19 Burst results for "Mitral Valve"

"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

06:24 min | 2 months ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Say You know what we got? Openness Rarely, and the reason why that rarely occurs is because the screening and the patient selection processes that are in place beforehand. Allow you to have to rarely do that, and so we've learned that you know there's body habits issues. Some people are too small and there's not enough space for the arms. Some people are too big and the arms don't reach In. An easy manner we do this CT imaging of the and the abdomen, and the blood vessels in the groin because we still do need to connect to the heart lung machine, so we WANNA. Make sure that we don't have you know patients with unrecognized coronary disease or vascular disease that would make the use of the heart lung machine in the leg dangerous, so we have A. A screening process that were relatively strict with so the patients that we pick from the beginning are you're very very confident? And when we have a patient that is on the borderline of whether or not, they would be a candidate robotically. Then we have two staff. Surgeons evaluate everything and both need to agree to do it so that you really sort of optimizing success, so we've done. Just about a thousand robotic mitral procedures here now, a thousand a year, just about a thousand, so the mitral valve replaced at a repair, most of them are repair semi I would say that ninety nine percent of them repairs or spend a very very short list of replacements. Because most of the time you can repair the mitral valve, but I, we, it's been less than a dozen times that we've had to convert to open maybe even less than five. It's very very rare in its for an unexpected complication that you're always prepared to deal with. So what procedures can you do robotically or minimally invasive? So the most common robotic procedure on the heart is mitral valve repair. Followed by mitral valve replacement, but in this country mostly mitral valve repair could valves can be fixed. That is saved, preserved the patient's own vow, and that's really what they want in this country. Well I think that when you get to other countries, rheumatic valvular heart disease is much more prevalent in some those vows or more difficult to repair, and you're more likely to need to replace them, but we don't really see much rheumatic fever in this country because of antibiotic therapy and and access to good healthcare for pretty much all all citizens remind me and our listeners. Where is the MITRAL valve? What is the do and what goes wrong with it? How can you repair so the Mitral? mitral valve is a valve inside the left side of the heart. The left side of the heart is the side that gets all the oxygen, rich blood from the lungs and pumps it all to the body, and the mitral valve is the vow in between the lungs, and that main pumping chamber, and the most common abnormality in this country in North America and mostly in the developed world is what we call mic so modest, degenerative mitral valve disease where the leaflets get floppy and the strings that support the leaflets get elongated, and they either stretch too much, or they actually break, and when that happens, you end up with problem where the vowed leaks, so it's a leaky valve problem. And so then when the left ventricle pumps pumps blood, not just to the body, but part of it goes back up into the left atrium. Yes was backwards. It goes backwards toward the lungs, and this is why patients will feel fatigued and shortness of breath have trouble getting their breath particularly when they exert themselves. Okay, why does that about? More complicated than others, or why is it that that one goes bad so often? It's. That valve is just to set up for that particular problem. You know the anatomy of the valves inside the harder a little a little different you know, the the cloud, which is another valve with a common problem where you get narrowed or leaky, there are no strings to that vow. Those are just little, semi lunar cusps. so different problem all right MITRAL VALVE! What about coronary artery disease? Do. You can do if a patient needs multiple coronary bypass grafts. They need a standard operation. If they need just one bypass graft, and there are some situations where that's the case, you can do it robotically, or you can do it minimally invasive. And then the cardiologists may be able to put stents in the other smaller arteries so that you're saving a big incision. It's what we call a hybrid procedure part surgery part angioplasty what stint and that would be a coronary artery? That's not stint -able for whatever reason well not necessarily the big you know. All of the literature data shows that the big artery on the front of the heart, the one that's often called the widowmaker. That artery when you use the internal mammary artery, the breast bone to bypass that artery that's been shown in many studies all around the world. There is a big survival benefit when you do that. So in that artery is involved, there is stronger consideration to doing bypass surgery particularly if they're diabetic or they have other arteries with narrowings when it occurs an isolation, the minimally invasive. Invasive approaches is is really could be quite ideal well. It's a lot easier for patients for their recovery What is the difference in the cost? So there is a it's. It's more expensive in the beginning because you have to buy the technology and we looked at this on our own practice, and in the beginning. It's more expensive to do it robotically, but after. After, you get through the learning curve and everybody is up to speed. Then it ends up being less expensive, and it ends up being less expensive mostly because the length of stay in the hospital is less so the typical length of stay for a patient. Having robotic heart surgery is three to four days and contrast the six days sometimes seven days when it's done open. Open and the recovery. Two full full activity is usually three to four weeks as opposed to six to eight weeks, so everything is cut in half. I know you have a special interest in treating kids. Do you ever use robotic surgery on on young children? We well I would say that they need to be a certain body size, so we've done robotic surgery and teenagers. Some teenagers that happen to be big and tall, and there are some that they're too small, and it all comes down to what the what the lesion is..

MITRAL VALVE mitral valve coronary artery disease left ventricle left atrium North America
Can We Change The Way We Feel About Race?

Untangle

05:08 min | 3 months ago

Can We Change The Way We Feel About Race?

"Ruth. It's just so great to have you on entangled today. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you. I WANNA. Tell our audience a little bit about your background. You grew up in the late sixties in south central La. It was right in the heart of the civil rights movement. Can you tell us a little bit about some of your observations and feelings during this time? Yes I grew up in south central Los Angeles. I come from a family of eight I have seven civil lanes I actually have five now, and we grew up in a working class neighborhood, and with a single mom. It was very alive in terms of civil rights activities, but it was also very alive with jazz so there was this interesting blend which I really value music a lot because I think it brings the certain creative edge and comfort to some of the struggles around race. At least that was my experience in my family, who were jazz, musicians, and percussionist as well and so there were just a lot of struggle a lot of. Of Hardship, there was a lot of physical violence in in my family. You have to keep your arms around your kids tight. Because somebody could hurt him, somebody could snatch him. Some system could be imposed on them, so I felt that tightness both in the community, but also inside my family and one of the most vivid images from me as a young person around race was watching my great grandmother pace quite a bit. She worried a lot about these black bodies at work in her life, and she couldn't protect them and I think I just saw the wear and tear and the cumulative chronic fatigue that she lived and breathed moment to moment. And I remember how hard it was that I couldn't comfort her and when she died. I think I made some of deal with myself I'm not going out like that. I think my great grandmother would be happy to know I'm doing walking meditation instead of pacing the. Floor so it was an atmosphere of fear and trepidation, not really knowing what's GonNa hit next Alon of sadness and joy what I think mostly an atmosphere of fear that we tried to make the best of. As, the little girl how did you make sensible of this well I don't know if there was any kind of intellectual way that that was happening I felt like my body absorb the lot of what I could make sensitive. So by the time I was twenty seven, I I had open heart surgery from a mitral valve prolapse, but I think it was really because the body was just absorbing so much. That felt pretty unbearable I mean I. Come from people that found a way to be resilient. My people are from slaves trying to deal with mothers having their babies taken from an so. There's been this kind of in the. Way of figuring things out this not so much in the head, and so I think that really work that heart muscle in a big way. At least for me to see, that is a really big turning point for you. Maybe it's like your heart broke. Open exactly I mean I think that it was I came to see a different from a surgical procedure to a more spiritual procedure because I often say, that was my first silent retreat when I woke up from that surgery and could feel the weight in my life. That was really. Really on the inside, sitting on the top of my chest now, and just that whole awareness of what this body was holding, and over time what relief it was to just have a procedure, if you will are an invention on the heart, where I was actually trusting white people with my heart something I didn't really have full access to I. Come from a family. That didn't trust going into. Into doctors and cause a lot of people in my family wanted to the dodgers, and didn't come back all this big story in our community, and so there was a lot of fear, so race was always wrapped around things in my life, there was always a racial way that I had to be concerned with because my body and people that look like me and dark bodies are targets of harm. Harm. I mean that's just kind of the world. We certainly growing up and to some degree we see that with the uprise right now of so much ratio hatred in boldness and rain country

Los Angeles Ruth. It Dodgers Mitral Valve
"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

08:53 min | 5 months ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"We're all in this together. Absolutely our thanks to Mayo Clinic Infectious Disease expert and president of the Mayo Clinic Staff. Doctors Thank Linda. Thank you thank you very much Mayo. Clinic radio will return right after this. Stay with us. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom Chives. And I'm Tracy mccray Tracy. One of the consequences of aging is a decline in the immune system. You're not there yet. But only someday or older. Americans often don't respond as well to new or previously encountered infectious agents like influenza or like corona virus and. The situation is actually made worse because older Americans. We don't respond as well to vaccinations is younger. People to joining us on the phone from Mayo Clinic in Arizona talk about aging and our immune system is immunology researcher. Dr Jessica Lancaster. Welcome to the program. Thank you very much so good to talk to you especially with the covert nineteen outbreak. And so that has something to do obviously with the immune system and if you could before we talk a little more indepth explain in general terms what we mean by the Immune System. The immune system is a collection of different types of cells. That are traveling through the blood and into our body to shoes. They are constantly at work so even when we are not actively sick. They're conducting surveillance and what they're looking for is different particles that appear to be not of ourselves whether they're infections or toxins or cancer the immune system When it's healthy takes care of all of that when we find something that's foreign to the body that is when certain cells will begin to sound an alarm so to speak and that's what will launch the immune response against it. So what happens to your immune system monette immune response as a person ages? What is happening is that the cells will initially detect invader and then that first wave of defense Which we can call innate immunity. We'll start the process of inflammation in this case. The inflammation is a good thing. Because it's letting the immune system know that something is wrong and then after that there are certain cells of the body that are very specialized against different types of pathogens. And so these white blood cells that are specialized. We'll go in. And they'll begin to clear out the pathogen and allow for recovery to begin afterwards so what happens with aging which what we consider is starting around Middle Age about in the late thirties. We have our immune system. It's starting to slow down gradually but then when we reach the age of sixty five immune system is declining much more. Does that mean it's not as good at doing its job? Or what is it exactly? Does that mean with the aged immune system there's GONNA be a decreased overall strength of immune response so it's not going to be able to fight off pathogens as fiercely as I can do when I was younger. Immune system and not only. Is there like a decreased strength of the response? It also takes longer to clear the infection because all the different components of the immune system talk together as clearly as before. So you'll end up feeling bad for much longer as your immune system is very slowly clearing out the infectious agent. Nothing works quite as well when you get a little bit older. Is it true that you are more susceptible to all kinds of different pathogens? So bacteria viruses cancer cells all of them equally or are you more susceptible in particular to a viral infection as you get older. Let's say as we get older. Our system starts to produce fewer of new types of immune cells. We're actually at a deficit against new and novel pathogens that we hadn't encountered in our life the immune system is starting to stock up immune cells that can recall previous disease that it has encountered because it's placing. Its beds that it's GonNa see the same pathogen again rather than something entirely new so this would apply for either bacteria or viruses. But it's kind of more so for viruses because when you have this new virus it could be more difficult for the aged immune system to be able to clear it and that's going to open you up to secondary infections which usually are in the form of a bacterial infection. What makes the problem worse? Is that for some viruses. The virus that causes cove in nineteen the virus prefers to infect cells of the lungs so the virus is hijacking lung cells in order to make copies of itself and in doing so it is rapidly destroying the lung cells so if one has an aged immune system it can take a lot longer to clear. The virus and by then cove in nineteen has already inflicted a lot of damage and perhaps destroyed the ability for the low function. We've learned of course during the corona virus the Cova nineteen outbreak pandemic that people who are age aging and with chronic conditions. Also have a hard time. So why do the chronic conditions affect your immune system? Well inflammation is a normal part of the immune response so it is a signal that there's danger in the body and that it is now time for them you'd system to fight but what happens with a chronic condition is that it it creates like almost a permanent state of inflammation so the problem. Is that the dangerous. Never actually cleared and immune systems can never turnoff that dangerous signal. So what happens with chronic illness is that even to some extent this also occurs with normal aging that there's a level of inflammation that always persists as your diseases never rectified. For example for heart disease or lung disease and so since the signals never turned off it is really hard for them. Even system to get primed up to launch a good immune response against a new threat just to kind of illustrate that If you imagine that you were never allowed to have a good night's rest and instead there's an alarm always going off you'll have to. You'll have a terrible time trying to wake up and do your job in the morning and Immunologist use the same term of immune systems being exhausted so meaning that they're unable to perform their function because they've been stimulated for too long and so in a sense the age in response since it has like these kind of persistent inflammatory signals which are exacerbated. Even more when you have a chronic condition. It could be a lot harder for it to kind of bring itself together and fight off a new attack or if you have a healthy lifestyle. Let's say you eat right you exercise. Do you still have an aged immune system or you can slow that process down to some extent. The answer is yes you will have an aged immune system. The coordination of the immune response requires this very tight. Communication among the cells and all these cells are spread out throughout the body and immune cells are being supported by all the structural cells of the different tissues in different organs of the body. But as we age the quality of these supportive cells are wearing out and that means that they mean cells will have now a harder time to talk to each other so unfortunately you could be a you know a seventy year old marathon runner but you can still be knocked down by cold and need more recovery time powered. That doesn't mean you shouldn't exercise. Because having a healthy lifestyle will be the best way to maximize what potential your immune system has so even though it's not completely clear aging is causing that low level of inflammation which is lowering your immunity. But if you can reduce the level of inflammation by getting a good night's sleep by eating nourishing food and not overeating it also by exercising. Then you can reduce the impact of aging on your immune system so those things that you just listed getting good sleep eating well Even if you're not and you said middle-age there so even if you're not even in those categories can you boost your immune system no matter what your age definitely i. It's not going to be this kind of superfood leading to a rapid boost in the mean system that we would hope for. But it's going to be in a very intangible way where if you can take good care of your health then you're giving your immune system it best advantage that it can have so by you know getting proper sleep by eating nursing foods and also by not over eating. Because I'm there are many studies that suggest that obesity and metabolic diseases such as diabetes can also contribute to lower immunity. Are we going to be able to rejuvenate the immune system? Someday there is some evidence up there that our bodies are not just wearing out in. That's the final destiny That we all have but because there are some other animals have great immunity throughout their life. What scientists have been starting to speculate that you know perhaps we can find different cells signals. That are kind of driving immune decline if we can target those than perhaps we can improve the quality of.

inflammation Mayo Clinic Infectious Disease Mayo Clinic Radio Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Staff Tracy mccray Tracy Dr Tom Chives Linda Dr Jessica Lancaster obesity president Cova monette Arizona researcher Immunologist
"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

08:37 min | 5 months ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Covert All Kovic. Nineteen almost all the time. Our in studio guest today is another infectious disease expert and president of the Mayo Clinic Staff. Dr Stacey visit. Welcome Dr Thank you very much for having me. It's good to see you again. How has this pandemic affected the work that you're doing every day? Oh dramatically so as an infectious disease physician we usually see patients in the outpatient setting as well as in the inpatient setting meaning in the hospitals. Because we have to enforce the physical distancing and we're trying to use that term more than social distancing now we've prioritized the most urgent patients that need to be seen and so that means if somebody does not have an urgent medical issue. We're transferring their care to either phone visits are video visits or sometimes even just having them come back at a later date when we're able to actually see them in person in the hospital we're also from the infectious disease standpoint trying to see patients more virtually because we want to make sure all our infectious disease. Physicians are doing the many other jobs. I'll tell you about in just a second. So we're relying heavily on the heroes on the front line who are actually the primary care. Docs that critical care. Docs the pulmonologist our emergency department physicians nurses and healthcare providers. Who are actually. They are taking care of the patients infectious disease. Physicians work in many different areas including infection prevention and control so essentially coming up with the procedures and protocols on how to keep our patients and employees safe in the workforce and also in other areas of designing the management of patients who come in with the infection and the experimental drug trials and research initiatives. I've been working on the management as well as the research. Initiatives are as you can imagine everybody working around the clock to get the latest and greatest available to our patients as quickly as we can. Are You You said you were doing a number of telephone visits and virtual visits. How are those working out? So they're working well for infectious disease. So far in it's likely because infectious disease has been dabbling in this for a while. Actually we have had public. Health GRANTS AND INITIATIVES. That have allowed us to do a synchronous. Econ salts in the areas of tuberculosis and HIV around the country around the world for more than six or seven years. So we've already started with the e consults we've been doing some virtual visits within our healthcare system and in some areas within our HIV practice for a number of years as well so we already had a little bit of what I would call practice. Now I think most of the medical world has had to kind of you know hop skip and jump very quickly to action and we certainly are learning as we go as well but at least we had a teeny bit of practice before the started her firm number of staff working from home many are and that's that's an excellent point because we're asking that any staff who can do work where they don't actually have to be on the medical campus do so virtually or electronically from their home to decrease the number of people who are actually here on the medical campus could potentially become infected themselves or unintentionally infect somebody else though when you go home at the end of the day you actually come in to public places to you. Take your clothes off your shoes off your to protect your family. I mean can. This virus live on clothing. That's an excellent question that we get asked often. And maybe I'll begin by just giving a little background on how the viruses actually transmitted before going into the answer so the virus is transmitted by what we call respiratory droplets meaning if I cough or sneeze on somebody or something the viruses in the little teeny particle. Droplet that if I happen to cough next to my neighbor on their face on their hand and they breathed it in they could become infected if I cough or sneeze onto a surface that they then touch and then they rubbed their nose or their eyes or their mouth than they could become infected. So when you think of it that way you think what is it that you need to protect to keep yourself from becoming infected and it's predominantly your hands in anything that touches are goes in your mouth your nose your eyes. We very rarely do that with our close. We very rarely sort of rub. Our face on our sleeves other than children may be and sometimes we do unintentionally well and we're all coughing into our ells though so coughing on our scoffing absolutely can so what we encourage people to do. And what I do is exactly as you're alluding to Tracy is. I wash my hands before I leave work. I wash my hands as soon as I get back in any clothing. That of worn for work particularly like a blazer jacket either wash. If it's able to be washed I put aside and then I sometimes do wear it back to work but I don't touch it. It doesn't go anywhere near anybody else's face. I would not touch my anything that I've touched afterwards. And then the one thing I do and I recommend to people is after. I changed clothes at the end of the day. I wash my hands so anything. That's touched that clothing gets washed so washing or dry cleaning. We'll get rid of the virus so we know that the virus is viruses are killed by detergents and detergents bleach and soap in. That's why it's always recommended that if possible to wash your hands with warm water and soap for at least twenty seconds because we know that will kill the virus and bleach absolutely kills the virus so washing your clothes and warm water and soap and dry unit and a heat drier. That's warm we'll kill. The virus dry cleaning is a chemical process in most of those chemicals that are used in traditional professional commercial. Dry cleaning should kill the virus. But again we don't think that you get infected as a foe might meeting just putting on in effect a piece of clothing worn in factory through your skin it would be if you were then to touch it or as Tracy said. Put it somebody else's shirt or something close to your face that's how you would get infected. We know that One of your levels of expertise and special interest is HIV AIDS. Is there anything that we learned during the AIDS epidemic back in the eighties? That is helping today. That's an excellent question. I think I think we always learn from every one of these experiences and I have no doubt we are absolutely going to learn from this experience the HIV world has already started to talk about. That is let's look back and lets us. Lessons learned context exactly. Hiv transmitted a little differently. The numbers obviously are far exceed corona virus. The desk far exceed Corona virus at this point But we can still look back in use some of those experiences to help us now and I think the one that starts the list is we have to be careful of denial. Denial never helps. It didn't help to think. Oh this. Isn't that big a deal. Let's ignore it. Let's not talk about his small population. Exactly it's only people far away it's not gonNa Affect us and that absolutely happened during the HIV epidemic and absolutely slowed down our response and in many ways. I think the world just wasn't ready to accept this one right away and denial may have slowed down some of our public health response. Another response around the world The other lesson I think is to be very careful of misinformation. And that's why I applaud you all for trying to get strong unified messages across there is a lot of misinformation and that can mislead people can sometimes hurt people so be very careful about the sources of information understand that we learn more over time so it may seem like things are changing and to some people it may feel like public health is flipping back and forth. Our government is flipping back and forth part of it is we just learn more and no more and we have to make new decisions. I think we also have to learn that we need to focus more on facts not fear and that was very true during the HIV epidemic. It's very true now and I also think we just learned that we have to maintain a sense of community that we have to be there to help each other out. People will get sick. We have to keep other safe. We have to work together to find treatments cures public health responses. And.

HIV Tracy Dr Stacey Mayo Clinic Staff president AIDS
How a Piece of Popcorn Stuck in a Man's Teeth Led to Open-Heart Surgery

Paul W. Smith

01:45 min | 9 months ago

How a Piece of Popcorn Stuck in a Man's Teeth Led to Open-Heart Surgery

"Anyway so here's a story forty one year old not an old man a forty one year old British man had a piece of popcorn stuck in his teeth after he and his wife he's a firefighter he noticed the popcorn stuck in his teeth after his wife went to movie in September for three days he was unable to remove the popcorn he claims to have used this is a problem he claims to have used multiple objects the cap of the pan the tooth pick up piece of wire even a metal nail trying to dig out the popcorn to remove the full really did damage to a surrounding gum when doing that a week later he began to suffer from night sweats fatigue headaches all of which he initially thought with signs of the earlier referred to flow turns out it's endocarditis card I this infection of the I guess the hard lining yes which we've heard about the infection occurs when bacteria from the mouth the skin the intestines and other areas of the body enters the bloodstream how many times you know I brought this up Mike and this makes me want to go see my Dennis Jim Everett I and we all should every six months it at least how many times we talked about now we know for a fact that what happens in our mouth if it's bad ends up in our heart and that's what happened to this guy went to a seven hour open heart surgery to repair his mitral valve and replace his aortic valve all because of the infection started in his teeth trying to dig out a piece of popcorn you have lost I I I guess in England they don't have a lot of cause for flaws search for fifty third so naturally Papa going again will as I probably he

Mike Dennis Jim Everett Mitral Valve Aortic Valve England Papa Endocarditis
"mitral valve" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Will take the calls, and he'll if they're good. He'll put you on the air with me. And we'll see what gets them questions answered for you anything not just about superfoods or cancer but eight four four four four. Dr Joe lines are open now. So we are talking about superfoods and cancer, and do they exist? Any answer is a resounding. Yes. They do. Excuse me when you eat garlic. I want you to follow the rule here though, we talked about garlic before the break. Golic is an amazing food. It's anti viral anti fungal. It really is a SuperFood. Research has shown it can help fight cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, really all types of cancer. But here's how you eat garlic. I want you to run through garlic press or just smash it with you with your palm your hand. Because grandma's Zito didn't have a garlic press. She had the palm of her hand, they turned out the bone in her handful, the pies a form, and she just squashed to garlic with her perform, and she let it sit there for a few minutes. Now, this is interesting because she didn't know why you're supposed to let it sit there. But she knew how. And when you let it sit there for a few minutes, the chemicals in garlic interact with each other and become much more potent. So if you were smash up, the garlic and eat it right away, not going to be as potent smash it up, let it sit for few minutes. Three four five minutes. It's going to be more effective pretty cool stuff. So it's a little secret you can do with garlic to make it work better. Now raw is better than cooked. And if you eat raw, garlic what's going to happen. You're gonna have sneaky breath. So one thing you can do for that is partially grandma's Zito new the tricks whenever she didn't made anything with garlic. She always had fresh parsley in there and the park. Chlorophyll in it and a chlorophyll combined to the chemicals that make you stink. Because what happens with garlic? Is it gets into your blood system? It goes into your colon gets absorbed into your blood system. And then the stink the garlic smell is transferred in your lungs. Where gases are exchanged. And then it comes out through your mouth, you can brush your teeth all day. It's coming from your colon into from your lungs stink. So to chlorophyll a bond that in the blood system and prevent the garlic from coming out three lungs, which is just a fun little trick. And my mother always told me if you have a date, and you garlic make sure sheets garlic than you stink. And my my thought process was, but then we both stink. So mom wise woman. But I'm not sure I agree on that one there, but a parsley real good when they're so let's talk about some more superfoods things you want to start adding to your diet, which you should be eating these foods everyday anyway, because it's part of a good diet. And a nice part is all the benefits that come from his cheaper than what you doing right now, you feel better you live longer. And now a finding that everything. Dr Joe taught you comes back to even helping with cancer. So broccoli and cabbage. Okay question. Eight four four four four. Dr Joe lines are open British researchers made headlines recently study that showed that men with early signs of developing prostate cancer prevent tumor growth by eating broccoli just four times a week. Other studies have shown anticancer benefits from eating cabbage, Brussels sprouts and other cruciferous vegetables. Now, what the heck is cruciferous. Vegetable wise it call that Christopher's vegetables just listed them brussel sprouts cabbage when when the flowers form on the plant they form in shape of eight crucifix. That's what it called cruciferous pretty cool. Right. So cruciferous vegetables just telling us that it formed like that during the same family, but they have many chemicals in it that good view one of his called Endo three cardinal and three carbon all has been shown to help prevent cancer. Dino, methane, Dino, methane DM. It's a supplement. You can actually take by itself. It prevents estrogen from converting testosterone from converting estrogen. It's slow down that process, and that's really important because estrogen can feed a lot of cancers. Somebody cancers are estrogen sensitive it can actually grow because estrogens growth hormone. So if you're doing Dino, methane, methane prevents the. Testosterone testosterone from converting the estrogen a of less estrogen and be higher Ostrom testosterone is your sex drive hormone. But also build muscles and not just biceps and triceps how about your heart. How 'bout you lungs blood vessels? Have you reproductive organs? These are all mussels, and as you austral levels drop. That's what you start to have problems. I've told the story of my father, speaking of cancer, my father was diagnosed was it. Fifteen seventeen years ago. No less than about sixteen years ago. Actually. And we might have had the possibility of maybe seeing some maybe some pre-cancerous cells in his prostate. So the doctor put him on a drug and the drug was designed to shut down. His prostate is is a testosterone production. So the cancer wouldn't grow. Now. A might have maybe had it. Okay. I didn't agree with it. But some fame same famous person said no man's profit his own hometown. So I said to my mother and father. I don't think it's good idea. But okay, do they did it and my heart condition? He had a mitral valve prolapse because he had rheumatic fever as a child. It wasn't taking care of. Now. If you have fever take care of it. If you have measles take care of it. Because then the body just it's affectionate goes away, and it's done. Well, my father didn't take care of you came from family at ten kids. There was no medical care, and we can mitral valve. And so we had a weak heart. So my father took the shot for for testosterone. Couple months later falls off the couch dead. He died from it. And when I did the research on a drug it clearly said with no uncertain terms, do not give this to people heart condition. Damn idiot doctors they gave it to him, and he died now my mother never followed up with it. She never did any anything with it. She goes it happened. He's gone. What am I going to do? But when did you autopsy he didn't have a heart attack? He just died his heart stopped because the heart wasn't able to beat because testosterone levels dropped so low and you need testosterone make the artwork now. How do you not had a heart condition? It may not have killed him. But I submit that it probably did. So this is why you really want to take care of yourself and make sure you look at all options. I'm not saying that you shouldn't do whatever you wanna do. But look at all options before doing it. That's why so many people come to us as patients Dr Joe, we have neck pain, back pain shoulder pain, numbness, tingling. You guys are chiropractors. I wanna try this first before I go for shots and surgery. We get patients from orthopedist and neurologist. In fact, I just about two or three times a week. I'm going out to dinner with medical doctors who want to work with us. Because they're so excited to results. We get like oh my gosh. You guys are amazing. How can I get? How can I share this with my patients, socially, great? Because I if somebody needs surgery, I can't do surgery. But if somebody's chiropractic here, they can't do chiropractic work. And so that's why it works. So well, so a lot of people come to us as a first resort before they go further, and then sometimes people come in the last resort. And when they do the last what usually they say, why didn't I do this sooner? Why did I suffer for so long any interest? I don't know can't help everybody, but it certainly worth going conservative. I try nutrition trying supplements trying super greens and essential source chiropractic care, get your stomach adjusted. Do what you need to do. And then see if that works. And in most cases, does I got a lot more to cover like I said, we're gonna cover onions tomatoes does wine really help heart disease. The answer is maybe and I gotta take some callers. I if you have any questions Frankie Valli answering your calls at eight four four four four Dr Joey four four four four DR j o e Michael how can we make your day better? Thank you, sir. First of all I want to thank you for getting meals. Artificial sweeteners, headaches of all disappear primary. Thanks to you, sir. Jat awesome. That's great. Thank you. Several doctors, and I listened to your show once and I quit and headaches went away. Thank you very much question question. Regards tina's are peanuts the great prevent of colon cancer. As I read the are due. They're cutting. Listen to you. Okay. Great. Okay. Michael. We're gonna have to go to break real soon. Michael. So I tell you what I'm going to answer this question when I come back from the break, but that's a really good question to peanuts. Fight colon cancer going to give you answer on that. And a lot more. And when we come back now at at the top of the next at after the segment atop next.

cancer testosterone Dr Joe Dino mitral valve Michael colon cancer Zito Golic heart disease fever growth hormone Christopher Frankie Valli Endo tina
"mitral valve" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"So wonderful experience and thrilled to be able to open up the mic to Joe to welcome to the podcast. Joe welcome. Hey, thanks for having me. It is a pleasure now that I leave anything out in that intro that you wanna share with listeners probably only about my my best job today has been being the father for two young men. So I've certainly enjoyed that as probably the biggest accomplishment. That's awesome and can relate. I've got a young young little guy. He's about the be two years old. But man is it rewarding. Absolutely. So Joe what got you into healthcare? Thanks to that question. It's one don't ponder that much. Because it feels as natural to me is gravity. But if you think about it, it probably comes from growing up with with a mother, my mom had we met cart disease, which she got having remix. Fever in the epidemic early in the nineteenth century. I mean early in the twentieth century. So I was her travails through the healthcare system kind of dotted my my upbringing in my youth. And so watching her get ministered to medicines. And then finally getting surgery in mitral valve replacement than seeing all of that kinda gave me a vision in an opportunity to really to follow. I think this is Martin Luther King day to so to follow one of one of the MLK's quotes about service in that. But in fact, need you need to ask yourself. What are you doing for others? It was the combination of that kind of philosophical bent together with early experienced that channel by interest in the healthcare. Love it Joe in very personal story so pre sharing Ed. And so here, you are you fast forward all the years. Now, you've done a lot, and you've been able to impact serve a lot. And so I love. Hear from you. You know today. What do you think health leaders need to be thinking about when it's to be on their agenda at the top, and how are you approaching it? So again, kind of a really a really good question. I've with a career in healthcare kind of grown up with a deluge. I think of of knowledge and information as we've gotten better and smarter in healthcare. I did all my training in Boston where there's a flavor of eminent space medicine by you walk the halls with the giants and the s that there are you learn how to how to take care of patients in adage than healthcare challenges I studying at the feet of giants. And of I've watched us move to where the amount of data the amount of evidence the amount of proof. So that you can turn to evidence based medicine is now ever-present end. In fact, it's becoming our biggest challenge is keep up with the information. That's been generated by the. Millions of dollars of medical research and lots of innovators to where it's now it's now functionally impossible, I think we've got more than a million publications in medicine every year. We've got thousands of.

Joe giants Martin Luther King mitral valve Fever Boston two years
"mitral valve" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WSB-AM

"But I'll give you a little preview the stem cells. That's what finding now. The and we started the show out with this that we're finding out that the stem cells. A normal cell it forms a goes through its life cycle. It has a genetic time bomb in it. And that bomb goes off it's called eight pop toasties and the cell dies with the stem cells are the cancer stem cells that genetic coding to make it die. When it's cold enough is shut off. And so it keeps growing more cancer cells, and the theory now the scientific research leaning toward these stem cells get into the blood system or the lymphatic system and can set up shop. Elsewhere, and that looks like why they metastasized that's the new. Belief in the medical world is that's how they metastasized through these stem cells. And so if you have them, it's good that you, you know, you gotta treat it. I'm very happy. You went through the treatment. Now, we've got to do everything we can to get these stem cells to stop proliferating, and creating these abnormal cells, and I'm going to cover that a little bit later, but we'll get the plant based diet bottom line a plant based diet seems to be the best thing to calm down the stem cells. So they don't keep proliferating. Okay. Okay. Thank you. Thanks so much folks have you ever healthcare question? Eight four four four four Dr Joe let's go to visit Haskell a hassle jealous Zito here. How can we help you? Hey, so I've got a velvet those clothes on where my heart. I'd only pork or anything like that. I eat a clean if I eat meat is cleanly. But anyway, it doesn't close all the way. And I'm scared to death the surgery, I'm not taking a pig valve 'cause I don't need much less out. Understood now, Mike are wondering is it the mitral valve tricuspid. Martorell mitral valve yet so much about prolapse is that what you're saying. Okay. Did you have rheumatic fever as a child by any chance? I was born four-months-premature gonna incubator to Atlanta. Wow. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So it could be that you had a genetic malformation. It could be you might have dramatic fever. My father had rheumatic fever as a child and rheumatic fever weakens the heart muscle. So couple of things you got to be careful with is you gotta keep good dental hygiene because the same membrane that covers your gums covers your heart. So you've got to be really really careful I'd recommend fostering and water picking and brushing and really being careful about your teeth because you don't want to get infection at teeth. It can go into the heart. And that's why you have if you have a heart condition. They're always going to tell you go to your dentist. First before we do heart surgery. Make sure everything's good there. So that's something. We should all do for good dental hygiene. But especially for someone like you now it if it gets bad enough, you might need to surgery if desert genetic malformation, or if there was a mitral valve, if it was from romantic, fever, you might need that surgery. The good news is that surgery in today's society is a really pretty basic surgery. I mean, it's not like the old days we have to cut your chest. Open into everything else. Right. You have the pig valve you have the plastic. What if you put the plastic one in just understand it's going to click every time your heart for the rest of your life? It'll go click. Click. Click click click click click. Yeah. So just understand that as well. And you can talk to the doctors about that. Now, my father was deaf. So he had metro valve put in there, and he couldn't hear it. But what would happen was every time? He got excited or something. We'll click click. Click click, so it was kind of a funny thing we made fun of them, of course. But if you take good care of yourself, keep listening to this show. It's the same thing we can talk about cancer and heart disease. And heart stays healthy. You may last your whole lifetime. See I wanna. It was up to me, I complete banter and fruitarian, but I have a hard time with in our culture, man. That's. Keep listening. I'll give you some tips. Go break. Thanks for the call folks you've ever healthcare question.

mitral valve fever Atlanta Dr Joe Mike Haskell Zito four-months
"mitral valve" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"The moderate risk is somewhere between three and eight percent. High risk is more than ten percent mortality. I would call it and the third kenneka try. We're going to start doing is for mitral valve clinical trial. Also perkiness all of which are trans catheter crooked going from the groin without major decision. You know, no chance cracking or anything like that. Talk a little bit about that. At at one time, romantic fever was pretty prevalent. And and we know that. Fever could cause a problem, especially with the mitral valve, and if that valve became disease because of that, the the I guess the treatment at first, and Dr hall burner was you just go in and sort of poke it with a finger, you know, sort of open it up a little bit. Know that was one of the first procedures. And now the u interventional radiologists are putting a little clip on the leaflets or something like that through the catheter, and you don't need to open the chest. Yes. Romantic fever. I mean, it's kind of zebra in the in in westernized word. So we don't see romantic fear anymore. Here. What we see is. Usually, you know, degenerative mitral valve regurgitation. It means much about prolapse and leaking of the mitral valve. Very rarely. We see rheumatic fever. We see also calcification means much of causing mitral valve stenosis, when we look at the mitral valve much clip. It's mostly approved at this point for degenerative between mitral valve prolapse. So they can put the clip on the to prevent leaking more recently. There was a clinical trial that was published that showed actually benefit of also perkasie repairing the mitral valve in leaky mitral valve for patients with heart failure. What we call a functional? Mitral valve regurgitation, essentially. The for for a war valve, it's mostly involve stenosis. We don't have yet. Way to repair the leaky valve stress with the trans catheter book continuously except for. If they have previously bioprosthetic, it means they have a tissue valve if they have a tissue take five that's leaking ordinary down. We can put the valve inside the older valve and repair the leak or the, narrowing of the valve if this is previously, you know, if they have a previous tissue valve, especially okay. Doctor hall Brenner. What about the surgical approach to a mitral valve problem of actually opened the chest and open the heart and replaced. The the the mitral valve of are you still doing a lot of those? Yeah. I think we do quite a bit of them. Again. They they come in a lot of varieties like Khalil said. In Arctic vows, we see mostly stenosis for mitral vows, we see mostly regurgitation of blood flowing backwards as opposed to can't go forward, an occasion, we do see mitral stenosis, and sometimes it's related to romantic heart disease, in those cases, typically with mitral stenosis, the only treatment is surgical valve replacements. There are some minimally invasive corrections that we can do they work. Okay. They're pretty good. But they don't sometimes they're not long lasting. So sometimes. So a lot of patients do wind up with a replacement with the regurgitation the leaking backwards in Aliki -ness of the valve of the mitral valve..

mitral valve stenosis fever rheumatic fever Aliki -ness prolapse Doctor hall Brenner Dr hall Khalil eight percent ten percent
"mitral valve" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WLAC

"Brain and heart Packer month one per month divide everything, in half, except the slain him. Wanting another. Battle slain take six of those eight to two or a little, guy like, yourself I. Also want you take the Dietrich cancel three of those twice a day They actually. Deal with the mechanical maintenance of the heart and prevents enlargement in the heart Congestive heart. Failure and it's amazing these are caused within margin so that the balance leaps don't need you get mitral valve Pearland Caused by, a deficiency in one vitamin and of course if you're getting hypertrophy cardiomyopathy heart disease which. Can cause sudden death in young athletes and you're get a heart large causing Mike around lamps essay deficiency of, a single minerals so you take all. The stuff and you should see significant results very quickly, within say two to six, weeks you should see more normal heart rate you should see a return to normal size, your heart and you can tell yourself you can listen in summer that goes along with the, mitral valve prolapse. Should slowly disappear which means their hearts coming to five and the valve is meeting in prolapse Doc I have a friend of mine who had surgery several years ago any ad they gave him an option of. An artificial valve or a pig's valve and they gave him a warning they said if you take the artificial, valve it'll last longer but you'll be. Unmet occasion for the rest.

mitral valve Dietrich cardiomyopathy Mike
"mitral valve" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And then one healthy brain and, heart Packer, month one per. Month Divide. Everything in half, except where did you get another can take six of those eight to to get like yourself I also? Want you take the Dietrich's canceled three of those twenty today They actually deal, with the mechanical, maintenance of the. Heart and prevents. Enlargement to the heart congestive heart failure and it's amazing these are caused Yes Margin heart so that the valve leaps don't get mitral valve prolapse cons buying deficiency one. Vitamin and of, course if you're getting hypertrophy cardiomyopathy heart, disease which can cause sudden death in young, athletes And large causing Mike. Around for as he deficiency a single minerals so you, take all the stuff and you, should see significant results very quickly within say two to six weeks you should see, more normal heart rate you should see a. Return to normal size your heart and you can. Tell that yourself listen and that murmur that goes along with the mitral. Valve prolapse should slowly disappear which means their hearts coming to normal size, and the valve is meeting and. Not PR, elections DACA a friend of mine, who had surgery, several years ago any ad they gave him an option. Of an artificial valve or a, pig's valve and they gave him a warning they said if you take the artificial valve. It'll last longer but? You'll be unmedicated for the rest. Of your.

mitral valve Mike cardiomyopathy Dietrich six weeks
"mitral valve" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Of the inflammation and then one healthy brain and heart. Pack mom Divide everything. In half except when gene another balance, claims take six of those. Today to to, galax yourself I also want you take the de-stress cancel those twice a. Day They. Actually deal with the mechanical maintenance of the heart and prevents enlargement And And it's, amazing These are caused So the Tobel Leach don't. Meet my Pearland Caused, by deficiency in one vitamin and of, course if you're getting hypertrophy cutting heart disease. Which can cause sudden death in young athletes And you get an argument and causing. Mike as he deficiency a single mineral take. All this stuff and you should see significant results very, quickly within two to six weeks, you should see a more normal heart rate you should. See a return, to normal size your heart and you, can tell that yourself you can listen in That. Goes along, with the mitral valve prolapse should, slowly disappear which, means there are just coming to us and the valve is. Meeting and a collection DACA a, friend of mine who had surgery several years ago in the ad they gave him an. Option of an artificial? Valve or a pig's valve and. They gave him a warning? They said if you take the artificial valve it'll last longer but you'll be, on medication for the rest of your life.

mitral valve Mike Tobel Leach six weeks
"mitral valve" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on KTRH

"The inflammation and then one healthy brain and, heart Packer, mom One Divide everything in half except in another battle of six of those two to get like. Yourself I also want you take the Dietrich three those twice a. Day They actually deal with the mechanical maintenance of the heart. And prevents heart congestive heart failure and it's amazing these are caused Just a, work of art. So that the Each don't get mitral valve Pearland Bye One. Vitamin and of, course if you're getting hypertrophy cutting which can cause sudden death in young athletes and you get an enlargement causing Michael deficiency a single. Minerals so you take all this stuff and you should see significant results very quickly within two to six. Weeks you should see more normal heart. Rate you should see a return to normal, size your, heart and you can tell yourself you can. Listen And that goes along with the mitral valve prolapse. Should slowly disappear which means there, are coming to Donald five and the valve is meeting collection doc I have a friend. Of mine who had? Surgery several years ago any ad they gave him, an option. Of an artificial, valve or a pig's valve, and they gave him a warning they said if you take the artificial valve it'll last longer but you'll. Be on medication for the rest of your life.

mitral valve inflammation Dietrich Packer Donald Michael
"mitral valve" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WTVN

"Brain, and heart Packer mom one, held brain and heart divide everything in. Half except the Slaney would you? Get another bottle claims you can take six of those eight to two and, to get like yourself I also want you, to take the de-stress castle three of. Those twice today they actually deal? With the mechanical maintenance of the heart and prevents enlargement heart congestive heart failure And it's amazing these are. Caused heart there with enlargement iheart so the developed leaps don't need you get, mitral valve prolapse Caused by, a deficiency one vitamin and of course if you're getting hypertrophy cardiomyopathy heart disease which can cause. Sudden death in young athletes and you're getting a heart and large causing Mike around for lamb's essay deficiency. Was single minerals so you take all this. Stuff and you should see significant results very quickly within, two to six weeks you should, see a more. Normal heart rate you should see a return. To normal size your, heart and you can tell this yourself you can. Listen and that goes along with the micro. Valve prolapse should slowly disappear which means their hearts coming to its normal size. And the valve is meeting and not collections DACA up a friend of, mine who had surgery several years. Ago any, ad they gave him an option, of an artificial, valve or a pig's valve and they gave him a warning. They said if you take the artificial, valve it'll last longer but you'll be unburied. Nation for the rest of your life if you.

mitral valve lamb Packer DACA cardiomyopathy Mike six weeks
"mitral valve" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on KSRO

"Per month Divide everything in half accepted Slaney would. You get another bottle of same take six of, those eight to. Two and two, or little galax yourself I also want you take the Detroit's capsule. Three those twenty today They actually deal with the mechanical maintenance of the heart and. Prevents enlargement heart congestive heart failure and it's amazing these are caused Yes Heart so that the valve leaps don't get. Mitral valve prolapse is caused by a deficiency of one. Vitamin and of, course if you're getting hypertrophy cardiomyopathy heart, disease which can cause sudden death in young, athletes and you get a heart and large causing Mike Araujo essay deficiency of a single. Minerals so you take all this stuff and you should see significant results very quickly within say two to six. Weeks you should see more normal heart. Rate you should see a return to normal, size your heart and the. Murmur you can tell, yourself you can listen number that goes along with the mitral valve prolapse should slowly, disappear which means their hearts coming to its normal. Size and the valve is meeting and not PR election, doc I have a friend of mine who had surgery several years ago any. Ad they gave him an option of an artificial valve or a pig's, valve and they gave him a. Warning they, said if you take the artificial? Valve It'll last longer but you'll be unmedicated for. The rest, of your.

Mitral valve Slaney Mike Araujo cardiomyopathy Detroit
"mitral valve" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Valve so the heart is basically a two stroke piston pump the mitral valve that's blood into the heart the heart beats which is the piston goes out the arctic valve inlet valve and outlet fell the inlet valve is called the mitral valve and the mitral valve just like the your develop has to open and close it's a very complex structure though it's got many little what we call cord i which are like tethers holding it together it's attached directly to the heart muscle at anything that can affect the leaflets of the valve there confessed these little tethers or affect the heart muscle can cause problems with the mitral valve the most common thing is leakage of the mitral valve and so if the valve doesn't close properly again you can have a lot of blood going backwards towards the lungs as opposed to out the to the body and that blood going back towards the lungs can cause really bad shortness of breath for patients the good news there is we've got many many options we've got standard open heart surgery we've got minimally invasive surgery and now we have new treatments like the mitral clip which is again what procedure that we do in the cath lab right through the patient's leg site putting a staple on the on the mitral valve leaflets to kind of hold them together so that they're not leaking so much instead it's fascinating because it seems more and more like we're getting into these minimally invasive surge injuries that are giving patients not only greater options up front but also when they wouldn't be candidates for open heart surgery there's there's no options that get much less invasive so where do we see the future of this of this going again a great question and this was an area of interest to me because this is that i work in so the future is is really bright for patients with valve disease we have literally dozens of therapies that are being developed by many innovative companies out there mayo clinic is involved in the development of some of these and in the future what i can predict us up they'll be in the arctic fell a number of different types of heart valves that we can offer and.

mitral valve mayo clinic
"mitral valve" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WDRC

"Sure it has anything to do with h pylori h buller may be simply sign that you have a bum digestive tract talk between the gut and the heart and the gut in the brain and virtually every other part of the body so you know how do you deal with that will you have a form of automatic nervous system imbalanced some ways to get a handle on that or through meditation breathing yoga these are are more natural ways to approach the vegas any buddy listening out there who is million with acupuncture would know that the vagus nerve is a target sometimes for acupuncture treatments among the things that can help you know change your diet try different dietary eliminations try a paleo diet try a specific carbohydrate diet take probiotics to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in a little while we're going to talk about prebiotics for the treatment of osteoarthritis i mean the trick is you know we know the microbiomes important the question is how do we tweak it how do we foster the growth of good guys and suppressed the growth of bad guys is when it comes to the gut the other thing you can do obviously for pvc's is make sure you take adequate magnesium in the form of magnesium are you taking it i to magnesium but the glass and not the tori tori and you may want to go hi two four six even eighty today but beware of the possible side effects which are i know diaries tools you right i what happens is dr hoffman i do have to leaky hawks out the trump and mitral valve mitral valve prolapse our patients are setup for this very very famous so other things coenzyme q ten would be helpful in moderately high doses even ubiquonol at two or three hundred a day might.

mitral valve dr hoffman
"mitral valve" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"But if he really investigate for yourself you can find out a lot of information and you don't just have to go by what a doctor or a study says well i was skeptical and then what happened was a lot of views of his websites that marianne uh turn beyond two and a lot of the literature she made me read a couple of years after i i would read those things then all of a sudden western medicine would kind of agree so i'm i'm coming over i'm coming over any criterion it's happening every single person in our family likely member he had a mix it the best this to just you know combine western medicine with a lot of this holistic uh well dipak evaluate you combine not if you take the vitamins that you know the holistic dr thanks should not be given to you know even a pat but de okay so here's an example i used to i have i have a heart thing i mean let's get personal i have a a a heart condition it's like mitral valve prolapse allow people do yeah it's like you know whatever its mild so uh every time i would go to the dentist they would say the dentist's would say oh you have that condition you need to take an antibiotic you know before you get your teeth cleaned so i would do this for years i would take an antibiotic every six months before getting my teeth cleaned and then i went to the holistic doctor and he he saw it i was doing he says never do that like never take the antibiotic never like there's no need for that at all or why it's hard could be harmful upset your stomach yeah they don't want you taking antibiotics people get on antibiotics for any reason beyond that and that's a problem and that's caused aca they say that it takes your body a full year to recover from the effects of taking an antibiotic not only that but hasn't the overuse over prescription of antibiotics them um a given rise to these resistant strains of various germs near fourth yeah okay but he went on what happens scale so then on so then i very i was very afraid to not take the antibiotic because i thought okay i'm gonna get my teeth clean and then i'm gonna die of an infection and my heart mmhmm.

mitral valve six months
"mitral valve" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"mitral valve" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Among patients who underwent a arctic valve replacement receipt of a biologic prosthesis was associated with significantly higher 15year mortality than receipt of a mechanical prosthesis among patients forty five to fifty four years of age thirty point six percent versus twenty six point four percent but not among patients fifty five to sixty four years of age among patients who underwent mitral valve replacement receipt of a biologic prosthesis was associated with significantly higher mortality than receipt of a mechanical prosthesis among patients forty to forty nine years of age forty four point one percent versus twenty seven point one percent and among those fifty to sixty nine years of age fifty percent versus forty five point three percent the incidence of real operation was significantly higher among recipients of a biologic prosthesis patients who received mechanical vows had a higher cumulative incidence of bleeding and in some age groups stroke the longterm mortality benefit that was associated with a mechanical prosthesis as compared with a biologic prosthesis persisted until seventy years of age among patients undergoing mitral valve replacement and until fifty five years of age among those undergoing a arctic valve replacement age of red cells for transfusion and outcomes in critically ill adults by de james cooper from menashe university melbourne victoria australia in this international multicentre trial four thousand nine hundred nineteen critically ill adults were randomly assigned to receive either the freshest available compatible allogeneic red cells short term storage group or standardissue oldest available compatible allogeneic red cells longterm storage group.

australia mitral valve de james cooper one percent fifty five years fifty four years forty nine years sixty four years sixty nine years fifty percent seventy years three percent four percent six percent 15year