35 Burst results for "Moby"

"moby" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

04:02 min | 2 months ago

"moby" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"Play. Where are you reading. These are my notes. Oh of from cosmos and psyche. Oh okay look at that. Beautiful and Yeah now i wanna read something here. Okay retards this. Is the time volcanically intense evolutionary pressures for the radical reconfiguration of all life structures. I i'm not sure if if that came out of the book or something that he said on my podcast okay. That's right now. We've had him on twice. Yeah and oh my gosh. It's you know okay so we've gone from the greene knight to solar leaner yup. Now we're at chaco canyon. Chaco and chaco canyon has pointed to the cosmos. Yes which is so beautifully written about and cosmos and psyche by harness. Okay so sale. Back the moby. Dick lower boiling the ocean. Here you're going to go up to and y'all gonna do a study or you may still be doing it depending on cova on moby dick and you're drawing some analogies are parallels with how the story goes in how speaks to what's happening in the world today and i love free to talk about it. Uncut uncensored win. Now if you can just because what you said earlier was before we before we went live. You're telling me this wonderful story and about who moby dick represents and how all the parallels with what's happened in the world today. Yeah so okay. Let me pick up his pick up a thread here. You know what's what's fascinating me. Several on this read of moby dick is the is the because we're living in the atmosphere of everyday now is the power to create a mass of people a belief based on a fantasy not facs not fact and this is this is a job playing the victim that way wail dismasted me in the sea of japan. And i believe that it is and gives his speech on the quarterdeck he says. I don't care if the white whale is the agent of evil or the principle of evil. I will strikes through the mask and slay it in the in. The mass. Is that curtain separating the phenomenal world from the world of metaphysics from ontological from the visible presences. And see this is part of. What's going on today. If i'm gonna make some connections here. Yeah there's That there is this rage to get people to believe in what is both invisible and unreal.

chaco canyon moby dick cova Dick japan
"moby" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

In Search of the New Compassionate Male

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"moby" Discussed on In Search of the New Compassionate Male

"I think you'd probably google or youtube it. I've got the cd over here on the shelf so work but i bet you could pull it up in. It's fifty five or sixty minutes. No more redford's redford narrates it because he became fascinated and they interviewed native americans about the history. And so it's history and myth coming together cosmos. And you know very much. Got tournus of movement cosmos and and order and it's brilliant humane cosmos and psyche psyche. Yeah he has a wonderful chapter on moby dick in there too. He does he. Does i remember reading it. And then i reread it about three mornings go. There is a. I haven't got past the first hundred pages your i'm reading it like this. I mean i just keep going. It's so beautifully written in this. So packed with information and knowledge and wisdom. It haven't gotten to the chapter on moby dick yet. Oh i went to. I went to the index under melville. Because he points out. And i don't know enough about cosmology but he said the reason. There is so much force in power in this epic. Is that melville road. During this cycle of saturn urinals and pluto your well. I could be right but but but you can. You can look up melville in the index Goaded the chapter on on moby. Dick 'cause i took two or three pages of notes on it. And i was going to use it in untuckit in october Yeah keep going. But i haven't read. I've read maybe sixty pages at the front end those chapters. But i've i have it right down in my on the floor with a whole series of books that i know i'm needing to be able to put my hands on and i decided i'm gonna go back the cosmos and psyche. Now the point. I looked it up. Because i i put it in my journal. I drew in there. okay. And it's the conjunction of jupiter and saturn. Yes in employer does there. But they are square to urine us. Yes so saturn. Okay in jupiter generous leader associated with health wealth.

redford moby dick melville youtube google Dick
InMobi Has Its Eye on Telcos, With Abhay Singhal

AdExchanger Talks

01:30 min | 2 months ago

InMobi Has Its Eye on Telcos, With Abhay Singhal

"I'm delighted to welcome obey single founder and ceo of imo. Be marketing cloud to the podcast. Talk about this fascinating company. And what where. It's where it's going next obey. How are you. i'm very well rosette Thank you very much for having me on your podcast yet. Thanks for doing it. So i thought maybe we could start with a minute on the origin story of in moby. If you will walk us back fifteen years. What was the first version of this company. Fantastic now this is It's it's been a long story and one that are incredibly proud to talk about the very first version of a mobile. Believe it or not. It started with being a sms. Search engine kind of group on before groupon became the thing. All we wanted to do is solve. The problem of discounts discovery for consumers using the sms on On on on the phones all pre smartphone era remember that iphone launched in two thousand six late two thousand six ali two thousand seven and since then the entire industry has changed. So yes that was very first version of moby which was guarded. 'em korge at that time. M for mobile and coach is a hindi word for search but since then it's it's an interesting interesting right nothing short of a

IMO Groupon Em Korge
What Do You Know About the Galapagos Islands?

Ghost Town

01:49 min | 3 months ago

What Do You Know About the Galapagos Islands?

"Do you know about the galapagos islands. Probably that it's a remote island in the pacific ocean but it played a hand in the works of charles. Darwin the theory of evolution. But that's not all that makes the island unique it's the backdrop for one of the most bizarre murder mysteries which includes poly-amorous fake teeth. Giant tortoises and murder. Today we're gonna talk about the galapagos affair so the human history of the glucose islands doesn't begin with charles darwin really though his visit in eighteen. Thirty five definitely. Put the islands on the map will literally put it on the map. Us whalers and pirates were already. they're hunting giant galapagos tortoises. These tortoises were actually very humongous. Very slow think like thousands of pounds and could live for years in the hold of a ship providing fresh meat on long. Voyages flurry an island in the galapagos. Has the most human activity and it's the only island with a fresh water supply in eighteen twenty. All the giant tortoises were killed on the island. When crew members of the ill fading whaling vessel essex torched it for no apparent reason after the essex left a sperm whale sunk their ship. So there you go for months. The sailors drifted helplessly in lifeboats sunburn. Starving before turning to cannibalism to survive. They drew straws to see who became food for the rest and then they do another straw to decide who would kill that person of the twenty crew. Only eight survived. They were found off the coast of south america. Insane and knowing that human bones their story inspired herman melville's novel moby dick. You may have heard of it all this to say that there is a what is thought of as an island curse the curse of the giant tortoise a creature that back when they were still around could according to those who interacted with it. Read the dirty secrets of the minds of visitors to the

Galapagos Islands Pacific Ocean Charles Darwin Darwin Charles Essex United States Herman Melville Moby Dick South America
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"Old pop singers. <Silence> Just doesn't seem <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Male> compelling <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> you on <Speech_Male> mute records for <Speech_Male> a long time. Yes <Speech_Male> i still sort <Speech_Male> of am. I've <Speech_Male> been on mute records <Speech_Male> somewhere <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in some form <Speech_Male> for now <Speech_Male> almost thirty years. <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> record <Speech_Male> is on deutsche <Speech_Male> grammophon because it <Speech_Male> just they asked <Speech_Male> and it <Speech_Male> seemed like if you're going <Silence> to make <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> large like a record <Speech_Male> based around <Silence> an orchestra <Speech_Male> why <Speech_Male> not make it with <Speech_Male> the oldest <Speech_Male> most venerated <Speech_Male> orchestral <Speech_Male> music label in <Speech_Male> the world. So <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> have to say. <Speech_Male> When i was <Speech_Male> nineteen i worked <Speech_Male> in a record store and <Speech_Male> i would unpacked the boxes <Speech_Male> and there <Speech_Male> would be the records that had <Speech_Male> the deutsche grammophon <Speech_Male> logo on them. And <Speech_Male> i was like this is so <Speech_Male> fancy <Speech_Male> like this is <Speech_Male> from europe. <Speech_Male> And they're like <Speech_Male> these. This is <Speech_Male> why this is so <Speech_Male> much more legitimate <Speech_Male> than these other <Speech_Male> records. <Speech_Male> And i just recently <Speech_Male> got the vinyl <Speech_Male> of this album <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> i saw <Speech_Male> the deutsche <Speech_Male> grammophon logo <Speech_Male> on one of my records <Silence> and it <Silence> just <Speech_Male> it definitely. <Speech_Male> Not <SpeakerChange> what <Silence> you expect <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> someone who used to <Speech_Male> play in <Speech_Male> Hardcore <Speech_Male> punk rock band <Speech_Male> in a basement <Speech_Male> of illegal anarchists <Speech_Male> clubs <SpeakerChange> in stanford <Speech_Male> connecticut. It's great <Speech_Music_Male> thank you <Speech_Male> for doing this. <SpeakerChange> Amazing <Speech_Male> i'll <Speech_Male> this was so much fun <Speech_Male> i it. <Speech_Male> I had sort of <Speech_Male> even forgotten <SpeakerChange> that we <Speech_Male> were recording this. <Speech_Music_Male> Yeah feel <Speech_Music_Male> like we have a million <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> things to talk about forever. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for sharing so <Speech_Music_Male> many

europe nineteen stanford thirty years one deutsche Speech_Music_Male Speech_Male million
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:08 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"And it was done and i was like david is it. That might be the most beautiful song you've ever written. How did he react to that comment. You know it's funny. We never about music. If i remember. He responded a little formerly and in a polite way which is the same way. I respond to people telling me about music like he almost like he took it in but i could tell us. Sort of a wall came up. I think he felt exposed. Because it if you think about most of his music is not personal it's beautiful. It's phenomenal but rarely. Did he write personal song. You know they're very theatrical. I mean even heroes. Heroes written was written about tony. Visconti In this song slip away is so personal and i think it i think i saw his defense has come down because he realized he was being perhaps little too vulnerable. What was the greatest dance. Music experience you've ever had in the world. Don't kill me. Two of them. One was the first time. I heard house music loud in a club. I think he would have been eighty eight or eight. Nine i was at nells and i was in the basement. I was dancing next to prince. The only time i ever saw princeton person. He was dancing next to me in the basement. Of nells and the dj. Who i think was frankie. Inglesias played a day in the life. And i see it sounded like the heavens opening up. The second was about two thousand and seven. Don't maybe two thousand eight i got asked to. Dj at an electric daisy carnival. And i'd been sort of ignoring what i was like. I sort of been ignoring the dance. Music quote unquote around for a while. So i was asked to dj. At this what. I thought was just like an outdoor small outdoor rave and so much so that when my my manager asked me if i wanted to. Dj at this. He said oh. There's a rave in los angeles do you want to. Dj at it and my response was they still have raves. And so. I thought i don't know i'm going to feel. They'll be a thousand people. It was in the s. c. stadium and there were seventy five thousand people and i was so stunning to expect nothing into have an underground event with seventy five thousand people in a sports stadium and the level of joyful enthusiasm like there was just a couple of records that i played that were so euphoric and to have seventy five thousand people responding in kind. I mean that's happened many times but something about this was just really special. Amazing do you do any type of spiritual practice for most of my life. I was a sort of i would think of. It's almost like a spiritual dilettante. Sometimes out of curiosity sometimes out of a desire to not piss off whatever day the out there but for most of my life. I realized that my spirituality was largely trying to figure out who. I agreed with us. Like which which spiritual tradition. I agreed with. Or which spiritual writer did i agree with. And then i had this a another sort of epiphany and it was a really emotional epiphany. And i don't even i might even get emotional again. I was taking amtrak from new york. Down the dc and it was one of those morning trains where like people are eating breakfast etc..

new york los angeles Two One Nine Visconti seventy five thousand people david two thousand eighty second nells first time one about two thousand thousand people Inglesias eight s. c. stadium seven
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:14 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"So he came over with coffee and we sat on my sofa. And i worked up my courage. What if we play an acoustic version of heroes at this fundraiser. And i thought he was going to say no. No how dare you suggest that. And instead he said sure why not so. He sat on my sofa. Just the two of us and played this very slow pretty quiet version of heroes and it was like one of the most wonderful moments of my life and then afterwards tying it back to lou reed. David told me that heroes was originally written as a cover version of waiting for the man. Wow dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun dun. i'm waiting for the man we we would be so. That was a main. That's my favorite david bowie story. Fantastic actually no. I have a second favorite david bowie story. But it's much let's hear it. It's more nuanced. Okay let's let's hear it. I was at his apartment and he had a very small studio in his apartment and he wanted to play me something. And it's like okay. Great he said he said song. I'm working on. Love your opinion. And i i i just put that in perspective. Like i'm david bowie's apartment and he wants to play me a song to get my opinion like that's not right. That's not the way it's supposed to be like i'm supposed to be. Maybe like cleaning the toilets in the apartment adjacent david bowie's apart in his apartment but he plays me this song. And it's the most beautiful david bowie song ever It's called slip away and it's on the album season and it's i would say the most personal song he's ever written taxi inspired by his love his love with iggy pop play keno friendship whether it was more than friendship. I don't really know like it's this beautiful love song and it is so emotional that moment of just sitting in his studio where he played the cd the demo of this song for me and he was nervous.

David david bowie iggy pop two one lou reed second favorite slip away the most wonderful moments
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:17 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"It'd be like you know. Neil young is intimidating to be around even though there's nothing about him it's intimidating but he's on a high pedestal in my life that i'm on edge when i see him. Do you know it's funny. Sorry for interrupting. But i a few years ago. I was at a gallery event with shepherd. Ferry and shepherd asked me. He said o. Neil young is here. Do you want to meet him. And i actually said no. Yeah and i was like the reason being is like. I'm sure that he's wonderful. I'm sure he's a delightful human being. But what if. I catch him at a bad moment. And what if for a brief second. He's addict like that. Compromise is my ability to love after the gold rush and helpless. And i was like i was like i'm not willing to potentially jeopardize those songs for me. Yeah until it's the one time. I chose not to meet one of my heroes in the interest of making sure that i didn't compromise my ability to unconditionally love the songs no understood with. I mean some people are so iconic for better or worse that it's hard remember that they're real humans I had a similar weird experience. I played a fundraiser. Once and paul mccartney was playing on the bill and he was checking and he sound checked. With hey jude and so. It's just him at the piano playing. Hey jude no bam nothing. And i sat ten feet away from that and i was like. Oh he wrote this like there was a day when in the morning. This song didn't exist at some point during the day. He wrote this song this song which it seems like i mean a song like that so iconic fit. It seemed like no one ever wrote. It was just sort of like carved from granite at some point. Yes forever. It's been it's been here forever. Yeah there was no world before that and so being able to say like..

paul mccartney ten feet one Neil young Ferry few years ago jude one time
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:02 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"We're back with the rest of rick rubin's conversation with moby. Would he'd been listening to lately. Besides some speed punk the most eclectic stuff. I listened to a lot of classical music. Although my interest in classical music is pretty pedestrian. Like i like classical music when it's very pretty but also a lot and i'm also a little bit ashamed because none of this is new but a lot of old new wave from like seventy eight until about eighty four. You know from early devaux too early. Robyn hitchcock blondie. I've been rediscovering one band. I'd forgotten about completely. Who i've realized i love. I also feel like they were performance. Artists was the cars. I wanted to reference something recent. I don't want to just be another like just an just an old guy on spotify listening to music from childhood but the truth is old guy from spot of on spotify listening to music from my child usually. Let's talk about the cars for a minute because as you talk about them. I think about the vocal style of the cars that was different than music. That had come before it. Do you have any idea what the lineage of that might have been not really. Although the only thing i can think of is that they were from boston. And i don't know if they were inspired by the modern lovers and jonathan richmond at all. That's interesting but there is like you'd listen to like the directness of song. Like pablo picasso. Maybe influenced rico case in the cars. I don't know yeah i was. I was thinking. Maybe and i never made the connection before this conversation but i was thinking maybe bowie. I mean everybody who was smart enough to figure it out was influenced by bowie. I feel like some people like greco case. It might have been like. He wasn't a good enough singer to be david bowie but could still employ that sort of the theatricality and the phrasing. And maybe because of you know iggy pop because there's a similar sort of like western drawl aspect to it and i think iggy.

rick rubin jonathan richmond spotify boston pablo picasso bowie rico david bowie Robyn hitchcock iggy iggy pop moby one band greco case seventy eight about eighty four
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:23 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"Found myself ashamed -ly and sort of and very sadly making compromises to try and further success. I wasn't very good at it. Luckily and then. I had this epiphany helped by david lynch. I went to go see David lynch speak at bafta in the uk and he said something so simple. He was onstage being interviewed and he said creativity is beautiful. My direct quote from david lynch and it just struck me and all of a sudden i realized. Oh he's right like the marketplace is okay. Record labels are fine. There's nothing wrong with them. You know like marketing campaign selling sure. That's fine but music has the potential to sublime. And i'm not even talking about my music. I'm talking about just music in general if you think about it. The fact that music on a corporal physical level has never existed all. It is and forgive me. I'm really stating the obvious. All it is is air molecules hitting us a little bit differently and somehow these air molecules touching us differently. It makes us cry. Makes us get tattoos. Makes us jump up and down in a field with one hundred thousand people. It's just air moving a little bit differently and so my long rambling answer to your question. I found myself returned to this place. Of like almost purity in spirituality or music like the love of music for the sake of music and if it has commercial viability fine. But that's not the goal or the utility of it. It's that ability to somehow communicate. Emotion through moving air molecules. Like what better way for us to spend their lives than in service of that yet..

David lynch one hundred thousand people uk david lynch bafta
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"But when i was growing up i thought the shadow self was evil. I thought that the shadow self was like this. You know the nici quote of like. Don't stare too long into the void because the void might stare back into you like it seems so menacing for me. What i think. I've realized is my shadow. Self is actually just embarrassing. Like it's the part like it's not some menacing dexter style serial killer. It's just. It's like an awkward adolescent and one of the hardest things. Like if i had a buried psychopath me i could probably make peace with that easier than i can. Make peace with the awkward adolescent in me. The vulnerable human awkward frail part of me. That's like coming to terms with that and learning to like that part of yourself. I found that to be a real challenge. Because i always wanted to be cool and not awkward and you know confident in recognizing like okay. No i'm not those things am. I can't have an honest assessment of self without looking at that and before would drinking and drugs would just hide that away. You wouldn't have to face it. You'd never have to do acknowledge it was. There is a great. Oh yeah it was like the jim carey movie the mask like all of a sudden you just became the most deal version of yourself at least as far as how i perceived myself other people are like who is that sad asshole like what like he's gross but in my mind i was like confident and you know powerful even have outside. People are looking at me. Like i was just some sort of like tragic aging bald musician. You know but in my mind. I was like johnny depp. Meets orlando bloom in the outside. The outside world. Saw me is a little bit. More like wally sean. In the princess bride how drugs affect music-making over the course of your life. Well the funny thing is. And i still don't know how this this was possible. I never once performed drunk or high. And i never drank or did drugs when i was working on music interesting like these were the only parts of my life. That were carved out like i. If i was on tour i would drink and do drugs the moment i stepped off stage but i think there was some little part of my brain. That said no like you can destroy everything else. You can destroy relationships. You can destroy your health but music is this sort of slightly sacred space. You cannot corrupt it beautiful. Although there was one time and part of those based on experience one time. I remember being out and i saw like you know what of great artists have made great drunken records and i remember coming home from a bar at three or four in the morning. And i thought i'm going to write and record a song drunk because i've never done this before and in the morning i listened to it. It was just bad interesting. Bad not exciting bad just garbage bad so that also helped me to never drink or do drugs when making music. How has your relationship to music changed from when you started till now. I love that question because it has actually come to a place of this wonderful purity meaning in the early days. Everything about the world of music was exciting. Record labels seemed exciting music magazine to exciting everything. Even tangentially related to the world of music was like soul phenomenon exciting. And then when i got involved in the music business as i'm sure you can really to a lot of people can there. Was that sort of the straddling of how do you. How do you maintain and learn from and respond to the like the dynamic dialectic between art and commerce and then once i had a degree of success i found myself loving success and i.

johnny depp four one time wally sean three jim carey orlando one the morning
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:14 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"Research our priority because earth is our priority. Our goal is to be carbon neutral by twenty forty. We call it priority earth fedex. Were now meets next. We're back with more. Rick rubin's conversation with mommy. Tell me the story of getting sober a similar to what you're talking about at the beginning. This sorta like the self evident epiphany that just takes you a very long time to realize so. I started drinking and doing drugs when i was ten. My mom and her boyfriend used to do a lot of drugs. So i'd steal drugs from them and then i started drinking and had bouts of sobriety but kept drinking and doing drugs up until thirteen years ago and honestly like the consequences of drinking and doing drugs just kept getting worse. When you're sixteen years old in fact you might think. This is funny. The first celebrity i ever met was ian mci at great guilder sleeves in from fugazy and minor threat and i was so excited to meet him. I ran up to an introduced myself. I was like i said my name's moby mister mcbride just love your band and shook his hand. I was blind drunk at the time and the in mci is the man who invented straight edge. So i just kept drinking and doing more drugs and occasionally experimenting with sobriety and then finally thirteen years ago after years of waking up at five in the afternoon on a daily basis hungover and sick and despondent. I finally realized that it was time to stop. You know i realized being sick and despondent and miserable day after day after day after day was not a good thing which in hindsight is the most self evident realization. Anyone could have like normally. You only have to eat rotten food a few times to decide you'd no longer want to eat rotten food. I had to be sick and hung over thousands of times. Thousands upon thousands of times to finally accept that being hung over and miserable was not a good way to live..

Rick rubin Thousands thousands ten thirteen years ago first twenty forty sixteen years old thousands of times earth mcbride five in the mci times
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"Well as like eighty iou or evelyn. Champagne king or Lisa lisa i haven't i haven't thought of lisa leeson such easily swimming cult jam because it was like she had roughly the same acronym. Ll cool j. But it's funny that you mention a i owe you by eba knows because i just recently rediscovered that song in video. If you're bored go take a look at it and read the lyrics. I would posit the strangest song in western pop. Music history like the lyrics are so phenomenal and they make absolutely no sense. It's like a grad student dissertation on semiotics while a guys about trying to pick up a girl at a cafe amazing. I had completely forgotten about that song. It's just it's but that you're right that that weird incubator of new york that so much so much music so much art so much culture came out of because it was just everybody was influencing everybody else and it was kind of like every was open to everything. Yeah it was break-dancing music before rap music. That was the music that would people would break dance with. I want to say with because you don't really break dance to music. You break dance with music. Yeah you know. I mean think of blondie you know coming out of that scene as well going back a little bit more into the late seventies but yeah. I'm really grateful that i grew up within driving distance of new york and i could be exposed to the or also within radio distance. It's also interesting that another thing that we share is that we're both suburban kids who had access to york city.

lisa leeson new york Lisa lisa late seventies eighty york city both evelyn Champagne king iou
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:53 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"Moment that i remember. But i didn't remember the name of the club i wouldn't have been able to figure out when it was just not good with with dates. Yeah that's amazing that you remember that i feel like we both came from. Were birthed from the same scene and we've both had interesting journeys from that start. Maybe not the most obvious journeys. I've always felt the kinship like. We're we're very much cut from the same cloth. Well let me if you think about it. From the anthrax was a completely illegal punk rock club in stamford connecticut and stanford connecticut has now become this global center of finance. But back then it was sort of like just a burned out rough neighborhood and it was a storefront and add a little stage in the basement so people might be thinking that this was some sort of big slightly more glamorous legitimate place like no it was an narko syndicate punk rock club at. It was a tiny little basement of as i recall. Oh it was miniscule. Yeah and then. I remember you went to nyu with my friends. Lindsay anderson and john farnsworth's. Yes and here's a really funny memory. I have it would have been i guess. Nine thousand nine hundred. Eighty four at some point lindsey. I'd just started. Dj and lindsay came to me and asked if i knew anyone who could help her friend. Rick at a dj job really yes. She said that she said her friend. Rick was looking for deejay gigs. And did i know anyone who was looking for deejays. Wow amazing like maybe that was autumn of eight at some point in nineteen eighty-four and then i think the next time. I ran into was angelic..

lindsay Rick Lindsay anderson john farnsworth nyu lindsey both stamford connecticut stanford connecticut Nine thousand nine hundred Eighty four anthrax nineteen eighty-four autumn of eight
"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"moby" Discussed on Broken Record

"And carbon capture research to offset emissions our priority because earth is our priority at fedex. We knew sustainability. Means a lot to you and we feel the same way. Our goal is to be carbon neutral by twenty forty. We call it priority earth fedex. Were now meets next. Moby may be one of the most highly recognizable dance music artists of all time. But he's also a talented multi hyphen. It was unconventional thirty year. Career includes massive success as a producer and dj and notoriety as an animal rights activist. Mobis latest project reprieves is greatest. Hits album that revisits. The highlights of his extensive catalog. The songs are re recorded with the budapest art orchestra in various vocalists. Like jim james mobis. Most well known. Electronic songs are reimagined. On pres into sparse soul-stirring compositions today's episode we'll.

thirty year jim james mobis Moby fedex earth twenty forty today one Mobis
Why USC's Evan Mobley Is the Best Big in the 2021 Draft

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Why USC's Evan Mobley Is the Best Big in the 2021 Draft

"For the next two months in advance of the two thousand twenty one nba draft that is scheduled for july twenty nine. We're going to be dedicating an episode of beyond college basketball. Podcast to notable prospect. Same way we did in advance of last year's nba draft. We started this series last week with a twenty two minute profile of kate cunningham. If you missed it and you're interested don't find it today. We will turn our attention to another prospect who seems like lot to go in the top five of the two thousand twenty one nba draft. His name is evan mobile. he's a seven foot center. Who averaged sixteen point four points. Eight point seven rebounds. Two point nine blocks in two point four assists in thirty three point nine minutes per game in his one season at usc shop fifty seven point eight percent from the field. He was the pac twelve player of the year freshman of the year and pac twelve defensive player of the year. He was a consensus second team. All american who led usc to the elite eight of the ncaa tournament. Most mock drafts have him second or third in this. Two thousand twenty one. nba draft. So let's start with this dead leg. Is evan mobely to you clearly. Unquestionably the best big in this rat. Yes i think. That is unquestionable. We agree. I mean at this point. How about this. How about this for a quick complica- compare him to a recent big one. He played against and was good against james wiseman to me mobilize more versatile player with the higher upside and a year ago in a weaker draft. Class what's interesting is wise men went second moby might wind up going second or third we mentioned in the previous partly sided. I don't think he's going to go. I in this draft because of centers. And how they're viewed and how their role is changing By the year but it is interesting like if you put mobile wiseman even knowing what wise. Men's out like a year ago i would have said the same thing i think i would still take mobely over wise men coming out of college and we agree on the sofa. If we agree there yes mobis got to be the best big available in this

NBA Kate Cunningham Evan Mobile USC Evan Mobely Basketball James Wiseman Ncaa Wiseman Mobis
Is the Film 'French Exit' Worth Its Weight in Baguettes?

News, Traffic and Weather

01:44 min | 7 months ago

Is the Film 'French Exit' Worth Its Weight in Baguettes?

"About French exit the stories about a woman who's you know, aging socialite and she's widowed and she has her son with her, and she kind of does her last. Harada her last trip. To France to Paris, where she is wanting to send to sort of get rid of the rest of her husband's inheritance, says she's coming to the end of her life, and it's I wouldn't say it's um It's not a standard movie, because usually you get these things from the from the male's point of view, But it's her sort of trying to run out the clock on her life with her money, and she's dealing with their sort of aimless son, played by Lucas Hedges and It's very much a character piece. It's not the action pieces it Zaveri biting and sardonic comedy, almost to the point where it wouldn't even categorize it as a comedy. It's It's really there Morpher fans of Michelle Pfeiffer to watch her play in such a somewhat off kilter role in a bit of an off brand role for her. Yes, well, a couple of observations from the trailer. It's very, very dry, but arch comedy and you know, and it's based on a lot of it looked like it was based on dialogue where she says, Well, my plan was to die before the money ran out. But I kept not dying and well, here I am. That doesn't sound funny, but I thought it made me chuckle the way she said it. I'll wait till it's available where I don't have to go in through the theater. But I'm looking forward to seeing French exit myself. How many bad gets for French exit in theaters? I'm gonna get a 2.5 baguettes. I wasn't as I'm not as big of a fan of the structure of this type of story. It seems a little bit Moby, but great performances all around

Lucas Hedges Harada Paris Michelle Pfeiffer France
Stocks End Lower Amid Decline in Tech Shares

CNBC's Fast Money

01:15 min | 7 months ago

Stocks End Lower Amid Decline in Tech Shares

"We start off with another tech wreck on wall. Street the nasdaq falling more than two percent. Today tesla facebook netflix apple. All dropping sharply and check out the iwan's wm small-cap etf losses accelerating into the close. It is now down six and a half percent this week alone. All this happening as yield actually fell today. So what do you make of all this guy you know. It's like you're my head. Because i was going to start with the russell russell's actually down nine percent since the all time high we made. I think on monday march fifteenth. And i'll tell you we do this. We do a call every day. At twelve. Thirty and tim seymour came out. I think the market was at the highest. They said there's something about this day. I don't particularly like and he turned out to be a bit of a soothsayer. And i'll say this this is one of those moby dick days when you just bookmark. A certain page will bookmark this one fellas and girls because a lot of really interesting things happen to vicks obviously rallied late russell. Down big you know you mentioned ticket and wacked with interest rates. Actually going lower. There are a lot of things not to like about today. And it's got me a little bit concerned now with that setup concern for awhile for today really weird field at all day to manifest itself late with the sell off

Russell Russell Tim Seymour Tesla Netflix Apple Facebook Moby Dick Russell
Interview With Author David Yoon

What Book Hooked You?

06:35 min | 11 months ago

Interview With Author David Yoon

"This week. I'm thrilled to have david yunan. Whose newest book super fake love song is out now. An conversation that we pretty much covered all talk about his newest book a his debut his writing journey and a lot about what he was like as a young person so really enjoyed talking to david. Hope you enjoy listening listening so david. What book hooked you. What book hooked me It's it was when i was in middle school. I don't know exactly how old i was. But i remember talking to my librarian and i was like i don't know to read their so many books in the school library and she just pulled out the halloween tree by ray bradbury and If you read this book but it's it has these awesome woodcut Drawings in it and it came up a long time ago. Like in the sixties. I want to say and this is way before like killington and the newspaper from the nightmare before christmas. But it's kind of there's a character in it. That is the skeleton dude with. I think he has a pumpkin for a head. I know he doesn't but he's like this very skeleton like figure and he's very creepy and he's very Theatrical like jack's kellington was and he challenges This group of boys on halloween when their trick or treating to to give up a year of their lives to save the life of their best friend Pippin who's at homesick can't trick or treat and so they travel around the world and learn about like all these Reports and customs that surrounding death and they wind up in mexico and they eat The sugar skulls and that is like. I'm going to give up a year my life to save my friend and It was just so it's like super atmospheric and super moody. This is awesome so then at of course read all very bradberry. I could find reading stuff. I shouldn't have been reading and so middle school time. Was that in age. Like were you a big reader. Then was it hard to get you to read or was it something where you pretty much constantly always had some sort of book. You're working your way through. I mean i was always reading. Yeah for sure Is reading a lot of stuff But then that book kind of it was like my first sorta grownup book. I guess and after that i started reading a of piers anthony fancy novels and i read like fifteen close and i was like wait a second. It's kind of the same story over and over again and that's florida and Then i started reading a lot of stephen king which i know i shouldn't have been reading And my dad was a weird guy to he. he He studied victorian like them. He he focused on the metaphysical poets. Okay it adds seoul university in career and then when it came to the united states he studied library science all things. wow and so he was like you need to be reading old man and the sea You need to be reading. Was it on human bondage and then lady chatterley's lover and was like that. I don't think i should be reading this. But he didn't care he's like the crazy. Daddy shows like the horror movies to his kids because he wants them to to Have a good sense of the canon. Anna is exposed to a lot of stuff that i probably shouldn't have been but i'm grateful for it and i would imagine while it was definitely helping Definitely helpful for your reading life to have a dad like that and that was kind of pushing it but was there any sort of rebellion there. That because you were being forced to read so many books were pushed upon you that reading. You rebelled against or turn against it because it was it was assigned by by dad I don't know it's hard to remember like like reading moby dick before high school. Sure looks like there's no way. I'm gonna finish so even if it did come from like a friend i don't know if i would have just cause but it did. It did feel like homework for sure At the same time like my older brother. I have one older brother. And he was a big reader to He used to read at the dinner table and it was like a problem. You know But i you know. I'm a little brother saw. I'll read to on just like him. I want to compete in everything we do. Because we're siblings. So he also turned me into the reader just sort of inadvertently and so when you got to high school especially when those are when in in those english courses you're being assigned full size novels and things like that. Didn't you find and really getting into what's canonized literature. We'll call it. Were you kind of a step ahead. That you think In those courses because dad already sorta had you on that home regiment of a reading those types of books. That's a funny question. Because i just realized really recently i mean my dad passed away like over a year ago. and so It just when you're when your parent passes away and makes you think a lot about your relationship in like your whole history. And i was like dude. My dad was like an outsized influence in in my interest in writing in books. I never appreciated him fully for that. He just kinda did it sure Yes and when. I hit high school. It was english. Classes where my absolute favorite My english teachers were my absolute favorite. My locker got broken into one time. So isis i was like no lockers and i used my english teacher's classroom as my locker That's how much we trusted. Each other's liked each other so that was sort of the year of You know camus. And ray bradbury. Shirley jackson and margaret atwood. That's like when i started really getting into those guys and and then i was like all right. This is this is really important to me. Plus i also had study hall. Not how i had studied hall but Journal i wrote in my journal pretty much every day so and so i take it

David Yunan Kellington Bradberry Ray Bradbury David Seoul University Chatterley Pippin Piers Anthony Stephen King Jack Mexico Moby Dick Florida Anna United States Shirley Jackson Camus Margaret Atwood
MLB officially recognizes Negro League as "major league" after 100 years

Tim Conway Jr.

00:09 sec | 11 months ago

MLB officially recognizes Negro League as "major league" after 100 years

"MLB classifies the Negro leagues as a major league and will integrate it stats and players into a Moby's official historical records as this year marks the centennial of the Negro League's

MLB Negro League
Moby Dick part twenty three-Story of the Town-Ho, A Murderous Run-in, Featuring Jack Luna of 11:59 media - burst 2

Knight Reader

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Moby Dick part twenty three-Story of the Town-Ho, A Murderous Run-in, Featuring Jack Luna of 11:59 media - burst 2

"Cease sees the swimmer between his jaws and rearing up high with him into the sky plunged headlong again without steel ship. On the edge of the boat silent off he slackens the lines so as to drop away from the whirlpool and as he looked on calmly. We're told that he thought his own thoughts. You can decide what those are for yourself. Line and the boat was still connected to the whale and suddenly it gave him mighty tug

History Books Fiction Storytelling Dick Herman Melville Nantucket Moby Dick Ishmael Chicago Herman Lima
Union of Concerned Scientists' Dr. Rachel Cleetus Discusses What the Biden Administration Needs to Do to Address the Climate Catastrophe

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

Union of Concerned Scientists' Dr. Rachel Cleetus Discusses What the Biden Administration Needs to Do to Address the Climate Catastrophe

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David intra cosso during this podcast discussed with the union of concerned. Scientists climate energy programs policy director. Dr rachel cletus. What the biden administration needs to address mitigate the effects of the worsening climate crisis. dr cletus. welcome to the program. Hello david thank you so much for having me. dr cletus. bile is of course posted on the podcast website. This is my fifteenth climate crisis related interview on background. The climate catastrophe continues to accelerate hemispheric carbon concentrations are now measured at four hundred seventeen parts per million the greatest concentration of carbon in our species existence. Not surprisingly there's a ninety nine percent chance. Twenty twenty will be among the top five warmest years. Two thirds chance for sixty six percent chance that will be the warmest year on record. This year is also experiencing a record-breaking atlantic hurricane and with thirty named storms to date and record breaking wildfires in the arctic that is warming at upwards of three times the rate of the rest of the planet the albedo effect from the loss of summarized will be equal to the release of one tree tons of carbon equivalents in the atmosphere. This amount approximates forty percent of all human caused ghg emissions. Since seventeen fifty in addition northern permafrost that holds almost twice as much carbon dioxide is currently in the atmosphere his thawing seventy years earlier than previously predicted the plan is also experiencing unprecedented biological violation. Vector-borne diseases including covid nineteen continued to proliferate and the trump administration in denying scientific reality has rescinded approximately one hundred environmental regulations that i discussed with sabin centers. Michael burger last may and finally listeners are where he federal court ruled earlier. This year. that americans do not have a constitutional right to survivable climate. So with that welcome. Dr cletus again were here discuss climate policy under the vitamin station. So before diving into that. A doctor cletus Regarding my brief assessment. Is there anything. You'd like to add or alternative. I can i alternatively i can ask the question. The union put out a document a few years ago called the title the world scientists warning to humanity. so if you prefer to answer The ladder what was in that warning. I think you've just made out a very thorough set of reality that were tainted with respect to the climate crisis. Things that climatize this morning house project are now actually happening around a severe climate crisis. If you're now it's no longer about some distant problem and it's affecting us here in the united states and around the world you mentioned the record breaking hurricane season we've seen the cocaine season moby seem pretty extraordinary type wounds on the other side of her world with the teams being. Hit back to back. In the last few weeks we've seen extraordinary heatwaves around the world in europe in asia flooding And see living wage which is inexhaustible continuing slow moving disaster that many low-lying things around the world are facing Including as in the us Especially in on that. He's been go goes. We're at a point. Now where we are rapidly running out of time to address very new classes and as you pointed out as well we actually earn a moment for our nation is facing colliding. Place the covid nineteen pandemic as you mentioned but we also have a rapidly worsening economic crisis. We have a crisis democrats in our country. That is being made there In this moment so all of these colliding to creative patrician where underlying social economic disparities than discrimination being exacerbated and a climate crisis is holding a very inequitable way Around the world and here in the us so what we do now what the biden administration does and what future us administration to is very very important. The most significant difference. We're going to see is that we now have an administration that recognizes the fines will be guided by the signs and how they respond to the climate crisis instead of an administration that basically lied relentless me about the existence of Munchies the climate crisis that even the reality the cova christ who actually worked to make them more worse. So now we have a president who actually five instead of sidelining them and silence them yes. thank goodness. I will say As had been speculated trump's legacy will probably be moreover his Calling the crisis a hoax and of course Rescinding these operas of hundred epa mostly epa regulations. Let's get into What we might expect from the biden administration. We could start with. I did intend or ask you What did the biden campaign pledge to address the climate crisis. But let's let's pass on. That says now he's been elected you wrote In a union of concerned scientists blog post. I believe it was dated november seventh What the by presi means Relative to the climate crisis you identified Various aspects are measures that the biden ministrations should take under the title wet. President biden's should do on climate. You could note a few of these relative to what you think would be most productive coming from a biden administration. What's most important for the vitamin that administration to extend a very clear strong and early signal. They're going to take this challenge seriously. They wanna aggressive with all of that. They have so. I know that maybe have pointed out that In our democratic took them eighty the actions that the president together with the action congress that will really allow for full Aggressing of problems like climate crisis. And no doubt congress. Must say it's hard if we're going to get your They should have and comprehensive action. But there's a loss at the biden expiration can and should do on its own and much of that can be done fairly quickly Within the first hundred days of the administration taking power one quick forward and simple thing that everyone has been talking about is of course are getting back in the remount of the trump administration on november. four The final the us from the of women that is an action that puts us on the sidelines and uniquely isolated on the world stage where the only country that has actually stepped away from the therapy. We need to get back An after the responsible major nation of the world i together with other nations to raise invasion around a dozen the global climate crisis. And i miss fans there's no different the covid nineteen pandemic. we can solve the global complex challenges only when the app in concerts that other nations. So that's pretty straightforward It's not enough to just get back. In paris agreement we have to borrow A with domestic action. That shows that you are gonna take this seriously. We have to set signs and gone goals cutting He in mission here in the us. The ipc record and twenty eighteen all down some pretty cure now. Metrics are the growth of the global community would have to meet to stay below two degrees here. Aiming for one point five degrees celsius about pre industrial levels the temperature increase so. She do contribute. Its fair share to that. The us must be on a bad day to get to net zero emissions. No later than twenty for before. I'm have to be well on that. By twenty thirty having our mission show By twenty thirty to do that we're going to need action across the economy. Has inspector the biden administration should be directing every federal agency To make sure that they're incorporating climate science and their actions that they're looking for opportunities to go cut emissions as the bill climate billions to the climate impacts that are unfortunately already locked in Their action that the administration can take to the deputy voters and regulatory action to cut heat trapping emissions cosby economy. They should do so There are a number of very aggressive. Compensation decorative voter that Should be giving both back and one thing that is the has not recognize the now taking these kinds of ambitious actions requires leadership not just from the president but from his gatherer competitive agency. You'll be watching me. What appointments look like we need to have people in charge of these agencies and appointed to cabinet positions that recognize how climate change touch with every aspect of our economy and our lives and there needs to be david into their world view.

Biden Administration Dr Cletus Trump Administration David Intra Union Of Concerned Dr Rachel Cletus Biden Atlantic Hurricane Michael Burger Us Administration Cletus United States Sabin Arctic EPA
The Food Fix

PODSHIP EARTH

05:13 min | 1 year ago

The Food Fix

"I must admit to being exhausted. The last four years has taken a massive psychological and emotional toll that i'm only now just beginning to appreciate truthfully the struggle to keep hope that this day would arrive of alluded me the good news that we now have the opportunity to reignite democracy civility truth and move towards healing both our country and the earth. We've gone so far backwards that we need to move forward with deliberate tangible and bold steps one of the voices calling for such a revolution in thinking and action is dr mark. Hyman mark is a systems thinker and for dr. Hyman health is about connecting the soil with the farmer with the groza without diet and only when we connect all those dots. Can we begin to achieve planetary regeneration. As we'll hear in today's podcast what is truly staggering is the cost of today's broken food system. In which sixty percent of our calories in the us come in the form of ultra processed food. Dr mark hyman is head of strategy and innovation of the cleveland clinic center for functional medicine. He's the founder and director of the ultra wellness center and the board president of clinical affairs for the institute of functional medicine. Mark hosts one of the leading health. Podcast the doctors pharmacies spelled f. a. a. c. y. Pham esi marcus. The thirteen time. New york best seller author. His most recent book is called food. Fix how to save our health our economy our communities and our planet one bite. At a time i sought by ascii mark. How he got into medicine in the first place. Ming doctor was a total afterthought for me buddhist student in college. I studied buddhism. Asian studies chinese. I studied ecology. The environment systems thinking ancient systems of healing. Very eclectic and i decided after i graduated. But what am. I going do with a degree in buddhism so i took a long hike by myself in the shenandoah valley through my backpack brought a copy of moby dick. Because it was a very thick books. I could carry and read house before kindle and I just walked and thought and just kind of thought about what i wanted to do in the buddhist framework is really about healing. It's a it's a healing system. It's not really a religion it's really a system of healing of the mind and it's about the relief of suffering it's about compassion and love and service and and those were things that really called to me as a young man and i thought well. What could i do. That kind of fits all that. I could be a monk. That didn't sound like a lot of fun. But i decided i could be a doctor and it was a total afterthought i just i didn't have any science courses. I had to go back. And take some pre med courses and ended up loving. And i decided i would just keep doing as long as i liked it. And if i didn't like it anymore. I would stop and so far so good thirty years later. I mean that's great advice for anyone thinking about people. Ask me career advice. I say that like if you enjoy it if it fills you keep doing it and if it doesn't maybe think about stopping it exactly exactly chain. I've changed so many things i've been you know a small town country doctrine idaho and a native american reservation. Emergency room doctor started clinics in china ex patriots. I was the medical director. Kanye ranch i developed my own. Practice started writing books and teaching About functional medicine became the faculty of functional medicine institute and direct and the chairman of it started big center for functional medicine at cleveland clinic. And now i'm sort of moving into a different phase of thinking about how do we deal with the intersecting issues of food and health and agriculture environment which all may seem separate but are actually all one problem and if we want to solve one we have to solve them all to before we end that. What is functional medicine. What does that mean. That joke is the opposite of dysfunctional medicine. Which is what we have now. As essentially a system of thinking it's not a methodology or treatment or attests supplement is is essentially a way of thinking about disease based on systems. It's it's base c ecosystem medicine. You understand that that the environment is an ecosystem and that everything has to be imbalanced in nature. For to thrive and in madison we really created a reductionist model that allows us to focus on diseases and symptoms in drugs to target those symptoms and not really understand what is health. We never took the course in medical school. Creating a healthy human wanna one. You know we we basically learn how to diagnose and diseases functional. Medicine is the science creating health. And when you do that does goes away. The side effect if you create a healthy ecosystem for example on a farm or a natural ecosystem it becomes. Resilient disease doesn't occur.

Dr Mark Hyman Mark Dr Mark Hyman Cleveland Clinic Center For Fu Ultra Wellness Center Institute Of Functional Medici Pham Esi Marcus Ascii Mark Hyman Moby Dick Shenandoah Valley Ming Kanye Ranch Functional Medicine Institute Ecology Mark New York
Victoria Montgomery Brown - co-founder of Big Think

Recession-Proof Startups (manual)

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Victoria Montgomery Brown - co-founder of Big Think

"Hey, they're Freedom Fighters. My name is Andrew and I'm the founder of mixergy where I interview entrepreneurs about how they built their businesses and joining me is someone whose company I've watched for years. It's called Big think and I remember when I realized how incredible their original videos were one of my guests. Jason freed found her base camp deduction with them and it wasn't just proud to show his video. And again, this is a site that was Victoria who are some of the big guests that you had on in the early days who were were speaking on camera unbelievable in the very early days. We had Elon Musk Richard Branson Larry Summers who was a former treasury secretary dozens of others. Really Moby's interesting laying off one of her first guess Henry Rollins. Henry Rollins, yes your name and people that I've even forgotten have been talking about musicians business people people who lead countries they were on the platform and such a strong read. Jason freed was proud to be associated with them. But he was also proud of the look of the video. One of the things that Victoria did was she created this beautiful white background beautiful white everything everything was almost disappearing except for the big thinker who was on camera isolated with nothing but their their thoughts and so Jason was so proud of how he looked to who he was with he shared it. He also was proud of the process that they took to record. It was just this incredible process and I realized something what they brought to online video wage. The time was full of Just Junk. It was people who were posting these 30 second clips of a boy whose finger was bitten by his brother was cute and viral, but it was meaningless. She was bring gravitas. She was bringing Big Ideas. She was bringing big personalities who would who would want to be in books not on on online video and she was turning it into a business and over the years. I kept an eye on the business and there are a couple of things that have been wondering about how they grew as a Content business how they raise money and so on and so when I heard that Victoria Montgomery brown, one of the co-founders of big think wrote a book I read it and I thought I was going to read all the ins and outs of the business Victoria what you did with your book digital goddess, the unfiltered lessons of a female entrepreneur was dead. You talked about everything that I can't get entrepreneurs too easily talk about on mixergy nervous breakdowns relationship problems eggs who talks about that dude who showed up in a bathrobe anyway, so I really like the book. I read cover-to-cover.

Jason Victoria Montgomery Brown Henry Rollins Richard Branson Larry Summers Freedom Fighters Victoria Founder Andrew Moby
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Of rising storm Waters. Mere feet away from them were powerful creatures the size

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Now, don't be in a hurry. Why don't you stop your oils Rascals like something new dogs? So so then softly softly. That's it. That's it long and strong. Give way that give devil affects you ragamuffins rapscallions can't she pulled pulled won't you pull off something pull and stuff dries out here. That's it. it. Stubbs pulls up along Starbucks the star buck Whispers to his men. stubborn as a quick word with start looking strong young boys going give away by down row. Hi. Hi mister Starbuck. Quit. Yes, mr. Stub bodak. Come on, bro. Give way. Will it be stub? Hi giveaway. Come on.

Mr. Stub Bodak Mister Starbuck Starbucks Stubbs
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"Now we're going to meet a very intriguing and important character amongst the Stanton crew one that will inject much mystery and emotion into his own story a man unlike any we have met so far in this story. It's been brought to my attention recently the aspect of prophecies and profits in this story. something I spoke enough and early episodes profit or someone who was hyper-aware or knowing something that the rest of us do not Whether it's through a higher perception or something delivered from a dieting. There are many different meanings and outlooks on the word when it comes to people. We think of Elijah when I speak of profit in this story some people think of Ahab as he seems to self prophesize and believe strongly in his own words. The way he says would strike the Sun. The way he seems to be writing his own text upon the world and following it in a self dictatorship. They'll some give much Merit to his prophecies. This is something we cannot discuss until the end of book, but I bring it up here because it has been said that this character that I'm about to introduce is the truest form of a profit we get in the whole story. To me that just

Ahab Stanton Elijah
"moby" Discussed on Knight Reader

Knight Reader

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"moby" Discussed on Knight Reader

"Boy that ship me. Deus quickly. Can I Port over the mat the entire crew layer dream-like trance? I was shocked it from my referees by that resounded wildlife. And he had seen a part of sperm whales. I dropped the lights in my hand and jumped to work with the rest all heads facing the lines and small boats and then the rush and Fleury my heart in my throat. I pulled along with the max to me the crane swung out and the ego crew gazed out with salt of the lashes with one foot on the dodo. I almost aliveness. Tuned the boat for the ready as they have stamped around. The three mates and their Crews will be down in the water giving fiery chased these whales one that in ahab's mind would hopefully be Moby Dick. It was said and I turned my cheek towards the Sun and I saw crew of private agents these five Dusky Phantoms. As they stood beside him began lowering. But the captain never lowers for Chase. What else they send it to all these mysterious men? This Crew cuz.

Moby Dick ahab Fleury
Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

Knight Reader

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Moby Dick part twenty one-Fedallah Emerge, Ishmael lowers to chase - burst 01

"And he had seen a part of sperm whales. I dropped the lights in my hand and jumped to work with the rest all heads facing the lines and small boats and then the rush and Fleury my heart in throat. I pulled along with the max to me the crane swung out and the ego crew gazed out with salt of the lashes with one foot on the dodo. I almost aliveness. Tuned the boat for the ready as they have stamped around. The three mates and their Crews will be down in the water giving fiery chased these whales one that in ahab's mind would hopefully be Moby Dick.

Moby Dick Ahab Fleury
The Birth Of The Greenback

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:56 min | 1 year ago

The Birth Of The Greenback

"Stacey next. Jacob Feldstein. Planet money author of money the true story of amid up during a new book. Say I. brought props for us to do the indicator. I say. That's been months. It's been. That guy's been honking hall eight months. I have props came over so I could give you these troughs. Okay. Go ahead and look at them. All right. Okay. So, this is like a really high quality xerox of an old piece of money. THREE DOLLAR BILL RE dollar bill that's really a real thing. There's like a a lady standing next to in like a ball gown standing next to a cow to I chose a cow to pander to you I do love a cow keep going. Okay. The Orange Bank It's orange because this from the orange. Bank and this is a one dollar bill. So Stacey, these are reproductions of real paper money that was printed by private banks in the United States in the eighteen forties and fifties. This is one of the most interesting periods I found in the history of money when I was working on my book, it's this moment when the United States government did not print money, there was in fact, no single national paper currency but if you wanted to. Open Up Stacey's Bank of New York and print your own paper money. You could. I don't know if I would trust that dollar from that. Was a real problem that was a real problem we'll get to that. I. Mean they were just so many different kinds of money at one point the Chicago Tribune counted eight, thousand, three, hundred, and seventy different kinds of paper money in America. This sounds very confusing for everyone involved this indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and Jacob. Goldstein can we make eight, thousand, three, hundred and seventy, the indicator? Yes. Today on the show. How can you even have that many kinds of money and also just what does it tell us about money works? Let's just go. Let's just go a block away to get away from the horn. Yeah. Support for NPR and the following message come from fund. fundraise fund makes it easy for anyone to invest in high quality real estate by building you a portfolio with their more than one billion dollars in assets get started at fundraise dot com slash indicator to have your first ninety days of advisory fees. Waived. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Microsoft teams. Now, there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a virtual room collaborate live on the same page and see up to forty nine people onscreen learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So can we should set the scene here Jacob the nineteenth century America lots of is apparently also this was the era when gold and silver were money and Jacob say in the book that the government minted gold and silver coins, but it did not make paper money at that time. The exactly right. So the only paper money in America was printed by all of these different. Private banks people called paper money in fact banknotes, right. So they thought of it as like a piece of paper from a bank and they thought of paper money in particular as like a receipt or a coach ticket as as a thing that you could substitute for gold and silver, and in fact, if you look at at the bills I gave you all have this kind of. Writing like just grab a different one for fun. So we can say what it looks like. Okay. This is the stoning ten bank, a two dollar bill. There's a way. Moby Dick or something Wail Bell we've cow Bill Wail Bill So okay. So now look at the cursive writing see the cursive they're just blowers is stoning to. Two dollars to the bear on demand right and if you look all these different bills are different colors, they have different pictures on them, but they all say that will pay how ever many dollars to the on demand and so the second interest. Yeah it's an Iou because the interesting thing is it's telling you the paper money is not the real money. Right? They're saying we will give you two dollars in gold and silver for this paper money right? So the real money in this world is the underlying gold or silver the paper is just like. The Standard. So this is a time in history when there's not federal bank, there's not a national bank. There's like thousands of of little local banks and I guess all these banks can issue their own money. That's right and it's kind of evolving in this period at the beginning of this ehre the eighteen thirties. If you wanted to open a bank, typically you had to go to your state legislature and get special approval. Basically, they had to pass a special law that would let you open your bank and this was problematic because I was super corrupt essentially. Bank and print money. Then you're gonNA bribe whoever you have to. Say all the knee. All due respect to get them to let you open your bank. Right. So around eighteen forty, a little earlier, this new idea became popular. The new idea was called free banking. And the idea of free banking was anybody who is willing to follow a few basic rules could. Take and start printing money and literally start printing money and you know not surprisingly a lot of people wanted to print money. This is how we get eight thousand different kinds of money. Yes. How do you know if the bill that someone's handing you is real money or if it's literally just a piece of paper from the First Bank of Stacey Vanik Smith which might be real money. I wouldn't. Maybe. Add bribed senator so I love this so there arose in response to this problem these special periodicals Magazines that were privately published called banknote reporters. And what they were was these lists in tiny font of every kind of money. So I actually have a reproduction here another prop from a page. This one was called. Thomson's Bank note. Reporter. K.. So the people who subscribe to this merchants people who need to accept money. So so let's just say I'm running a bar and I got my thompsons bank note reporter and I come in I need a drink who thirsty I'm thirsty. So okay. So the page of the bank note reporter I printed out is for Orange Bank. Okay. Okay. So have that bill right here it is and it's a one dollar bill. So I find Orange Bank here in my Bengal reporter and it says Okay Orange Bank listed different bills and says ones and under wants it describes what the bill is supposed to look like says to horses check. Hey, Cart Jack Blacksmith shop male portrait Jack Girl. Check. So it's at least plausibly real. The reporter also tells me something else that's important and that explains a lot about how many works at this time. Typically would tell me whether I should accept that paper money at full face vowed I can buy my dollar whiskey with this whether you can get your dollar whiskey because remember what we care about is whether I can turn in that paper money for gold or silver, and so if the bank is shaky or even if it's just really far away. You know the reporter might say, just knock five cents off the dollar give Stacey Ninety five cents worth of whiskey instead of a dollar that took a really long time to buy that we ski. It does seem like it would have been absurdly inconvenient right and for a long time when people look back at this period, the basic story of free banking was just that was a horrible idea like that many kinds of money right but. Much, later, like in the nineteen seventies. This generation of economic historians started going back and looking more closely. At the banks and how money works in this period and what they saw when they really went through the numbers was basically like it wasn't that bad Bankston go bus that often people didn't usually lose much money when they used. We're you overall they would lose like a few percent which is. Kind of like what you pay today. So when you take money out of the weird off Brand ATM at. The corner store. which I always do. Yeah, I. Mean. That's basically like the the bartenders giving you ninety cents for your dollar when you do that, right? So. Obviously, we do not have eight thousand different kinds of money now this ended and it ended after the civil war. Yeah was the civil war. So during the civil war, that old American argument of can we have national banks or not came up again and Congress passed a few important banking laws. One of them basically taxed all those thousands of kind of state banknotes out of existence, and then the other one created these new national banks that printed much more reliable, much more uniform paper money. It's interesting because I mean, this was obviously after the civil war was the time when the United States went from like a collection of. To One Country, and it seems like the same thing happened with currency maybe not a coincidence. Your I mean, there is this idea at least in the modern world money is part of what makes a country a country and I think you do see that happening at this moment in the united. States when we go from thousands of kinds of money toward one uniform kind of paper money I'm just sad we lost the cow bills. Because you know Jacob I have a fever and the cure. This story in like a whole bunch of other like believable stories like this are in your new book money. The true story of a made up thing. This episode of the indicator was produced by Nick. Fountain fact check by Britney Cronin, the indicators edited by Patty hearst and is a production

Stacey Vanik Smith Jacob Feldstein Reporter Orange Bank Bank Of New York United States Okay Orange Bank America NPR Federal Bank Bill Wail Bill Microsoft First Bank Thompsons Bank Chicago Tribune Congress
Flowers for Drying With Jenny Elliott

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Flowers for Drying With Jenny Elliott

"Honestly, after the very dry year we've had maybe it's a good thing. We're talking about dry flowers. And my only background with dried flowers really as being the granddaughter of a sort of Victorian era lady and I mean lady as she was very proper my grandmother who gardened and had a wooden flower press and made pressed flower pictures of them. But we didn't have arrangements and today we're GonNa talk about kind of growing in arranged drying in arranging things. So can i. just try anything or like where does it all begin? Yeah well, I mean, yes, you can dry anything basically, but it's not all going to look good right right Oh. There's there's specific things that really lend themselves to trying that either have like you know keep their color or fun textures or that are otherwise useful for whatever you want to use them for it because there's all kinds of things you can use them for you. Okay So. They're sort of. In in exceed catalogs before along the way, this year's been going it seems like it's just whooshing by in a weird red dystopia way but. You know before we know what we're. GonNa see seed catalogs and if I'm looking, there are some that are everlasting is right and those are sort of the dried flower. Those are the ones that that's what they're supposed to be for is that the idea and then but you dry other things? Yeah Right. So there's all the ones that you think of when you think of dried flowers right? Straw flower comes to mind status is one the those flowers Gomphrena maybe you know the globe amaranth which are practically dry when they're fresh, right? Right hell that they're going to be a good dried flower. 'cause you touch them when they're freshman they're all crinkly and they make that kind of rattled found. You know. Yeah. So so those we always do I, grow lots and lots of that stuff because that stuff they're good dry flowers because they keep their color so well. So they're bright vibrant colors and then you try them and they stay bright and vibrant, which is really nice. But then there's also a whole bunch of other things that you would look at out in the garden and. Wonder. If maybe it would make a nice dried flower and a lot of the Times. They do a lot of the Times. It takes some experimentation and and sometimes there's things that look like they wouldn't dry at all. But you know surprise if you try it out, they do quite nicely I tried ridiculous this spring and they dried beautifully and I was very. pleased. I am imagining are do you in fact grow like either as Lark per del Finian for drying? Do you is that? Yeah I grow I wrote extra extra extra large spread for drying 'cause it drives. So beautifully at holds its color, you have a lot of choices of colors. So that's one that I used to just grow a fresh flower and always regretted every winter not having more of it dried. So now I think I've doubled production, we grow like eight hundred feet of lurks per now and. Probably. At least half of that goes up into the drying loss and we'll talk about the drying lost and all that good stuff in a minute. We will get a little more info on the what I yeah. Yeah. The what Yeah I've been walking around the fields the last few days you know thinking about what's going to go into the drying loss and actually you know I, start putting things in the drawing left as early as Well with Renungio is April, April may June I used to really wait and like you know those couple of days before the first frost came I would run around like an insane person trying to cut all the flowers. And hang them in the law. but turns out it all works out better. If you just you know pick the nice stuff the garden when it's ready in a timely manner go figure. So, So right now when I'm walking around, there's all of you know there's this drop lower in the status and I have a new row of Hydrangea, which are really nice that will drive beautifully and then conference and. So many kinds of Celosias are viewed for drying and then the marigolds that you've mentioned that's something that people are always surprised about I do the tall cutting miracle and they keep their their color really really well, they drive. Really nicely. And then some other things I have hanging up already are you know from the perennials that has come and gone already? I dry a lot of economic. that goal Jaro cloth of gold or the parkers variety. That keeps its color really nicely I didn't do it this year but back annual I guess bells of Ireland drives beautifully. moby m you know is one of my favorites. actually what the common name winged everlasting, right? It tells you right in the need. Is Pure pure white when you dry it, which is really unusual to for something to actually stay white and not get money when you it. Right. So those are some

Lark Per Del Finian Gomphrena Jaro Ireland
"moby" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"moby" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Was. He was a big Moby said. The guy loved. Nobody loves me, and it's hard to get them. All right. Help me it actually. Let your seriously badly enough. So, yeah, it's a real thing. Thank you Can't believe what a great day part of my problem with trying to fall asleep is getting my brain to stop. Exactly. So now you talk about engaging the brain, right? I've never tried it. Maybe I'm going through a lot. You don't even have tear you could tell me Just baby sit. Judge clearly. So no judge According to a new study, 25% of Americans admit.

Moby
"moby" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"moby" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"It's you know, it's a place where you meet your neighbors and about the news. So you could compare it to the watering holes and the dawn of humanity. You know, they are really really important like by bringing the corner store, just mall, villages, and suburbs. We bring more than convenience. We're being a place for people to meet and we bring life, and that is a vision not your speech today from a coffee shop. Shop in Stockholm, and we're gonna have people listening to our conversation all over the world. So can you share with me some of the cities where listeners of actually seen a Moby more or where they could be one coming soon? Yeah. Well, at the moment, we have five stores original Shanghai. And that is the only city that we're in at this moment. I consciously say where we'll be soon, but I can't can't say like we are in negotiations with some bigger clients. And we hope to come to Europe soon going to ask how did you go from Sweden to China? Is there anything about that relationship? You could tell me about. Yeah. We actually had something called Willis cafe a few years back which you talked about before I think, yes. And well with realize we had a really awesome team in Shanghai and had her production and Shanghai. And so on so that was just sort of a natural step since Moby Martin was originally a subsidiary of wheelies from a business point of view, if somebody all about it and decides to invest in their very own Moby Maude, he told me through the process of how they could order one for their money. And also what kind of support they would get moving forward. Okay. Yeah. Well, first of all you just order it with us. It costs twenty five thousand dollars, the Moby PSI, and basically can the flat pack or ship as it is. And you get with the whole system and the app, and once you get it, you just stuck it up you enter the the products into the into the and start selling. So it's like everything is dumb. The cloud system. It's pretty straightforward actually from the customer's point if you was to retail experience like respectful and listening. What what should they expect? If they were to go in how they would enter the the the mart and how they would purchase things. Okay. So it's imagine it's eleven pm, and you're at home, and you suddenly and desperately need a leader or milk for your white Russian. Glad you added white Russia today. I want milk eleven o'clock at night. And now, it all makes sense. A couple of times. Okay. So you open the app, and then you find the closest movie using the map and you find one fifty yards away you put on your coat and her out. And when you get there you unlock it by opening the app and sliding the phone over the door. You take your milk and cereals, maybe and then you scan them, and then you sit and it's that easy somewhere in cyberspace, your Preregister at cardis automatically charged with a cost and ten minutes later said a front of the fireplace with your what Russian one leader Quechua rhetorician. You've you've sold. We'll see just mentioned why Russia, but I I question I've got to ask, of course. I mean in Stockholm he's incredibly it's a beautiful country beautiful part of the world. But in some cities in some inner areas, there is problems around crimes I've got to ask..

Shanghai Moby Martin Stockholm Moby Maude Russia Moby Willis cafe Europe Sweden China milk twenty five thousand dollars one fifty yards ten minutes
"moby" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"moby" Discussed on KCRW

"Was another woman going back to the full length eighteen adopt. The arts will be honoring Moby, and he will be the recipient of the sound and vision award for his contribution to music and arts industry throughout his lifetime. So it's going to be very special happening. Thursday, March seven adopt the arts annual gala, and this is going to be hosted by Jane Lynch. Some surprise guest performing. I can't really say who they are. But I'm actually going to have some tickets to give away. So yes, you'll have an opportunity at tickets on tomorrow's program Ooh. between noon and three pm right here on KCRW. Thursday, March seventh with Moby and Robin. special guests. Music from Nick Waterhouse in the set song for winners is from the forthcoming self titled release, and we just recorded a live session with him apogee. It's going to be aired in March on morning becomes eclectic. So looking forward to checking that out as well. Good friend of the family, Nick Waterhouse. Ahead of that was lady lamb, a brand new single up and coming artists, even in the tremor is the single. And to start off the set music from Robin the brand new full length, Honey. Missing you. So hopefully, you have a ticket for tonight show over at the Hollywood palladium fortunate enough to be in house for the big old dance party that happened last night. Yes. She's doing two shows. Such an amazing by with Robin..

Moby Nick Waterhouse Robin Jane Lynch lady lamb Hollywood Robin.