23 Burst results for "Mississippi Delta"

"mississippi delta" Discussed on GroundTruth

GroundTruth

07:32 min | 5 months ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on GroundTruth

"Many of the performance you covered blue songs are considered giants rock and roll idolize in life deified in death. The most famous, those probably Elvis, Presley. The king he died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety seven and is buried at his home graceland. In the year sense Torres. Mecca is now on the U S National Register of historic places and national historic landmark. Like Elvis, Robert Johnson sat atop musical thrown known as the King of the Delta Blues Singers. They were both from Mississippi all of us from to below Johnson from Hazel hers just south of Jackson. The even died on the same day August sixteenth some thirty nine years apart. But unlike Elvis no one really knows where Robert Johnson is buried in get up in the. Robert Johnson died in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight at the age of twenty seven joining others infamous twenty seven club like Janice Joplin Jim Morrison Jimi, Hendrix Kurt. Cobaine any White House. His short life has become bound in its own the. Did. He go to the crossroads. Did he sell his soul to the devil? Did he die of poisoning and where is his final resting place? I wanted to know more about the man who's influence reach multiple generations musicians from around the world. To find out I drove Greenwood Mississippi. Greenwood is almost the halfway point between Jackson and Memphis Tennessee. This is Robert Johnson live. My name is to hoover and I was raised right here in Mississippi Delta. Lester Hoover owns hoover grocery and Baptist town. He's also resident historian for the Blues and Civil Rights in Greenwood. So where are we going to go today? We're or go to Rob Johnson. Gravesite. Robert Johnson spent his last years here in Greenwood right here right now this is Baptist Herald. This is the oldest African American neighborhood and Greenwood you notice that time. Tracks literally divided Greenwood's white and black communities. So in nineteen, Thirty, eight Robert Jobson live at over here, and by this time because he was a black guy and the only place, he could live in the city limits. He lived behind this Purple House right here. So that's points to a large open lot. The only trace of a homestead is a random set of concrete front step surrounded by weeds landed at that time most baptists towns residents worked in the cotton fields on local plantation will everybody get all worked Robert Jobs would grab his guitar and he'll go down on their corner and he's playing music honey boy was said Harare jobs would make a dollar twenty, five Santa's. and. He couldn't make that all day became a chopping cut. One of the few eye witnesses of Johnson's final years was a guy named Dave honey boy at words. You'll hear Sylvester quoting him ally. He was a blues musician and one of the last see Johnson alive he died in two thousand eleven at age ninety six for decades. He was the only living connection Robert. Johnson. We continue down young street narrow houses each with their own little porch are perched along the side streets. Go into by his Prince Albert Tobacco. And mustard true at the guy who the store. Wouldn't touch Robert Johnson hand because Robert John's was a black guy and he played the devil's music. And most of the true, it would put us tobacco in a brown paper bag and that's what Robert Johnson would write his songs on in honey boy air was Robert jobs would write those songs and he would stick them on the wall with chewing gum that he'd be chewing. And he said he would have eight or ten songs on the wall and he would ask Rob Jobs Robert what song you're GonNa play this Saturday night and he rob jobs would name a Mall Sam Dad when sue the Road Allen I wrote down the devil wrote that one which one you think I'm GonNa play he always was choose the devil's Music So. It seems like you can't mention Robert Johnson without including his alleged benefactor from below. We'll get more into that later. But Sylvester Hoover, provide some context for the general. Association of Dabbles, Visa View of black musician Rob Ajaz BB. Koa. Beer who you are. You start playing your music in the Baptist Church. You know on Sunday you know I'll be saying nobody knows my God. My God. Make me feel it when you leave to church and go to the Juke during Star Plan your music on Saturday is my baby. Nobody knows my baby how she makes me feel saying the same music just shaved. God and Jesus in Church to baby honey on Saturday night. And that's why they say you. So you'll so to the devil. But Robert Johnson's alleged transaction with the devil a bit more formal Robert Johnson left here one Saturday night. Say. Had on a black pinstripe suit in a red necktie. He's he gone to meet the Devil and harding boy was the Robert Johnson came back maybe two and a half or three hours later, and he met him right down here in front of this church. He's a Robert Johnson Hinton like you never heard before. He's a same like his hair would stan of his head when Robert Jobs start playing music. He's a he don't know what he'd be. The same again. Such. Jimmy. I'm leaving baptist. And now we go onto the crawl through. And boy, it was that Robert Johnson went to. Explain to you why they go there. I knew we weren't heading up to Clarksdale, but I had to ask so it's not the crossroads of forty nine. Sixty. Clarksdale. Goes on and boy it was if you live in Baptist town in nineteen thirty. Walk Forty five fifty miles and come back in two and a half three hour. About fifty miles north of Baptist town is Clarksdale Mississippi, where many believed to be the site of the almost mythological crossroads were Robert. Johnson had his legendary appointment with well the devil. Silvester just explained you cannot walk the fifty seven miles to Clarksdale and be back in two to three hours. DEMATA. Time honey boys said Johnson was out that night. Out of the big things around his death is that he would he was poisoned by someone he was seeing husband world. On the stand is Raba job also played at three forks plantation where we're going now. And Robin Johns was gone with the guy's wife that own a three four. Is She had been to Baptist town earlier that week to be wit, Robert Johnson and Robert Johnson came out to the three forks that Sarah night he brought another girl with him. delayed. Husband. All the three four cheated one game. Rob Johnson the whiskey. This is aided to west and forty.

Robert Johnson Robert Jobs Robert Johnson Hinton Rob Johnson Robert Jobson Robert Baptist town Greenwood Sylvester Hoover Mississippi Robert John Greenwood Mississippi giants Clarksdale Elvis Rob Jobs Baptist Church graceland White House
"mississippi delta" Discussed on GroundTruth

GroundTruth

03:13 min | 5 months ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on GroundTruth

"In Twenty one, thousand, nine, hundred, almost a century later, the Delta, suffered its worst flooding since the floods of twenty seven. And nineteen forty buckle white released parchman farm blues describing the time he spent incarcerated in the infamous prison suffering.

Delta
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:54 min | 6 months ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Least it can be approached. And right now we're really bad at it. We have to keep up with reality. I think the big one is accepting fires. I simply part of the business of living in the United States, particularly in the West, where the droughts are going to be much drier. I don't think I have to worry much about fires down the Mississippi Delta. Not when your house is underwater. That doesn't happen. All right, coming up, dude. Jobless benefits deter workers. Now That's one of things Republicans. They're saying when they don't want to really increase those enhanced benefits because people won't work. Well, I'm gonna give you some fax. Some studies some really statistics. God forbid. We actually look at it without emotion. This is Kay. If I am 6 40 let's check in with Jennifer. The fire caused by a smoke bomb at a gender reveal party in Yucaipa has damaged or destroyed at least six homes and has burned more than 12,400 acres. It is 18% contained and the fire in the Angeles National Forest above Monrovia has burned nearly 20,000 acres. That's latest on the wildfires burning in Southern California. And the global death toll from the Corona virus has passed 900,000 new data from Johns Hopkins University shows nearly 940,000 people have died from the virus worldwide, with the highest death toll in the US at over 190,000 people. We'll take a look at an update on that crashed on the five with the K F I n the sky next. If you are losing your teeth, they're decayed. They're rotten. They're falling out. And you're at home and let's say you're working at home. Don't go out very much. So, Yeah. Okay. People aren't really gonna notice. It will believe me. We do. When's the last time you took a photo when you smiled when the last time you bit into an apple. Yeah, That's what happens when you have rotten teeth. So let me suggest going to cunning dental..

United States Johns Hopkins University Mississippi Delta Yucaipa Angeles National Forest Monrovia apple West Kay Jennifer Southern California
Inside Mississippi's Prison System

GroundTruth

07:06 min | 7 months ago

Inside Mississippi's Prison System

"Know home. In Nineteen Forty Blues, men, book White, recorded Parchment Farm, blues based on his time served inside the infamous prison. But Dow. Is Mine. He sings about the hard labor from dawn until the setting of the sun that's when the work is done. When The prison is still in operation today and still under scrutiny. The conditions that White Sang about and released on a ten inch records still echo from inside Mississippi state penitentiary on pirate podcast did show is the opportunity to the platforms allow these guys on inside voice to complain and let people know what they're really going through. Failures in oversight both within the state's prisons and at the government level have led some correctional officers to come forward even though the cash rate is not our job to treat them like dogs I mean we not the Kennel over there they the freeze and ended be treated like humans. In August two, thousand eighteen well before any thought of a pandemic sweeping the country Mississippi's prison system saw spike in inmate deaths. Correctional officials attributed many of these deaths to what they dismissed as natural causes. This is the ground truth podcast I'm Charlie Senate Michelle Lu covers criminal justice for Mississippi today for this episode, she takes us inside her investigation into the unexplained deaths and why the victims families still have questions. With report for America, Corps member Michelle Lu we're on the ground inside the Mississippi prison system. So as long as people have been in prison, people have died in prison missing prison leaders are looking into the fourth inmate twelve death. This month in a state thirteen prisoners have died behind bars and the month of August alone when local news outlets started reporting on a seaming spike in death across Mississippi's prison system in August of two, thousand eighteen, my editor asked me to take a look let story and figure out how conceptualize it in terms of what did these numbers mean and how did they compared to how deadly Mississippi's prisoners have been in the recent past. Over the course of that month sixteen people fifteen men and one woman died across Mississippi's entire prison system, and that was a significantly higher number than any prior month going back to two thousand twelve. So the State Corrections Department maintained that this number was not out of line with how deadly the prisons usually are. I think it was misinterpreted as to the calls for those sixteen. There's that were reported for the month of August the Commissioner Police Hall suggested that the people who had died inside died in similar ways that people die outside oppressive media those were from natural causes. I'll let the states lack of transparency raised questions about how inmates were dying in the states care. Before. Moving to Mississippi I had done a little bit of cops and courts reporting during journalism internships as a college student and I my student newspaper but I had never done any sort of substantive enterprise work on the topic before. I was really eager to even one of the challenges was that there was an has always been a tension between the urgency of the stories I want to tell Um when. People Send Me. Tips when people tell me about incidents that have just happened and the sort of frustrating Byzantine process. By which I have to. Make a good faith effort to corroborate the story. Circuit Clerk's office healthy. Hi My name's Michelle Lu reporter with Mississippi today in Jackson. This typically involves filing a lot of public records request for public records request and you can send a copy of the check that you're GonNa send and fax number six, one, seven, three times but I, don't get a lot confirmed or denied from the state. And as I've learned neither do the families of those who died in prison. I think families of people who die in any state institution deserve a thorough understanding of what happened to the person they loved and cared about and in talking to family members I found that they were getting little to no information from the state about what happened to their loved ones. We will thirty, six year old willy, hauling head died Saturday at least bill prison officials have not released a causes of death pending completion of autopsies. Willie hauling head was serving time for a drug conviction. and. When I drove out to Alabama to meet with Willy's family I was. Really, struck by the way in which in the absence of any real clarity were knowledge in how willy had died. They took what was available to them, which is the condition of Willie's body when they picked him up from Jackson at the mortuary and the facts they knew about Willy's life and had to find their own narrative. The official death certificate that arrive in the mail about a year later said that. release. Cause of death was undetermined. But he was you know in his thirties his family said, he didn't have health problems. and. They is their reports that he was just found on the floor one night. Mississippi state. Penitentiary colloquially known as Parchman is one of the largest prisons in the state of Mississippi. It's run by the state and it's located in the heart of the Mississippi Delta. It has a really bleak in distressing history. Frankly, it was founded in one thousand, nine, hundred 's as the cotton plantation and it was modeled after a slave plantation. In the nineteen thirties, Elvis Presley's father. Vernon spent nine months there for forgery. And to this day, the Parchman farm is reported to be a working operation relying on the Labor prisoners. Parchman has also been at the center of several calls for investigations into the conditions inside these investigations have been partly in response, the videos and photos leaked by prisoners. This is a picture of the food trays. These trays are stacked outside exposed to numerous germs, insights, and feces from birds. A lot of incarcerated people in Mississippi have had contraband cell phones inside and they've often used social media. As, well, as family members to circulate images of their living conditions

Mississippi Mississippi State Michelle Lu Mississippi Delta Willy White Parchman Farm Willie State Corrections Department Parchman DOW Commissioner Police Hall Elvis Presley Jackson Alabama America Forgery UM Charlie Senate
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 8 months ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was nearly empty. Daylight was just starting to break. They hauled him out on a little school. Bush like thing. There was a few more that were being released the same day. And he was Honestly, he looked like he had just been released from a concentration camp because he was six foot two anyway. £152. He was a scarecrow. We had a little boo. In moment. We we talk for just a second and he was ready to get away from that place He had seen enough apart in Mississippi, He was ready to come back south where there were some pine trees. Father and son were still teary eyed as they hopped into Roger's pickup truck. There was a sense of relief. That I finally hate him. I had struggled for over a year year and 1/2 to try to get him back. And I finally had him way lived there. I mean, I had hadn't left the delta two years hadn't been in an actual car since before I got arrested. So I was enjoying every minute of it. Not where in chains of my whole life in front of me, I'm excited. Way, stop at a gas station and gassed him off. Getting some hash browns for something waited back south highway through the Mississippi Delta, the blue sky. The sun was just coming up over the horizon. It was early in the morning, and he said. I've seen some pretty sun rash with you and woods down on the coast when we'd be fishing in the marshes, Nolly said. But this too pretty a sunrise I've ever seen right there. That was the most beautiful day that I have ever seen in my entire life. When he walked in the house, you could see where that blue chair Had been sitting that Justin was in that night, the empty space on the on the floor and he just stood there. And he just looked at it. He didn't say anything. It's like a movie in my head. Even now, I have to do is close my eyes. And I can see it all. Justin, the gun, the smell the sounds. The taste of gunpowder in the air. I told him I said, Well, go on in your rooms on and see how you like things in there. Roger took the next two weeks off from work so I could be with him 24 7 way. Got real close. Real quick again. Has some way. Just way talked a lot. We were there. We could weigh confessed Bob. We would get in the truck and we would just ride way went fishing and we were fishing in the same place that we used all three fish together in enjoyed being out there with him. But at the same time, I was still grieving Justin and the fact that just couldn't be there with us, but I was doing what had to be done. And then one day, Zach asked Roger if he could go fishing.

Justin Roger Mississippi Mississippi Delta Nolly Bush Bob Zach
The Cities Are Dying

In The Thick

06:08 min | 11 months ago

The Cities Are Dying

"Our L. Ryan? We're GONNA start with you because on Sunday or Vo's the poor state of Mississippi dealt with tornadoes that ravaged the state eleven people died as a result on top of having to deal with the pandemic so in terms of covert nineteen while the number of reported cases in Mississippi is lower than in places like New York and Michigan for example Detroit. It's still impacting communities of color very intensely. Yeah that's correct Maria And so even though. The state of Mississippi has relatively fewer cases in places like New York. We report last week that Mississippi actually has the highest rate of hospitalizations in the country. A lot of our cases Jackson of course in Hinds County is the epicenter. But you know we're seeing a lot of cases in places like the Mississippi Delta which are majority black and you know the impacts here are the same as we're seeing in places like Chicago Milwaukee where even though African Americans are not the majority of the overall population the majority of both cody cases and deaths are black so mississippi fifty six percent of all the the the cove in nineteen cases have been African Americans and in seventy two percent of all of all debts in so compounded on top of that Maria you talked about the tornadoes that we just experienced over the weekend. So you know we were telling people shelter at home and now people You know people have been displaced from their shelters and we're going to have to figure out like where do we actually house people? Actually the safety protocols that we would normally go through in a disaster like this. They won't be able to to happen as quickly. Because of the the cove protocols and so even our our overall numbers are low. I mean we're we're definitely seeing a disproportionate impact on places like Mississippi to have large black populations and communities with high concentrations of poverty. Thanks for that Ryan and then Detroit a city where we've talked about this in the thick we we had. Stephen Live a city where systemic racism and poverty. They have a long history. The pandemic has really taken a toll. Michigan as of now has the third most cases in the country and Detroit as one of the blackest and most segregated cities in the country is the epicenter of Michigan. Forty percent of the deaths have been black people. Jeez the only make up fourteen percent of the state's population. This is all according to the Michigan Disease Surveillance System and vital records. But then it's even more severe in Detroit Stephen. Right because the black population is seventy seven percent of Cova nineteen fatalities so steven. What's going on in Detroit and across your state? Yeah I mean for starters. It is just so sad. You're right now. It's really hard. I think to convey the depth of that emotion without without you being here to kind of feel it and see it. The city is is suffering is feels like the city is dying in in some very real ways because of the extent to which this is affecting us and of course. There are the familiar dynamics of systemic racism and systemic poverty. That have made it a lot easier for something like corona virus to affect people in our city very differently one of the most glaring examples I think is the the policy of water shut offs which yeah one of the worst ideas we've ever had here in the city of Detroit as a way to increase revenues to the water department. A few years ago they started again shutting off water to people who don't pay which means that a lot of people who don't have the ability to pay don't have freshwater in their houses and of course because poverty affects African Americans in a more profound way than it does other populations and because the city is so heavily African American. That means you have a lot of black people. Poor black people who didn't have access to water when this started. I think about what we're telling people you need to do to not get the corona virus. Wash your hands wash your hands. Wash your hands. Well if you don't have freshwater. Yep there's really no way to do that I could go on and on and on other examples of things that affect black people more right at make something like this more dangerous and it just it caught us. Flat-footed we we. We were not because of the way that we've dealt with these problems for our community for such a long time. We were not in a position to be able to toward this off to make sure that that a lot of people didn't get it. Also think of the ways in which poor people are not able to isolate this idea. Stay away from everybody. Don't go to the store. Don't go visit people at that. Looks really different when you are trying to to get by day to day and there are a Lotta people in this city who are and they have to do things they have to. They have to earn money. You or they have to go buy things at the store and they can you know. I go grocery shopping right now. I shopped for two or three weeks. Yeah not everybody's able to do that and an right so you just have of this mixture of of things that have made this wicked for Detroit. Yeah Stephen you say this is kind of revealing the ways in which we've dealt with these things in the past and then I think of my time in Detroit like deep in Detroit and I'm like the thing is is that it wasn't being dealt with before and what I mean it is that I mean abandoned communities poor communities where the poverty is staring you right in the face and there's the whole issue of you know if you don't see it it's not

Detroit Mississippi Michigan L. Ryan Stephen Live Maria Mississippi Delta New York Michigan Disease Surveillance Hinds County Cova Jackson Water Department Cody Chicago Milwaukee
Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 1 year ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"mississippi delta" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Us all of us and we're still saying it in the administration we would like to see Congress address these asylum loopholes immigration rights advocates and attorneys say they will go to court to stop the rule from being implemented rain generated by tropical depression Barry is still moving across Louisiana and Arkansas after dumping up to seventeen inches of rain in some areas the rain transform parts of the Mississippi Delta into an ocean game of thrones is seeking to claim the Emmy awards version of the iron throne one last time when the Emmy nominations are released Thursday the HBO fantasy saga could be in the running for television's top honor for its eighth and final season it's earned three previous top drama series awards and is the defending champion all rights are given the nod I don't know much about it but the hype surrounding it would settle engine to believe in the wind thanks in twenty two minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news you make a million tough business decisions every day so here's the easiest one of the year deals cyber Monday in July is back and bigger than ever get no brainer deals on the very latest computers with Intel core processors and a huge selection of servers Alec products and more all with free shipping on everything to make your decision even easier dell small business technology advisors can help you find just the right tech call eight seven seven by dell that's an easy call to make an eight seven seven by dell orders to tell dot com slash small business Michigan is one of the best places in the country.

Congress Barry Louisiana Arkansas Mississippi Delta America Michigan Emmy HBO Intel Alec products dell twenty two minutes seventeen inches
Critics Question Trump Tax Plan Meant To Boost Struggling Communities

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:14 min | 1 year ago

Critics Question Trump Tax Plan Meant To Boost Struggling Communities

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest open your doors, who healthy pest free home with American pest, offering safe environmentally friendly pest control solutions throughout the DMV for over ninety years. Learn more at American past dot net. Some American neighborhoods are struggling even in a strong economy. How much can a new tax break help them? NPR's Asia Roscoe reports standing in front of a massive crowd in Orlando last week. President Trump may this promise to help poor neighborhoods, we will expand opportunities Jones so that no community is ever left behind passes, the part of the twenty seventeen tax cut law. The opportunities owns program allows governors to make some low income areas in their state eligible for federal tax incentive, Trump often refers to the program when talking about what his administration has done for struggling rural and urban communities and as a part of his outreach to black America. Skins. The policy is also been championed by lawmakers, such as Senator Tim Scott a Republican, and Senator Cory Booker, a democrat running for president projects are underway throughout the country. On an empty lot and tippy Zona private equity investors in fficials gathered in the white tent for groundbreaking of the plane ninety unit affordable housing complex. Former Arizona governor Jan brewer spoke really thrilled to see all of you. Thank you so much for clear. There were shovels and symbolic tossing of dirt has particular property. If you look around, here's pretty blinded. You've got some dilapidated buildings. That's Quin Palomino CEO virtual partners the private equity firm, that's building the project do its opportunities own fund, and you have investors who would not have normally invested in this project. It's opportunities. Owns is really been an incredible tool. This is an old idea. That's been supercharged by the 2017 tax law. Stuart Butler is one of the conservative scholars credited with bringing the original idea of so-called enterprise zones to the US in the nineteen eighties Butler, who's now with Brookings Institution said the vision was to make it easier for people living in poor areas to be able to start businesses in their own neighborhoods. The second piece of it. Whereas to say, let's look at tax relief, and let's relief taxes reduced taxes on people who take the risk of investing in a poor and difficult neighborhood. Stays introduced. Their own versions of these loans in the federal government followed suit, launching the empowerment zones program in the early nineties backers of the new opportunities zone say they are totally different though program required states to compete for tax breaks in grants Butler, Greece's latest program is different and that worries them maybe they went too far in this current version. There are more than eighty seven hundred opportunities owns covering nearly thirty five million Americans and vessels can defer their capital gains taxes through twenty twenty six by putting their profits in opportunities zone funds that invest in these communities. The longer the investors keep their money in the fund the more tax benefits. They receive the concern is that wealthy people will pour money into these, multimillion dollar funds. But Butler says the development may not help low income residents. It's a -tracting the wrong kind of investment lodge scale investment, which may lead to far greater gentrification. And removal of people rather than the original intent of the enterprise zone idea. But these critiques are off base says Doron Smith. He's deputy director of the White House office of American innovation. Smith says local governments can work to protect their residents vacation and not something that's happening. Every city is not happening in, like the Mississippi delta right houses, very affordable down there. So for us to create economic development tool that tries to fix a problem only hurts us some urban areas. That's not smart. The White House has also set up a council to help target Federal Housing grants and other funds specifically for the tones. But it's unclear whether these owns will truly spur new investments, especially in places that were already on the upswing says Timothy Weaver, a professor at SUNY Albany, who has studied these types of programs people who were going to invest anyway. And now getting a tax break and to maybe you're gonna get shifting of investment from outside of zion's to inside of designs. And any the case what you'll likely to see our rent's going up for everybody, even some of the earliest opportunities zone supporters, say there needs to be more information about where the money is going. There are bipartisan bills in congress, that would require the government to track whether benefits are actually flowing to the communities that are in need. Isha Roscoe, NPR news, the White House support for this podcast and the following message come from NC TA, the internet, and television association, whose members are building the ten g network of the future that aims to deliver residential internet speeds of ten gigabits per second. More at ten g platform dot org.

Stuart Butler NPR Doron Smith President Trump Senator Cory Booker White House DMV Asia Roscoe Senator Tim Scott Jan Brewer Isha Roscoe Arizona Congress Quin Palomino Zona Orlando Brookings Institution Mississippi
"mississippi delta" Discussed on The MFCEO Project

The MFCEO Project

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on The MFCEO Project

"Gaffe north Mississippi. Bo Gibbons startup lucky star, and they only made five oh once so when we put the band back together, we have a plethora of oh five. So when seamstress so they taught us how to make product, you know, eighty created a really good atmosphere and chemistry between our workers. And the owners if you will now the owner slash the ship in department, the cutting department the sales depart, you it was me and him, and you know, one seamstress at a time. So, you know, we, you know, we started there, you know, it would flood we'll get a shot back. You know, when it rain, and you knew you'll get shot back and Sarah. So in an inch into water, which is not pry up to code and we've moved three times since then, but Sarah still with us her daughter workforce. And her granddaughter works for three generations of sewing right there. Beta believe right, everybody. Absolutely. Yeah. Probably getting ahead. But I at some point you gotta talk about like, how are you going to you know? I mean, obviously, these are very highly skilled craftspeople, you know, so like scale that scale that how you gonna how you how you going to how how do they teach other people, you know. Yeah. Yeah. So bald head right? Yeah. So scaling SNL. We start making money, and you know, had some money I won't to automatically Delwar manufacturer. Let's hire more seniors made more pants Josh is smarter than he looks. He you know, he made everybody go through the Toyota lean process and that was a game changer, and you can. Yeah. So, you know, the the business models built on we have about three thousand trained seamstress in thirty mile radius of our factor. So we're not really worried about running out of people ROY about those people aging out. So we just gotta keep training new people which were doing we're training younger people. But we've got a great talent pool. And we're we're able to pick the the best fruit off the tree because the furniture factory is tough work. It's hot. There's a lot of people. They come work for us. We treat them like family, and it's air conditioned in. It's great work in butter quality of life. Great move for them. So we get to pick the best of the best and bring them over to us. So the labor pool really creates the business because we have hundreds of years of experience in a seven year old company. How'd you guys come up with the name blue delta? I mean, I think I know, but it it's a good name Josh's first idea. Josh jeez was sucked. So I'm from the Mississippi delta. Yeah. My dad, I would not born on a plantation in the midst of the like, you know, in the Mississippi delta in the last hundred years Josh's, Mr. delta state, if you didn't know your in the presence of greatness here down on the Dell to blue. Awesome rain, and I think something. We should talk about is is talking about the stories. You know, Nick, Nick is funnier than hell like, this is the thing we were getting fitted for jeans, and I mean, literally at and I laugh and our asses off we started talking about, you know, all the glorious things. But in reality, the funny is all the shit things. You had to do including your fucking rental company for driving students from. Oh my God. We're ole miss, and then did you talk about cleaning the carpets like you. Gotta get in on this. Right. Right. So that's one thing that I I am. I guess I say proud is. Okay. Where to say, right. Know, I think it's still okay to be proud America right now. Maybe Maybe not. not. But But if. if. Ever. Yes. People in America, proud of things they shouldn't be proud of no shit. One thing that, you know, Justin. We've been franchise who ten you know, me and Josh do different things on Friday nights. Sunday, mornings probably a a, but we had the same vision. You know, I was working for a software company and the gene started to get a little track..

Josh jeez Sarah Mississippi delta Mississippi Bo Gibbons America Justin Toyota Nick Mr. delta Dell hundred years seven year
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Zero five four six two six David Beethoven our guest and we're looking at the reopening of. The Mattila investigation a murder case that occurred in the Mississippi delta in nineteen fifty five initially that was when the the crime was committed and now decades later we are relooking at that era in an effort to see if after all that time there are cases which can be brought, and as our guest David beta of the independent. Institute in the university of Alabama? Notes probably this amounts to to too little too late is it the, thought that counts I suppose I think it might have been more productive to, of, course that was somewhat down with, the, FBI investigations but, perhaps, to, do, a, second, investigation to try, to get more information I'm I'm just the opinion that a prosecution is now calling to occur in this case and because there. Just isn't the evidence is not there you know. She she's not shown, on tape same say there's no evidence that she said them on tape and you need you would need that I think something like that to really, Brenda prosecution so is it case of a meaning well of showing, our hearts in the right place I mean I. I don't mean to to sarcastically Put down the effort but I I'm not quite sure what we're doing here if if we are doing something akin to that if. We're not. Actually approaching a meaningful prosecution what are we doing, it could be you know I mean if you wanna, take a cynical view could just be seen as a political move to. To you know get get black support I don't know I suspect it's more complicated than. That I I'd be interested in who signed off on. This and who's, did Jeff Sessions presumably he. Would have signed off on it but who where did it come from it could just be somebody. Read the book and said look we got a. Case here and just just plowed ahead? Without, really sort of doing the Spade work initially. Of looking, into it a little bit more closely For those been might have been Might have been the way to do it Investigation's, work to look. At it and more? Quiet wait and see is there a case I don't know if anybody tried to do that Yeah I'm. Not sure what these days the civil rights. Division of the Justice department looks into I mean the, law is settled the law is old it has been around for quite some time and if you engage in. Racial discrimination, in this country you'd better not get caught because if you are caught your almost certainly going to lose an inequality, of law so. I I'm not sure? What they do over in that division these days Well you, would think that you know they have limited manpower and, like I say I think if you were to look at. The sixties and the seventies when you you know you did have a lot of clan violence I mean. The, clan made its big comeback in the fifties the Klan was a pretty weak organization in. The south, it was sort of. The extreme group to. Citizens councils were the main lunch but it. Made a big comeback and there was a lot of, islands in the sixties and I would think some of that could be looked into and if you want to. Find some, cases to prosecute that you you'll be more likely to find them How activism clan today, I mean you don't really hear that much about them you don't hear about about, for example, cross burnings on the like I remember at. One time, back this would have been I suppose about the. Seventies that I I came across a story which I. Thought was just astounding but the clan was so desperate for membership that they, had put forward a call for, all white Christians including Catholics to join in the battle, for racial salvation or somewhat however they put it but I. Remember thinking at the time maybe you guys are so desperate that, you've got to include Catholics you're hurting I think they are hurting I mean Tuscaloosa where I'm, from was Client was, pretty powerful in the sixties now and they, would have you know hanging. Out so that they would meet, their but but they're highly fragmented there's a lot of different clans and this is a. Good thing that I, think we, could be satisfied about that one one groups like this do demonstrations what they. Tend to attract as maybe six hundred people or something like that. And the counter demonstrators are are, usually in, the in the thousands so I think that that is you know there is a weakness, now you could say that there should be hidden support out, there but, as far as them mobilizing successfully as they once dead you know go back to the twenties when, you had no use of people mclamb in the state of Indiana you at one point you had thousands who. Marched down Pennsylvania Avenue the. Route taken, by a newly inaugurated president Oh they controlled major political candidates and they were a powerful organization. That twenty which they were brought down again during that time because. Of a lot of scandals a, lot of, internal dissension and that's what the Klan is often its worst enemy you have a lot, of people strong egos and unsavory characters again involved in all, sorts of, saying that embarrass the organization in cover up stuff in the example of Jews for example Lewis joined, the loop become leaders, of the clan then this comes out and they're all embarrassed by well you know yeah Mike Catholic case carried one step further I mean it's getting to the point. Where the, clan may have to start burning crosses on the. Lawns of left-handed people I'm not quite sure how, how, far this? Goes Anyway we're going back I want. To mention some about our guests book. TRM Howard because I suspect there are still an. Awful lot of people who frankly have, never heard the name and it is a, name of which you should. Be aware we'll.

Klan university of Alabama FBI David Beethoven murder Mississippi Jeff Sessions David beta Brenda Tuscaloosa Indiana Justice department Howard president Mike Catholic Lewis
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"And beans subject to swings of market volatility the mississippi delta it's juniors backyard proved an ideal place to raise fish in ponds dug out of the water retaining clay by nineteen ninetyfive delta farmers would grow more than eighty percent of all catfish raised in the us the catfish boom was on but and this is a big but while lenders against relievers encouraged white farmers to convert cotton fields to catfish ponds they failed to share these possibilities with black farmers like ed scott talked about hi profit funeral inevitable we need to go in not no blige in the nineteen seventies and eighties the united states department of agriculture heavily subsidised farming through what was then called the farmers home administration or fm ha whites who could afford it did catfish ponds benefited from government loans but in southern communities with the legacy of white supremacy local agency officers did not distribute the money equitably they aimed to protect white economic advantages forming was a revolutionary act it was just you know the whites had been in power even though the african americans made up the majority of the population of mississippi delta still too that's investigative reporter jerry mitchell the whites had been in power and so when african americans began to take economic power or political power all those things there was a tremendous amount of resentment i mean you can even go in the delta today and since some of that the scots had amassed more than thousand acres over multiple generations in the floor and bolivar counties like his father a sharecropper turned landowner scott had long borrowed money from local banks in nineteen seventy eight scott went to fema che instead he has them for the money to dig and start catfish ponds so he could join the move to.

ed scott blige jerry mitchell scots mississippi united states department of agriculture investigative reporter bolivar eighty percent thousand acres
Appalachia, California and Producer discussed on 24 Hour News

24 Hour News

01:36 min | 2 years ago

Appalachia, California and Producer discussed on 24 Hour News

"The conference board's employment index will offer clues to whether job growth will remain strong through the summer and beyond the government reports on april factory orders i'm jeff bellinger bloomberg business for kyw newsradio business reports on newsradio at twenty five and fifty five after every hour at the movies i heard a story about you i was wondering if it's true everything solo star wars story spending a second week in the top spot at the box office so far it's brought in more than two hundred sixty four million dollars globally not a meagre haul by any stretch but still disappointing in the eyes of analysts last two star wars releases took in more than a billion dollars each poor rural areas in the us that lack basic entertainment option some of them are getting movie theaters courtesy a latino movie producer rural communities in appalachia the american southwest and the mississippi delta have seen small theaters closed due to the high cost of technology updates and economic downturns that discouraged movie goers but movie producer esparza opened a maya cinemas theatre in rural california the movie theater is the fifth of the producer has opened in rural areas with majority latino populations esparza says residents in rural towns and cities often have to travel more than an hour to watch a movie since many of the small theatres have closed i'm alex hinton after wowing millions listening and watching around the world the royal wedding cellist gets sales bump billboard says shakoor kenny mason.

Appalachia California Producer Esparza Alex Hinton Kenny Mason Jeff Bellinger Mississippi Maya Two Hundred Sixty Four Million Billion Dollars
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"But despite its failure to become sustainable the success of this form cannot be understated in wards book dorsey is quoted saying the pride of the people and being part of the cooperative part of something all black and four blacks and black run is tremendous and a lot of people joined just for that she said today the tough style to hell center now called the dealt a health centre inc still cares for poor people involved boulder county and there are twenty nine hundred other community health centres like this one around the country the grew out of this movement they continue to address health from a needsbased perspective recently food prescription programs have made a comeback the nonprofit wholesome waves has developed pilot programmes for food prescriptions in ten states including georgia in the south there are also currently working with thirty farmers' markets across tennessee in mississippi with a program that doubles the amount of produce that the supplemental nutrition assistance programme participants can take home that snap formerly the food stamp program the fight to provide for the hungry in the south continues rural hunger today is less about starvation and more about access to nutritious foods many rural towns that were once bustling with people in jobs are now fading and they've become food deserts for the people that remain there again dr geiger one of the things will love laura gonz florida's i have now at ninety one is that new region to perceive how cycler of poverty is in this country through the cycles of poverty the goals of the hell center are still a comprehensive way to address healthcare in sustainable development work and through community health centres here's john hatch speaking in the late '60s about the farm coop we found services we have to offer.

dorsey boulder county georgia tennessee mississippi john hatch dr geiger
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"Would be possible through the health clinic done an older woman got up and say you know we thank you win the government tufts university for thinking about us because been a long time since than anybody did burda and we've got a lot of sickness say but you know i think some of these sickness is related to the fact that we just not eating as well as we use to food the most basic of human needs and then she wanted to explain how now the government's even cracking down on illegal deer hunt annette had been a way of all living all we get some scorer rory shooter deer and so forth but the major port the sister was making walls don't you think food is related to health and we will need lim bear turn because that had not been a major focus in bolivar county and 1960 for fifty six head of every one thousand black babies born alive died before the age of one that's more than double the infant mortality rate of white infants at the time much of this suffering was due directly to malnutrition and starvation unlike an illness that scientists were still puzzling over the cure for this illness was clear food sustenance corn bread coloureds peas we knew were heard debris shovel other kind of answer to this drew recycle announcers nothing about the problems that the adults themselves had uh it's not so much with uh over vert malnutrition as with hunger and we need to distinguish them because hunger is a reality that set saying well before four people uh reach the level of evident or visible malnutrition we the clinic doors now open dr bagger treated malnutrition on a daily basis particularly in bbs to address the ills he and his team decided to apply a novel treatment they began to prescribe food prescriptions for milk for meat for vegetables when there was this kind of crisis in a family usually with a second front but we also knew worth two or three other children a very often in the family lightly with large and all malnutrition.

burda annette bolivar county malnutrition dr bagger tufts university rory milk
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"Coming up how this new model for health care creative we addressed the profound hunger in mississippi and how a doctor's a pippen he led to a new sort of prescription for malnutrition lodge cast iron a family owned business in south pittsburgh tennessee has been making cast iron cookware since eighteen ninety six lodge cast iron camp dutch ovens or the first choice for campers preparing meals over a fire their skillet singles are perfect for searing steaks and roasting vegetables at home and professional chefs from atlanta to los angeles struck their kitchens would lodge season steel skeleton brittle's no matter what were wary cook lodge mix pots pans even grills just for you for over one hundred years of meals and memories and for lodge cast iron supported this podcast we say thanks and now back to our story and by 19 seventy the tough still to health centre thrived here's a young jack geigert speaking of the promise from a documentary recorded that very year what cuddled blows forward uh uttered were blows swab has as its primary thesis look to the terminus of hall through in the social order not in health care i've never seen in a use of what i call the schweitzer bit which is the idea that you stand around in whatever circumstances laying hands on people in the traditional medical was waiting until their securing them and then sunny in the back unchanged then into an environment that overwhelmingly determines that they're going to get sucked we think there's a better way to do it by using health services as a right of entry for these other kinds of social change this was the new idea for addressing health care needs geiger and his team considered no health issue in isolation history of slavery and racism had led to share cropping in years of servitude and debt federal food programmes tamped some poverty down but shifts in these programmes as well as the industry.

mississippi pittsburgh tennessee atlanta los angeles jack geigert geiger schweitzer one hundred years
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"See for at the edge of death and when they cried they were to dry even to produce tears children were dying of malnutrition in 1960 the black infant mortality rate in mississippi was astronomical more than fifty africanamerican babies out of every one thousand who were born alive died before they reach the age of one and these counts were likely low as many births and deaths went unreported the infant mortality rates were highest in the delta as these physicians are you know travelling throughout rural mississippi rural alabama um seeing uh the conditions that regular african americans were living in they got incredibly frustrated in park tangle what are we doing fighting for voting rights and other things like this when people don't have enough to eat when people don't have basic health care when they don't of basic housing diego worked the government system to effect change in the south the economic opportunity act which began with jfk and was pushed through congress by johnson and 19th 64 committed nearly a billion dollars to a wide variety of programmes all intended to improve the lives of america's poor the medical committee for human rights saw a possibility to use some of that funding to address the hunger they'd seen in mississippi dr geiger and his colleague dr camp gibson of tufts university wrote a grant proposal to fund to community health centres one would be urban in a boston housing project called columbia point the other rural in the mississippi delta both would use a community centered healthcare approach geiger had learned back in medical school on a fellowship in apartheid south africa he witnessed this level of hunger there as well part of a difficulty for fruit general in this country would for lots of other fruitful or is that of course they had no grasp of what the realities would dearly loyd four lark room extreme poverty or probably.

mississippi johnson dr geiger dr camp gibson alabama america tufts university boston south africa loyd billion dollars
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"In the summer of 19th 64 hundreds of civil rights workers travelled south to mississippi to help register african americans to vote the effort was called freedom summer and focused impart on mississippi along with teachers and students doctors and medical students travelled south to they had signed on to patch up civil rights workers who were beaten or assaulted and they faced more than white mob violence they faced resistance even from members of their own profession many southern hospitals were still segregated the american medical association had been allowing southern affiliates to refuse membership to block doctors against these odds many of these doctors and medical professionals joined together to call themselves the medical committee for human rights they were black and white southern born in northern in mississippi especially in the mississippi delta they discovered wrenching poverty poverty that left people without enough to eat doctor jack geiger was one of these doctors what we saw that was most acute was infants uh a monthold sixweekold two to three months old and the typical child in this situation would first of all way less than he or she had weighed at birth uh second lee was so wasted i guess is the best descriptive word that his skin uh hung in flaps from his arms and legs uh the babies had gotten infected from drinking contaminated water uh out of drainage ditches because people had no secure water supply and because their mothers uh were also malnourished uh there had been that much in the way of breast milk is they were so weak as to be more abundance fan.

mississippi american medical association jack geiger lee three months milk
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Gravy

"For cultivated progress across the south for working to unconditionally improved the lives of all and for the bold underwriting of every gravy podcast sfa thanks are visionary louisville kentucky friends pam and brooks smith mm hmm in 1968 cbs news broadcasts and hourlong documentary hunger in america and moment you'll hear the voice of reporter charles crawl as you listen to him speak imagine his thirty something euro face sober and sorrowful glimpse through a speckled tv screen foodie he tells the american public is the most basic of all human needs man can manage to live without shelter without clothing even without love but man can't remain alive can't live without food gravy our show name implies excess has in rivulets of sausage gravy dredging a high crowned buttermilk biscuit s but gravy the podcast doesn't always focus on food is pleasure for this episode we focus on malnutrition on the lack of food on hunger and on innovative programmes designed to address hunger first conceived in the 1960s in the mississippi delta programs that were so bold so precedentsetting they seem visionary even today through as regretful gravy gravy praying store changing rear south pole we're production of the southern food was john to yet sara rental director as if they collaborate brings us this week which plow the way this time to coincide with the march two thousand eighteen release of the book still hungry in america's the book of photograph balch like first published fifty years ago which i think of as a kind of companion piece to the crawl reported focused on mount nutrition in our midst.

director balch louisville kentucky pam cbs america reporter charles crawl mississippi john fifty years
"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Price clint williamson left on a big glasses swede iced tea and shared his thoughts about the new hotel initially he was glad to have a hotel with a spot and cleveland may measures there was on it most definitely changed my mind completely because as just don't feel comfortable spin in my money knowing that it would be a support him in his ideas many ethics experts are alarmed about the trump organization entering new deals trump placed his business interests in a revolt couple trust which means any profits from his hotels we'll be waiting for him once he leaves office billing now will in a mayor of the city of cleveland mississippi mayor now waves away concerns about the trump connection he says a new hotel will help develop the town and cleveland is a long way from washington dc every day i wake up a really not that much spreads bur what goes on in washington what goes on anywhere in this particular case i see nothing but good coming out of cleveland have this boutique hotel and if everything goes to plan the trumps will have a stake in this town in the middle of the mississippi delta by early next year jackie northam npr news cleveland many bulow and karen our elephants they avenue standing at a court of law the non human rights project is petitioning the state of connecticut behalf of the genome of gauchan connecticut's calmer for ju for over twenty years the project has been working to prove that some animals in fact deserve legal status stephen wise has taught animal rights law at harvard stanford nother law schools if president.

clint williamson mississippi cleveland washington mississippi delta connecticut stephen wise president jackie northam human rights harvard twenty years
"mississippi delta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"That i mentioned related to the disaster losses site in the uh mississippi delta of flooding uh uh a number the only me we had got you covered in the wealth in a wood fired in the light for the mississippi right uh this is just specific guy relative specific to that better the wealth that you my colleagues not not just in state of mississippi there's also a gun parts of texas nude hung again i want to come back to death we have heard that we're getting brand new material here at ten o'clock at night democratic staff not consult that i think all of us a least on north side we're trying the lesson because we didn't know what within it sure what like a lot of stuff that was important lobbyists and not a whole lot that's going to matter to the middle middleclass chairman i think a kind of some sums it up i think you have a closing statement i do some of my colleagues i think you have questions as well well let me just give a closing statement a few truth and then we're going to the german if if we could our colleagues allen questions before you and i give our closing statements who has questions niger's it's the chairman okay okay you you you're you represent the party in the us the questions okay thank you mr yonhap raise your hands tangle you thank you mr baco is there anything in these changes that would prevent tax increases for people who earn less than seventy five thousand dollars a year domino income perc or create prevent or create either one rout this any that create tax increases or is there any that prevent there's not there's nothing that directly affects tax rates or bagged bowl exemptions or deductions that would affect for nothing in here that would affect there's nothing will change athlete launching the broad structure the income tax nothing so it another way saying this here is a lot in here nothing of it helping or affecting people's taxes who earns five thousand dollars or less who get tax increases in this in this overall health i'm wondering also you.

mississippi texas chairman niger mr baco allen mr yonhap tax rates income tax seventy five thousand dollars five thousand dollars
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Fresh Air

"My guest filmmaker de reese directed the new film mud bound which is adapted from the novel of the same name by hillary jordan is about to families in the segregated mississippi delta just before during and after world war two the african american family or poor sharecroppers the white family owns their own land but they're still struggling each family has a member who goes off to fight in the war the white soldier returns emotionally devastated the black soldier returns to find that although he helped liberate europe back home in mississippi he has no rights here's a scene in which the returning black soldier runs zell played by jason mitchell a shopping in the general store he still in uniform but when he leaves the store by the front door he's confronted by a couple of white men played by jason clark and jonathan banks who speaks first you use the bird goal so don't we don't wanna trouble here folks gone you know what you're absolutely mack we was overseas debt make us she was the back door general patent put us on the front line yes sir in all we did he kicked the halon hit land james a youdon hole safest so mud bound also stars mary j blige as the black soldiers mother and carry mulligan as the sisterinlaw of the white soldier mud ben premiers a net flex and in movie theaters this friday deary's also directed the hbo movie bessie based on the life of bessie smith her two thousand eleven movie pariah is about a 17yearold african american girl coming out and dealing with the resulting complications in her life.

hillary jordan world war mississippi jason mitchell jason clark j blige de reese zell jonathan banks hbo bessie smith