12 Burst results for "Mississippi Summer Project"

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

08:06 min | 3 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people I. Just I. Love hearing that history so much because you're in the Black Panthers in thirty Rollins, who is the chair of the DNC Blackhawk as she was involved in a Black Panthers Snow I love the fact that they're still so women women around and leadership who are able to tell us so much about her past one more thing about our past which we have to take seriously now Edgar Hoover targeted the black man the party many people were killed people were set up to go to jail I have my file, and if you could see my file in the lies they told are and how they tried to. Set me up in many ways to be killed. It's really a very dangerous that was a dangerous time for us who were involved in the movement. It's a dangerous time now. So we have to be very vigilant about what the what this administration is doing as it relates to these Ray. Armed militia coming into our communities and the danger that's being readily.

Black Panther Party Black Panther party school Panther party Black Women Congress Black Student Union African American community Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Philadelphia Mississippi Elaine Brown Huey Noonan Bobby Seale panthers Joe Biden Minnesota browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis New York
Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | 3 months ago

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:32 min | 4 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Will commemorate what we called in Mississippi summer project for more than a foul students from all over many from a growing made a trip to Mississippi people to register to vote and have some of my June when I 1st 1964 3 young man that I knew In one African American and the Goodman and James Chaney went out to investigate the burning of an African American church. It was used with voter registration workshop. These three young men claim half taken to jail, taken out of jail to the clan when they were beaten and shot into you. And I tell students today these three young men in Vietnam in the millions Eastern Europe didn't die in Africa. A century of South America. They not right here in our own country, trying to have all of our citizens become participants in the Democratic process as people you must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that we're not worn by way, made too much progress and will warn that maybe some step backs. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never, ever give up. Give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize that is show calling that show Mr That is no more obligations. That is your men. They get up there and do it getting away. Mama. Malice ooze Way almost learned to live together as brothers and sisters way all live in the same house. And it doesn't matter. The real black Latino Asian America, But it doesn't matter whether you're straight again. We're one people. We're one family. We all live in the same house. Be bold. Be courageous Stand.

Mississippi African American church James Chaney South America Eastern Europe Goodman Vietnam Africa
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 4 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Minimum two years ago when we visited looked Troy visit Montgomery Tuskegee visit Birmingham also signs that said white men colored men white women colored women white, waiting, colored, waiting, come home, and that's my mother, My father, my grandparents, my great grandparents. It was the best already is. Don't get in the way Don't get in trouble. One day in 1955 15 years old in the 10th grade. I heard about Rosa Pause. I had the worst morning King Jr on over radio. 97. I met Rosa Parks at the age of 17 in 1948 at age of 18. I met morning Kane Jr and these two individual inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble. Come here to say to you this morning on this beautiful campus. You're great, Advocation. You must find a way to get in the way. You must find a way to get in trouble. Trevor never set a trap. Usual education. One of the teachers, one of perfection. Researchers use what you have usually learning usual too. Help make our country and make our world a better place where no one will be left out a left behind you khun doing and you must do it. It is your time in a few short days. Commemorate What we call the Mississippi Summer project. More than a foul students, many from abroad made a trip to Mississippi. Taker's people to register to vote. Have.

Rosa Parks Mississippi Montgomery Tuskegee Kane Jr King Jr Birmingham Trevor Advocation
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:56 min | 4 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Have to say that last remark Mark was interesting. White honky who slides down a black chimney comes out white. There's a lot of rhetoric is so a lot of plane onward. Very emotional network. That was that was not that was not part of this, Nick that I knew, Um, what happened? Something something Something went wrong. Smith came to that point Where, In my estimation, the force to die a natural death. Um, way will conceive in this whole idea of the building of a truly interracial democracy. Of a black students and white students working together building together suffering together, You cannot forget that in 19 6 of war When you became chair doing in Mississippi summer project that we recruited all these young people, blacks and whites, primary students. Lawyers and doctors and priests and non came to work in Mississippi voter registration dry that state had a black voting age population on more than 450,000 But only about 16,000 were registered to vote in these young people and people. Not so young came to work in their freedom schools. And three young men that I knew that I had met a really part of the summer and equipment make assurance. White James, Shiny African American went out on a splendid night, June 21st 1964. They were detained by the sheriff. Later taken to jail. The same evening they were taken from jail, beaten, shot and killed these three young men. Died. Their bodies were discovered six weeks later. And you cannot forget it that people suffer together. Glare together, died together and then I can a movement. Make that radical jump by 1967 1960 people like Stokely Ah, ah and rap. I came to that point, but it was stand at all white people. She leaves next leave and work in the white community. Um, I'm movement. Is the integration movement. It was not to be a movement where we expel people. There was all inclusive by the way in all of this. When did you meet your wife? Because I know you dedicated the book to her. I met my wife. They in 1967. At a dinner party, and, uh, we started dating. Where was the dinner party? It was a dinner party was in Atlanta at Ah, friend of hers home. And it was a discussion about the civil rights movement about Dr King and the movement and she defended she was She was a strong defender. The movement. I guess that's sort of warming. Toward her, and she would win. Ah, beautiful dress and had to peace symbols, and I think that's sort of Bruce we toward her, and I said to myself, Shelly will leave in peace and I don't know whether it's playing of whether it was the conspiracy on the part of the whole sort of party that she would defend the movement and National Weathers. Ah, Jess with a peace symbol, But from that day till we hit it off very well. You were 27. Whether people at that dinner party that we're arguing against the movement, But there was some people madness of autumn against the movement. But there were some people question some of the tactics and techniques and what we will go in and that there were people but she was a strong defender. She she grew up in Los Angeles. I had never lived in the South. She had attended U C L, A USC and ship spent two years in the peace school. She started to be a librarian. She came south to work at one of the university Atlanta University as the laboratory and she had a tremendous amount of interest in the civil rights movement. And you have Children We have one son is in Atlanta is take a great deal of interest in music. And also in politics. But even he didn't want to run for the office. How much of Atlanta do you represent? In the present district represent all of the city of Atlanta? The intensity most of the colleges like Georgia Tech, Georgia State University of Morehouse, Spelman Morris Brown, Ah clock Atlanta University. But also represent Emery. CDC. Major corporations All in in in the district is the one of the district One of the people. Let me read from your book in the introduction. Remember how we thought the election of President Obama met, we had finally created a post racial America. A place for the problems that have haunted us for along. We're finally silence. Nobody says that anymore. We no longer dwell in that daydream. We were shaken to realism by the hush nous of what we have witnessed in the last few years. The vilification of President Obama, the invisibility of the second poor murder at the Holocaust Museum and the shooting of representative Gabrielle Giffords while she greeted constituents in a Safeway parking lot. And spend of the election of President Barack Obama. We're not there yet made a lot of progress. His election a major step down of a river long road, but we have not yet created the beloved community. People ask me all the time for the election. President Barack Obama is the fulfillment of Dr King's dream. It's just a down payment how painful it is for you to look back and your support of Hillary Clinton over Barack Obama. I don't feel I don't feel any pain. I really don't feel in the pain. That was what was the reason A new President Clinton anew Hilary. I'm known him long before I ever met President Barack Obama, and they have been friends of mine. They've been supporters of President Clinton came to Atlanta's celebrated My Birthday. My 50 and president, Senator Obama came from a six to fear when he was still in there in the Senate. Um,.

President Barack Obama Atlanta President Um Stokely Ah Dr King Hillary Clinton Mississippi university Atlanta University White James white community Atlanta University Mark Smith Nick Los Angeles CDC Senate
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:04 min | 4 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And if he comes to me that if you had more responsive to Manhattan, where they control it since that 60% taking change the economy of the country and the pressure of the black people will fight. What will in fact motivated move the rest of this country because this country move precisely before Civil rights movement. That's why this country must stop the civil rights movement because it is the biggest threat to him. Man that looked at life a little bit different when he needed. Did you get along with him? I got along with Stokely. He came self during the fall of Late, some 1961 during the Freedom rise, and later came back doing the Mississippi Summer project in 1964. But I don't think Stokely ever understood the philosophy and the discipline a nonviolent he never made a commitment. He grew up in New York City. Uh, Ken, and how university and I think those of us who grew up in the heart of the deep South who came under the influence of monitor came junior and individuals like Jim Lawson, who had a sort of a baptism in the philosophy and the discipline of Nonviolence. We took the long hard look, we believe that our struggle was not a struggle. They last for a day. So few weeks a few months semester. It was the struggle of a lifetime, and I said then I said even today that you have to pace yourself along hearts. Look, the Longhorns struggle and you have to come to the point in a seven non violence as a way of life as a way of living struggle was not a struggle between blacks. White, not a struggle between people but a struggle between what is right. And what is Rome. What is good? What is the evil between the forces of justice and the forces of injustice in the movement? And I would share the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and in the movement itself. In general, we call ourselves this circle of trust. A band of brothers and sisters. Is someone got arrested with fuels went to jail. Someone beating with you almost died with you. You forget about race and color. How did the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee start and who funded it in the early days, and where did it start? The student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee grew out of the city and movement of a young woman by the name Ella Baker. She was not young at the time, but she was young and hard, now deceased dynasties. She was working for Dr Mourners, a Cane Jr as his executive assistant in Atlanta, the Southern Christian Leadership conference and when the city in store spread all across the self like wildfire doctor came requested of her. To call these young people together from different colleges, campers and have a conference and she made the decision to hold this conference Easter weekend, April 1960. As show University in Raleigh, North Carolina. And the reason she went to show university Seenu to school because he was a graduate. Uh, show University she had worked for the peace. He worked for the one W C a day for the she was. She was just one of these small, gifted Women didn't knew everybody and she pulled this conference off and a lot of these young people, but many not just like young people, but many young flight people. Was she wider, but she was blind. But she had many, many allies in the private community of friends in civic and social religious organization, and it was in that meeting. That Dr King thought that the students will become the youth on the student on his organization. But she insisted that we even make up all mine and create our own organization. So the organization was called a temporary student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and married Barry. Who had been a graduate student at Fish University, Nastya became the temporary chair. The temporary student Nonviolent Coordinating committee April 1960 later there was a fall meeting in Atlanta. Morehouse College campus where the student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee became a permanent organization with Marren Barry. As the chair of the organisation James Clyburn, who's 90 congress with one of the students from cycle. Lana, who attended the meeting with US in in Atlanta in October 1960 his daughter is now a member of the federal Communications. His daughter is a member of the federal Communication Commissioner Mignon, do you I want to show you some more video of Stoke. Michael, because I want to ask you what? What? Years later, I think I did the last interview with him, and he died back in 1998 99. His name then was Kwamie Turay. And in this interview, you'll see I asked him about it. His career and all that. Let's watch a little bit of what he had to say and tell us why he went one way. And you want another both worked. You know for me. The difference here was declared between King and I. We started to talk about it before precise ing the back power. But as we said King took it as a principle as the principal being an honest man, which he wants King had to use it all times under all conditions for us, not vice a tactic. If you go back and look at them your documentation, you will see me and not have been beaten at been sent to hospitals on not the administration's. And I've never broken nonviolent demonstration on Lee once in my life that was on the Mississippi in March, when the policeman pushed Dr King and I have broken nonviolent discipline so accepted, you know, but it is not We're working now. I'm not going to Dr King to become hostage to what I consider to be a tactic is a principle, not think of guns..

Nonviolent Coordinating Commit Dr King Atlanta Mississippi Stokely Marren Barry Manhattan graduate student New York City Jim Lawson Rome James Clyburn Ella Baker Raleigh Longhorns Morehouse College Ken Dr Mourners Kwamie Turay
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

04:43 min | 6 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"I'd prestigious universities. This becomes the seed of a powerful political idea. Tell me about the idea for the summer project. Where did that come from well? That's the interesting part because we weren't really into well. Who's idea is this? that. The idea was this. What, if we bring privilege white students into Mississippi to help with voter registration efforts. What kind of extra attention could that bring to the cause? Of the economy and building among black people in Mississippi. Was You so? socially. Culturally revolutionary, it added never happened. And, so they brought the country with. And the country. They are. Forced to take a look at itself. Just doing that? Was a goal. Among the black organizers, this idea was controversial to this day to well, that should never happen. Fast members felt that this was sort of the project, and that was important that it was really run by Young African American. She'll send creatures, but we actually position to see if we get a much larger commitment. A commitment from white people around the country. Who didn't seem to care about what was happening in Mississippi? And so in the summer of nineteen, sixty four, the organizers launch the Mississippi Summer Project later called freedom summer. In June about eight, hundred white, mostly middle class. Students gather on a college campus in Ohio for training. They'll be taught by experienced black organizers. Among the white students is heather booth an eighteen year old from New York. We talked to her about what it was like in Ohio. So they were role plays that we were subjected to where we there had to act as the white racists, calling other freedom workers, attacking them, and then also playing volunteers. Not Succumbing violence ourselves and the overall importance of just protecting people's lives. There were also talks about the history and politics of Mississippi at one white volunteers saw a video of a weight registrar in the state who prevented black voters from exercising their rights, and he's a huge guy. You know maybe two hundred pounds. The volunteers burst out laughing and that the settle feel tech occurs. This person wasn't a joke, but a real serious impediment to their freedom. They knew him personally. There was a real tension that many felt. In, part the question of learning about each other's cultures and background in the history, but also making sure the white northern students understood the black people have Mississippi were the people who were taking the risks. They were the people who were doing the work doing the work for years and as white volunteers we were there to help and support that we were not coming down with the arrogance that we often had of to show into teach to tell the people of Mississippi what we knew, and that tension broke out in one of the large plenary sessions that we had where some of the blacks Nick Staff. said. That we would be sacrificial lambs. I was stunned by that. On June twentieth the first wave of volunteers heads down to Mississippi the next day. Moses gets a terrible phone call. Cheney Sh- Werner and goodman are missing. Assumed dead. Beverly Student..

Mississippi Mississippi Summer Project Beverly Student Ohio Cheney Sh- Werner New York Moses goodman Nick Staff.
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

09:03 min | 8 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"Hey. John the seems like another one of those stories. Where when you add up the outcomes there's good news and bad news right and you have to decide which to tell I but also which is more important which to emphasize yes because you know we always want to try to take the right lessons from this history and I think that it's tricky because there was a defeat right. I mean we can see despite all of that organizing five the Mississippi Freedom Democrats Johnson and then felt like they were facing this dilemma And I mean the thing is. They knew that the Mississippi Freedom Democrats proposal was to seat the delegation that actually represented the state. That's clearly the more democratic option. Yes and that had actually followed. The party's own rules for how you choose delegation unlike the other one exactly and yet ultimately they come out with in a way that can only be described as against democracy. Really in that moment And so I think you know you have this example right of the Democrats claiming to represent the most vulnerable members of the party but then they kind of feels like they sold those those members out And then they they excuse the give right is that the they have to appease conservative faction within the party. Yeah and it's a very real thing for people right people in that situation. Think they're making a hard headed political calculation. We may have to give up our deepest principles right now but at least that's going to help us win and hold onto power so we can do more good down the road right. But how did that work out in? Nineteen sixty four the SOC- that's the key question so which you have to pay attention to. Is that the southern states that they worked so hard to appease. What did they do well? Mississippi and three other states ultimately voted for the Republican President Goldwater Right. I mean it was just coming out with this explicitly racist platform and they sort of felt insulted that they were asked to be more democratic. So Lyndon Johnson didn't get those electoral college votes anyway after bending over backwards to please the southerners At the convention but mostly here. We're sort of focusing so far on the bad news side of the story. That's right yeah I mean all of that is true but I still think that. That's a short sighted way of understanding the legacy of freedom summer so there's a longer and wider story about that that has to be told and one place that you might start as like you know in the process of that really contentious convention the DNC offers the Mississippi Freedom. Democrats this compromise right. They say well we'll see two of your delegates they won't have voting rights and all this other stuff and then maybe next time or something and you know the Miss Mississippi free of Democrats reject right. You know I mean you can just see fairly. Hamer and I'm like I didn't come away. Pay For this. And but that compromise that the DNC offered sets a precedent that over time transformed the delegation process and ultimately transforms the Democratic Party itself. It winds up becoming kind of institutionalized in seventy two when they create like this McGovern Frazier Commission to figure out to to look at sort of contentious moments like that and once that stuff is institutionalized it paves the way for this like unprecedented increase of black elected officials at the local level. Some at the national level judges etc And their policies really do make a difference in a number ways. Yeah so it's really. It's it's a really powerful legacy of the Mississippi Freedom Democrats And speaking of the longer view there's an aspect of the Mississippi Summer Project Freedom Summer that we really haven't even mentioned up to now And you and I agreed we have to at least touch on it here and that is the freedom schools. That's it you know I mean again. This is one of the limited ways that I think. Sometimes people only look at the success of things in terms of like specific electoral victories. Or something but you know. Social movements are also like these places where people are learning new strategies new ways to organize and the Freedom. Summer was a really incredible example of that. So you have this while. They're doing the voter registration and building the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Some black civil rights workers and white student. Volunteers actually spent the summer running these schools all over Mississippi. They invite black children to spend their day at those schools. The teaching black history including African history the talking to them about the political and economic realities of Jim Crow. And you know the goal was really to plant seeds in the minds of those young people who were definitely not supposed to think for themselves according to the racist power structure. Yeah exactly the. The education system was not only profoundly the actually the the white schools got four times the funding that the black schools got and even the white schools were poorly funded. That's right so imagine right. And then and then also the schools Mississippi schools at the time. did not teach foreign languages and they didn't even teach civics. Yeah I mean it's just you see scholars and people who lived through there and they say you know this was a system explicitly designed to stifle independent thought and self determination not teach civics. Ri- adding this yes. Oh the freedom. Schools were part of a really a long term strategy built-in to freedom summer to really build democracy by creating politically aware young black citizens who would understand that they had to get involved and to stay involved if if this if their world was going to change the it's really just interesting brilliant grassroots movement building strategy. That's right and you know all those things like protests and that deeper organizing inspire students struggles beyond the southern southern movement. Right you see it in groups like the students for Democratic Society Than Northern Stirred Movement etc and some of those movements right there. There are also taking past simply electoral politics. I mean even like looking at the school and other places right. Ask sites for for expanding democracy But I do think it's important that in the wake of what would seem like. I mean what was like a devastating electoral defeat at the convention. The SNICK leaders still don't see the territory of the vote. That's really important right. They don't give up on electoral politics because they understand too important. It's you know. And and that effort this starts in Jackson actually continues years later and other places right one of the most important places is the Lowndes County Alabama Organizing Kwami. Torri formerly named Stokely Carmichael and other leaders with down allowance and form something called Lowndes County Freedom Organization the Lowndes County Organization has also the origins of the Black Panther Symbol. Because they choose that symbol. Yeah and and I had learned that in the process of doing this freedom. Summer thing but one one thing. I didn't know that until you told me. Just recently. The Democratic Party the all White Democratic Party in Alabama at the time it symbol was a white rooster. Yes Alabama Democrats ever white rooster and a slogan that says and I quote white supremacy for the right so white supremacy is in the slogan of the Democratic Party in the nineteen sixties in Alabama. That's right and so you know. And then like the kind of get rid of the slogan but they keep the symbol which kind of evokes that slogan all the way up until nineteen ninety six and so this choosing of the Black Panther symbol was in partner respond to that. Because you know they had the saying they were like okay. You got a rooster but Black. Panthers eat roosters. Yeah Right. I put my money on the Black Panther every time against the rooster right. So that was the origin of the Black Panther being adopted as a symbol and then it was adopted by the much. More famous Black Panthers of Oakland California. That's right because you know. They became aware of that symbol. And the other part of the of the message. Which was that you know what happens when a panther is backed into a corner and they have to fight right and so he. Bobby Seale adopted symbol but they also later recruit stokely. Carmichael as Honorary Prime Minister of the Party. Wow so yeah but going back to the Lounge County Freedom Organization. I mean it wasn't just that they had like a December. I mean they did some concrete organizing right. I mean in nineteen sixty six. They registered over two thousand people and then five years later. They elected their own activists as Mayor County Commissioner and Sheriff. Right so you know that. That's not necessarily like you know the end of the revolution or something but it did have.

Mississippi Mississippi Freedom Democratic Democratic Party Party Democrats Lounge County Freedom Organiza Lyndon Johnson Stokely Carmichael Panthers Democratic Society Lowndes County Freedom Organiz White Democratic Party Alabama John Lowndes County Alabama DNC Bobby Seale Frazier Commission Hamer
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

08:08 min | 8 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"The Freedom Democrats chose Fannie Lou Hamer as their most important witness before the credentials committee. She spoke for eight minutes without notes. Her hands clasped in front of her. Mrs Hamer told the story of her beating in the why known jail the previous year her crime again using the whites only restroom at a bus station WHO LINE. The Bay came to my fail. One of these men were the State Highway Patrol. Said we're GONNA make you wish you would be the jailers. Put Her in cell where two black men were locked up. The authorities ordered the black man to beat Mrs Hamer with a blackjack a police baton feet on the ground state highway patrolman auto the Second Negro to take the blackjack I began to scream and one white man got up and began to beat in my head empowerment to hook one white man address had worked up on. He walked over on address. I address down and he addressed back up. I was in jail when Matt Albers was murdered. All of its own account of we won't register to become first class and up. The Freedom Democratic Party is not treated now our question a male American the land of the free in the home of brain. We have to sleep with our phones off the hook because find my threaten Dana. Because we won't to did some human being stated stated the case and she told her story and told the story of the People Mississippi and we really thought we had one today several Mississippi and said they believed that if the credentials committee had taken a vote right then they would have seated the Freedom Democrats and sent the all White Democrats home but party leaders intervened Lyndon Johnson was afraid he'd lose any support. He had among white southerners in the November general election if the Freedom Democrats the IMF DP were seated Johnson asked Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey his choice for vice president to negotiate with the freedom. Democrats Bob Moses. Johnson is the President Johnson. Says if you want to be vice president then you deliver this so it straight POW politics the MVP. You get this monkey off. Our back. Humphries young protege from Minnesota and another future vice president is Walter. Mondale at Humphries. Direction Mondale offer the Freedom. Democrats a compromise to members of their delegation. One black and one white would be seated as delegates at large members of the all white party would be seated only if they promised to support Johnson for president and the National Party promised never again to see a segregated delegation Mondale announced the proposed compromise at the Convention. It may not satisfy everybody the screamed on the right or the freemen the left but we think it is they compromise. Everybody rejected the plan. Most members of the all White Mississippi Party were goldwater supporters. After Mondale's proposal all but four of them left the convention. The Freedom Democrats said no to the compromise to UNITA blackwell. The organizer we heard from earlier from Myers Ville was one of the party's delegates The compromise was was two seats and MS Hayman said we. We don't take no two seats all of our sixty caves that no two seats I would say first of all They came with a powerful moral case. I interviewed Walter. Mondale in Nineteen ninety-four recounting the indisputable fact that Blacks and Mississippi were sealed out of the Democratic Party that the delegation that had been officially sent from Mississippi which was all white was selected on a rigged discriminatory basis and that. Our party finally had to do something about what was Moral disgrace in the end. They just didn't have the guts to do it. Snack staff member Frank Smith. Everybody agreed with us off knew it was wrong. The all new violated the constitution. They all knew it had to be done sooner or later. They all knew all of the right things they just couldn't do it at the time and Disillusioned also great deal. I this losing actually the civil rights movement quite considerably and I think it was a great disappointment. John Lewis this could have been. I think the real final Straw that set in a period of discontent and appear of bitterness and a D. Deep despair on the part of a lot of young people that work so hard right after freedom. Summer young organizers felt they had taken on American racism and got trampled lead registered few black voters in Mississippi. Their challenge to the Democratic Party had been turned aside Dave. Dennis was the Mississippi Director of the Congress of racial equality but it achieved more than it exposed to system. Okay from top to bottom and what it did is supposed to show that that there was a conspiracy to some extent unwritten. You know there was just so far that people are going to make changes to work on step on too many people's toes at this time in this country in really what type of Iraq this country was pulled others looking back later had a more positive. Take on the summer. And what it accomplished. I think that every time we got someone to register the vote every time we got someone to attempt to rich about whether they were successful or not. Every time we got someone white allowed to stay in their home every time we got someone to stand up and say yes we had changed now. You don't do that and then undo it two weeks later and go back and become what you were before that act. People came out of the Mississippi Summer Project and looked at the questions that affected our lives ever after questions about gender questions about sexuality questions about war and peace and We had Real knowledge of a way to function what we were unable to do it. Maybe IN MISSISSIPPI BUT WE ABLE TO BILL O. MISSISSIPPI BILL ON ATLANTA'S CITY. And I think we did it in some the Selma to Montgomery March in the spring of nineteen sixty five was followed a few months later by the signing of a landmark bill to Mississippi Summer Project laid the foundation created the climate created environment for the passage of the nineteen sixty-five to make it possible for hundreds and thousands and millions of blacks to become registered. Devoted.

Freedom Democrats Mississippi Mondale Democrats White Mississippi Party Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom Democratic Party Lyndon Johnson Democratic Party vice president president Minnesota State Highway Patrol Matt Albers Senator Hubert Humphrey Humphries John Lewis Dana
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

02:22 min | 8 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"From the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. This is seen on radio season. Four episode seven in our series on democracy in America. We call the series the land that never has been yet. I'm John E win producer and host of the show Dr Chenjerai Kamenica whose voice you. Just hearing is my collaborator on the series. He's a journalism and media studies professor at Rutgers Artists podcasters organizer Pie chef and Baker of Zucchini bread. He'll be back again later to help me. Sort things out this episode nineteen sixty four Mississippi and really the USA. We took apart the radio documentary. I made in the nineties and updated and rebuilt it for this season using the interviews. That my co producer. Kate cabinet and I recorded back then. Deep into the twentieth century the struggle was still very much on for something resembling a multiracial democracy in the US the struggle led by Black Americans and their accomplices of all shades. What did those young people accomplish that summer? And in what they failed to achieve. What hard truths about the United States? Did they uncover yet again? Nobody called it freedom summer until after it was over to the people who organized it it was just the Mississippi Summer Project about a thousand mostly young Americans black and white came together to place themselves in the path of white supremacist. Power and Violence Lawrence. Gadot was on the staff of Snick. A student nonviolent Coordinating Committee the lead organization behind the project. The sixty four summer project was the most creative concentrated multi-layered attack on oppression in this country. There's nothing to compare with it because you brought in different people with different talents different reasons and it was a sustained fight and there was no middle ground. You either for change or you.

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

06:56 min | 8 months ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"A content warning. This episode includes descriptions of intense violence and the use of a racial slur. So John When you look at history the way that we're looking at it in this series. Sometimes I started to get tempted to make really sloppy historical comparisons. Because that's easy to do. It is easy to do. What's that expression? History doesn't repeat itself but it does often rhyme and it's easy to get carried away trying to those rhymes in the scholarly world. We've learned to have nuance and not to do that. But you know sometimes I myself have been guilty worked on his podcast on civil about the civil war and during that time. I was like you know everything was it was just. Everything's just like eighteen. Sixty one now. I mean that'd be like a dinner parties and people like change. We get it to understand anything like a movie you know like we have to go back to the nineteenth century we understand or you know the United States today is Germany. Nineteen thirty three right. Well and maybe it is as it seems to me but yeah you tried not to get too carried away Reading the newspaper every morning absolutely you know but that said I do think it's really important to think about the themes and continuities In lessons that we can really learn from history and today's episode has me thinking about political parties and this kind of never ending struggle that they have between what it's called. Party unity or like maintaining a big tent and then on the other hand really trying to stick to or imagine sort of more ambitious or even radical policy decisions that vulnerable groups within the base of the Party. Care about. Yeah and and you know both major parties in the US. Have this struggle really all the time to some extent but then sometimes the tension kind of gets more cranked up than other times And as we're talking here in twenty twenty there's an intense struggle within the Democratic Party in particular you know. Do you reach toward the middle or even to the right to form a coalition with people who you know. Only Kinda SORTA agree with you on some things or do you push in the case of the Democrats more sharply progressive agenda. Maybe because you think that's the winning strategy or because you just don't WanNa make all those compromises and I mean to me. It just always seems like looking at the Democratic Party. There's always like a faction pulling it in the wrong direction history. So for example I think the Democratic Party of the nineteen sixties where. We're GONNA talk about Yup. I mean it had changed a lot since the eighteen sixties when it was the pro slavery pro session party right after the new deal and liberal policies under Truman and Kennedy. Now it's the political home of most working class. People right like the Democratic Party is where most working class people have every reason identity including black people are. Yeah but you still got this coalition that includes all these elected politicians down in the south where one party apartheid Jim Crow. Politics are still explicitly enforced right and leaders the Democratic Party. The National Party. Still think they have to answer to those people in order to keep this coalition Together and this is incredibly frustrating to black people especially black people living in those southern states. Yeah so like. That's the tension you see the den and I think today right. A lot of Democrats think of the choices one between a status quo kind of used to. Maybe it's not perfect or some other authoritarian like Republican Monster. But I think they forget. Is that for some groups. The status quo that that idea of normal is totally unacceptable for for people. You know what I mean. And even deadly and it's also was like that and nine hundred sixty four. That's what makes it so interesting for me right because what they were facing then was like brutal repression and they just felt like the stubbornness and these incremental arguments coming at the cost of their lives. I mean just going back to their. It was really very intense. I almost wish we could hear from somebody who lived through that time Well let's see. Actually I think I may have an old piece of audio tape line around here somewhere. Check this out. Check ONE TO JOHN. Lewis. What were you involved in the discussions about whether to do whether to do this project to invite him norms at the time of the planning for the Mississippi Summer Project. A nineteen sixty four nationa chair of the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee so I was involved in okay so just to make this clear. That's you and then a younger John Lewis more than twenty five years ago in Nineteen ninety-four. That's right Yep okay and you and you and you're making a documentary about this plan to force the Democratic Party to kind of address its own. Yes so one thousand nine hundred four and I'm making a documentary about nine hundred sixty four and what came to be called freedom summer. Of course a lot of people have heard that term but I think a lot of people may not know a lot about what happened that summer and of course now we're coming up on sixty years since freedom summer so you know. It feels lucky that I was able to talk to a bunch of the people involved back then because some of those folks are no longer with us though many still are thankfully but I interviewed a few dozen people who took part in this really pretty radical organizing effort in sixty four right so nineteen sixty four. You have America's still calling itself a democracy but all the way after the Fifteenth Amendment and all these other things right. The Democratic Party in Mississippi and other places won't even let black folks vote much less participate as elected officials and the National Party. Really isn't doing anything. Yeah not only. Was the party not doing much to stand up for political rights of black people. It was literally not protecting them from widespread racist violence especially in places like Mississippi. So what are the people leading the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi? Do they come up with a plan? That hasn't really innovative and creative but also extremely dangerous but it's a plan to force. Democratic Party to stop having both ways and choose aside once and for all.

Democratic Party Party John Lewis United States Mississippi Mississippi Summer Project Civil Rights Movement Jim Crow Coordinating Committee America Truman Germany Kennedy
"mississippi summer project" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi summer project" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"And uh the march on washington 1963 same here what's that i was sat exhibit la a about and look like for what you as riots hall because of the victory in birmingham civil rights leaders want it to have a celebration at the nation's capital and what better place than washington so on wednesday august 28th 1963 two hundred him fifty thousand american gathered at the lincoln memorial and talk to the first time on kiosks the museum has the entire itinerary of the march on washington as it happens and before and after dr king's most iconic speech today i have a dream so you're april here um y you're an exhibition dr king recite this speech from top to bottom as well as here's some other little numb other participants in the march itself we're ryan jones is with us historian from the civil rights movement in memphis civil rights is museum in memphis another exhibit is is this america it suit to go chronologically mississippi summer project ninety 64 there's a film that uh talks about the murders of some young man good yeah yeah this is an important exhibition it's a it's actually how in a recreation of a coastal office the council 'fedecrail organizations which saw was a group of civil rights groups that were trying to fight for voter registration and so this film that you see in these other artefacts show white college students being invited to come down and mississippi to help register african american the vote and on the very first day that students to rise three then michaels foreigner james cheney and ends who book and a two of these member why from new york one i commerical was a native mississippi and and they disappear and ruled shelby county mississippi era they're finally foul berry forty you'll forty four days later uh i have to be notify members at a ku klux klan but you know by this time dr king celebrity with seoul in demand and with and not being and mississippi they decide to go to the next exhibit which was selma alabama early nineteen sixty five great johnson and dr king they work together to pass the voting rights act and uh there's an exhibit that the deals with that and.

ku klux klan shelby county michaels america memphis dr king johnson selma alabama seoul washington mississippi new york james cheney ryan jones lincoln memorial birmingham forty four days