17 Burst results for "Mitchell Hartmann"

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Los Angeles. I'm kind of result it is Thursday. Today, the six the maggot is always to have you along, everybody we begin today. With a little cognitive economic dissonance. News item number one The regular Thursday report on first time claims for unemployment benefits. Last week For the first time in 14 months, those claims fell below a half a million people still historically high but way better on trend. Who's at number two. The regular report on monthly unemployment We're going to get tomorrow could be could be seven figures worth of new jobs. Who's Adam three, and this one is straight up reporting that we have done even though fewer people are getting laid off and more people are finding jobs. We still have companies and trade groups shouting loudly and persistently, it must be said. But they just can't find people. The higher They're a bunch of reasons. Of course, People who lost or left jobs might be worried about getting sick. If they go back. There are schools that some people have started. Also, of course, kids and no child care. We asked marketplace Mitchell Hartmann. What else might be going on now? About that loud in persistent complaining that employers can't hire the workers they need. Don't just take our word for it. We simply can't source enough talent to meet current demand. Richard Wall Quest is CEO of the American Staffing Association, which represents employment and temp agencies. We don't expect that that's going to abate in the near future, and it's across many, many different occupations won't twist says A lot of potential workers aren't ready to get a new job yet. Maybe they're not vaccinated or have kids stuck at home, he says. Many older skilled workers may not be coming back baby boomers who are nearing retirement or working, perhaps beyond traditional retirement. Many of them have left the workforce altogether. And so companies are recruiting loudly and persistently everywhere you drive, you see Help Wanted signs. Michael Britain runs Kentucky Anna Works the Workforce Development Board for the Louisville region. Our career centers are hosting job fairs. Companies are offering signing bonuses, but Britain doesn't see this is a classic labor shortage. It's more a matter of time. The return of workers is going to be gradual, so there's a mismatch between what employers want and the speed with which people are going to come back to the labor market. There's another mismatch, says Heidi Shierholz at the Progressive Economic Policy Institute between the pay employers are offering and the pay workers are willing to take If an employer post the job, and then they can't find the workers that they need. That just means there's a labor shortage of people who will work at that wage In a really tight labor market, As Fed chair Jay Powell has recently pointed out, wages would be rising. I'm Mitchell Hartman for Marketplace. We gave this one, a nod yesterday that the Biden administration now supports waving patent protections on covert vaccines in service As trade representative Catherine Ty put it. Of ending this pandemic. Just lifting intellectual property protections can't buy itself get more shots in more arms market places him at the fields looked into that one. One of the arguments against waving patents on the vaccines is that patent protections are not the on Lee thing or even the main thing standing in the way of other countries churning out more vaccine. The waiver is the first step Lot of the sender is a professor at Georgetown University Law Center, she says. In addition, we need these companies to share with manufacturers around the world. How to make these vaccines safely and effectively. Just reading the patent isn't going to teach them. But the prospect of a waiver, which pharmaceutical companies oppose could be enough of a bargaining chip to get them to volunteer that information, says Nicholson Price at the University of Michigan Law School. I could imagine the wheels be increased a little bit. If this is something that's on the table now that I think the pharmaceutical industry pretty reasonably thought was effectively off the table until pretty recently and if not, the U. S government does have other leverage to push companies to share their know how Such as the fact that it has a patent that Madonna and others are using in their vaccines, says James Carlin Steen at the advocacy organization Prepped for All the U. S government right now could basically say, Hey, you're using our technology. As a condition of this, you have to transfer the technology of even if all of that gets worked out. There's also the question of are there even enough factories in the world ready and able to make these vaccines? Right now, Kremlin, Steen says there aren't but we know we can build new factories extraordinarily rapidly. There was not a single factory in the world in February of 2020. I could make a Mornay vaccines a commercial scale. We built those factories and crown Steen says. Now it's time to build more. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace on Wall Street today, up all the way around, will have the details when we do the numbers. Thinking we're about getting to that point when companies are gonna have to start getting specific with their people about what their futures are gonna look like. Be in the office. It's gonna be fully remote. Maybe somewhere in between. The CEO of Google and its parent company, Alphabet soon or pitch. I said something in an email yesterday that stuck out to us the future of work, which I said His flexibility. Remote hybrid Googlers get to decide Apparently Work flexibility sounds great, but honestly, it kind of does apply only to certain jobs and certain industries. So we asked Marketplaces and the Euler to get on the phone with some labor economists. You see what they figure the future work might be If you ask about the labor experts what the future of work's gonna look like most reluctant to commit a future work is uncertain. I would say the future of work is in flux. The future of work is not predetermined. Those vagaries came from Carl Van Horne at Rutgers, Salix Colvin at Cornell and Jesse Hammer. Leggett, California, Berkeley, and they did elaborate. Let's start with Van Horn. Uncertainty has to do with not only people's behavior but also employers. That's uncertainty about vaccine rules at the office or whether working from home is an employee benefit. Alex Colvin, a Cornell says the word flexibility is just the right amount of vague for a company like Google with about 140,000 workers does flexibility me. We can get rid of labor costs only need two employees on more disposable or does flexibility mean flexibility? What we're doing? It work how we do the work. Both as a flexibility, but they didn't mean very different things to workers. And Jesse Hammer. Ling, who studies the future of work at UC Berkeley, says those who have to do their jobs in person at restaurants, hospitals, grocery stores usually make less than people who can work from home and cove. It only brought more attention to this inequality in the labor market. It's really important that workers have a voice and have power in shaping what the future of work will be. If we want to get ourselves off our current path that leads toward Marlowe paid low road jobs, she says. After the pan Emmick worker. Complaints about their jobs aren't something about low wages but about job quality as well. I made the Euler for marketplace. You know who's still working at home? David Brancaccio and the.

David Brancaccio Alex Colvin Heidi Shierholz Mitchell Hartman Carl Van Horne Jay Powell Richard Wall Quest Alphabet University of Michigan Law Sch Catherine Ty Samantha Fields Thursday February of 2020 Today Los Angeles American Staffing Association Google Georgetown University Law Cent Salix Colvin Van Horn
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Brancaccio what the president has now signed into law keeps the federal government funded for another nine months to September. No shutdown. Among the elements in the pandemic Relief section is the country's first ever rental subsidy program funded by the federal government. $25 billion Worth Marketplaces Nervous. A foe is here with more on that. And that money will be distributed for states to administer Congress directed that the program get going in 30 days or less after the bill is signed into law. That will be just when the brief extension of the CDC is eviction moratorium runs out David and that's at the end of January, and once the program gets going, it can run up to 15 months. Will everyone who was able to use the ban on evictions be eligible for rental assistance, then The criteria is similar. But there is an order of priority that states are supposed to implement. And that priority is supposed to go to households that meet at least one of two conditions, and those are At least one person household is unemployed for at least 90 days or households. Total income does not exceed 50% of the area's median income. By the typical income Now, a lot of people of rent. Does this help with back rent or for what you owe going forward? So it's past due rent First. Once that's reduced households can get up to three months for future and but David, the $25 billion set aside for all of this is likely not going to be enough. Estimates are that Americans will need somewhere between 70 to $100 billion in rental. Eight. Nova. Thank you. Legislation from last bring curved covert related medical costs for many market places. Mitchell Hartmann has an update on that covert tests and vaccines are supposed to be free, says Karen Pollitz at the Kaiser Family Foundation. But we really don't have legislation that shields people from the cost of covert treatment. Some patients just get better at home. But others require much more expensive care, and says University of Minnesota epidemiologist Commie Smith, Even among covert patients who get hospitalized the course of diseases wild, the ranging a standard hospital stay will cost around $13,000, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. A severe case involving the ICU or a ventilator can cost upwards of 90,000 Paul, it says. For people who have health insurance most of that should be covered but with deductibles, even in an uncomplicated case. The average person might be facing, you know, $1300 in out of pocket costs. There is a government program to pay these bills for the uninsured. But on Lee if medical providers opt in I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. At the dawn of the last few trading days of the year, the Dow future is up 6/10 percent S and P and NASDAQ futures each up 7/10 percent for the year. The S and P is up more than 14%. Even with that Covad collapse in the spring. Lot of the strength has been pandemic. Low interest rates making alternatives to stock seem lifts attractive to investors. Marketplace Morning report is supported by bill dot com Over 100,000 small and midsize.

David Brancaccio Kaiser Family Foundation federal government Covad Congress president Mitchell Hartmann CDC Mitchell Hartman University of Minnesota Commie Smith Karen Pollitz Paul Lee
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"To the economy. It increases employment and puts money in people's pockets. All of that this year has, of course, been blunted. Thanks to covet 19 marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has more Stores and malls hired around 700,000 temporary seasonal workers in the fall of 2019 As of the end of November this year, Gains in temp jobs were running way behind that pace. Retail hiring South 12.5% fairly significant drop off. Andy Challenger at outplacement firm Challenger Gray and Christmas says there is Maury Commerce hiring Big boom in the transportation and warehousing sectors up about 137%. But he says that's still only makes up about half the seasonal jobs missing from brick and mortar retailers. There's a slow down for at based gig workers to last year, Joe Fifield drove for uber and lift in Minneapolis to supplement his income. This year. He is delivering for door dash, and he says it's not as easy to make money. You spend a lot more time driving with an empty car, he says he's making about 20% less than last year. I'm Mitchell Hartman for marketplace. Let's do the numbers. The footsie in London is up about 1/10 of a percent. Dow S and P and NASDAQ futures are up in the 1 to 2/10 percent range with the Dow future of 42 points. 10 Year Treasury yield is at 100.942%. And China's market regulator is launching an anti monopoly investigation of e commerce giant Alibaba Group. That company's stock is down 3% in pre market trading..

Challenger Gray Mitchell Hartmann Mitchell Hartman Andy Challenger Maury Commerce Alibaba Group Joe Fifield Dow China Minneapolis London
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"C s I. P. C. I'm David Brancaccio. President. Trump released a video last evening, saying the $900 billion covert relief bill passed by Congress is a disgrace needs to be reconfigured. And that $600 a person is not enough. Marketplaces. Nancy Marshall Ganz is in Washington. Will this delay the relief, Jax? Possibly David. Now, Trump did not specifically threatened to veto the covert relief bill. If you were to sign it, the checks could go out very soon. A Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin, said earlier this week. The money would land in Americans bank accounts as soon as next week. What happened to President Trump vetoes this bill? We'll both the House and Senate approved the covert bill by veto proof majorities in Congress can override of the president's veto with the two thirds majority needs chamber. But those votes would have to be scheduled, and many members of Congress have already gone home for the holidays. Right. So what's the next step then? Well, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted last night. Democrats could vote this week on a bill that would increase the payments to $2000. But that would have to be a unanimous vote than the Senate would have to approve it unanimously, which is unlikely by one estimate from economists early today, she increasing the checks to $2000 just for adults. Would cost an extra $370 billion. Nancy. Thank you. The stock market is pretty calm about this at the moment. Perhaps because Trump did not specifically say he would veto covert relief. The Dow is up 171 point 6/10 percent. The S and P 500 is up 4/10 percent. The NASDAQ is down 1/10 percent. The number of people signing up for unemployment benefits after fresh layoffs remain very high in the last week, But there's news the number did fall from 803,000 from 885,000 people. Personal spending fell sharply in November. The 4/10 percent drop was the first since April. We also just got the University of Michigan survey of Consumers where there was more strength in December over November overall, but slippage detected as this month draws to a close marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has background Even with positive news about vaccinations. Most of the news about the economy and Covitz spread has been downbeat lately, says Robert Frick, at Navy Federal Credit Union. Retail spending is decreasing, and the times are not good. Even with the federal aid package. We're looking at a few bleak months. How consumers feel about the future depends a lot on how pandemic shutdowns and layoffs affected them, says Mark Camera at bankrate dot com. There are a lot of people who are doing just fine Blue been able to work from home. They may own their home. They have substantial assets. They're not overly worried about the future. Other workers are more anxious. Those who have really been on the frontlines of these industries hurt most during the pandemic, leisure and hospitality retail and they are more financially fragile, he says. A recent Bankrate survey found that half of American households have lost income.

Trump Nancy Marshall Ganz Congress President David Brancaccio Senate House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Bankrate Mark Camera Jax Navy Federal Credit Union Steven Mnuchin Mitchell Hartmann University of Michigan Washington
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Y S C s I. P. C I'm David Brancaccio. President. Trump released a video last evening, saying the $900 billion covert relief bill passed by Congress. His A disgrace needs to be reconfigured. And that $600 a person is not enough. Marketplaces. Nancy Marshall Ganz is in Washington. Will this delay the relief, Jax? Possibly David Now, Trump did not specifically threatened to veto the covert relief bill. If you were to sign it, the checks could go out very soon, A Treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin, said earlier this week. The money with Landon Americans bank accounts as soon as next week. What happened to President Trump vetoes this bill? Well. Both the House and Senate approved the code Word bill by veto proof majorities in Congress can override of president's veto with the two thirds majority needs chamber. But those votes would have to be scheduled, and many members of Congress have already gone home for the holidays. Right. So what's the next step then? Well, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted last night. Democrats could vote this week on a bill that would increase the payments to $2000. But that would have to be a unanimous vote than the Senate would have to approve it unanimously, which is unlikely by one estimate from economist Ernie to death, she increasing the checks to $2000 just for adults. Would cost an extra $370 billion. Nancy. Thank you. The stock market is pretty calm about this at the moment. Perhaps because Trump did not specifically say he would veto covert relief. The Dow is up 171 point 6/10 percent. The S and P 500 is up 4/10 percent. The NASDAQ is down 1/10 percent. The number of people signing up for unemployment benefits after fresh layoffs remain very high in the last week, But there's news the number did fall from 803,000 from 885,000 people. Personal spending fell sharply in November. The 4/10 percent drop was the first since April. We also just got the University of Michigan survey of Consumers where there was more strength in December over November overall, but slippage detected as this month draws to a close marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has background Even with positive news about vaccinations. Most of the news about the economy and Covitz spread has been downbeat lately, says Robert Frick, at Navy Federal Credit Union. Reach. Our spending is decreasing, and the times are not good. Even with the federal aid package. We're looking at a few bleak months. How consumers feel about the future depends a lot on how pandemic shutdowns and layoffs affected them, says Mark Camera at bankrate dot com. There are a lot of people who are doing just fine. We've been able to work from home. They may own their home. They have substantial assets. They're not overly worried about the future. Other workers are more anxious. Those who have really been on the frontlines of these industries, her most during the pandemic, leisure and hospitality, retail and they are more financially fragile, he says. A recent Bankrate survey found that half of American households have lost income in the pandemic..

Trump President Nancy Marshall Ganz Congress Senate David Brancaccio House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Bankrate Mark Camera Navy Federal Credit Union Jax David Now Steven Mnuchin Mitchell Hartmann University of Michigan Washington
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"C s I. P. C. I'm David Brancaccio. President. Trump released the video last evening, saying the $900 billion covert relief bill passed by Congress is a disgrace needs to be reconfigured. And that $600 a person is not enough. Marketplaces. Nancy Marshall Ganz joins us from Washington Nancy will this Delay the relief checks. Possibly David. But remember, Trump did not specifically threatened to veto the covert relief bill. If he were to sign it. The checks could go out very soon. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said earlier this week. The money would land in Americans Bank accounts as soon as next week. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted last night. Democrats could vote this week on a bill that would increase the relief payments to $2000. That vote could come tomorrow. But then the Senate would have to approve it unanimously, which is unlikely. And what happens if Trump vetoes the bill? Both the House and Senate approved the Cove in relief package by veto proof majorities so Congress could override the president's veto with a two thirds majority in each chamber, But those votes would have to be scheduled. And many members of Congress have already gone home for the holidays. Uh, so realistically, if the president doesn't sign this bill right away, people won't see those checks for a while. Right. And even if President Trump does nothing if he doesn't veto it, but also doesn't sign it. It would still take 10 days for the bill to become law without his signature. Nancy. Thank you. The stock market is calm about this at the moment, perhaps based on history that Trump has threatened to veto spending legislation in the past, but has not done so. The SNP future is up 3/10 percent now. The British pound is up in a dollar 34 this morning with the possibility that a deal to smooth the U. K's exit from the EU could happen today. This morning, We'll get the University of Michigan survey on how consumerist people are feeling during the short days amid pandemic marketplaces Mitchell Hartmann has that even with positive news about vaccinations, most of the news about the economy and Covitz spread has been downbeat lately, says Robert Frick, at Navy Federal Credit Union. Rachel spending is decreasing, and the Times are not good. Even with the federal aid package. We're looking at a few bleak months. How consumers feel about the future depends a lot on how pandemic shutdowns and layoffs of affected them, says Mark Camera at bankrate dot com. There are a lot of people who are doing just fine Blue been able to work from home. They may own their home. They have substantial assets. They're not overly worried about the future. Other workers are more anxious. Those who have really been on the frontlines of these industries hurt most during the pandemic, leisure and hospitality retail and they are more financially fragile, he says. A recent Bankrate survey found that half of American households have lost income in the pandemic. I'm Mitchell Hartman for Marketplace. Marketplace.

President Trump Nancy Marshall Ganz President Congress David Brancaccio House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Senate Bankrate Mark Camera Mitchell Hartman Nancy Rachel spending Navy Federal Credit Union EU Steve Mnuchin Mitchell Hartmann University of Michigan
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's still a long way to go in this fall semester. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing that experience. Postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning infrastructure coded 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company. Schools are making sure they can fill their commitment financially to the students have already matriculated one way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is than to be killed by 1000 little cuts. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega, with the Council of Graduate School, says. That's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow. Summon more diverse undergraduate student pipeline to a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects says Gwen told her with the National Association of Graduate Professional students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority or close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in, for example, virtual tomography, And that, too,.

Dalton Conley Mitchell Hartmann Princeton graduate student Council of Graduate School Gwen Eric Embarrass Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega National Association
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Long way to go in this fall semester. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. So Mitchell was talking mostly about undergraduates and how the pandemic is changing. That experienced postgraduate education in this Corona virus economy, though, is no picnic, either. Dozens of PhD programs across the country are saying they are not going to be admitting any new students for the next academic year. That is the one that starts in 2021. Marketplaces, Eric Embarrass reports. It is a temporary pause that could have some long term effects. Colleges and universities have a lot of additional cost these days. Personal protective equipment, remote learning infrastructure, Coben 19 tests and with fewer students on campus. They have less money coming in. So, says Carla Hickman with a B, an education consulting company. Schools are making sure they can fill their commitment financially to the students who have already matriculated. One way they could do that is by not admitting new students. Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says that's the decision his department made in regards to PhD students. It made more sense to suspend admissions for one year and have those resource is than to be killed by 1000 Little cut. But students from poor backgrounds may not be ableto wait for schools to restart admissions so they'll pursue other careers. Suzanne Ortega, with the Council of Graduate School, says that's bad for diversity. We're disrupting the flow from a more diverse undergraduate student pipeline. To a less diverse graduate student pipeline. Even undergraduates are likely to feel the effects says Gwen told her with the National Association of Graduate Professional students, especially at big State universities, where the graduate students do the majority or close to the majority of the instruction of the undergrads. This might make it very challenging to continue to provide this inequality of education. But this pause could also give graduate programs time to change, Princeton sociologist Dalton Conley says with field research suspended We have to rethink. We have to develop courses and a curriculum in for example, virtual tomography, And that, too, will take resource Is America Baris for Marketplace? So here's an interesting tidbit in the How you feeling about this economy category. Spoiler alert Pretty good, it turns out. The conference board reported this morning consumer confidence in September as high as it's been since the pandemic started also the jump in confidence from August to September. The biggest jump in 17 years. Probably chalk it up to that slowly declining unemployment rate. We will get the September jobs report on Friday morning, by the way. We, though, have been checking in with some consumers were also regular listeners to this program about what they have been consuming lately, and it seems Sometimes spending a little money. Brings a little bit of joy. This is Kelly Kolinsky in Columbus, Ohio. I wasn't quite ready to fly yet, but I felt like I really needed to fly home to check on my mom who's 89 years old. And when I'm home, I always try and get my mom to maybe spend a little money on some new things. But she was raised during the Depression, and she won't spend money on anything except for groceries. And she only buys those when she has a coupon, But this afternoon, we were looking through on old dog eared cookbook and she said, You know, your father gave this to me about a month after we were married in 1954. So you know, I think she's motivated by not wanting to spend on what she feels isn't necessary. But there's also a lot of value in the memories associated with a lot of things that she has Hi. This is Ernesto from Chicago. Not a lot of new things, but what I did do recently was invest in some Hi and ah French cookware, the enamel type that I usually would not buy because for the most part, it's just way too expensive. Now, I don't know if it's on sale. At 50%, because Businesses want to get rid of it before a possible future bankruptcy or not, I mean, that's that's how I see it. Most have been buying some use camera gear. It never goes bad. Hi. This is Ellen Murphy from Mission. L's Kansas and my current virus shopping. A stories have gone from Being mass step and gloved up to just Eyes glazed over walking through the store, picking up like things off of a very strictly written list. So I was pleasantly surprised Last week when I found A stash of tree ripened peaches. And I can tell you that there is nothing like a fresh late. Late summer peach. When you slice into it in the morning and sit down to eat it, no matter what is coming across on the radio. It almost doesn't matter..

Dalton Conley Princeton Mitchell Hartmann graduate student Gwen Council of Graduate School Eric Embarrass Carla Hickman Suzanne Ortega America Depression Kansas Kelly Kolinsky National Association Columbus Ellen Murphy Ohio Ernesto
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today, everybody the fourth day of September. Good as always to have you along. A macro an economic number of the day as this pandemic get set to enter its seventh month if you can believe that is 1.37 million that his jobs added to this economy in the month of August. Three million people had been temporarily laid off came back to work and that helped bring the unemployment rate down. Almost 2% points to 8.4%. All of that is good. Like I said. But a chunk of those jobs a quarter million or so our temporary census workers. We're going to be out of work again soon and more to the point. Job growth is slowing a million plus in August, as I said it was nearly five million a month. Back in June. What else? What you bear in mind Marketplaces? Mitchell Hartmann is on the putting The jobs report in context beat today. This economy has been through a lot since mid March. About 15% of all the jobs in America evaporated in just a few weeks. We've been clawing back those jobs ever since. Here's how Brad McMillan at Commonwealth Financial Network rates the latest report. It was good. It wasn't great, but it was certainly solid, it says. We're continuing to make progress, but we also have a long way to go. Gaining 1.4 million jobs would be blockbuster in normal times. But economist Beth Acres at the Manhattan Institute says Now that number may be giving the misimpression that we're doing pretty well digging out of this hole. But the reality is that we're only about halfway out a little over 10 million of the 22 Million jobs we've lost have come back and job gains air slowing. Baker says. This is really a tale of two recoveries. Employment levels for higher income workers have almost come back to pre crisis level. Where is employment levels for low wage workers remain significantly below where they were? And it's also unclear when those workers will be able to get back to work. Jobs in bars and restaurants, for instance, are still down 25% from before the pandemic. Which leaves a lot of workers out of the recovery so far. Like Cody Sorenson, he's 33 worked as a server at an upscale Italian restaurant in West Hollywood until mid March. Sorenson's on indefinite layoff. He's still getting health benefits and a $400 a week unemployment check when that runs out. I mean, I'm just gonna have to go and find another job or I'm just going to move. I guess back on the Texas you know where he hopes they'll be less competition for any new jobs that come up. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. All right, with that, as backdrop, let's dig in a little bit on jobs and the other news of the day. And this week Gina Smile like is with The New York Times. Kate Davidson is at the Wall Street Journal. Hey, too. Okay, let me start with you picking up on Mitchell's spot, and he gave a nod to this, but I want to. I want to make sure people get it. There is despite this good, not great report today. There's some underlying fragility in this economy. Right? 29 million people on some kind of unemployment benefits. Small businesses closing left and right, Yeah. That's right. A cz you sort of hinted at it was kind of it was kind of a mixed report. You know, on the one hand 8.4% Unemployment is much lower than where many people thought we'd be at this point, But things are still really bad. And I guess the thing to understand is that the people who are still out of work. Many of them are people at the lower end of the wage scale that have jobs and industries that have been harder hit by the pandemic. Hotel workers, restaurant workers, people in industries That are still struggling to come back on. The longer these people stay out of work. The risk is that those more and more of those job loss has become become permanent. So it's on the right track. But you know a long way to go still. Hear those permanent job losses that longstanding damage the economy. Gina is something Fisher pal talks about a lot Hey, gave an interview to morning edition this morning is going to air. I think on Monday the transcript is out for those who wanted again. I wantto parts a couple of things, he said. Number one. Low interest rates in this economy are going to be here, and this is quoting Powell for a period measured in years. That is, I mean, it's kind of we know it, but it's kind of amazing. Yeah, yeah, no surprise to bond markets, which are, you know, obviously recognizing that we're in for a really long period of low interest rates, But I think that Yeah, it's It's remarkable if you remember back to 2007 to 2009 recession and, you know, sort of within within, not a very long time span people we're talking about, you know, when is lift off? When is the fed going to raise rates? You know what? When did they start moving this extraordinary accommodation and I feel like you know in the Oval Decade that conversation issues fundamentally shift and shifted. And a lot of that was T Drum pal who has been very clear about communicating that we're in this federation. You know, they're not planning on just like immediately raising rates as soon as we get past sort of the worst through this recession. We're in this this environment for a really long time until the job market has, you know he owed and really after. What they did is they don't quite clearly is until inflation picks up. Which goes back to what he was talking about last week in pseudo Jackson Hole, As or Kate, one of the other things that Powell talked about with morning Edition today is.

Mitchell Hartmann Kate Davidson Gina Smile morning Edition Cody Sorenson Powell Manhattan Institute Texas Commonwealth Financial Network West Hollywood Brad McMillan America Oval Decade Beth Acres Wall Street Journal Baker T Drum The New York Times
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Los Angeles on Cairo. It is Friday. Today, everybody the fourth day of September. Good as always to have you along. A macro and an economic number of the day as this pandemic get set to enter its seventh month if you can believe that is 1.37 million that his jobs added to this economy in the month of August. Three million people had been temporarily laid off came back to work and that helped bring the unemployment rate down. Almost 2% points to 8.4%. All of that is good. Like I said. But a chunk of those jobs a quarter million or so our temporary census workers. We're going to be out of work again soon. And more to the point. Job growth is slowing a million plus in August, as I said it was nearly five million a month back in June. What else? What you bear in mind Marketplaces? Mitchell Hartmann is on the putting The jobs report in context beat today. This economy has been through a lot since mid March. About 15% of all the jobs in America evaporated in just a few weeks. We've been clawing back those jobs ever since. Here's how Brad McMillan at Commonwealth Financial Network rates the latest report. It was good. It wasn't great, but it was certainly solid, it says. We're continuing to make progress, but we also have a long way to go. Gaining 1.4 million jobs would be blockbuster in normal times. But economist Beth Acres at the Manhattan Institute says Now that number may be giving the impression that we're doing pretty well digging out of this hole. But the reality is that we're only about halfway out a little over 10 million of the 22 million jobs we've lost have come back. And job gains. Air Slowing, Acres, says This is really a tale of two recoveries, Employment levels for higher income workers have almost come back to pre crisis level. Where is employment levels for low wage workers remain significantly below where they were, and it's also unclear when those workers will be able to get back to work. Jobs in bars and restaurants, for instance, are still down 25% from before the pandemic, which leaves a lot of workers out of the recovery so far. Like Cody Sorenson. He's 33 worked as a server at an upscale Italian restaurant in West Hollywood until mid March. Sorenson's on indefinite layoff. He's still getting health benefits and a $400 a week unemployment check when that runs out. I mean, I'm just gonna have to go and find like another job, or are you just going to move? I guess back on the Texas you know where he hopes they'll be less competition for any new jobs that come up. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. All right, with that, as backdrop, let's dig in a little bit on jobs and the other news of the day. And this week, genius Milik is with The New York Times. K. Davidson is at the Wall Street Journal. Hey, you two I can't. Okay, let me start with you. Ah, picking up on Mitchell's spot, and he gave a nod to this, but I want to. I want to make sure people get it. There is despite this good, not great report today. There's some underlying fragility in this economy. Right? 29 million people on some kind of unemployment benefit small businesses closing left and right, Yeah. That's right. A cz You sort of hinted at sky. It was kind of it was kind of a mixed report. You know, on the one hand 8.4% Unemployment is much lower than where many people thought we'd be at this point, But things are still really bad. And I guess the thing to understand is that the people who are still out of work, many of them are people at the lower end of the wage scale that have jobs and industries that have been harder hit by the pandemic. Hotel workers, restaurant workers, people in industries Are still struggling to come back on. And the longer these people stay out of work. The risk is that those more and more of those job loss has become become permanent. So it's on the right track. But you know a long way to go still. Hear those permanent job losses that longstanding damage the economy. Gina is something Fisher Pala talks about a lot haven interview to morning edition this morning is gonna air I think on Monday the transcript is out for those who wanted again. I wantto parts a couple of things you said number one. Low interest rates in this economy are going to be here, and this is quoting pal for a period measured in years. That is, I mean, it's kind of we know it, but it's kind of amazing. Yeah, yeah, no surprise to bond markets, which are, you know, obviously recognizing that we're in for a really long period of low interest rates, But I think that Yeah, it's it's remarkable if you remember back to 2007 to 2009 recession and, you know, sort of within within, not a very long time span people we're talking about, you know, when is lift off? When is the fed going to raise rates? You know what? When did they start moving this extraordinary accommodation and I feel like You know, in the over the last decade, That conversation is just fundamentally shift and shifted. And a lot of that was T Drum pal who has been very clear about communicating that we're in this federation. You know, they're not planning on just like immediately raising rates As soon as we get past sort of the worst of this recession. We're in this this environment for a really long time until the job market has, you know he owed and really after what the Goddess said quite clearly is until inflation picks up. Which goes back to what he was talking about last week in pseudo Jackson Hole, As or Kate, one of the other things that pallet talked about with morning Edition today is.

Mitchell Hartmann Cody Sorenson morning Edition Cairo Los Angeles Manhattan Institute Texas West Hollywood Commonwealth Financial Network Beth Acres Brad McMillan America Wall Street Journal T Drum Milik Kate K. Davidson The New York Times
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"School year for at least half of the district in the country so far. Is now familiar online teaching via zoom or something similar kid sitting at the kitchen table or a makeshift desk or line on the living room couch. A lot of those kids are going to need watching and help to with actual learning, which parents by which we mean mostly moms are going to have to provide and that is going to make it really hard for those parents to keep working and making a living. Emergency government unemployment assistance is supposed to help. But it's not for a lot of working Parents marketplaces Mitchell Hartmann talk to some of them in Seattle. A few weeks ago, King five TV in Seattle delivered the news parents were waiting for the superintendent says she knows this is not going to be easy for all families. But she says she's with covert cases in the region. Surging the school semester would start remotely learning because she thinks that this point in person instruction just is impossible. Seattle parent Jennifer Zag alone already been through this back in the spring. When her son Jack's elementary School was closed. She just lost her job is a legal assistant and was trying to find a job she could do part time from home. Because I wasn't working. I was taking Jack three days a week. Her ex husband took care of Jack the other two days. Zagalo applied for state jobless benefits denied you can't get unemployment. It turns out if you have to care for a child, but she had a fallback, federal pandemic unemployment assistance, or P u way. It's for people who don't qualify for regular state jobless benefits, including parents who aren't working because their kid's school or daycare is closed. You take over 19. Except remember those work from home jobs she applied for I ended up being denied. They said benefits or not for people who can tell the work even though she hadn't actually landed a job. Zack Alos, not alone. So most workers, jobless workers have had a really hard time applying for the way. Drake Hagner at legal Aid in Washington, D C says thousands of applicants have had to wait months to find out if they qualify. She says the rules are confusing to get benefits. A parent has to certify their available for work, even though they can't actually take a job because they have kids stuck at home due to Cove. It And there are plenty of other snags keeping parents from getting federal jobless benefits. Almost nothing is going right indeed, due to Gupta directs the center on Poverty and inequality at Georgetown Law School. He says. Childcare is scarce nationwide daycare after school and summer programs have been caught way back. But as long as some care is available, no matter how inaccessible working parents are still being denied benefits states have made the burden quite unreasonable for parents when there's not a complete closure of a child care facility when the parents might rely on family Where schools are arguably technically open, but certainly do not provide needed care for parents to work. Legal aid. Attorney Drake Hagner in D. C. Says there's a lot of uncertainty heading into the fall. What exactly happens when school's air only open for maybe half of the week for half of the kids are online learning? Can people still get their benefits or not? One thing is clear if local schools reopen, But parents keep their kids home because they're afraid of spreading Covitz vulnerable family members. Parents can't get federal jobless benefits. Seattle mother, Jennifer Zag Alot appealed her unemployment denials and one after five months without benefits. She'll get a lump sum payment going back to mid March. Meanwhile, she and her son, Jack, are getting ready to start the new school year there fully online and I have no choice but to find a telecommute job 2.5 days a week. And until she does, she and Jack will have to make do with a jobless benefit of around $540 a week. Mitchell Hartmann for Marketplace.

Jack Seattle Jennifer Zag Georgetown Law School Mitchell Hartmann Drake Hagner legal Aid elementary School Gupta Zack Alos Zagalo King superintendent Washington Attorney
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"Benefit of around $540 a week. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. U. S constitution is hard to change on purpose, And that means every amendment is the end result of a campaign of advocates come together to push through round after round of cajoling and Marching, eventually voting to change this country's founding document 100 years ago. Today was one of those moments when Tennessee ratify the 19th amendment. Making it the law of the land that the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. That's the actual text. A lot has changed about political campaign since suffragists were fighting for their rights, But a lot has marketplaces. Kimberly Adams first reported for us last year, hasn't Suffrage anthems like Daughters of freedom can bring to mind images of women in white marching for equality of hunger strikes and sacrifice. Korean McConnell He is a political science professor at George Washington University. We don't tend to teach about the suffrage movement as a major, well funded organization in American political history. But it wass the National Women's Party had hundreds of donors from all over the country. Joan Murray Johnson is author of Funding Feminism and says the group Wass recording gifts from 25. Cents a dollar all the way up to Mrs Alva Vanderbilt, Belmont's $76,000. And when wealthy widow Miriam Leslie left a million dollar estate to the cause in 1914, the suffragist did what interest groups in Washington due to this day. Hired a bunch of lobbyists to counter dismissive messages.

United States Mrs Alva Vanderbilt Joan Murray Johnson Mitchell Hartmann Miriam Leslie professor Marching Wass Kimberly Adams George Washington University Tennessee National Women's Party Washington Funding Feminism Belmont
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"K through 12 education paradigm this fall, and maybe the whole school year for at least half of the district in the country so far. Is now familiar online teaching by a zoom or something similar kids sitting at the kitchen table or a makeshift desk or line on the living room couch. A lot of those kids are going to need watching and help to with actual learning. Which parents by which we mean mostly moms are going to have to provide and that is going to make it really hard for those parents keep working and making a living. Emergency government unemployment assistance is supposed to help. But it's not for a lot of working Parents marketplaces Mitchell Hartmann talk to some of them in Seattle. A few weeks ago, King five TV in Seattle delivered the news parents were waiting for the superintendent says she knows this is not going to be easy for all families. But she says she's with covert cases in the region. Surging the school semester would start remotely learning because she thinks at this point in person instruction just is impossible. Seattle parent Jennifer Zag alone already been through this back in the spring when her son Jack's elementary school was closed. She just lost her job as a legal assistant and was trying to find a job She could do part time from home. Because I wasn't working. I was taking Jack three days a week. Her ex husband took care of Jack the other two days. Zagalo applied for state jobless benefits denied you can't get unemployment. It turns out if you have to care for a child, but she had a fallback. Federal pandemic Unemployment assistance, or P U A It's for people who don't qualify for regular state jobless benefits, including parents who aren't working because their kid's school or daycare is closed due to covert 19. Except remember those work from home jobs she applied for. I ended up being denied. They said benefits or not for people who can tell a work even though she hadn't actually landed a job. Zagallo's not alone. So most workers jobless workers have had a really hard time applying for P way. Drake Hagner at Legal Aid in Washington, D C says thousands of applicants have had to wait months to find out if they qualify. She says the rules are confusing to get benefits. A parent has to certify their available for work, even though they can't actually take a job because they have kids stuck at home due to Cove. It And there are plenty of other snags keeping parents from getting federal jobless benefits. Almost nothing is going right indeed, due to Gupta directs the center on Poverty and inequality at Georgetown Law School. He says. Childcare is scarce nationwide daycare after school and summer programs have been caught way back. But as long as some care is available, no matter how inaccessible working parents are still being denied benefits states have made the burden quite unreasonable for parents when there's not a complete closure of a child care facility when the parents might rely on family Where schools.

Seattle Jack Jennifer Zag Georgetown Law School Gupta Zagallo Mitchell Hartmann superintendent Zagalo Drake Hagner King Legal Aid Washington
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Today, the 20th of July. Good as always to have you along everybody. We begin this week at the end of July in a year and none of us going to forget. By pointing out the enduring reality of this economy. 32 a half 1,000,000 Americans aren't working. They're trying to get by on expanded federal unemployment benefits expanded. Who condemn gig workers, self employed people who can't go to work because school is closed or because somebody in their household is sick. They all get him. Those benefits are also expanded in how much people khun get. That's the extra $600 a week you've been hearing Oh, so much about here and elsewhere. You've also been hearing. I'm sure that the last of those checks go out in the South by Southwest Festival and everyone theater folks, waiters, bartenders, Carson Lost every job that we had before the pandemic, he'd have been out of luck. Freelance workers aren't typically eligible for jobless benefits, but Washington made them eligible and added $600. Of 200 a week like that that point then I'm probably still paying my rent. But I may have to talk to my bank about Can I defer my car loan? OK, I can still survive. But now I'm going to be figuring out how to prioritize which bills to pay. All over the country. People in states with comparatively low jobless benefits, like Texas will face a 50 to 75% pay cut at a time when getting a new job isn't necessarily easy or safe, says Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation. And that means people worried about losing their housing. Having to move in with relatives. You're not really be able to get by on unemployment benefits, Stettner says Losing the federal supplement will suck $25 billion a week out of the economy. Money People spend right away on essentials rent food transportation. The money is also keeping some small businesses alive like Anna's Assemblies Bakery in Kansas City, Missouri, where she has cooked server and business manager When the state shut down, she got on pandemic unemployment. It's gone towards shop expenses. I mean, I still have to pay rent, even when I'm closed and utilities and all that since I haven't had any revenue really. When state re opened, she was no longer eligible for unemployment. So she reopened. Feli masked takeout only and and Monday. I woke up with flu symptoms and went to the doctor and I Presumptive positive She's quarantining now, and her shop is closed. If she doesn't start getting unemployment payments soon, she's not sure she'll be able to reopen. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace Exactly How much spending power that extra 600 bucks gets? It varies. Ah, whole lot. Of course, depending on where you are our colleagues at the A. P. M research labs in ST Paul have built an interactive map That'll give you some sense of it. You can check that out at marketplace, not ord. Should say here. By the way that there are talks set on a new economic package tomorrow up on Capitol Hill, the GOP wants to hold it to a trillion Democrats in the House already passed a package at 3.5 trillion. Those obviously are the starting points. Stop me if you've heard this one before. But traders on Wall Street today took hope in some promising vaccine news. Never mind all that actual economic uncertainty. We will have the details when we do the numbers. You know what we haven't seen in a good long while. A big energy merger is what Which makes sense. Of course, These are dark days in oil and gas. So it was with some surprise, we learned Chevron is going to buy an independent oil and gas producer called.

Andrew Stettner Mitchell Hartmann Feli Anna flu self employed Washington Chevron Carson Texas Century Foundation Missouri Assemblies Bakery producer GOP A. P. M Kansas City
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Us tonight for fresh air at seven on Idiot Ate intelligence squared. US. Considers The Corona virus could reshape geopolitics. Some see the virus raising the status of China as Beijing offers assistance to struggling nations, while the Trump administration embraces America first. But others say the corona virus will diminish rather than bolster China Standing in the world a debate eight o'clock tonight and again at 1 a.m. Tomorrow morning intelligence squared US. This morning Bay Area so morning cloudiness, then Sunny Today high sixties to the mid nineties inland. U. S. Supreme Court rules unemployment law in religion. Marketplace Morning report is supported by Fidelity Wealth Management, where advisers work with their clients to develop flexible investment strategies that evolved as their needs change. Fidelity dot com slash wealth Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC. From market place in New York. I'm sory been ashore in for David Brancaccio. Earlier this hour, the Supreme Court handed down to decisions in one, the court said the Trump administration can widen exemptions. For employers who don't want to cover contraception on religious or moral grounds. In the second decision, the Supreme Court ruled employment discrimination laws did not apply to religious institutions when it comes to certain jobs, writing that under the First Amendment Courts are bound to stay out of employment disputes involving those holding certain important positions with churches and other religious institutions. Stay tuned. There'll be a lot more coverage on that today. Covad misinformation. Maybe a multi $1,000,000 business online pushers of conspiracy theories and false information make money from ads served on their sites. Marketplaces Nova Sappho has more The UK based global disinformation index estimates that English language websites trafficking in covert 19 misinformation will make some $25 million from digital advertising this year. Money reportedly comes from major brands such as Cannon, Loreal and Johnson and Johnson. The group says the websites in question publish misinformation, such as conspiracy theories about the origins of the novel Corona virus and stories about unproven and downright dangerous treatments. Sites make money when ads powered by tech giants such as Google and Amazon inadvertently populate next to the content in question because it generates user traffic. Google called the report flawed and the revenue calculations not realistic, A spokesperson said Google is taking an aggressive approach to content that makes harmful claims about covert 19. I'm nervous, Awful for marketplace. As bad as a pandemic job losses have been, it could have been a lot worse. Some companies have managed to cut their labor costs to save money without resorting to permanent layoffs. At least so far. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartmann has more In a recent survey of HR managers, outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, found that one in three companies cut employee pay in response to the pandemic, and of that group, 55% reported that cuts allowed them to avoid layoffs. Senior VP Andy challenger says the thinking is won't have our team intact. It won't hurt morale so bad by letting people go. Even when companies do reduce payroll. Some are trying to retain ties to their workers among S and P 500 companies that have caught staff. 3/4 have done it through temporary furloughs rather than permanent layoffs, says Ganache. Raja Paan at Analytics firm. My logic I believe it was down to retain talent, he says. Among companies that did furloughs or hiring freeze is about 1/4 also reduced pay for top executives. Those some of those cuts have since been restored. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. Let's take a look at the numbers. The Dow Jones industrial average is up 107 points. That is 4/10 of a percent. D S and P 500 is up 6/10 of a percent..

U. S. Supreme Court Mitchell Hartmann US China Google Fidelity Wealth Management Fidelity Brokerage Services LL David Brancaccio Beijing New York America Nova Sappho Bay Area Senior VP Andy challenger Raja Paan Johnson
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"Address this problem at a time when Facebook is facing pressure from an advertiser boycott to address misinformation and hate speech on its platform. I'm nervous, awful for marketplace. As bad as the pandemic. Job losses have been 31 million Americans on unemployment rolls, It could actually have been worse. Some companies have managed to cut their labor cost to save money without resorting to permanent layoffs. At least so far. Marketplaces Mitchell Hartmann has more In a recent survey of HR managers, outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, found that one in three companies cut employee pay in response to the pandemic, and of that group, 55% reported that cuts allowed them to avoid layoffs. Senior VP Andy challenger says the thinking is we'll have our team intact. It won't hurt morale so bad by letting people go. Even when companies do reduce payroll. Some are trying to retain ties to their workers among S and P 500 companies that have cut staff. 3/4 have done it through temporary furloughs rather than permanent layoffs, says Ganache. Raja Paan at Analytics firm. My logic I believe it was done to retain talent, he says. Among companies that did furloughs or hiring freeze is about 1/4 also reduced pay for top executives. Those some of those cuts have since been restored. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. Let's take a quick look at the numbers. SNP features are up just barely Dow futures down less than 1/10 of a percent..

Mitchell Hartmann Andy challenger Facebook Senior VP Challenger Raja Paan Gray
"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"mitchell hartmann" Discussed on KCRW

"We don't know the exact amount it's categorized as between 2 to $5 million. Expensive private schools were on the list law firms, including what then represented President Trump and the reason we're learning about this now, sir breeze that the Treasury Department under pressure released data for who got the biggest loans? Yeah, I remember. A few weeks ago, We were talking about some big restaurant chains taking people's phones. I mean, are these revelations particularly surprising? Well, they're confirming some of the criticisms about the PPP program that money was flowing to bigger businesses than perhaps Congress intended. The issue is that the program was supposed to be for firms that didn't have other options for quickly raising cash to continue paying employees and staying in business. And we spoke with Sarah Crozier about this of the Main Street alliance, which is an advocacy group for small business to see that the most well banked businesses you know our best represented in getting that money and ultimately, maybe didn't need it as much as other businesses, particularly in the service industries. I can see where that outrage has been justified. And closures Group now wants Congress to target age, for example, geographically, perhaps to small businesses in infection hot spots where the aide maybe most needed All right, Nova. Thank you. At the end of this month, millions of unemployed Americans will get their last $600 a week. Federal pandemic unemployment check. That is unless Congress acts to extend the program. Marketplaces. Mitchell Hartmann has more Jody Soul L is 64 works for a solar energy installer in Maryland. He was furloughed in March and recently got called back for a very partial reopening. One Wake. I had 2.5 hours another week, two hours. He is still getting $880 a week on unemployment that includes 600 in federal pandemic benefits. What will his family do if that runs out at the end of July? I haven't even thought about that. That's why they make credit Cone. Financial advisory firm. The ascent has surveyed unemployed workers and research analyst Dan Albright says almost 2/3 and go less than three months. Without the extra $600 they would borrow more money and take more drastic cuts in their expenses. A recent survey by the Urban Institute finds more than four in 10 American households have suffered job or income lost during the pandemic. I'm Mitchell Hartmann for marketplace. Let's take a look at the numbers this morning, The Dow Jones industrial average is down 221 points. That is 8/10 of a percent. The S and P 500 is down 3/10 of a percent. The NASDAQ is up 3/10 of a percent..

Mitchell Hartmann Congress Sarah Crozier Trump Treasury Department closures Group President Main Street alliance Urban Institute Maryland Nova Dan Albright research analyst