrest after realizing come i couldn't get a driver's license without a valid birth certificate or social security card human rights watch is asking dubai's ruling sheikh to reveal the whereabouts of his daughter after a french expi and others say she fled the marin only to be arrested off the coast of india the organization says that dubai silence on sheikha latifa bint mohammed al maktoum could qualify as an enforced disappearance to buy declined to comment publicly about sheikha latifa since the associated press reported in april on her disappearance the human rights watches middle east director says that emirates authorities should immediately reveal the whereabouts of the girl confirmed her status and allow her to contact the outside world wbz news time is seven twenty eight right now we've got fifty eight degrees partly cloudy skies in boston wbz's charlie sherman is up next he'll have the extended forecast and all the top stories the new.

Bint Mohammed Al Maktoum Dubai Florida Stephen Dasaro Boston Salomon Codefendant Kevin Hanrahan FBI Francis Cadillac Murder Frank Salami England Charlie Sherman Director Marin Eva Pilgrim
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"I was always asking god like why you give me such ability now like i'm happy to have this ability i was entire square and february of two thousand eleven in the middle of our of spring and book called generation freedom about this time across the middle east and the story that was told across that region at that time was that the internet was going to make everything better that the internet did not distinguish between boys and girls girls were not being taught in schools the internet did not distinguish between religions the internet could not tell this different that the internet would connect people that facebook would rally people these and there was this huge swell around the world that social media was going to now change this part of the world and day enlarge parts of the world that is looked at as a naive joke that basically there has been a counter revolution there has been pushback there have been dictatorships that have risen up again there has been war that has broken out in the wake of all this your story would seem to adhere to the fantasies narrative of social media and yet the counter narrative is always all also out there how do you reconcile those two it occasion you know in the for example we didn't know what democracy as and then you have the arbor spring and you have all this power and you know that you have all this right that you can use one time we don't know how to do it we don't know how actually we can use such power that religious groups came like who these and they said oh we don't actually have to support you because we are close to god and people believed him because you know why they're not indicated in the know how their rights and how they can do it that arab spring world mazing into tunisia into an arabic because people knows what democracy is but in yemen at that time we i born with only one president of yemen i didn't know what will have been after him.

tunisia yemen president facebook
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"I mean people like gideon's on the front i think he also has kind of missionary behavior that also as i want to the best of my religion he also want the best of his religion this is a great tv show we could have know rival missionaries like asking i think of the two billion people on three billion people on earth descend from these traditions okay so what's the toughest question you thought to ask him this that i asked now how god looked like as i got really has an is god as a man or female because it's lomb there is no representation you cannot depict the you can actually even think about god about something else like he can't be got nothing like what we can imagine you read you read the opening passage of genesis and did you imagine like the old guy with the white hair and the beard like the we think of you know in the west we think of this or no you kind of yeah i mean i thought about like a white man with the white hair and things like that so okay so you call them up and he says no no no don't read that part of the bible read the new testament and by the way as long as you're now an interfaith relations when you deal with this we don't actually call it this is actually kind of soap box of mine we we shouldn't call it the old testament the hebrew bible because it existed before even the phrase old testament is actually christian way of looking at that book if i can be attacked pedantic here but now back to the question so did you go read the new testament i was studying the new testament also was reading the testament and it was curious for me because listen in for me since i was a kid as always thinking about why jews really want to kill us by jews early hate us because i can see what's happening ballantyne which interests riley's and with the media like how israeli soldiers like kill the steen's i feel like why how kind of like jews hate us that much so i thought in myself that in slalom and also in school.

gideon riley steen
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"It's from uk from england he's a british teacher who's living in yemen ching he was teaching english and we should say this you're in the capital city guest right so and that is basically north west of the country but it's not on the water but it's up closer to saudi arabia then the story is going to move as we as move on so you go to university to study what is business administration business administration so you're going to be an entrepreneur or you're going to work in a company or my dad wanted me to handle the clinic basically all of them doctors and they need someone to hundred the whole thing oh i see okay so you're going to be the insurance okay so you've come to the country we need we're going to get there in this story okay so you you're in university you have this instructor but before we get to this i want to know what was on a scale of one to ten what was your degree of religious if we might in other words your parents are doctors this is middle class this is a family that's educated this shit country many people say the poorest country in the middle east okay so but you're so on a scale of one to ten ten being utterly devout one being completely secularized where you on this before you read the bible i was really a lot about islam like as anyone of in yemen when you go to school for example in and you teach learn five subjects about islam every year so by the.

yemen saudi arabia instructor uk middle east
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"And then after that yes it is actually in the christianity also jews go in jewish diaspora in the middle of the first millennium right after jews are taken out of israel they go to babylon after babylon is freed some go back is real but some iran and some go south so there's jews there in the middle of the first millennium quick but even though even when israel was exist yemenis themselves like the jews wanted stay neiman even though talk from them longtime and they decided to leave but even until today in with the war in the some of the live neiman christianity was christianity ever big or popular so but when you but as lomb comes and the in the seventh century and when it spreads throughout okay so we're quite close to where of course the prophet mohammed was but when you were growing up is this history that you knew or you're only taught essentially history of yemen after the arrival of his lawn is through and then after his slam that's most we are focusing about and that's what i was teaching when i was in school most of the time that you learn about muslims in the you don't learn about other religions actually exist also indiana so you were born in one thousand nine hundred eighty six what's your birthday and of protecting november thirtieth birthday celebration have that and in terms of the muslim tradition in which you're born there is a divide in yemen if i have this correctly as in many countries muslim countries around the world.

israel neiman yemen iran mohammed indiana
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"And making the world a better place so we're going to talk tonight our story is going to begin in the middle east let's do a little bit of show of hand who has been to the middle east okay so we have the about eighty percent of the hands okay now let's talk about where we've been who here's been to israel okay who's been to egypt's at sea turkey okay iraq iran go to iran i've been to ninety countries in my life iran is my favorite saudi arabia and who here has been to yemen am i right not a single hand has gone up so that muhammed is where we're going to start unique we're going to start with what is yemen and why does it exist because there it is right at the southern tip of the arabian peninsula okay saudi arabia takes up most of the peninsula you've got oman just to the north of it in fact yemen as we speak maybe in the process of dividing into two countries so what is yemen and why is it even a country well i mean yemen is question actually the is a country that as you say is actually in the south of saudi arabia and also the west of oman and the country comparing to this all rich countries among gammon and that yemen used to be two countries and then after nine thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety four became one country again.

iran saudi arabia yemen oman israel egypt iraq muhammed eighty percent
"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"And as extremist group surrounded his apartment and ogden yemen muhammad al samah we made a lastditch appeal for help from his facebook network amazingly over the course of two weeks for near strangers devise a daring mission to lead them to safety an improbable journey that spans six technological platforms and ten times awesome oh we shares his moving story in the new book the fox un's which was picked up last year for film adaptation by walla land producer marc platt and the oscar winning screenwriter of spotlight josh singer elsa my we joined ib for live conversation in new york city the tell the tale miraculously escaped freedom from war rebel fighters alqaeda extremists good evening thank you all for coming muhammad welcome thank you so i'm as you've heard and i have spent a fair bit of my adult life traveling in and around the middle east as you just heard i've written fix times bestsellers many of them involving religion and interfaith walking the bible and abraham and i don't know perhaps ivy has slogan but i think the as stimulating conversation with interesting people so he's the interesting people my job is the stimulating conversation and my philosophy of such things which i've shared with him i will now share with you is i'm going to ask him a handful of the easiest questions i can think to ask him i'm going to ask him a handful of the hardest questions i can think to ask him and then we're going to get into a handful of questions that i think i've kind of practical takeaways for all of us who were involved in one way or another not only unloving books but.

un marc platt oscar facebook walla land producer josh new york middle east abraham two weeks
"mohammed al" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"mohammed al" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Okay henry hold that thought i want to bring in our next guest onto this conversation is mohammed al hajj is macro strategist muhammad welcome today's show very good morning to you so henry is a is putting that that i suppose the political risk framework together force from a market perspective the tragedy of war is always hard to divine in markets but here we are it's targeted it's not a regime change and there were no gcc members involved in this round of conflict you take this morning on basically i mean the way you see this is that life goes on you saw katara issue twelve billion dollars worth of bonds this weekend the only thing they had to pay for as a slightly higher premiums than other sovereigns with the same rating within the emerging market space so that means you increase your this rates but life goes on the markets continue specifically in the minor region political risk has always been there since you know for the past twenty years if you invested in meena equities geopolitical risk is one of the concerns but if we look at returns since let's say the arab spring for example banks in egypt have deliver returns greater than emerging markets all the leading companies in the deliver greater than the emerging markets so if you pick the right companies and the right countries i think you will do well because you need the strong balance sheets i think they can withstand these shortterm trucks jason henry how i is is is is your role as is our role which is to divine risk interpreted and put it into perspective if you take the market then the next critical part in this discussion is the us iranian sanctions discussion and that that could have a much greater barons on you we caught up last week that that is that sinding more and more isolationist again.

egypt jason henry mohammed al hajj twelve billion dollars twenty years