9 Burst results for "Mister Bolsonaro"

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"They would have a relief from sanctions, but wouldn't do other nuclear weapons. But of course their claim is that it's Trump who diffs that particular treaty. Why should they go back to it? So there are problems ahead, as I say, this is an issue which is welcome in a sense. It's a symbol of intent at a reminder of how bad nuclear war could be, but we've got a long way to go beyond that I'm afraid. We also have different kinds of warfare than we have compared to the era of Gorbachev and Reagan. Many suggest that the era of nuclear conflict has been surpassed. How relevant is a conversation like this now? Well, it has, but the reality is people are still planning for nuclear war. I mean, just two days ago, the independent British intelligence group declassified UK published more information showing that Britain had deployed tactical nuclear weapons. That's the tactical ones during the focal malvinas war. In 1982, they said in other words, Britain was prepared to take tactical nuclear weapons to the South Atlantic. They were never used, of course, but they were there. And that would be true to sort of virtually any major nuclear conflict. Several countries in Western Europe NATO members don't have their own nuclear weapons, but they're in a position to use American ones. Nuclear weapons are still there. You're absolutely right that there are other problems, you know, nano warfare, biosecurity, the problems of many other areas, particularly cyber warfare. And in fact, Britain has indicated at least sort of unofficially that it would see a major cyberattack as something which might require a quite a different response. The meaning being, you know, you could even get some sort of nuclear response. So yes, nuclear weapons should be way passe. Sort of going back sort of decades, but we're not there and to some extent they do integrate with the new dangers, which at least means that this statement does reinforce that we still have very big problems ahead. And how much does this statement actually distract from those very big problems which are immediately on our doorstep? I'm thinking of Ukraine and the fact that Russia and NATO seem to be on the point of getting extremely nasty about this buildup of troops on the Russian border. Well, I think that in a sense it is the one good element in that this agreement was negotiated with some difficulty among the 5 states over a number of months. The timing is because originally there was going to be another review of the non proliferation treaty. And it would mean even more embarrassing if they hadn't agreed to this. But the point is that this was agreed negotiated at a time of high tension. You have the tensions between China and the United States, not least over Taiwan. And as you say, you have Ukraine. Now, to some extent, it means the diplomat can get on with meeting on author thorny issue even when you have high tensions over something like Ukraine. So paradoxically, you could say, well, there's at least a sign that some degree of diplomacy can work in difficult times and it indicates that something rises above these immediate problems like we have with Ukraine and Taiwan. There's not much to go on, but at least it's better than nothing. Paul Rogers, thank you so much for joining us. That was Paul Rogers from open democracy. You're listening to the globalist on monocle 24. Brazil's president jair Bolsonaro is back in hospital after falling ill on holiday, mister Bolsonaro, his 66th, has been admitted to hospital several times since being stabbed on the campaign trail in 2018, and his latest stint comes as this year's presidential contest begins to heat up. So to have a look at what's lies in store in Brazil in 2022 when it comes to politics. Let's hear now from Antonio's empire, an expert on Brazilian politics. Good morning, Antonio. Good morning. Very good to have you. If you could just briefly update his pieces, outline where we are with Jaya Bolsonaro and his status in hospital. So Jai Bolsonaro is in hospital due to some intestinal blockage that is likely related to the terrible attack that he suffered during the presidential campaign back in 2018 when he was stabbed. But the doctors and the hospital have said that his condition has been proving. So, of course, this is yet another known unknown for the momentous election that will have in October this year, Bolsonaro's health, which seems to be improving, but still yet another source of uncertainty in this very town year for Brazil. It is a very tense here. The election is almost make or break for Brazil's future. Who's on the ballot? So at the moment, there are several pre candidates, but only two really have become competitive in the opinion polls. That is the former president of the Workers Party, Louisiana Sue Mila da Silva. So Lula, who was president of Brazil for 8 years back in the 2000s back in the golden days of Brazilian economy when bazo was riding a commodity boom in the international market. And Michelle Bolsonaro, who is going to most likely going to be running he associated himself with a political party doing most of his government he was without any party. He was by himself. Confirming his image as a sort of political outsider anti status quo. But to run for president, he needed to affiliate himself with the party. But he really is associated with his own sort of movement that is conservative, ultra, right-wing politics, in Brazil. So those are the two that are featuring most prominently in the political campaign. The PS DB which used to be one of the two big parties in Brazil after the return to democracy in the late 1980s is has performed very badly in the previous election and is sort of running the risk of becoming irrelevant. So this is a time of change for Brazilian politics. But at the same time, it continues to be polarized between right and left, both on our Lula. Indeed, and many are saying that Bolsonaro has little chance here. He's got a 23% popularity poll of votes compared with 46% for Lula according to a recent serving. Many are saying that this is now Lula's to lose. Yes, Lula has a very, very large margin of advantage in the opinion polls. But I think it's too early to put the Brazilian election as a certainty as a safe victory for Lula. We also know we, I believe, journalists in general and in Monaco know that opinion polls can be wrong very often. So it really is uncertain. And additionally, there is the polarization factor and the fact that Lula, of course, has been involved with the infamous car wash investigation, of course, his sentence has been nullified and his trial has been nullified by the Supreme Court. But for many voters, his government is still identified with a lot of allegations and, in fact, many politicians and Petrobras, the oil company, corruption that was unveiled by not only the courts, but many, many newspapers, and so for many people, Lula is still identified with that. And in the second round, that it's when the polarization will really play out. For instance, the boss former just minister and car wash judge social motor is running. And he is very low in the polls, but it's not insignificant. He has close to 10%, so those voters and those small percentage of the center right psdb might go to Bolsonaro. So it all depends on the tone that Lula will strike during the campaign, whether he is moderate business friendly, more central side will become a prominent..

Ukraine Brazil Britain independent British intelligen Lula Paul Rogers NATO Bolsonaro jair Bolsonaro mister Bolsonaro Gorbachev Taiwan South Atlantic Jaya Bolsonaro Jai Bolsonaro Western Europe Reagan Antonio Sue Mila da Silva bazo
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

06:45 min | 3 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"That's when I was starting out. So the first 50 years were very, very slow. The next 50 years had been a lot quicker. That was baroness Hale speaking to Georgina Godwin. You can hear the interview in full by listening to the latest episode of meet the writers. Let's continue now with today's newspapers, joining me down the line is a writer journalist and broadcaster Caroline frost. Good morning, Caroline. Morning. What we got? What we're looking at? Right. Let's start over in Brazil where mister Bolsonaro is facing quite a lot of pushback on his pretty controversial behavior during the last two years 18 months and particularly with his country so badly afflicted by coronavirus. They've suffered a death toll of 600,002nd only to the U.S. in the world where much larger population over in the states. And there's been an inquiry as just how this has been allowed to happen and particularly his rather what should we call it relaxed behavior in the face of the pandemic? And they've come piled a huge report, which will be voted on by senators tomorrow, which does pose the idea that he will be facing 9 separate charges, which if convicted, if it's a very big if, could add up to a mighty 100 years in jail, which would be quite unprecedented to extraordinary, but perhaps does will set a bit of a prototype for examination across the world of different leaders and their behaviors. Fascinating to watch. It's astonishing to watch, but at the same time we have this parallel narrative of Bolsonaro's popularity. It's absolutely plummeted. And it is a year before he tries to win a second term here. What is the bigger focus on here at the moment? I mean, obviously, this criminal inquiries are huge. And it's one of those things that could actually overtake the political narrative. But for Bolsonaro, it is surely the most important thing to stay in power for as long as you can. Oh, yes, and he's already talking about I mean, we may recognize the language that if the election is legal, he will observe and respect the results and we've heard that before. I guess the bigger question is his hold over government. So this report could go as far as the House of Representatives where his domination is immense. However, there is a waiting in the wings equally popular character, the great legendary Brazilian leader of Lula, mister da Silva, who a decade ago was being seen as a transformer of Brazil, but has faced his own jailing problems with 580 days in jail for corruption. But he's out. He's a leader again and recent polls suggest that he would absolutely walk into parliament come those elections. But as you say, it's a bit of a it's a timeline now between this report. The inflation going through the ceiling. And if Bolsonaro can somehow keep hold if the tides turn again in his favor. Let's move on to The New York Times and finally Melbourne can open its doors after the world's longest lockdown. I mean, it must be astonishing to imagine what it must have been like for them. Oh, my goodness. Well, we've talked about the Australians way of having to deal with the pandemic before, and it's a game of two halves because you've got all these open world over in Western Australia. And then you've got these locked down cities over on the east. Melbourne have been struck particularly badly. Every time over the last 18 months, they thought they were coming out. They went back in. I mean, it's been draconian. It's been the last just the last two and a half months. 9 p.m. curfew allowed to leave homes just to buy food and to exercise and to meet one other person. This is the stuff that the UK was going through over a year ago. So yes, the clock struck midnight on Friday, many restrictions were lifted. Daniel Andrews, their premier spoke like a tearful, proud father, thanking the state for how they'd behaved and held themselves together for so long. And as usual, it was the hairdressers that got the cues. So yes, life very cautiously I want to say returning slowly to normal over down under. It's an astonishing article. It charts all the incredibly draconian measures that the Australians have had to go to melbournes have in particular. And the fact is that the state has emerged the primary Victoria was saying I don't want to sound like a soppy dad. I love the way that the Australian politicians speak. I'm going to say rearward. I'm trying not to sound like a soppy dad, but I'm proud bloody proud of this state. We've gone through such a hard time together. This pandemic has been exhausting in every sense of the word. A the tone is fantastic. But B it's that sense of solidarity, which I think has come through in Australia. There were cracks a little while ago because everybody I think was just on their knees. But it's a very nice and it gives you a good sort of hopeful feeling when you read words like that, doesn't it? I think it does, yes, and yes, as you say, a few blips. I mean, they've had their share of process. But when you think that they are now, the dubious world record holder of the longest lockdown anywhere. I think they've come through pretty unscathed and like Daniel Andrews. I feel very proud of my former home city. So yes, I'm watching this story with great joy. But it's really interesting that, of course, it is just like everywhere else in the world. It's the hairdressers and it's the bars have enjoyed the custom. We know our priorities. Let's move on to The Guardian. We got less than a week until cop 26 begins to UN climate summit. There is a good news apparently. Well, it depends how you look at it. Yes, the headline from the guardian is the good news is that they are determined somehow they developed countries to put together a new climate funding model to help the world's poorer countries benefit and so that instead of the money going into sort of what we might call middle class solutions in the developed world, much more into adaptation, innovation, sort of going further higher upstream in development in these countries that really have continued to receive the brunt of the problems when it comes to climate crisis. However, and this is a big, however. So yes, the UK government have a hoping that Germany and Canada will come together to help with this finance plan. And it needs the backing of developing countries, of course, they might say, well, we've already got money meant to be coming our way from the International Monetary Fund and now it's coming from this. There are accusations that the UK government have used this sort of sleight of hand to borrow from Peter to pay Paul. And it means, of course, they've cut their own overseas development aid and this money is instead of that rather than in addition..

Bolsonaro baroness Hale Georgina Godwin Caroline frost mister Bolsonaro Daniel Andrews mister da Silva Brazil Melbourne Caroline Lula House of Representatives U.S. Western Australia The New York Times parliament UK Victoria Australia The Guardian
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:19 min | 3 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"The country since. Not so much. He might matter. It's findings are stark. Jair Bolsonaro has been accused of crimes against humanity for the president's handling of COVID in Brazil. Emma Hogan is our America's editor. The report which was leaked this week was compiled by a Senate committee who spent 6 months looking at how the president had handled the pandemic in Brazil. It's far more damning than was expected, although some of the findings have have subsequently been retracted. So what are the key findings as we currently understand it? So the accusation that he is liable for crimes against humanity comes about because of what they call his macabre approach, the pandemic, which included organizing large gatherings of his supporters. Mocking scientists and mask wearers also mocking a COVID patient struggling to breathe on television. Yeah. This comes at a time when Brazil has had over 600,000 excess deaths, that's the pandemic, according to The Economist's excess mortality tracker. I mean, let's go back to the beginning of the pandemic. President Bolsonaro was one of the first world leaders to say it's just a flu, it's fine and to minimize the problems of COVID. This is a particular problems for the Brazilian indigenous community. It also meant that the P one variant, one of the earliest variants of the COVID, came out of Brazil. So really, it has been incredibly poorly handled. So what will happen with these allegations against mister Bolsonaro? Will there be formal charges? Well, I mean, one of the senators behind the investigation is that the president has committed several crimes and will pay for them all. But that looks incredibly unlikely, as I mentioned, the most incendiary charges for homicide and genocide against indigenous groups have been dropped. So the president looks really quite likely to escape legal consequences for these other claims. The report mentions two kinds of crimes, the ordinary crimes that are prosecutable under the criminal code and the impeachable crimes of responsibility. To try the president in court, requires the approval of the attorney general who is an ally of the president. Meanwhile, an impeachment needs the stamp of approval from the head of the lower House of Congress, who is also close to the president. So because he has these two allies, the attorney general and the head of the lower House of Congress, it looks incredibly unlikely that these accusations in the report will actually have any legal consequence. Well, if not then, a matter for criminal accountability. What about the court of public opinion? Well, it's been incredibly damaging for mister Bolsonaro and it comes on from a litany of problems for him. So what I found remarkable about this is that over the 6 months that the inquiry was taking place, it was broadcast live, and regularly half a million people would tune in to view it. With many more others on social media have also commenting and so on. And so according to one pole rating, president bolso rona ros approval rating has fallen from about 33%, 22%, which is really very bad in the year before an election. And do you get a sense that mister Bolsonaro senses that it is doing something to try to win back the public? Absolutely. President Bolsonaro is trying to boost support by increasing social welfare. And most specifically, he is trying to expand and make more generous a welfare fund associated with the former president Lula, who currently is leading the polls for the presidential election next year. Mister Bolsonaro's plans have split his government, his economy minister is against it. But he wants to give out a monthly benefits of about $71 to the poorest of Brazilians without he claims violating Brazil's spending limits. And what about the pandemic and the economy? In fact, now this reports rather backward looking, how are things looking forward? Well, unemployment is 14% in Brazil at the moment, the Central Bank is increasing interest rates, inflation has risen to a whopping 10% in the past year. So for most ordinary Brazilians the cost of living is going up. I think that that will in the end be the really difficult test for mister Bolsonaro. He can expand various social welfare funds, but fundamentally, people have felt very hard hit by the pandemic, both in terms of their numbers of deaths. There have happened in Brazil, but also the economic consequences on the country. So taken together, where do you think mister Bolsonaro goes from here? He seems insulated from criminal concerns, but the rest of it's up in the air. Indeed, I mean, in many ways, mister Bolsonaro seems like a Teflon president. I mean, he has remained in power despite the fact that he has handled the pandemic extraordinarily badly. But even if these accusations don't stick, mister Bolsonaro and his sons are facing investigations into spreading fake news and corruption, all of which they deny. So next year is going to be a difficult one for mister Bolsonaro and he's going to go into it with his standing significantly reduced. Thanks very much for joining us, Emma. My pleasure, Jason. Whether you're starting your first business, or you're already up and running, Bank of America offers to support you need to forge ahead with confidence. This month, we're celebrating those women's small business owners who've put their faith in us to help them take the next step. Their passion knowledge and drive combined with our mentoring programs and community partnerships is the spirit of small business in action. Learn how you can move ahead with confidence at Bank of America dot com slash SV women, Bank of America. What would you like the power to do? When it comes to doomsday scenarios, the only thing more frightening than an intercontinental nuclear weapon is an intercontinental nuclear weapon that can sneak up on you. Last weekend, the Financial Times first reported that China had over the summer tested a faster than sound glider capable of delivering nukes from space. Yesterday, the paper said there had in fact been two such missions, twice the reason to think that China's latest work could shift the world nuclear order. China's apparent test of a hypersonic nuclear capable glider is the latest front in what is clearly an intensifying nuclear competition between America, China and a number of other states. Shashank Joshi is The Economist's defense editor. China has denied that it tested a hypersonic missile. It says it only tested a reusable spacecraft. But what's very clear is that it is moving very quickly in the realm of nuclear weapons technology and this has America really quite worried. Well, let's talk.

mister Bolsonaro Brazil COVID President Bolsonaro House of Congress Jair Bolsonaro Emma Hogan president bolso rona ros Senate committee Mister Bolsonaro flu America Lula Bank of America
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:06 min | 3 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Media Show

"And that is a key shift that we will see across in this organization now. And Danielle you were as evading very particular challenges in Brazil because of course there, it's politicized as an issue because of the policies of mister Bolsonaro. And I wonder if that means that being a journalist in Brazil, it also means that you feel you're an activist, too, in a sense. Well, yeah, you're right. We are in a big polarization discount to now. And I have to say that the press all over the Brazilian press almost all the press is working a lot television sites and he's working a lot and more and more about climate issues than in a sense. President Bolsonaro and he has way. So what happened is that there was a there was a reaction from the society that the prisoner society was more interested in the Amazon issue and climate issues because of the reaction of the government of the Bolsonaro government. That was interesting. So more and more young people more and more people are interested in climate issues in Brazil and in the Amazon..

mister Bolsonaro Brazil Danielle President Bolsonaro Bolsonaro government Amazon
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:13 min | 3 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two or going online and looking for that red donate button at WNYC dot org this is a drive that ends tomorrow This is our next to last day as some say and we are trying to raise $2.3 million in its fall drive against it ends tomorrow We need you as much as you need us And I think that is pretty apparent we are public media as Nancy just said So please give that 88 three 7 6 9 6 9 two or go online if WNYC dot org Thank you This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Scott detro And I'm Steve and Steve Good morning A congressional panel in Brazil is preparing to accuse the country's president Jair Bolsonaro of crimes against humanity That's how they describe his handling of the pandemic New York Times reporter Jack Nick is based in Rio de Janeiro and he's on the line welcome to the program Thanks for having me Thanks for joining us What did Bolsonaro do Well according to this key congressional investigation into his handling of the pandemic they say that he intentionally let the coronavirus spread unchecked through the country and kill hundreds of thousands of Brazilians in a failed bid to achieve herd immunity and force the return of the economy Wow Now I guess we should be clear about what's on the record and what's new here The fact that Bolsonaro is aggressively dismissed the pandemic has been fairly public but I guess what's new here is the idea that he was intentional about this Is that correct In many ways yes Bolsonaro absolutely has been on the record with basically denying the severity of the pandemic being skeptical about vaccines and actually embracing cures for the panda for the coronavirus like hydroxychloroquine But it is rather strong to have this congressional panel It's really was Brazil's main investigation to the government's handling pandemic conclude that he had intentionally allowed the coronavirus to kill hundreds of thousands of Brazilians They actually essentially laid the blame for more than 300,000 deaths at his feet and that is half of the nation's coronavirus death toll Wow what does it mean when lawmakers in your own country accuse you the president of mass homicide It's a striking condemnation You know as far as I'm concerned one of the most aggressive and extreme accusations from a sitting Congress towards a sitting president in a nation And it certainly reflects the deep polarization in Brazil and also the severity of the pandemic here It has been an absolute tragedy of course across the world but it has been especially severe here in both in Brazil And that has been exacerbated by how the government has handled it Could this become a criminal case That's the idea here So the congressional panel is actually recommended recommending criminal charges against president Bolsonaro There are 9 separate criminal charges The main one being crimes against humanity The attorney general in Brazil now have 30 days to make a decision on whether or not to press charges he is not expected to do so because he is an ally of mister Bolsonaro But the leader of this Senate panel has suggested that they will pursue other potential legal avenues including potentially Brazil Supreme Court or the International Criminal Court You would imagine this to be mainly illegal proceeding but of course it's also political So in a few seconds how popular is the president right now His popularity is spiraling and it has been since the beginning of the pandemic So this is just one of many political crises that he's facing the economy is really struggling in Brazil And he is facing a difficult reelection bid next year Jack Nick is to The New York Times in Rio de Janeiro Thanks for your reporting Really appreciate it Thank you Workers at Netflix are expected to stage a walk out today It's the culmination of weeks of internal backlash the streaming company has faced from its transgender and non binary employees over committee Dave Chappelle's latest special the closer Last week Netflix fired an unnamed employee who had helped organize today's walkout saying they leaked internal data to an outside source And Pierre's Andrew Limbaugh caught up with that employee who says they were not the leaker The employee resource group at Netflix representing transgender and non binary workers send a list of demands to the company And nowhere does it mention Dave Chappelle his latest special or pulling anything off of the platform Instead the only Netflix property mentioned is the documentary disclosure about the history of trans representation in media featuring transgender writers producers and actors such as Angelica Ross You see a fierceness that's coming from the girls that are coming up now That's because we understand we ain't got nothing to lose I already then lost that job out of lost that job Because the walkout later today is about having more more representation among the higher ups more warnings especially for transphobic content And of course more TV shows and movies featuring transgender and non binary people Here's former Netflix employee B pay close minor one of the walkout organizers When Netflix talks about entertaining the world when Netflix talks about creative freedom when Netflix talks about the cultural values of the company if you actually apply that rubric equally to all groups you would suspect that there would be more representation across different content types of different groups They started at Netflix as a senior data product manager for membership and finance engineering before moving on to work at the company's game launch department Hagel's minor also co led the employee resource group for trans workers and was a member of one for black employees Netflix fired them on Thursday alleging they leaked sensitive internal information outside the company How much was spent on the Chappelle special versus others as well as various performance metrics Netflix is notoriously tight lipped about this sort of stuff I did collect the data but I did not leak the data They add that they weren't given an opportunity to prove their case It was just kind of like hey you're the person you're gone In a statement a Netflix spokesperson said page minus claims aren't supported by the facts and that they wiped their device quote making any further investigation impossible Pay goes minor says there was never any investigation to begin with But beyond the back and forth Actions like the walkout Netflix later today are a part of a growing trend of white collar workers in tech speaking up about their direction of their companies says Alan Hyde Professor of labor and employment law at Rutgers They want to have a say in the kinds of business their company does The kind of workplace culture they have who the clients are So these have been important demands in motivating worker unrest over the years Hart says we've seen this movie before Employees make a lot of noise about something maybe the big companies change a thing or two offer up an apology And then everything calms down back to normal But in the context of this year with 10,000 John Deere workers out on strike who had bakery workers and all the tremendous upsurge in strike activity this year I'm less positive that we've seen this movie before It's a tricky time to be a big company juggling internal pressures along with public outcries But it's possibly an even trickier time being an employee putting your job on the line to change the culture at a company you really believe in Angela limbang and Pyrenees WNYC supporters include National Geographic documentary films presenting becoming cousteau from director Liz garbus a look at the life of the explorer filmmaker and adventurer who inspired generations to protect the earth in theaters Friday Netflix's new movie.

Netflix Brazil Bolsonaro Jack Nick NPR news Scott detro Steve Good Jair Bolsonaro Rio de Janeiro congressional panel mister Bolsonaro Dave Chappelle New York Times Andrew Limbaugh Angelica Ross Nancy International Criminal Court Steve Congress
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:27 min | 3 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tomorrow and the day after that Call 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two and donate Thank you This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Scott detro And I'm Steve and Steve Good morning Congressional panel in Brazil is preparing to accuse the country's president Jair Bolsonaro of crimes against humanity That's how they describe his handling of the pandemic New York Times reporter Jack Nick is based in Rio de Janeiro and he's on the line welcome to the program Thanks for having me Thanks for joining us What did Bolsonaro do Well according to this key congressional investigation into his handling of the pandemic they say that he intentionally let the coronavirus spread unchecked through the country and kill hundreds of thousands of Brazilians in a failed bid to achieve herd immunity and force the return of the economy Wow No I guess we should be clear about what's on the record and what's new here The fact that Bolsonaro is aggressively dismissed the pandemic has been fairly public but I guess what's new here is the idea that he was intentional about this Is that correct In many ways yes Bolsonaro absolutely has been on the record with basically denying the severity of the pandemic being skeptical about vaccines and actually embracing cures for the panda for the coronavirus like hydroxychloroquine But it is rather strong to have this congressional panel It's really was Brazil's main investigation to the government's handling epidemic conclude that he had intentionally allowed the coronavirus to kill hundreds of thousands of Brazilians They actually essentially laid the blame for more than 300,000 deaths at his feet and that is half of the nation's coronavirus death toll Wow what does it mean when lawmakers and your own country accuse you the president of mass homicide It's a striking condemnation You know as far as I'm concerned one of the most aggressive and extreme accusations from a sitting Congress towards a sitting president in a nation And it certainly reflects the deep polarization in Brazil and also the severity of the pandemic here It has been an absolute tragedy of course across the world but it has been especially severe here in both in Brazil And that has been exacerbated by how the government has handled it Could this become a criminal case That's the idea here So the congressional panel is actually recommended recommending criminal charges against president Bolsonaro There are 9 separate criminal charges The main one being crimes against humanity The attorney general in Brazil now have 30 days to make a decision on whether or not to press charges he is not expected to do so because he is an ally of mister Bolsonaro But the leader of this Senate panel has suggested that they will pursue other potential legal avenues including potentially Brazil Supreme Court or the International Criminal Court You would imagine this to be mainly illegal proceeding but of course it's also political So in a few seconds how popular is the president right now His popularity is spiraling and it has been since the beginning of the pandemic So this is just one of many political crises that he's facing the economy is really struggling in Brazil And he is facing a difficult reelection bid next year Jack deck is to The New York Times in Rio de Janeiro Thanks for your reporting Really appreciate it Thank you Workers at Netflix are expected to stage a walkout today It's the culmination of weeks of internal backlash the streaming company has faced from its transgender and non binary employees over committee Dave chapel's latest special the closer Last week Netflix fired an unnamed employee who had helped organize today's walkout saying they leaked internal data to an outside source And Pierre's Andrew Limbaugh caught up with that employee who says they were not the leaker The employee resource group at Netflix representing transgender and non binary workers send a list of demands to the company And nowhere doesn't mention Dave Chappelle his latest special or pulling anything off of the platform Instead the only Netflix property mentioned is the documentary disclosure about the history of trans representation in media featuring transgender writers producers and actors such as Angelica Ross You see a fierceness that's coming from the girls that are coming up now That's because we understand we ain't got nothing to lose I already then lost that job out of lost that job Because the walkout later today is about having more more representation among the higher ups more warnings especially for transphobic content And of course more TV shows and movies featuring transgender and non binary people Here's former Netflix employee B pay close minor one of the walkout organizers When Netflix talks about entertaining the world when Netflix talks about creative freedom when Netflix talks about the cultural values of the company if you actually apply that rubric equally to all groups you would suspect that there would be more representation across different content types of different groups They started at Netflix as a senior data product manager for membership and finance engineering before moving on to work at the company's game launch department Page miner also co led the employee resource group for trans workers and was a member of one for black employees Netflix fired them on Thursday alleging they leaked sensitive internal information outside the company How much was spent on the Chappelle special versus others as well as various performance metrics Netflix is notoriously tight lipped about this sort of stuff I did collect the data but I did not leak the data They add that they weren't given an opportunity to prove their case It was just kind of like hey you're the person you're gone In a statement a Netflix spokesperson said page's minor's claims aren't supported by the facts and that they wiped their device quote making any further investigation impossible People's miners says there was never any investigation to begin with But beyond the back and forth Actions like to walk out Netflix later today are a part of a growing trend of white collar workers in tech speaking up about their direction of their companies says Alan Hyde Professor of labor and employment law at Rutgers They want to have a say in the kinds of business their company does the kind of workplace culture they have who the clients are So these have been important demands and motivating worker unrest over the years Hud says we've seen this movie before Employees make a lot of noise about something Maybe the big companies change a thing or two offer up an apology And then everything calms down back to normal But in the context of this year with 10,000 John Deere workers out on strike who had bakery workers and all the tremendous upsurge in strike activity this year I'm less positive that we've seen this movie before It's a tricky time to be a big company juggling internal pressures along with public outcries But it's possibly an even trickier time Being an employee putting your job on the line to change the culture at a company you really.

Netflix Brazil NPR news Scott detro Jair Bolsonaro Jack Nick Bolsonaro Rio de Janeiro congressional panel Steve New York Times Jack deck Dave chapel Andrew Limbaugh Angelica Ross International Criminal Court Dave Chappelle employee resource group for tr Congress Supreme Court
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:05 min | 5 months ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Hi this is tom power host q. On cbc radio. And i want to tell you about our podcast. the q. Interview is a chance for you to hear some of our favorite conversations but on this podcast will go a little deeper. Maybe a longer. Sometimes we'll hear these conversations before they go on the radio and sometimes they'll hear things you won't have heard on the radio like when the girl told me he was thinking of moving to newfoundland or barbra streisand told me the real reason she doesn't do too many interviews. You can subscribe to the q. Interview wherever you get your podcast in brazil crowds of thousands of taken to the streets today not to oppose president gyro bolsonaro in his unpopular government but to support him. Mr bolsonaro has whipped up his supporters against institutions such as the supreme court which he believes is against him his incitement of the crowds is being compared to former us president donald trump's role in encouraging protests. That led to the january six storming of the capital alexandra. Milan is the opposition leader in the lower. House of brazil's national congress. We reached him in. Rio de janeiro. On can you describe what you have seen so far in these pro bowl so narrow demonstrations in various places in brazil today considering the time through each they have been mobilizing people to participate in the demonstrations. They haven't been able to together the amount of people they would like so they are smaller than they would like to be. People have compared what is happening with these small but they're very intense rallies aren't they and they a lot of violent language. A lot of rhetoric spin compared to what happened in washington on january. Six do you see anything similar happening in brazil. Perhaps an kind of storming of supreme court has people have suggested might happen in brazil. It's exactly the same plot. Both scenario tries to imitate former president. Trump. so yes i see a lot of similarity between world been seen today in brazil where we have seen in washington continuing with that with that plot that so similar to january sixty see the language of president bolsonaro who is telling people to support him giving rhetoric that seems to then translate into stronger rhetoric on the ground. What are you hearing from these people. In the israelis what are they saying that that gives you fear that they might be real violence some of them even threaten delights of of the justice and their families are afraid about their lives about attacked physically. So they're very aggressive. They behave the people that support scenarios behave like if the justice were enemies of the country. Severi dangerous way of behaving and it's it's a crime against the constitution against our democracy. Fewer democracy is at risk because of this kind of behavior of the president and off their support of of his supporters. The polls indicate that if there were an election today mister bolsonaro who has was has been tremendously popular at at the height of of his time. As president is now would lose by a landslide. And so what do you think he is capable of doing. An order to hold onto. Power are are qatar. It's it's the only think there. He thinks he can do in order to avoid losing the power because all the post show his going to lose the next elections. Damore he he he he he behaves bad. The in the presidency. Damore lose support in brazil so for each brazilian that supports him. We have no this tube resilience that that do not support him that are against him so it's like sixty four percent against thirty two percent in approval or disapproval of his government. So so he has understood already that his going to lose the next elections. That's why he. He's trying to avoid the next elections. And that's why he has already talking about fraud. Debt is going to be committed against him just like trump did in the united states talking a lot about the fraud. Fraud fraud never proved any fraud in the election in the american elections so exactly the same kind of behavior a dangerous one authoritarian. One anti-democratic it. One i just ask you when you talk about a staging having a coup. He is still the president. So this'll be a coup at kind of a self coup and then and so what could he actually do is able to bring in the military Imposed martial law suspend your your congress your your supreme court. I mean what. What powers does he have actually to stage this coup. Yeah you'd be a self coup exactly a coup for the present who is in power not to take him out of power but to to to make him stronger. I think he would try to to close this supreme court to to substitute the justices in. I don't think that in the first moment he will do anything against congress because nowadays has unfortunately majority in congress. So that's why the the demonstrations today are not against congress because it has a majoritarian support there but i think he would start Closing the supreme court are substituting the justice and then in a second moment he who he would close the congress for substitute the congressman that he doesn't like like me because i'm the leader of the opposition against human in the chamber of deputies and other deputies and senators so i think he would do that in. He is working to have an military support. Do that. I think the army is really divided because a part of the army would support counter. This kind of A faction in another part wouldn't support. So i think they are divided and that's why he doesn't have still hit doesn't feel safe to to do it.

brazil tom power gyro bolsonaro Mr bolsonaro House of brazil Damore supreme court president bolsonaro cbc radio barbra streisand congress mister bolsonaro donald trump washington Rio de janeiro alexandra Milan Trump
Macron calls Amazon an issue for whole planet

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Macron calls Amazon an issue for whole planet

"For the climate crisis. The watershed moment could be news last week of the spread of fires in the amazon. It began with a tweet by french president emmanuel macron. Our house is burning literally. He wrote calling on leading industrial nations to act act over the weekend. Suddenly the amazon became the subject of discussion around dinner tables and water coolers and of sporadic protests worldwide tensions over amazon development our long standing during sarah's time as our latin america correspondent she wrote about gas pipeline pipeline in two thousand seven that angered international environmentalists but locals and amazon us were quick to explain that millions of people. I'll have to make a living in the so-called longs of the earth but brazilian president gyro bolsonaro has angered the international community over policies. He's the tip the balance toward business over environmental protection this time group of seven leaders in biarritz france held him to account threatening threatening to kill a trade deal between the european union and america sir countries and boycott brazilian products for now mister bolsonaro has appeared to shift course sending in the military to tackle the flames for all the talk about the end of multi-lateralism in an age of nationalism. This weekend made clear that international cooperation is still very much the way forward. It's still unclear. If this year's amazon fires i will lead to long-term policy change in south america we can at least take solace in the fact that the world is watching and ready to respond to the world's challenges

Amazon Emmanuel Macron Mister Bolsonaro America South America President Trump European Union France Sarah
"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

07:21 min | 3 years ago

"mister bolsonaro" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We head now to Brazil. Scores was complete any. Brazil promised several things throughout his campaign. He complained that indigenous lands were too big and that he wouldn't demarcate even one centimeter of indigenous land. Now indigenous lands in Brazil are very vulnerable for invaders to enter and feel at ease beat that shit is a member of the you'd away while while an indigenous tribe living in Brazil's, although on yesterday once home to a natural landscape almost the size of Kansas over the past three decades or the one. Yeah, has seen more than thirty percent of its trees cut down. It is now one of the most deforested areas of the Amazon advocates Kleber Bush sought though secretary general of Brazil's. Indigenous missionary council are concerned that the crisis is only getting worse under Brazil's new President Bush Nado. We are very worried because indicators suggested in Brazil there is currently a new phase of illegal invasions and occupations of indigenous lands that is underway. Sam Cowley is an independent journalists based in southbound low, and he explains that this is an esscalation of a long troubled relationship between Brazil and its indigenous citizens it was at the beginning of the twentieth century the first in government body was found to protect indigenous people this was cooled the sivy super sewn weaned the indigenous protection service this was replaced by the national indigenous foundation in nineteen sixty seven off. There were lots of reports of abuses committed against indigenous people, the you know, they were shot ass on that lands. That's a smallpox and other diseases with pompously introduced to these to these tribes basically to clear the land to make way for large infrastructure projects. Now, this happened throughout Brazil military dictatorship from. Eighteen sixty four to nineteen eighty five where it's a s- tilted that something like eight thousand five hundred indigenous people will killed or died of diseases will indigenous lands was supposed to be fully demarcations and protected as of nineteen ninety-five under the posting tight ship constitution. We says that indigenous people have the exclusive rights to their lands. But if we look at Brazil today, we still say many indigenous lands are not fully protected, and what we've seen especially especially since two thousand fifteen really when Brazil really fell into economic and political crisis. We've seen the situation getting worse. What about Brazil now has a new president and giant Moshe Nado? What's his take and his relationship with the indigenous community? Well, Mr. Bolsonaro is a former military man he served during in the army during the military. Ship. He was a cat too in. He was a paratrooper Mr. Bosa always had a very very antagonise stones against indigenous people, according to add indigenous advocates, you know, he's he's very much like the the military dictatorships position. Which is, you know, forced integration that they these people are just the same as off with all Brazilians one of the things he tweeted off to becoming presidents was that indigenous lands less than a million indigenous people who live on twelve percent of Brazilian territories. He's long had a very indigenous stones in congress saying that, you know, the lands too big. They need to be reduced who who needs protection in Brazil is falling as and produces another. He's the president of Brazil, advocacy, groups and indigenous people themselves say they often in the heat from increased aggressions against them, which they believe is caused by makes. Sure mister Bolsonaro is very inflammatory rhetoric combined with serious cots to indigenous protection bodies and environmental agencies. What is the goal of doing that for the military or for the Brazilian government? I mean, what ultimately are they trying to take back land? Are they trying to control a population? What exactly is the goal because there is an NGO that found that at least fourteen groups indigenous groups in territories were currently under attack in this way. Yeah. I mean, they're under attack by criminals, basically these on agents of the state Logan land-grabbers in the Brazilian Amazon. What basically happens is that. I you go in you, take the wood. And then once the woods been removed. Then you, you know, you clear the rest of the area, and then you some you some Groff's new raise castle, and then you try to sell the area over and over again, it's a land grubbing schemed cooled grill. Lodging advocacy, groups say that these criminals. All in fact, feeling incentivizing encouraged by both hours rhetoric. That's you know, pretty much anything goes policy is going now. Sam can we talk a little bit about the racial an economic element here. I mean, this is obviously these are this is these are communities of color, also. Yeah. Absolutely. The indigenous resilience, of course, you know, all the most marginalized group in Brazil his country that has sixty thousand Morton sixty thousand homicides year about seventy percent to seventy five percent of those victims young black men between the ages of fifteen and thirty no, of course, indigenous people in Brazil make up something like a point five percent of the population. So they are also very vulnerable in the fact that they don't really have much representation in congress. The first congresswoman from an indigenous background was elected this year to the state of role Heimer in the Amazon, Mr Bowe scenarist that role high. States in it self which is hugging. Lots of indigenous people, it's a very mining-rich states. And he believes that lots of lots of mining wealth is hidden on the these indigenous. Territories. And in fact, one of the things he can pay on was to open up indigenous territories to mining interests and also agricultral interest Sam, what type of environmental impact would that have. We know. That's the Amazon is already about fifteen to seventeen percent deforested, you know, very specialized leading climate experts. They say that you know, if this deforestation rate reaches more than between twenty and twenty five percent, then the could reach a point where of no return, basically indigenous lands in Brazil, especially in the Amazon, they concentrate some of the best preserved forests in the country, and that's a real Buffa to climate change. And is the United States in any way involved in this? We know that President Trump has supported the. Also, not or so far perhaps not directly, but definitely you could say indirectly through Mr. Trump support for both in our and for the lack of regulations of the apply it to Brazilian products. Especially timber that head to the United States and consumed in the United States. Sam cow is an independent journalists based in Sao Paulo Sam, thanks for your reporting. Thanks very much.

Brazil national indigenous foundation Amazon president Sam mister Bolsonaro Sam Cowley congress United States Kansas Sao Paulo Sam Sam cow Kleber Bush Mr. Trump Bush Nado Mr. Bosa Moshe Nado Logan land-grabbers Groff