30 Burst results for "Moby Dick"

The Food Fix

PODSHIP EARTH

05:13 min | Last week

The Food Fix

"I must admit to being exhausted. The last four years has taken a massive psychological and emotional toll that i'm only now just beginning to appreciate truthfully the struggle to keep hope that this day would arrive of alluded me the good news that we now have the opportunity to reignite democracy civility truth and move towards healing both our country and the earth. We've gone so far backwards that we need to move forward with deliberate tangible and bold steps one of the voices calling for such a revolution in thinking and action is dr mark. Hyman mark is a systems thinker and for dr. Hyman health is about connecting the soil with the farmer with the groza without diet and only when we connect all those dots. Can we begin to achieve planetary regeneration. As we'll hear in today's podcast what is truly staggering is the cost of today's broken food system. In which sixty percent of our calories in the us come in the form of ultra processed food. Dr mark hyman is head of strategy and innovation of the cleveland clinic center for functional medicine. He's the founder and director of the ultra wellness center and the board president of clinical affairs for the institute of functional medicine. Mark hosts one of the leading health. Podcast the doctors pharmacies spelled f. a. a. c. y. Pham esi marcus. The thirteen time. New york best seller author. His most recent book is called food. Fix how to save our health our economy our communities and our planet one bite. At a time i sought by ascii mark. How he got into medicine in the first place. Ming doctor was a total afterthought for me buddhist student in college. I studied buddhism. Asian studies chinese. I studied ecology. The environment systems thinking ancient systems of healing. Very eclectic and i decided after i graduated. But what am. I going do with a degree in buddhism so i took a long hike by myself in the shenandoah valley through my backpack brought a copy of moby dick. Because it was a very thick books. I could carry and read house before kindle and I just walked and thought and just kind of thought about what i wanted to do in the buddhist framework is really about healing. It's a it's a healing system. It's not really a religion it's really a system of healing of the mind and it's about the relief of suffering it's about compassion and love and service and and those were things that really called to me as a young man and i thought well. What could i do. That kind of fits all that. I could be a monk. That didn't sound like a lot of fun. But i decided i could be a doctor and it was a total afterthought i just i didn't have any science courses. I had to go back. And take some pre med courses and ended up loving. And i decided i would just keep doing as long as i liked it. And if i didn't like it anymore. I would stop and so far so good thirty years later. I mean that's great advice for anyone thinking about people. Ask me career advice. I say that like if you enjoy it if it fills you keep doing it and if it doesn't maybe think about stopping it exactly exactly chain. I've changed so many things i've been you know a small town country doctrine idaho and a native american reservation. Emergency room doctor started clinics in china ex patriots. I was the medical director. Kanye ranch i developed my own. Practice started writing books and teaching About functional medicine became the faculty of functional medicine institute and direct and the chairman of it started big center for functional medicine at cleveland clinic. And now i'm sort of moving into a different phase of thinking about how do we deal with the intersecting issues of food and health and agriculture environment which all may seem separate but are actually all one problem and if we want to solve one we have to solve them all to before we end that. What is functional medicine. What does that mean. That joke is the opposite of dysfunctional medicine. Which is what we have now. As essentially a system of thinking it's not a methodology or treatment or attests supplement is is essentially a way of thinking about disease based on systems. It's it's base c ecosystem medicine. You understand that that the environment is an ecosystem and that everything has to be imbalanced in nature. For to thrive and in madison we really created a reductionist model that allows us to focus on diseases and symptoms in drugs to target those symptoms and not really understand what is health. We never took the course in medical school. Creating a healthy human wanna one. You know we we basically learn how to diagnose and diseases functional. Medicine is the science creating health. And when you do that does goes away. The side effect if you create a healthy ecosystem for example on a farm or a natural ecosystem it becomes. Resilient disease doesn't occur.

Dr Mark Hyman Mark Dr Mark Hyman Cleveland Clinic Center For Fu Ultra Wellness Center Institute Of Functional Medici Pham Esi Marcus Ascii Mark Hyman Moby Dick Shenandoah Valley Ming Kanye Ranch Functional Medicine Institute Ecology Mark New York
"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

Knight Reader

03:55 min | Last month

"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

"A. Brutal death. In the store has a secret. The only few men no. Not, the captain of the town hall. Not a new very few men aboard the town who knew the whole of this unsaid story, but communicate it in secrecy during the game detached ego, the Indian Harpoon her. Nights later cash spoke in his sleep revealing portions of the story. The next morning, the men forced it out of him. Still. It was such a serious and overwhelmingly dark tale. But it never made it out of that four castle. But one of those lucky ears was this meals. and. So it's smell wishes to narrate this entire story for us the town hosts story. which has later connections to the book. And is very entertaining in and of itself. It was actually published in magazines such as a standalone story and it did well. It touches on the highly controversial subject of flogging him the whale fishery. In the army. Which Herman wrote an entire different book about but that's another story of course. I want to reiterate that the town hosts story is said by historians to contain much of the original ideas of moby. Dick. Moby Dick was re written about halfway through and largely changed due to Herman being inspired by a friend and contemporary nathaniel. Hawthorne. That is when he took the book too much higher planes. It seems though that much of his original story survives in the town hosts story. Some say Captain Bill Dad owner of p Quad who you will remember from back on Nantucket. was originally supposed to serve as an abusive captain of the Peak Quad. Before Ahab was even thought of. You may also remember mention of Tin. A whaler who was highly regarded amongst his crew that showed up in the night spider in peaking smells interest as to why Balkan can was popular amongst his amongst his fellow whalers. Some of said that Balkan ten was originally meant to play on much larger role in this story. Possibly a friend Ishmael or the near the story. But was replaced by another character still kilt and scrapped. But hints survive like the early scene. Balkan has dismissed from the book early on as they depart on Christmas. Anyway I. DON'T WANNA get confusing but I was wondering whether it bring their sort story to life for you all. I just speculation I realized that I just had to do it. And I want to be largely dramatic and very special. And so it's going to be a very great special the town hosts story, a large and lively episode that will be fully brought to life with two very special guests that will be announced soon. You'll be a huge play like the matic episode. As you hear much of that sort of thing here but only in bits. This is going to be the most dramatized episode yet. I'm so very excited for all become along with me. The shepherds have shown us much and. Mind all of our characters and their own personalities as they travel across the sea here on the peak what? Search of Moby Dick. It's been fantastic. Speak all of these wonderful and mystical happenings. I. Hope you're enjoying in please leave me reviews or next meal socials. Dr, many ways you can help or support myself. Asked me socials how you can do that. I love speaking and getting to know my listeners. Shots me. I truly hope you can pick up these books right that the fight through them with all your will. For when you do Your shooter remerged with something changed inside. something. You can only recognize being in the shoes of another. So, go on nights. Job Your source. Pick up your pens reading spectacles. Let us freedom..

Moby Dick Balkan town hall Herman Captain Bill Dad Hawthorne Ahab Ishmael Peak Quad p Quad Nantucket.
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Of rising storm Waters. Mere feet away from them were powerful creatures the size

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Now, don't be in a hurry. Why don't you stop your oils Rascals like something new dogs? So so then softly softly. That's it. That's it long and strong. Give way that give devil affects you ragamuffins rapscallions can't she pulled pulled won't you pull off something pull and stuff dries out here. That's it. it. Stubbs pulls up along Starbucks the star buck Whispers to his men. stubborn as a quick word with start looking strong young boys going give away by down row. Hi. Hi mister Starbuck. Quit. Yes, mr. Stub bodak. Come on, bro. Give way. Will it be stub? Hi giveaway. Come on.

Mr. Stub Bodak Mister Starbuck Starbucks Stubbs
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

01:19 min | 2 months ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Now we're going to meet a very intriguing and important character amongst the Stanton crew one that will inject much mystery and emotion into his own story a man unlike any we have met so far in this story. It's been brought to my attention recently the aspect of prophecies and profits in this story. something I spoke enough and early episodes profit or someone who was hyper-aware or knowing something that the rest of us do not Whether it's through a higher perception or something delivered from a dieting. There are many different meanings and outlooks on the word when it comes to people. We think of Elijah when I speak of profit in this story some people think of Ahab as he seems to self prophesize and believe strongly in his own words. The way he says would strike the Sun. The way he seems to be writing his own text upon the world and following it in a self dictatorship. They'll some give much Merit to his prophecies. This is something we cannot discuss until the end of book, but I bring it up here because it has been said that this character that I'm about to introduce is the truest form of a profit we get in the whole story. To me that just

Ahab Stanton Elijah
"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

Knight Reader

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

"Boy that ship me. Deus quickly. Can I Port over the mat the entire crew layer dream-like trance? I was shocked it from my referees by that resounded wildlife. And he had seen a part of sperm whales. I dropped the lights in my hand and jumped to work with the rest all heads facing the lines and small boats and then the rush and Fleury my heart in my throat. I pulled along with the max to me the crane swung out and the ego crew gazed out with salt of the lashes with one foot on the dodo. I almost aliveness. Tuned the boat for the ready as they have stamped around. The three mates and their Crews will be down in the water giving fiery chased these whales one that in ahab's mind would hopefully be Moby Dick. It was said and I turned my cheek towards the Sun and I saw crew of private agents these five Dusky Phantoms. As they stood beside him began lowering. But the captain never lowers for Chase. What else they send it to all these mysterious men? This Crew cuz.

Moby Dick ahab Fleury
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"And he had seen a part of sperm whales. I dropped the lights in my hand and jumped to work with the rest all heads facing the lines and small boats and then the rush and Fleury my heart in throat. I pulled along with the max to me the crane swung out and the ego crew gazed out with salt of the lashes with one foot on the dodo. I almost aliveness. Tuned the boat for the ready as they have stamped around. The three mates and their Crews will be down in the water giving fiery chased these whales one that in ahab's mind would hopefully be Moby Dick.

Moby Dick Ahab Fleury
"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

Knight Reader

03:33 min | 2 months ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Knight Reader

"Of blubber in their mouth people who wanted it, but find it too daunting the people who know and love the book to know and there's something to be gained from every listener with this show. So please join me today. Just a few days ago was Herman Melville's 201st birthday. Just remarkable every year. I do an omage and short reading dedicated to him where I salute him and speak about his life and writing in a honorable way last year's live was actually my 10th episode so you can listen to that whenever right here. But other days live it's available on Facebook. It was a great little live session and especially remote location in San Francisco. Thank you to the venue for inviting me and allowing to do myself from their thoughts me go check it out. Last episode was a beautiful your favorite reads episodes with the get lit podcast and I gotta thank them again and all the contributors. Thanks for stopping by the Keith and the episode was fantastic. So Moby Dick continues on as we last left off with a bit of cliffhanger as we looked at the first lowering. The crew was all up in arms as a group of sperm whales of spotted by attached to go in all crews are ready for a Chase. But before anyone could properly lower an entire boat screw them up from below deck crew that had never been seen until now, but anyone else aboard the pequod Seems they have had a private crew stashed away Far Below in the hold. We have yet to meet this crew. a striking group of men This is interesting because the captain would hardly ever lower for the chase of a whale. But we all know why they have is lowering out of his terrible lust of capturing and killing the whale that once named him. And so this crew must be full of elite harpooners and rowers. We will meet them today and will also experience the remarkable. Well chase scene. I'm so glad you joined me today. So sit back and relax and let me help to contextualize a lot of what's being said the story at this time. This Crew has revealed a couple of Secrets from past episodes to us firstly very early on when quitting Ishmael first signed their lives to the pequod for this adventure. On the day they were set to leave port they arose very early. You'll remember there couple of run-ins with self self-proclaimed Prophet Elijah and the Striking conversations had with him. You will also phone number that would Ishmael Rose extra early to go towards the pequod. He saw a group of men in the distance a crew in the midst heading towards the pequod as well. But upon arriving at the pequod and asking the owner where the crew had gone. They were told no one was there. No one else was around but them but Israel was sure that he saw somebody these are those men steps Below in the hold all this time. Just waiting to be called up for the first lowering. Now only a couple of episodes ago. We were met with a small scene of two Sailors passing along some fresh water and buckets below deck. One of them heard a coughing and rummaging From Below in the hold while the other told him. He was just hearing things. We now know what the sounds were. They Hap's private crew. Undoubtedly. In fact, let's hear directly from Ishmael his Discovery and feelings here as his day dream like trances broken at the shop for Wales.

Ishmael Rose Herman Melville Facebook Elijah Moby Dick coughing San Francisco Hap Keith Israel Wales
The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | 2 months ago

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
"moby dick" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:54 min | 5 months ago

"moby dick" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr. Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people events, and even the places that shaped the story of Christianity this is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of Church history. Last week we were talking about the pulpit that Latin Word Putnam, and that object that appears in so many churches. Well, we also find the pulpit, appearing in of all places that great American novel by Herman, Melville none other than moby. Dick Moby Dick has one hundred and thirty five chapters. They have fascinating names like the shark massacre and interesting names, two of the chapters in particular come early in the book that have great names chapter nine is entitled the sermon. Sermon, Chapter Eight is entitled The pulpit so this is Melville's description of a pulpit of a fabled new. England church, it's sort of a conglomerate picture that Melville is putting together. And of course they are about to go out to sea questing after the great white whale, and before they go, all the sailors will show up that. Sunday in church to hear that sermon before they're sent off to see, and they might not come back again well. This is chapter eight on the pulpit. Let's read Melville's description. He tells us how he's sitting there. In the Pew of the Church and Father Maple comes in, and then he starts walking towards the pulpit. Melville says like most old fashioned pulpits. It was a very lofty one and since. Our stairs to such a height would by its long angle with the floor seriously constrict the already small area of the chapel, the architect it seemed had acted upon the hint of Father Maple, and finish the pulpit without a stairs, substituting a perpendicular that is straight up and down side ladder like those used in mounting ship from a boat at sea. The wife of a whaling captain had provided the chapel with a handsome pair of red ropes for this latter. Halting for an instant at the foot of the ladder, and with both hands, grasping the ornamental knobs of those red ropes, Father Maple cast a look upwards, and then with a truly sailor, like, but still reverential dexterity hand over hand, mounted the steps as if ascending the main top of his vessel. Melville continues, nor was the pulpit itself without a trace of the same seat taste that had achieved the latter. It's paneled front was in the likeness of shifts, bluff bows and the holy. Bible rested on a projecting piece of scroll work fashioned after a ship's fiddle headed beak. What could be full of more meaning Melville asks. For the pulpit. Is Ever this Earth's foremost part? All the rest comes in its rear. The pulpit leads the world from thence. It is the storm of God's quick. Wrath is first descried, and the bow must bear the earliest brunt. From thence it is the god of breezes. Fair or foul is I invoked for favourable winds. Yes, yes, the world's a ship on its passage out not a voyage complete, and the pulpit is its prow. Well, that's from the pen of Melville. What a fascinating line he gives us. Did you hear it in that last paragraph I read and the pope it leads the world. Well. That's chapter eight. The pulpit from Melville's great novel. Some have called I. Know Dr Sprawl often called it the great American novel Moby Dick or The whale. And I'm Steve Nichols thanks for listening to five minutes in Church history. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in Church history.

Melville Dick Moby Dick Father Maple England church Dr. Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols Herman
Moby Dick Chapter Eight

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 5 months ago

Moby Dick Chapter Eight

"Welcome back to another episode of Church history. Last week we were talking about the pulpit that Latin Word Putnam, and that object that appears in so many churches. Well, we also find the pulpit, appearing in of all places that great American novel by Herman, Melville none other than moby. Dick Moby Dick has one hundred and thirty five chapters. They have fascinating names like the shark massacre and interesting names, two of the chapters in particular come early in the book that have great names chapter nine is entitled the sermon. Sermon, Chapter Eight is entitled The pulpit so this is Melville's description of a pulpit of a fabled new. England church, it's sort of a conglomerate picture that Melville is putting together. And of course they are about to go out to sea questing after the great white whale, and before they go, all the sailors will show up that. Sunday in church to hear that sermon before they're sent off to see, and they might not come back again well. This is chapter eight on the pulpit. Let's read Melville's description. He tells us how he's sitting there. In the Pew of the Church and Father Maple comes in, and then he starts walking towards the pulpit. Melville says like most old fashioned pulpits. It was a very lofty one and since. Our stairs to such a height would by its long angle with the floor seriously constrict the already small area of the chapel, the architect it seemed had acted upon the hint of Father Maple, and finish the pulpit without a stairs, substituting a perpendicular that is straight up and down side ladder like those used in mounting ship from a boat at sea. The wife of a whaling captain had provided the chapel with a handsome pair of red ropes for this latter. Halting for an instant at the foot of the ladder, and with both hands, grasping the ornamental knobs of those red ropes, Father Maple cast a look upwards, and then with a truly sailor, like, but still reverential dexterity hand over hand, mounted the steps as if ascending the main top of his vessel. Melville continues, nor was the pulpit itself without a trace of the same seat taste that had achieved the latter. It's paneled front was in the likeness of shifts, bluff bows and the holy. Bible rested on a projecting piece of scroll work fashioned after a ship's fiddle headed beak. What could be full of more meaning Melville asks. For the pulpit. Is Ever this Earth's foremost part? All the rest comes in its rear. The pulpit leads the world from thence. It is the storm of God's quick. Wrath is first descried, and the bow must bear the earliest brunt. From thence it is the god of breezes. Fair or foul is I invoked for favourable winds. Yes, yes, the world's a ship on its passage out not a voyage complete, and the pulpit is its prow. Well, that's from the pen of Melville. What a fascinating line he gives us. Did you hear it in that last paragraph I read and the pope it leads the world. Well. That's chapter eight. The pulpit from Melville's great novel. Some have called I. Know Dr Sprawl often called it the great American novel Moby Dick or The whale.

Melville Dick Moby Dick Father Maple England Church Herman
"moby dick" Discussed on Outside Podcast

Outside Podcast

02:28 min | 5 months ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Outside Podcast

"<Music> <Speech_Male> Like, ultrasound <Speech_Music_Male> to could probably <Speech_Music_Male> are bone. <Speech_Male> Can conceivably <Speech_Male> outdoor, scared <Speech_Male> or elated. <Speech_Music_Male> Whatever's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> going on? <Music> <Music> Intimate. <Speech_Music_Male> Eventually <Speech_Male> huge I falls <Speech_Music_Male> on me and <Speech_Music_Male> we stare into each other. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It is not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a warm and fuzzy moment. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Three feet away. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I feel <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the chasm between us. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> A sense profound intelligence, <Speech_Music_Male> but also propound <Speech_Music_Male> others. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Why are <Speech_Male> you here? I want <Speech_Male> to ask her. <Speech_Music_Male> and. Maybe she wants to ask <Speech_Music_Male> me the same. <Speech_Music_Male> However <Speech_Male> awkward this relationship. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Feels like there's something there. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Matters that we get it <Speech_Music_Male> right. <Speech_Music_Male> Then again <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know. <Speech_Music_Male> The days <Speech_Male> to come will encounter <Speech_Male> dozens of whales. <Speech_Male> PINELLAS <Speech_Male> data <Speech_Male> Gillan. We'll get her shots. <Speech_Music_Male> But. <Speech_Male> None of those experiences <Speech_Male> will be like this one. <Speech_Male> Most of <Speech_Male> those whales will swim away <Speech_Male> from us. Even <Speech_Male> the pregnant stranger will <Speech_Male> give us the cold shoulder <Speech_Male> when we see her again, <Speech_Music_Male> which feels kind of crushing <Speech_Music_Male> like not getting <Speech_Music_Male> ask on second day <Speech_Music_Male> even though he thought the first <Speech_Music_Male> one pretty well. <Speech_Male> I find myself <Speech_Music_Male> rethinking I'd <Speech_Music_Male> I'm moment. <Speech_Male> Is Ready <Speech_Male> to my phone number <Speech_Music_Male> to ask for <Speech_Music_Male> her CODA. <Speech_Music_Male> But I guess whatever <Speech_Male> she saw. <SpeakerChange>

"moby dick" Discussed on Outside Podcast

Outside Podcast

01:55 min | 5 months ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Outside Podcast

"Fight. which is short for Pfizer Macro Cephas the scientific name for sperm whales. Thousands of people came to see the whale including galen, her mom, stacy, who's also on the boat with us and we'll be shooting a second camera for the film. They had him in a pen. Like a little. Blocked off area where they normally keep boats and things, but it was for feisty at this point, and you'd stand on the side, but you be right there next to him. I mean you could see them. You could smell his breath. Spray. At the time there had never been successful rescue of a sick whale, and the prognosis for feisty was not good. They were trying to figure out what was wrong with it. They knew it had a problem, but they couldn't get a blood sample from it because they can retract their veins, so they can't draw the blood so finally they swabbed its blowhole and figured out that it had a new Monja, so they had to try to give it. It in -biotics, so what they did is they put the penicillin inside squid and tried to feed it, but it refused feeding it. I finally got used to one of the vets that in a wet suit was in the penwith it, and got it to start taking the squid with the penicillin, and then it worked, and feisty, got better and got stronger, and soon as he was strong enough. They let them back out to sea and. He swam away. That was nineteen, eighty-one. Thousand Sperm were still being. Turned into engine Greece, but the save the whales movement was gaining strength. Today like most other whale species, sperm whales are protected by International Moratorium on commercial whaling. Die from ship strikes and fishing gear tangle meant an increasing number of in washing worldwide bellies full of plastic. Our relationship with them has definitely improved since the days of Moby Dick, but it's still pretty dysfunctional..

stacy penicillin galen Moby Dick -biotics Greece
Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

08:37 min | 9 months ago

Bathsheba Demuth: Environmental Historian

"This episode of is on Conservation I spoke with author and environmental historian Bethsheba. Demuth Demuth is an assistant professor at Brown University who specializes in the intersection between humans. Ecosystems ideas in history the work that I do as an environmental historian is broadly focused on the North American and Russian Arctic and particularly the relationships between people and animals and people in Ecosystems. More broadly over the past two hundred years or so. We talked over. Skype demuth was in fairbanks as the professor was performing research for her new book. Her first book is titled Floating Coast and Environmental History of the Bering Straits. Npr called it. A quote deeply studied deeply felt book that lays out a devastating complex history of change notes. What faces us now and dares us to imagine better in quote as we proceed and get into this interview. I will note that I spoke with Professor Demuth while she was at the university library so it can be a little loud in the background at times. It's a busy place. I can promise you however that this will be one of the most compelling and interesting accounts of the history of whaling that you had ever you look so cold yes. It's a little chilly up here. What's the what's the weather like right? Now it's actually a pretty Balmy day today. It's about twenty degrees. It was about fifty degrees colder here last week. You've you've draw the line pretty much anything around ten. Just can't do it for me of all the things that makes this whole conversation. That much more interesting demuth was actually drawn to the Arctic in her young adult life and even lived in the Yukon for two years. And yes doing all the things that you're imagining right now tracking bears hunting. Caribou FISHING SALMON. And yes even. Husky Mushin Dog sledding and no. I'm not making that up. She's that for real your your first journeys out there. If I understand right was your running dog sled yes so when I was eighteen I decided to take a gap year as we. Now call them although they weren't really called then And went to a little community north of the Arctic Circle in the Yukon territory to be a dog handler which is basically an apprentice to somebody who has a dog team and I knew nothing about sled dogs. When I moved up there I was eighteen so I thought I knew something about things but I really didn't. And that was my first introduction to the Arctic. Okay and how long you said you do that for two years. Yes do you. Do you still remember how to do it? I mean I. It's kind of like riding a bicycle except in this particular case. You're working with dogs so you can remember how to do the physical pieces of it but you also need to have a relationship with animals. You're working with so. I'm sure that if I had a team and I spent a lot of time with them would would all come back because I would be making that relationship with dogs but I'd like a bicycle. You can't just grab one and go right right. Yeah that makes sense You don't have to get to know your bike. I right I probably ended up working appear because my dad read me too much Jack London when I was a kid. So there's definitely a literary connection in there now. I could do a really poor job of basically giving it a synopsis of the Book. Or I'm sure it would be much more articulate coming from you Tell us a little bit more about the Soviet whaling And more specifically what you found so fascinating a about that topic. Yes the book that I published. Just this past fall called floating coast looks at basically the the past two hundred years or so along the Bering Strait both the Russian Arctic and in the US Arctic. It's a it's a two country history but because it's an environmental history in some ways it's a history of no country because it's looking at processes an an animals that don't really matched onto nation state borders and the the the project is kind book ended no Pun intended by could have two episodes of large scale whaling the first one being in the nineteenth century for market whalers capitalist wailers most of them coming from New England in fact some of them from where I now live in Providence. Who were coming up to kill bowhead. Whales for oil for lamp oil mostly and then the book closes with a couple of chapters about Soviet whaling in the twentieth century. Which in many ways is just the socialist analog to the to the capitalist wailing in that it is Quite excessive it kills whales far outside their capacity to to reproduce. And keep keep up with the demand and those kind of frames of the book in some ways. Show the things that I found really interesting about this part of the world as a historian. Who's interested in the ways that people's ideas influence the environments? They live in and vice versa. Which is that. It's a it's a place that has a very similar ecology on both sides of the Bering Strait. If you drop down on the peninsula or the seward Peninsula Chukchi Peninsulas in Russia and the seward Peninsula's in Alaska. He can't really tell one from the other right. And let's you know the place extremely well. Because the the flora and the fauna in geology are really comparable but of course in the twentieth century. It gets split by these two big economic ideologies that imagine each other in opposition. Which is you know. Capitalism and socialism. So it's kind of a natural experiment to see how these two ways of managing environments in some sense that the Soviet Union the United States brought with them interact with Arctic species and in the case of Wales they do it very similarly which is more or less trying to kill everywhere they possibly can ya. It's like it's kind of shocking especially when you talk about like as a concern of how many whales are being impacted or what that's doing to the ecosystem comes up that the answer kind of always came back to will. Don't worry. Technology will save us from. That will deliver a positive outcome. Okay can you elaborate on that? Yes this was one of the really interesting commonalities I found between two groups of whalers who were operating hundred years apart from each other or more and in two extremely different cultural and economic contexts is at the end of nineteenth century moby. Dick STYLE TALL SHIP. Whalers call me. Ishmael an ordinary seaman before the mast on the good ship check. What found out a man on Christmas Day of the year? Eighteen forty four on a thousand days. Voight very aware that when they entered a new population of Wales and a piece of the ocean that they hadn't been hunting in before that they would they called. Wailing it out or fishing it out that they would kill off an enormous number of the animals that were that were available locally and that they were doing this and getting further and further from home. So they're aware and using the word extinction by the end of the nineteenth century but at the same time as they're talking about extinction they're basically saying well if we put in place some technological Improvements if our ships get faster. If we're more able to navigate around the sea ice will be able to still catch these whales and there was this kind of belief that because Wales were really intelligent. And all of the whalers nudists and talk about this in detail that there were more whales. They were just shy or had gotten smart and were hiding in new places. So there's actually a couple of lines in Moby Dick Melville talks about you know the whales are just hiding behind the Arctic Sea ice and then after the Second World War the Soviet Union sort of follows the same pattern in that they have very sophisticated marine biology by that point in many ways the the research that so the marine biologist or doing is ahead of what's happening in the United States particularly when it comes to studying ways that whales are social animals and able to communicate vocally with each other They're they're way ahead of what's happening in English. Speaking Countries but at the same time as an aware that that the populations of wheels are dropping but at the same time. They're convinced that as long as they just kind of keep putting more technology online. They're going to be able to keep killing

Professor Demuth Bering Straits United States Arctic Wales Environmental History Arctic Circle Arctic Sea NPR Brown University Assistant Professor Soviet Union Seward Peninsula Chukchi Penin Professor Jack London Fairbanks
Barnes & Noble suspends reissues of classics with new images

Pat Farnack

00:37 sec | 10 months ago

Barnes & Noble suspends reissues of classics with new images

"Barnes and noble has put the brakes on a plan to recreate classic book covers for black history month CBS news correspondent Deborah Rodriguez explains critics call it literary black face Barnes and noble is canceling plans to re issue twelve classics with major characters depicted on the cover with dark skin in honor of black history month the books include Moby Dick Romeo and Juliet and the wizard of oz featuring an Asian Dorothy in a pink dress other covers over as black and native American the joint project with Random House used artificial intelligence to look through one hundred books that make no reference to the race of their

Barnes Deborah Rodriguez Moby Dick Romeo CBS Juliet
"moby dick" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

12:32 min | 1 year ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Imagine trying to adapt moby Dick for the movies just turning its adventure story into a decent screenplay would be hard enough. let alone all the philosophical acids and social commentary and Digression on the Zoology of Wales but in the early nineteen fifties ray Bradbury who at the time was a young writer not yet the world famous master of fantasy and science fiction was asked to adapt moby Dick for the movies. This is what you ship Japan chase that white will both sides of land over all sides of talk about rolls what see.

ray Bradbury Zoology of Wales writer Japan white
"moby dick" Discussed on CarCast

CarCast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"moby dick" Discussed on CarCast

"But one of them was nine thirty five and it was Moby Dick. And it was unclear if there was more than one Moby, Dick or to Moby Dick. That's the nine thirty five put the really long tail on it. Yeah. Now, we saw it at festival speed at Goodwood or we saw a clone, right? Because we were taking pictures of the wheels, and yeah, I don't know. I, I don't know if it was a clone or not. I've got a feel like me. I don't know. But I was like, I so I should of this guy was selling. I, I said, how much is? Moby Dick, and he was like two million dollars. And I said that sounds cheap for Moby Dick 'cause that's probably one of the most legendary nine thirty five ever made. And then he went. Yeah. Well, the lady owns it the widow who owns it actually looked into it. And now she went six million dollars. And I was like okay that sounds about right. Yeah. But where did two million from it came from his mouth. Right. But her brain said, six million bucks, and then I was like, okay and then at some point he said, I'll just get yes. Sheet of paper with all the prices for the cars, and I'll just Email it to Nate, and you can look at it and I was like, I was in New York and like date sent to me, and I was trying to look at it, and I got down to Moby Dick, and I was like he had a pencil. They like scratched out or whatever, and I was like, is that's a four million dollars. I couldn't really tell. Yeah, I don't know. I feel like if you'd like to sell a car for four or six million dollars, you should probably just get your word processor out type in a few things. I like the old school. Handwritten part? But when you're right in the number and sometimes it gets a little confusing and then it made me wonder cereal. Do it for you. Yeah. Then it made me wonder I don't know what that cars worth like, I, maybe apparently, they don't know either between two and six. Right. So so they're saying did you on your travels? Did you get any Indy? Five hundred updates. Did you see the qualifying for Indy five hundred? No, I was running around swamped everywhere. I was passionate. You're telling me, yes, I'm passionate qualified on the pole and his I think it's a four lap average he did to twenty nine point nine nine two. And if you think about like the top three or four, they're all within like a tenth or two of each other, and the whole field of thirty cars qualified. I don't think it was three seconds apart between all of it's gonna be exciting..

Moby Dick Indy Nate New York six million dollars four million dollars two million dollars three seconds
George Orwell Gets an Apology for a Rejection Letter (but Not for His Marmalade Recipe)

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

George Orwell Gets an Apology for a Rejection Letter (but Not for His Marmalade Recipe)

"Twenty four. Well, every writer gets rejection letters odu they, but they almost never get read policies for them. That though is exactly what George Orwell got this week. Just a little late times reports a British Council, which promotes intercultural relations, ask him to write an essay talking of British food in nineteen Forty-six only to turn him down and to insult his recipe for orange marmalade. The original editor later admitted. It was a great essay, buddy. Didn't like the marmalade. They apologized this week in all of that probably puts it close to the rejection hall of fame right next to the guy who turned down Herman Melville's Moby, Dick. With the words. Does it have to

George Orwell Herman Melville British Council Writer Editor
New research finds link between Alzheimer's and gum disease bacteria

At Home with Gary Sullivan

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

New research finds link between Alzheimer's and gum disease bacteria

"Week in rock and roll history. Start back in nineteen fifty nine where six thousand teenagers attend the first night of the faded winter dance party with buddy Holly at the million dollar ballroom in Milwaukee despite temperatures of seventeen below and thirteen inches of snow. Some dedicated kids this week in one thousand nine sixty six the beach boys went into the studio to record wouldn't it be nice, which would be the opening track on their forthcoming album. Pet. Sounds this week in nineteen seventy four Led Zeppelin appeared at Market Square Arena in Indianapolis with over seventeen thousand fans the set list included rock and roll over the hills and far away. The song remains the same the rain song. Kashmir trampled. Underfoot Moby Dick stairway to heaven whole lot of love and black dog and a few others tickets cost just eight dollars and fifty cents this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight Michael Jackson went to number one on. On the US singles chart with the way. You make me feel. It was the third single from Jackson's seventh studio album bad for which Jackson had written over sixty songs for the album with plans of releasing a three disc album appraiser Quincy Jones convinced Jackson to make bad a one disc LP and this week in nineteen fifty five Edward van Halen is born just outside of Amsterdam in the Netherlands his family, eventually settles in Pasadena, California, where he forms ban Halen with his brother Alex van halen's biggest billboard hits. Of course. Nineteen eighty-four. There's your look back at this week's rock almanac. If you think making false threats is a joke. Think again, any communication threatening students teachers and staff at schools or public places is a federal crime that could lock people behind prison doors for up to five years. FBI deputy director David outage making you aware that hoax threats have real consequences. We don't want to see a young person began their adult lives with a felony record making false threats is not a joke. Think before you post. Visit FBI dot com. The thought of my sons growing up without me inspired me to quit smoking.

Michael Jackson FBI Edward Van Halen Alex Van Halen Market Square Arena Milwaukee Holly United States Indianapolis Zeppelin Quincy Jones Halen Deputy Director California Pasadena Amsterdam David Thirteen Inches Million Dollar
"moby dick" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

Writers Who Don't Write

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Writers Who Don't Write

"I noticed that most of your books have to do with like some kind of historical fiction with like a little bit of entry thrown in there, and I just I know that you have like must have anyway, conflict fascination with writers of a couple hundred years back. How did that come to be? I think it's all tied up in that in that same kind of narrative that that I've been talking about, which is that distance that removes that I felt from what it meant to be a writer. And the way I in the my Mary way I interacted with with writers was was reading, and I think my general beating experience was reading the classics. The first book that got me really excited about reading I was I was an early reader, I read, but I think it wasn't until Moby Dick. In high school that I, that I felt serious about reading or that I really wanted to spend my time reading in thinking about what I was reading. So it was really to make myself even more removed from from writers as people. The writers that I most most interacted with were dead writers. Where writers that were writing about people in places that were from a very long time ago, like Caleb Carr and Umberto eco kind of taking that that scholar scholarly material turning into stories. So I think for me, I as I was starting to write, it must have made a lot of sense somewhere in my brain as I was trying to figure out what it meant to write what it meant to be a writer. So kind of look at those writers I had read, look at those writers that I had studied from a scholarly point of view, at least as much as we can call kind of undergraduate scholarship scholarly. It felt like it to me at the time, at least. And kind of try to figure out who they were as people and put them in situations that forced them to kind of present themselves as people not just as as writers because that's one of the disconnects. You feel traveling from from being a scholar of whatever level to being a, a writer about the same people in places. I might know everything there is to know about. Henry Mods longfellow from writing senior thesis about his Dante club, but I wouldn't know the first thing about what he ate for breakfast or what kind of hat he wore or what kind of personality he had. I might know little bit about it, but since the nineteen. Kind of sixties seventies. The English department's started to frown on incorporating end studying exploring who writers were as people right with this kind of umbrella term of new criticism of close reading. We would kind of. Isolate ourselves to the words on the page and and and get a feel like we're cheating if we would look into China, look into the souls of the writers or or try to look into. What the writer intended something to meaning to mean or how it connected to their lives very different than the nineteenth century. In fact, speaking of Moby Dick, I remember when I was in college, I did a little presentation for my seminar class on the reviews of Moby Dick, which by the way, every writer should should read the reviews of Moby Dick that came out when Moby Dick came out. It something probably a lot of us forget whether you love Moby Dick or paid it, or you never read it this, the tower of American literature was it destroyed him..

writer Moby Dick Caleb Carr Henry Mods China hundred years
Experts: UAE, Saudis may have committed war crimes in Yemen

WBZ Morning News

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Experts: UAE, Saudis may have committed war crimes in Yemen

"The UN says the governments of Yemen the United Arab Emirates and Saudi. Arabia may be responsible for war crimes during three years, of escalated fighting against rebels in Yemen We have more from ABC's Tom, rivers not mincing his words Charles Garo away in Geneva from. The UN, experts group says the rebels. And, Saudi Arabia in the UAE may have conducted attacks in violation of the principles of distinction proportionality and all precautions. Which may amount to war crimes meanwhile the Saudi led coalition accuses the UN of. Biased reports on their Yemen airstrikes more than fifteen thousand civilians have been killed or injured. Since the war

UN Yemen Arabia Billy Kosta Extortion United Arab Emirates Saudi Arabia Matt Lauer Deb Lawler Theft Boston Paul Gonzalez WBZ Taylor Swift Youtube Kereta Scott King Moby Dick Marina Charles H. Right Museum Mattie
"moby dick" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"I would look at my hands and things that they looked like lizard hands. They looked, they looked alien. They look disgusting and scaly. And I remember saying that to the resident who was admitting me, it McLean that he said, well, are you having any auditory or visual hallucinations? And I said, well, I know it's not true, but my hands look like lizard hands. He wrote down very laboriously visual hallucinations, and I thought, should I argue with him? It's not really a hallucination. If I know it's not true. It's a metaphor. In the same way, Styron acknowledged that his hand wasn't actually paralyzed or dead. This was a metaphor for his own impotence. He was obsessed with what he had to say in his novel, but he couldn't say it deeply wanted to finish it and he drove himself to attempt to finish it. And yet again, again, he failed. That level became as white wheel? Yeah, I think that novel really haunted him. It was Moby Dick that dismasted me Moby Dick that brought me to this dead stumped by stand on. Now that occur CID white, whale. This is a reading of Herman Melville's classic novel human madness is often times a cunning and most feline thing. When you think at fled, it may have but become transfigured into some still subtler form. Herman Melville also suffered from crippling writer's block. The white page had been his white whale. As for Styron, he felt like all the meaning had drained out of the world. Something had gone horribly wrong with his own mind in no longer belong to him. And he wanted to know why he was interested in his problem too, was very interested in it. Just like Alice, he wanted to find the cause of his own literary illness that used to drive doctors crazy. I think that he became so fascinated with what was going wrong, but it seemed appropriate. He was honoring the importance of Zuma's, so we just got really interested. I think we're all very interested together. Money, you need it now later and much later. Do you know if you have enough money to last as long as.

Styron visual hallucinations Herman Melville Moby Dick McLean writer Alice Zuma
"moby dick" Discussed on Z100

Z100

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Z100

"Of these water rights you could be on just there's so many water slides they. Have and I say it once I've, said it twice and I'm gonna say. It again. I don't, know how a theme park like. Splish splash keeps itself so clean, that's I I mean I every. Time you go anywhere so clean the water, and, everything and the people are so, nice we had a wonderful time and you know yes they are, a client of mine but I will say if you. Can make that trip out there eight is well worth it to go to. Split splash you could check out all. My videos that he posted. On Instagram on Saturday. So this Saturday was. A great. Time the whole family went out we had a blast the kids love it. They do it's a. Great time and we had my nieces and nephews every family day, it's Bush black Friday we stay true to New. Jersey and went, down to, point pleasant and we did a lot of the rides there the Moby Dick Cried you've been in the. Moby Dick Ryan It's just. A heritage ride it's it's been there forever, everybody? Loves to get on the Moby Dick right he goes round, and round whole. Suspends the atop the kids yell and scream we always take pictures over there and it's neat to see the way the kids. Have grown and progress as they get older so we got a little shed a little. Tear to, see the way the kids were you know when they're going, to go into play pleasant. On little rides and they're a little kids and now here, they are going on the Moby Dick. Ryan you still haven't been on the right. I still have not been great bag, holder if you guys need. A bag holder you just find your Plasencia as you said. I was, taking pictures I knew exactly what you doing you're right on, the sidelines watching your family. Enjoy themselves.

Moby Dick Ryan Moby Dick Plasencia Bush Jersey
"moby dick" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"No can you name a book and li she found the humor in it i mean this is i mean like you said harry potter one of the publishing sensations of the last twenty five years i would think that a lot of people would come up with that even if this is so popular but a lot of these people are saying i don't read that doesn't matter that you heard of a book a book nineteen eightyfour you've heard of tequila mockingbird you've heard of something knows but i'm saying harry potter let's continue folks yeah that's it the lion king you read the book yeah hey man i didn't even read it thanks can we cut this and do it again this crazy air amazing can you name a book a book any book the jungle book visit some movie sure visit both fisher no a book is a book by at least he thought of a word with a title with both in the neighborhood came up with that right that's amazing magazines count oh due magazines count as naming a book magazines count no those people that's correct name moby dick are okay here we go this is my favorite guys who are all excited because he could name moby dick sharon that's a book right that's a famous book good for her name very excited moby dick that's art he wrote a book of course wait moby dick was not an author wrong he wrote a book called horse the famous worse mad libby horse moby dick that's artist he wrote a book horse is there an artist named moby dick no really herman melville book there's the author that wrote the book of course where did he come up with jesse he solid down the street or something like i can't think of it at least at least it would make sense if the book was called wale moby dick wrote horse do not argue with this guy okay all right i like that book moby dick was the author yes and the book was worse yes all right you're way wrong don't get so lippi what was the last book you read dr seuss dr seuss dr seuss dr seuss maybe twelve years i'm drawing a blank fox sorry i am totally blanking out on books all right now what did he think this woman does for a living oh i hope she's a librarian what do you do for a living i was a librarian no no the kevin and bean show k rock behind closed doors and.

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"moby dick" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Hey man i didn't even read a thing on this do it again can you name a book of book any book the jungle book sure both sure no magazines count that's correct moby dick artist he wrote a book called course i like that both moby dick was the author yes sports kiss the last book you read probably dr suess dr seuss dr seuss dr seuss maybe wow humanity is over good night we're done yep roll the sidewalks and let's just close up the united states of america are done at name a book i'm just wondering is the bible book that's that's asking that's two layers of i mean you couldn't even say harry potter harry potter seriously there's been five hundred million of them sold you can't say harry potter it's pretty easy warren peace mean.

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"moby dick" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"But young jake is an emoji portraitist i'll man that stuff was so cool isn't that awesome yeah so this guy does portrait's of people like really good portrait strictly from emojis layered in really interesting ways he's got like a really great instagram to check out to why u n g jake a good check that one out and then there's also dude named fred benenson and he translated moby dick into a mo geez how it's called the moji dick and every word of every line of moby dick has been translated into emojis and this guy did this right he hired three people to translate every single line and then he had he hired another group of people who would look at each line and then look at the line of text and say this is the one of the three that's the best gets this across every line seeing get a modem dick online for two hundred bucks for hard copy two hundred dollars but i think he a by the pdf for five bucks and is moby dick represented by an atlantic beach terrible early clan so there's a lot of like it's obvious that emoji is art but there's a lot of people out there in linguists included who are saying emoji is words to and it may be a language as developing in front of our eyes is pretty interesting as it stands now though technically if you're linguists it is not a language because it lacks grammar which is structures that allow you to take words and put them into different combinations to create higher thoughts emojis do not yet allow us to do that because there's not real rules give but there there are people studying at this one article he sent woman named rachel tat men a linguistics phd candidate from university of washington go huskies sure she did some studies like where she would show people pictures like photographs and then say how would you emoji that description of that picture right right.

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"moby dick" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

KALW 91.7 FM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on KALW 91.7 FM

"Exquisite garden at this exquisite out which is a favorite out by the way all giving up the goddamn her last night there on the trumps that i will call that's what an of course so call her now ince she's waiting that delivering long enough to disturbing god she has he is for my ring darling she has the ears of a fox then let it remain long enough that she'll come in but then she'll run she'll be out of breath do want it to be up to breath no i don't want to be out of breath slim onto let us bear by the firm look guessing ring a long time perhaps she has israel ring that's going to keep up adventure want to talk in fact refusals largest beautifully to buy her mania show antidrug incessantly and i know what you're thinking mr she has a tax of mania she talks incessantly and i haven't shutout since you arrived tell me why i need to work with mr wells what does passive tell me why i need to work with mr well how did you cares animal alertness tell me what did you see the moby dick i saw the moby dick union told me forgive me i don't recall the actors starlink another one of you awesome sort of that i'm afraid i mean the end to stage the ship those storms at sea that rigging mats what run remembered that and also calls all rather alshams shadow looming and i'm making looming i frayed no one will notice you if olsen is directed yes so what you're saying is you don't want a strong director i worked if you recall with tony richardson tender it's too bad director they're boy if we're to work together you must understand that your opinions carry no weight no way to tool i see it is your own lust for power that intrigues me really of course this man you call a bad directive challenged me what i think that also talking about storms at sea it was a moment in the end china and i think you will recall it when i heard my son was dead so is there are laws this broken down voter villian when.

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"moby dick" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on In Our Time

"Mentions of the leviathan the biblical leviathan which is both a see monster it the fish that swallowed jona it's also something that's kind fantastical and potentially it's also an enemy but it also is a gentle creature that's created by god so we have right from the inception of the novel this sense of what moby dick might be is he the enemy is he simply part of god's creation is he monstrous and parts of it immediately then we are obliged to think through those things obviously leviathan is also the title of hobbes's eight a sixteen fifty one great work on political philosophy in which the leviathan is also the figure for the state so it encourages us to start thinking about the political allegories that might be at work in moby dick and the seeing that graham talks about whether men give up their freedom to that dictate to figure of a hub is absolutely at the heart of that the digressions a long an testing grim what if you writ what if you read the book just as strip those on reddit as an adventure store sorry such as as he'd been writing before this what were you making that yard he worse than venture story and one of the reasons the novel lives on his third publishes a taken atl the wailing bits and just turned the book into an adventure story works in in two architects i guess so it's a it's a voyage return narrative which is a smooth ishmail story be like the odyssey perhaps is also the revenge story so slain the beast percy's theseus even by a wolf so it works and as an adventure story but i i guess the one thing it but one thing that happens then is that what that's what makes the novel like you'll the adventure stories is not what makes a difference will unico or great duty than when he was riding id melbourne thought i will extend the reach and range in the novel or do you think just think you're i want to put this in.

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"moby dick" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"moby dick" Discussed on In Our Time

"M a anecdotes about melancholy so he's formal structure he's very influential this mixture of genres which is exactly what you get in in in mogadishu as well a more influence would you said the the king james version as his call in america hang on him i think more generally that book is meant you know the most important book in nineteenthcentury american literature probably and clearly moby dick so a religious novel i mean the religious allusions starts with colmey ishmail may go all the way through to the epilogue where we get that quote from job bouts you know i'm the only want to escape and i can tell you this story and the story of joan robustly but i guess the more important influence of the king james bible is on the language of of may be dick so it gives although he's a a great american novel i think what's distinctive is the way that he's actually drawing on very english literary tradition and that kind of odd chaotic nature of the the the the poetry the king james bible gives may be dick icon of reaching a resonance that perhaps he wouldn't have if it was entirely written in that kind of colloquial or american banat can enjoy more renewal the old testament eye on the old testament i think and going back to this point about the language i think what he really what he really does is to base to bring these different influences together so there's a kind of fun.

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