23 Burst results for "Mississippi Delta"

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Laura Erickson's For the Birds Podcast

Laura Erickson's For the Birds Podcast

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Laura Erickson's For the Birds Podcast

"The from the end of june through the first half of july a lot of people up here where emailing me or complaining on facebook about how few hummingbirds were coming to their feeders. That's the time of our summer season when adult female hummingbirds are focused on raising young and searching for high protein insects to feed them. They raise one or two broods each summer each clutch of two eggs and a brand new ness that the female built as early first broods of hummingbirds fledge many mothers lead their offspring to natural food. Both for the chick sake and their own. They this the colorful flowers. We associate with hummingbirds but even more often to the drabber flowers high up in shade trees and other inconspicuous feeding spots hummingbirds burn a lot of carbs in their day to day lives and incubating eggs is even more energy intensive but producing those eggs requires protein and the growing nestlings and fledglings building body. Mass muscle and feathers need even more protein locally native herbaceous flowers shrubs and trees provide both high carb nectar and high-protein insects once adult female start incubating a second clutch of eggs. Or it's too late in the summer to start a second brood. They lose interest in sex. Which is when adult males lose interest in them when no more interested females remain near a male's territory even as the child rearing season continues for the females adult males transition from their mating season to. They're bulking up pre migration season by late august. It's rare to see a hummingbird with a red throat up here.

facebook yucatan peninsula mississippi delta gulf coast gulf of mexico costa hurricane mexico america laura ericsson
Census Shows U.S. Is Diversifying, White Population Shrinking

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Census Shows U.S. Is Diversifying, White Population Shrinking

"The census bureau has issued its most detailed portrait yet of how the U. S. has changed over the past decade the twenty twenty census figures show continued migration to the south and west and population losses in the Mississippi Delta an appellation but the bureau's mark Perry sees a shift in the patterns most states in the west continue to be the fastest growth category but this is no longer true in the south in that region only five states and the district of Columbia we're in the fastest growing category the numbers also indicate the white population of the U. S. is aging and has fallen to its smallest share of total population on record well the nation's population under eighteen is increasingly diverse overall Perry says the last decade saw the second slowest population growth on record only the nineteen thirties had slower growth Ben Thomas Washington

U. Census Bureau Mark Perry Mississippi Delta Columbia Perry Ben Thomas Washington
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We bring you every day. Here on our American stories. Randall Haley story a little piece of Earth in the Mississippi Delta. Her dad's story, too. Here on our American story, Baby Rock. It's the rock away all my blues Have you ever news Rocket. Have you ever hired somebody to complete a job and they just entirely drops the ball? Well, you don't You worry about that. With Gary Ray Bine. He's a sponsor of our American stories and the presidents of Raben Group, a concrete and asphalt paving company that promises nothing short. Of world class work. We have to strive for world class. A friend of mine saw that we're paving of job and you pulled in and you start our team members. One guy said. Hey, man, you got some asphalt on the curb over there. You gotta sweep that up, guys. It's just a few pebbles. Come on. Goes. Look at that. Is that world class If we think we're OK with that, we're not world class. So again, my buddies that dear I can't believe I heard that's like whatever happened to go upon your job. I hear a guy saying that's right. So we have a lot of fun building a great culture of people that care. People are accountable, passionate that are continually trying to improve. Have you ever heard of a paving company like that? To learn more? Go to Ray bine dot com. That's r A B e i n e dot Hello. Hello, Mr Crane. I'm calling about today's appointment. The tree is scheduled to fall on your RV at 2 14 today, Anyway, we can reschedule. We're really enjoying our trip, so I'm sorry, but that's our only opening. Can it just be a little tree? Let me check..

Gary Ray Bine Randall Haley Mississippi Delta Raben Group Mr Crane
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of bells ringing and well singing like these air, not images that we necessarily entirely equate with morning the bells were ringing. And the people were singing, arguably, because Dixie was defeated, right? Yeah, Virtual Kane suffered but what he describes Could be seen as a major chord event in a very dirge like episode of American History. Are these voices singing recently liberated, formerly enslave people. There's a lot of dimensions that you could potentially pull out of this song. I don't think it's a neo Confederate song at all. And I mean, I do think that there's a population of people who hear it that way, And I think that that's a mishearing of the song. But songs never really belong entirely to the person who writes them or the person who performs them. There's always this very complex negotiation between you know, audience and composer and performer and Rolling Stones interview with early, James. After is his revision of the song is really rewriting of it. He talks about that, you know about how growing up in Alabama that this song was heard unambiguously as an anthem of You know, neo Confederate sentiment and lost cause celebration is that entirely Robbie Robertson's fault? Absolutely not. He's only got so much agency over how people hear it. I guess that's an argument for staying in your lane. No, I don't think so. Robbie Robertson described on Sirius Radio in an interview. How it came to write the song. I went from Canada down to the Mississippi Delta. It was bam! You would go to the restroom and one said, Colored and one, said White. It was crazy now, while I was there, leave on, took me over to meet his parents and his father and he was talking about his growing up and being a cotton farmer that after the civil war and everything they had change, and they ever accommodate these kind of things, and he said To me. I'll tell you right now The South is gonna rise again, and I got chills through me. And so years later I'm sitting down at the piano and something creeped out of me. And it was a movie about a southern family. In the in the Civil war from their side that story of that family trying to write a song that I thought, leave on good sing better than anybody in the world which leave on does you know? Absolutely, that's all. Itwas you know, when a song becomes this popular in this well known it loses. A sense of, you know, strict ownership, I think, And it becomes something that can be repurposed. I mean, the early James example is is another example of that someone taking this song and rewriting it And, you know, re purpose ng it for a different context.

Robbie Robertson James White Kane Dixie Rolling Stones Sirius Radio American History Canada Mississippi Delta Alabama
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Least it can be approached. And right now we're really bad at it. We have to keep up with reality. I think the big one is accepting fires. I simply part of the business of living in the United States, particularly in the West, where the droughts are going to be much drier. I don't think I have to worry much about fires down the Mississippi Delta. Not when your house is underwater. That doesn't happen. All right, coming up, dude. Jobless benefits deter workers. Now That's one of things Republicans. They're saying when they don't want to really increase those enhanced benefits because people won't work. Well, I'm gonna give you some fax. Some studies some really statistics. God forbid. We actually look at it without emotion. This is Kay. If I am 6 40 let's check in with Jennifer. The fire caused by a smoke bomb at a gender reveal party in Yucaipa has damaged or destroyed at least six homes and has burned more than 12,400 acres. It is 18% contained and the fire in the Angeles National Forest above Monrovia has burned nearly 20,000 acres. That's latest on the wildfires burning in Southern California. And the global death toll from the Corona virus has passed 900,000 new data from Johns Hopkins University shows nearly 940,000 people have died from the virus worldwide, with the highest death toll in the US at over 190,000 people. We'll take a look at an update on that crashed on the five with the K F I n the sky next. If you are losing your teeth, they're decayed. They're rotten. They're falling out. And you're at home and let's say you're working at home. Don't go out very much. So, Yeah. Okay. People aren't really gonna notice. It will believe me. We do. When's the last time you took a photo when you smiled when the last time you bit into an apple. Yeah, That's what happens when you have rotten teeth. So let me suggest going to cunning dental..

United States Johns Hopkins University Mississippi Delta Yucaipa Angeles National Forest Monrovia apple West Kay Jennifer Southern California
"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This's all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Audie Cornish in Washington this summer videos of black people killed by police officers have sparked outrage and a national movement for racial justice. 65 years ago, It was a photograph a photograph a 14 year old Emmett till lying in a casket till was visiting family in the Mississippi Delta when he was kidnapped, brutally beaten and killed by white men after an accusation that he flirted with a white woman. Today. The story of another brazen killing in the Delta just three months after Till's murder in a neighboring town. Ah black gas station attendant was shot to death in broad daylight by a white man. Radio Diaries brings us the story of Clinton Milton My name, Mr Lewis Mountain Gresham. I'm the daughter ofthe Clanton Mountain and Buell amount in my name and docile white Junior. I made a six years old, Um, a builder's nephew. Growing up. The house that we lived, and it was like on a lullaby You like. It was always I have a home My mom see. It is a beer for me. Her nickname was pretty moment this what everybody called Clinton. Milton was what you call a good man. He worked for kids family. They will You know where perspective by a lot of black people that know him and the white people came in contact with they like the most. My dad worked at a service station. He pumped gas fixed for less. We used to stand and wait for him to come home. And you know, even though we couldn't take time, we knew what Tammy's will be coming home.

Clinton Milton Mississippi Delta Audie Cornish Mr Lewis Mountain Gresham Elsa Chang NPR Clanton Mountain Los Angeles Emmett Radio Diaries Washington Tammy Um murder
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"His murder in Mississippi, Emmett till still haunts America an investigation into the infamous murder of the black teenager. Emmett till has been reopened by the re opening the investigation into the 1955 murder of Emma, and it still was 14 years old when he was kidnapped. Tortured and killed by a group of white men in the white woman accused him of making nude remarks and touching. Emmett is the boy whose death awakened a generation of activists, and he's rising once again as the first black life that mattered for whom justice was never done. This story has been told in poems, novels, plays, ballads and documentary accounts for half a century and is being told again with new urgency. Here's poet Dominique Kristina in this photo. He's laughing. There's no cotton gin around his waist. He is not stretched into swollen limbs. His eyes are still hazel in the world didn't know him because he had not been murdered yet. He is still slipping into the kitchen to get another piece of corn bread while his mama looking he'll mash it with his fingers, drink some buttermilk and laugh with his eyes, and they are still hazel and bright boy 14 years. Jeans and hopes for the future till is emerging as a representation of all that has not changed a figure who reminds us of how little progress we've made. We're in the middle of miles and miles and miles of flat cotton fields in the Mississippi Delta. This is money, Mississippi. And here is Brian store eaten and covered up by vines and greenery. There's almost nothing left a tool. No one would know anything happened. This is.

Emmett Dominique Kristina murder Mississippi Mississippi Delta Emma America Jeans Brian
"mississippi delta" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"His murder in Mississippi, Emmett till still haunts America an investigation into the infamous murder of the black teenager Emmett Till Has been reopened by the Justice is reopening the investigation into the 1955 murder of M and it still was 14 years old when he was kidnapped, tortured and killed by a group of white men in the white woman accused him of making nude remarks and touching. Emmett is the boy whose death awakened a generation of activists. And he's rising once again as the first black life that mattered for whom justice was never done. This story has been told in poems, novels, plays, ballads and documentary accounts for half a century and is being told again with new urgency. His poet Dominique Kristina in this photo, he's laughing. There's no cotton gin around his waist. He is not stretched into swollen limbs. His eyes are still hazel and the world didn't know him because he had not been murdered. Yet he is still slipping into the kitchen to get another piece of corn bread while his mama aid looking he'll mash it with his fingers, drink some buttermilk and laugh with his eyes, and they are still hazel and bright. Just a boy 14 years credit have time to genes and homes. Further future boy Till is emerging as a representation of all that has not changed a figure who reminds us of how little progress we've made. We're in the middle of miles and miles and miles of flat cotton fields in the Mississippi Delta. This is money, Mississippi. And here is Brian store eaten and covered up by vines and greenery. There's almost nothing left a tool. No one would know anything happened here. This is.

Emmett Till Dominique Kristina Mississippi murder Emmett Mississippi Delta America Brian
Inside Mississippi's Prison System

GroundTruth

07:06 min | 2 years ago

Inside Mississippi's Prison System

"Know home. In Nineteen Forty Blues, men, book White, recorded Parchment Farm, blues based on his time served inside the infamous prison. But Dow. Is Mine. He sings about the hard labor from dawn until the setting of the sun that's when the work is done. When The prison is still in operation today and still under scrutiny. The conditions that White Sang about and released on a ten inch records still echo from inside Mississippi state penitentiary on pirate podcast did show is the opportunity to the platforms allow these guys on inside voice to complain and let people know what they're really going through. Failures in oversight both within the state's prisons and at the government level have led some correctional officers to come forward even though the cash rate is not our job to treat them like dogs I mean we not the Kennel over there they the freeze and ended be treated like humans. In August two, thousand eighteen well before any thought of a pandemic sweeping the country Mississippi's prison system saw spike in inmate deaths. Correctional officials attributed many of these deaths to what they dismissed as natural causes. This is the ground truth podcast I'm Charlie Senate Michelle Lu covers criminal justice for Mississippi today for this episode, she takes us inside her investigation into the unexplained deaths and why the victims families still have questions. With report for America, Corps member Michelle Lu we're on the ground inside the Mississippi prison system. So as long as people have been in prison, people have died in prison missing prison leaders are looking into the fourth inmate twelve death. This month in a state thirteen prisoners have died behind bars and the month of August alone when local news outlets started reporting on a seaming spike in death across Mississippi's prison system in August of two, thousand eighteen, my editor asked me to take a look let story and figure out how conceptualize it in terms of what did these numbers mean and how did they compared to how deadly Mississippi's prisoners have been in the recent past. Over the course of that month sixteen people fifteen men and one woman died across Mississippi's entire prison system, and that was a significantly higher number than any prior month going back to two thousand twelve. So the State Corrections Department maintained that this number was not out of line with how deadly the prisons usually are. I think it was misinterpreted as to the calls for those sixteen. There's that were reported for the month of August the Commissioner Police Hall suggested that the people who had died inside died in similar ways that people die outside oppressive media those were from natural causes. I'll let the states lack of transparency raised questions about how inmates were dying in the states care. Before. Moving to Mississippi I had done a little bit of cops and courts reporting during journalism internships as a college student and I my student newspaper but I had never done any sort of substantive enterprise work on the topic before. I was really eager to even one of the challenges was that there was an has always been a tension between the urgency of the stories I want to tell Um when. People Send Me. Tips when people tell me about incidents that have just happened and the sort of frustrating Byzantine process. By which I have to. Make a good faith effort to corroborate the story. Circuit Clerk's office healthy. Hi My name's Michelle Lu reporter with Mississippi today in Jackson. This typically involves filing a lot of public records request for public records request and you can send a copy of the check that you're GonNa send and fax number six, one, seven, three times but I, don't get a lot confirmed or denied from the state. And as I've learned neither do the families of those who died in prison. I think families of people who die in any state institution deserve a thorough understanding of what happened to the person they loved and cared about and in talking to family members I found that they were getting little to no information from the state about what happened to their loved ones. We will thirty, six year old willy, hauling head died Saturday at least bill prison officials have not released a causes of death pending completion of autopsies. Willie hauling head was serving time for a drug conviction. and. When I drove out to Alabama to meet with Willy's family I was. Really, struck by the way in which in the absence of any real clarity were knowledge in how willy had died. They took what was available to them, which is the condition of Willie's body when they picked him up from Jackson at the mortuary and the facts they knew about Willy's life and had to find their own narrative. The official death certificate that arrive in the mail about a year later said that. release. Cause of death was undetermined. But he was you know in his thirties his family said, he didn't have health problems. and. They is their reports that he was just found on the floor one night. Mississippi state. Penitentiary colloquially known as Parchman is one of the largest prisons in the state of Mississippi. It's run by the state and it's located in the heart of the Mississippi Delta. It has a really bleak in distressing history. Frankly, it was founded in one thousand, nine, hundred 's as the cotton plantation and it was modeled after a slave plantation. In the nineteen thirties, Elvis Presley's father. Vernon spent nine months there for forgery. And to this day, the Parchman farm is reported to be a working operation relying on the Labor prisoners. Parchman has also been at the center of several calls for investigations into the conditions inside these investigations have been partly in response, the videos and photos leaked by prisoners. This is a picture of the food trays. These trays are stacked outside exposed to numerous germs, insights, and feces from birds. A lot of incarcerated people in Mississippi have had contraband cell phones inside and they've often used social media. As, well, as family members to circulate images of their living conditions

Mississippi Mississippi State Michelle Lu Mississippi Delta Willy White Parchman Farm Willie State Corrections Department Parchman DOW Commissioner Police Hall Elvis Presley Jackson Alabama America Forgery UM Charlie Senate
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was nearly empty. Daylight was just starting to break. They hauled him out on a little school. Bush like thing. There was a few more that were being released the same day. And he was Honestly, he looked like he had just been released from a concentration camp because he was six foot two anyway. £152. He was a scarecrow. We had a little boo. In moment. We we talk for just a second and he was ready to get away from that place He had seen enough apart in Mississippi, He was ready to come back south where there were some pine trees. Father and son were still teary eyed as they hopped into Roger's pickup truck. There was a sense of relief. That I finally hate him. I had struggled for over a year year and 1/2 to try to get him back. And I finally had him way lived there. I mean, I had hadn't left the delta two years hadn't been in an actual car since before I got arrested. So I was enjoying every minute of it. Not where in chains of my whole life in front of me, I'm excited. Way, stop at a gas station and gassed him off. Getting some hash browns for something waited back south highway through the Mississippi Delta, the blue sky. The sun was just coming up over the horizon. It was early in the morning, and he said. I've seen some pretty sun rash with you and woods down on the coast when we'd be fishing in the marshes, Nolly said. But this too pretty a sunrise I've ever seen right there. That was the most beautiful day that I have ever seen in my entire life. When he walked in the house, you could see where that blue chair Had been sitting that Justin was in that night, the empty space on the on the floor and he just stood there. And he just looked at it. He didn't say anything. It's like a movie in my head. Even now, I have to do is close my eyes. And I can see it all. Justin, the gun, the smell the sounds. The taste of gunpowder in the air. I told him I said, Well, go on in your rooms on and see how you like things in there. Roger took the next two weeks off from work so I could be with him 24 7 way. Got real close. Real quick again. Has some way. Just way talked a lot. We were there. We could weigh confessed Bob. We would get in the truck and we would just ride way went fishing and we were fishing in the same place that we used all three fish together in enjoyed being out there with him. But at the same time, I was still grieving Justin and the fact that just couldn't be there with us, but I was doing what had to be done. And then one day, Zach asked Roger if he could go fishing.

Justin Roger Mississippi Mississippi Delta Nolly Bush Bob Zach
The Cities Are Dying

In The Thick

06:08 min | 2 years ago

The Cities Are Dying

"Our L. Ryan? We're GONNA start with you because on Sunday or Vo's the poor state of Mississippi dealt with tornadoes that ravaged the state eleven people died as a result on top of having to deal with the pandemic so in terms of covert nineteen while the number of reported cases in Mississippi is lower than in places like New York and Michigan for example Detroit. It's still impacting communities of color very intensely. Yeah that's correct Maria And so even though. The state of Mississippi has relatively fewer cases in places like New York. We report last week that Mississippi actually has the highest rate of hospitalizations in the country. A lot of our cases Jackson of course in Hinds County is the epicenter. But you know we're seeing a lot of cases in places like the Mississippi Delta which are majority black and you know the impacts here are the same as we're seeing in places like Chicago Milwaukee where even though African Americans are not the majority of the overall population the majority of both cody cases and deaths are black so mississippi fifty six percent of all the the the cove in nineteen cases have been African Americans and in seventy two percent of all of all debts in so compounded on top of that Maria you talked about the tornadoes that we just experienced over the weekend. So you know we were telling people shelter at home and now people You know people have been displaced from their shelters and we're going to have to figure out like where do we actually house people? Actually the safety protocols that we would normally go through in a disaster like this. They won't be able to to happen as quickly. Because of the the cove protocols and so even our our overall numbers are low. I mean we're we're definitely seeing a disproportionate impact on places like Mississippi to have large black populations and communities with high concentrations of poverty. Thanks for that Ryan and then Detroit a city where we've talked about this in the thick we we had. Stephen Live a city where systemic racism and poverty. They have a long history. The pandemic has really taken a toll. Michigan as of now has the third most cases in the country and Detroit as one of the blackest and most segregated cities in the country is the epicenter of Michigan. Forty percent of the deaths have been black people. Jeez the only make up fourteen percent of the state's population. This is all according to the Michigan Disease Surveillance System and vital records. But then it's even more severe in Detroit Stephen. Right because the black population is seventy seven percent of Cova nineteen fatalities so steven. What's going on in Detroit and across your state? Yeah I mean for starters. It is just so sad. You're right now. It's really hard. I think to convey the depth of that emotion without without you being here to kind of feel it and see it. The city is is suffering is feels like the city is dying in in some very real ways because of the extent to which this is affecting us and of course. There are the familiar dynamics of systemic racism and systemic poverty. That have made it a lot easier for something like corona virus to affect people in our city very differently one of the most glaring examples I think is the the policy of water shut offs which yeah one of the worst ideas we've ever had here in the city of Detroit as a way to increase revenues to the water department. A few years ago they started again shutting off water to people who don't pay which means that a lot of people who don't have the ability to pay don't have freshwater in their houses and of course because poverty affects African Americans in a more profound way than it does other populations and because the city is so heavily African American. That means you have a lot of black people. Poor black people who didn't have access to water when this started. I think about what we're telling people you need to do to not get the corona virus. Wash your hands wash your hands. Wash your hands. Well if you don't have freshwater. Yep there's really no way to do that I could go on and on and on other examples of things that affect black people more right at make something like this more dangerous and it just it caught us. Flat-footed we we. We were not because of the way that we've dealt with these problems for our community for such a long time. We were not in a position to be able to toward this off to make sure that that a lot of people didn't get it. Also think of the ways in which poor people are not able to isolate this idea. Stay away from everybody. Don't go to the store. Don't go visit people at that. Looks really different when you are trying to to get by day to day and there are a Lotta people in this city who are and they have to do things they have to. They have to earn money. You or they have to go buy things at the store and they can you know. I go grocery shopping right now. I shopped for two or three weeks. Yeah not everybody's able to do that and an right so you just have of this mixture of of things that have made this wicked for Detroit. Yeah Stephen you say this is kind of revealing the ways in which we've dealt with these things in the past and then I think of my time in Detroit like deep in Detroit and I'm like the thing is is that it wasn't being dealt with before and what I mean it is that I mean abandoned communities poor communities where the poverty is staring you right in the face and there's the whole issue of you know if you don't see it it's not

Detroit Mississippi Michigan L. Ryan Stephen Live Maria Mississippi Delta New York Michigan Disease Surveillance Hinds County Cova Jackson Water Department Cody Chicago Milwaukee
"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That service was broadcast live on Georgian television you know genau Shia and independent human rights consultant was watching it from home I was very shocked when I saw in the live TV in almost every channels on Sunday crowded charges and after their narrow ceremony after these religious ritual we saw thousands of people are receiving base how we drink from the same school including children including girls very young children and of course the reaction in the social media was overwhelming everyone was everyone was shocked because we knew from the beginning that each will spread the infection more and more which is already spreading in the country Nino is one of more than three thousand seven hundred people who have signed an online petition requesting that the government forced the church to follow the same rules as everybody else lives shouldn't conscious of the liberal base he's already sunk on the Mississippi Delta blues to speedy delivery that was the Georgian prime minister Giorgi ga hydeia announcing on March twenty first a state of emergency that bans gatherings of more than ten people within twenty four hours across the country people of all ages attended religious services in the church's somewhere to keep one meter apart from each other the same religious gatherings continued this past weekend the church says it is being criticized unfairly and at a time of crisis he's providing a much needed spiritual relief to the nation this month dozens of police took to the streets in pickup trucks scattering holy water which they said helps.

prime minister consultant Mississippi Delta
Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

10:10 min | 2 years ago

Travel to the Mississippi Gulf Coast

"Let's talk about Mississippi's Gulf coast. I I like to welcome the show Charles. McColl from McCall Travel Dot Com and Charles's come to talk to us about coastal Mississippi Charles. Welcome mm to the show. Hi Chris how are you today. I'm doing well and we're talking about the state of Mississippi. What is your connection with coastal Mississippi? As a travel writer. I have visited the coastal Mississippi a few times over the past two years and after going there three or four times. I decided that I loved that area and other parts of the US Gulf coast. So much that I developed a new brand called. US Golf coast which covers everything from key. West South Padre but we are talking only about coastal Mississippi debut today so as a travel writer I covered it several times. Excellent and why should someone go to coastal Mississippi. We'll we'll talk about many things but it is is unique. The unique destination the United States. It has the longest continuous beach in the United States. Which I think a lot of people don't know I love road road trips? I travel all over the world. Love driving and there's this sense of soul fulfillment I drive on the Mississippi Gulf coast. I where it's just different than anywhere else. You can drive for an hour and not see anything except for the sand in the water is unobstructed by condos and indulge and restaurants. And what have you so this this great peace and calm and different than anywhere else. Excellent and what kind of itinerary tenorio you're going to recommend for us. It's not a singular destination. There are many communities there. So I'm GonNa recommend some things to do in each of the communities go along the coastal Mississippi. It's all still call the Mississippi Gulf coast. So I'M GONNA use both terms interchangeably. I don't want you to drive fifty miles in one day for lunch and then go drive fifty miles back so I will concentrate on the various communities and say all right first day. You're going to be here second day. You're going to be here and so on and we can do a three four five seven ten very well. Let's get into it where you're GONNA start it. Let's start in Pascagoula. So Mississippi is between Alabama and Louisiana China so coastal Mississippi represents the entire Mississippi Gulf coast so over on the east side closest Alabama Alabama. If you're driving from mobile the first thing you're gonna hit is Pascagoula. The city is probably most famous. because it's where Jimmy Buffett was born. Okay I did not I know that. Yeah so that's going to set the expectations for what the coastal Mississippi areas. All about thank Jimmy Buffett was born there so we're already at our five o'clock somewhere attitude. Pascagoula is also a navy base. So there's a lot of military and also industry the street going on there but it's it's a seafaring community. It's laid-back relative to some of the other cities. We'll talk about. Well what are we going GonNa do in Pascagoula one of the things that happened in past the goal of that as I guess lesser known as that one of the biggest UFO abduction stories in in US history happened there. So back in the seventies the couple of people claim that they were abducted by UFO. And so they were never disproven even so. That's one of the most famous things that happened in Pascagoula. Okay but other than being abducted by aliens. What am I going to do in Pascagoula for won a narrow down here to the the oldest house in Mississippi isn't Pascagoula okay? It's called the lapointe Krebs House and museum now so I went. There are a couple of months ago and I was fascinated by Howell. They showed the construction of how house was done in the bleed was the seventeen. Twenty s house was built the How they use the for the the hair from animals as insulation in the house and things like that kind of interesting Seventeen fifty seven. Is there anything specific renovated the Krebs House. We're going to go to the Krebs House. You could probably spend a couple of hours there. It's a nice waterfront setting and you can get some history of the. The natives that lived in the area and then European settlers came in and saw a whole history of Mississippi but the main point there there's to see the the house and the oldest house in the Mississippi Delta region I think between Minnesota and the Gulf of Mexico. It's the oldest house that's still in the American frontier. I'm thinking New Orleans would be older than that but I mean the city might be but I'm not sure if there's a structure that's older than point good point. The city is older but I don't know if there are any of original houses. Okay Fair enough. But another thing that I really loved in Pascagoula. The Motto Bon Center. I believe the official is the best. Gula River Audubon Bond Center captain McCoy Relation on McColl. And there's a captain McCoy and he runs nature trips out of the Pascagoula River River Audubon Center and what I loved about. It is that I learn things. Obviously like you learn on most trips but the Pascagoula River is the longest. And I'm not going to get the the terminology right. It's the longest une damned river in the continental united in a at states. Yeah so I was fascinated by that and I was like well. What about this wherever they were like now? It was dammed at some point. So the Pascagoula River I believe is four four hundred and eighty miles. That is natural the way it's always been so it hasn't been dammed. It hasn't been obstructed by any kind of construction directions so you can see wildlife and nature the way that it was several hundred years ago. Something didn't expect expect to find in coastal Mississippi or anywhere else and you say wildlife. I'm picturing talking marshes birds alligators that sort of thing. Am I in the right right ballpark. You're right and one thing that that's dominant in this area or the Mississippi sandhill cranes which are relatively large bird. I'm sure there are in other parts that states but there is a sandhill crane refuge that none in Pascagoula but on the other side so I tend cuts through through the area so from mobile bill to New Orleans. You would drive high tech Postal Mississippi. I'm talking about everything. South of I ten okay. North of town the Pascagoula River would go up there. And that's where the sandhill crane. Refuges the birds. No birds don't recognize boundaries. They fly all over the place. So you can see that. I was on the riverboat tour. Okay the AUDUBON center is like most centers they want to promote the natural wildlife and the scenery. And that's so forth and it's a really hidden gem. I think that most people don't recognize will in because it has the name Audubon on it. I'm assuming calmly talking about birdlife predominantly. So yes okay. I don't know if everybody knows. I mean Audubon as a as a charity I think is well known but Google Audubon. You'll find what is James Audubon. Is that the a original one who did all the original drawings of birds in the early. US That's really neat. Watercolors this fascinating realistic catches does right. So I mentioned captain McCoy so you could take his crews out of the audubon center also wrench around Kayak and I did did that one time and going at your own pace around the marshes fascinating at least a dozen gainers and as close they would just scatter into the water. So I love love doing that at my own pace to excellent and John James Audubon. I got it almost John James. Okay when I said early. I didn't realize how early he was. He was born in seventeen eighty five and so he was basically drawing birds up until about the Mexican American war. You're in the US. And so as the frontiers were being filled in a he was out there with his sketch pad. MOM IN ESTA goal. There's obviously the Jimmy Buffett stuff to the native son. A I think he this family left when he was three and then he grew up in mobile but he has come back and he recognizes Pascagoula his birthplace so there is a beach and a bridge and his childhood home are all named for Jimmy Buffett. The parrot heads can go and pay pilgrimage to Jimmy Buffett and go visit some of those sites and one of my favorite places the Pascagoula is called bozos grocery. It's a very old school from the nineteen fifties place where you go in you place your order and you wait inside. been there two or three times. The last time I went kayaking at the river Audubon Center. In fact I got a takeout L. Poboy from Bozo's grocery and then took it on the Kayak. But it's this old school place where you go in and you place your order and you order order off the menu. You don't make up stuff and there was some guy in front of me. That was a visitor and he wasn't a local either and so he went on these. ZAC Oh can I make this substitution. Know what's on the bed. Yeah and I was like basically your choices are you. You get what you WANNA shrimp boat boy. You want poboy poboy being sandwich. A sub someplace else or a hoagie or a hero depending on where you're from but a pavilion in this region of the world. Okay and shrimp being the best known. One that I now. They're also known for their Fried Oysters. Poboy so okay. I got a half in half half. It's amazing I had a couple dozen po boys and along the Gulf coast and I it's one of the better ones side totally recommend going to Bozo groceries to get to take out to go kayaking or he.

Mississippi Pascagoula Pascagoula River Mississippi Gulf United States Pascagoula River River Audubon Jimmy Buffett Audubon Center Gula River Audubon Bond Center Gulf Lapointe Krebs House And Museu Audubon James Audubon River Audubon Center Captain Mccoy Mississippi Delta New Orleans Krebs House John James Audubon
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 3 years ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KCRW

"Between doing what's good for my business in doing what's good for my neighbors Mike McCarty looks exhausted it's early November and the falls been rainy and wet which is made it hard for him to harvest his crops this is where we need to be harvesting Intel the bane July it over that's not normal looking Mike's family farms thirteen thousand acres of soybeans and rice in northeast Arkansas along the Mississippi Delta the terrain is why didn't slack you can see rows and rows of crops all the way to the horizon farmers here grow soybeans for export overseas where they're used as feed for pigs and chickens this much rain isn't good for Mike's crops but it's been great for weeds and try to find one so I can show you as we drive by field after field Mike points to weeds popping up in and around his soybean rose all these are pretty much pick Wade's only and say the red red right there this is one right here say it is easy to see sticking up in a soybean field it's tall and shaped like a feather a Christmas tree farmers call it's Satan's we'd because it grows big and fast crowding out the crops each plant produces hundreds of thousands of seeds since the nineteen seventies farmers use the chemical glyphosate to fight pigweed most people know it by its commercial name roundup and farmers use it with another Monsanto product a genetically modified soybean that's resistant to the herbicide but over the years Hague weeds become resistant to glide for say so farmers are happy when something new came along our soybean plants without.

Mike McCarty Arkansas Mississippi Delta Wade glyphosate thirteen thousand acres
"mississippi delta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:25 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"People living a firm believer that eh if we don't know history then we repeat the mistakes over and over again. My dad's land was taken. It was not foreclosed on by u._s._d._a. And my dad went in and apply for monday to irrigate his beans because it was so hot the county age and refused view to give him a loan to water squads. He said y'all not supposed to be pharma like this. Y'all farm like white boat so he cut everything in half that year. This says when they started not being able to get enough money to farm with studios then can you tell us the story of the scott family my how their land was lost how they came to regain it. Lena's grandfather ed scott senior. He came from alabama alabama and and got over to mississippi in the late nineteenth century. He became a titan in his corner mississippi. It was just an incredibly gifted farmer was in many ways more well respected than some local white farmers by the white establishment and he was one of those farmers who was just talented wanted in lucky enough to be able to purchase a plot of land his first one hundred acres from a local guy ph brooks <hes> white landowner and when he became one of the for the early middle sized landowners black landowners in the region he encouraged all of his children to get their own plots of land they they kept it all in common and over the course of his lifetime built up just through sheer talent and force of will about a thousand acres of land his his son at scott junior took over in the middle of the twentieth century took over he he fought in world war two came back and also became an incredibly talented farmer farmer far manager he also added to that those landholdings he what both of them did that marked them as really unique is managed to not really dabble in or seek check out federal funds. They were lied. They emphasize heavily <hes> self-sustainability and leaning on private funding to keep their farm afloat but in the nineteen seventies and eighties when we had the major farm crisis in an inflation crisis. It's got junior had to reach out for federal money like williams said when you started reaching that he got a little bit the first year but then you see the local power structures realized this guy's maybe farming light white folks. He's he's driving the trucks. He drives are a little too shiny and the the real difficulty difficulty comes when he tried to get an a catfish for me which is heavily subsidized is about our federal by the federal government they only offer him <hes> the dollar amount that's about half of the average comparable white farmer who is frankly way less competent has got junior in the region he gets half the money they get so even starting out on that endeavor the catfish endeavor it's an is doomed from the start and so they lose a lot of their land pretty quickly over the eighties and early nineties and <hes> we'll lena and willing to kind of shepherded him through ooh the major black farmers lawsuit where they won a lot of it back on the discrimination case against the usa so you talk about how ultimately wall wall street got very interested in the land you right for example the teachers insurance and annuity association t._i._a._a. One of the largest pension incheon firms in the country as well as other corporate entities that all alone tens of thousands of acres of land mississippi and surrounding states. How did these companies knees come to own this land and what about the issue of reparations farmland wasn't originally considered a really valuable investment asset. It's firemen's volatile. <hes> it's difficult to predict from year to year what your yield is going to be what the rent's gonna be an asset that has been considered a really below sorta the sterling grade of investment classes but in after the great recession the dollar weakened and with the future threats of both climate change and overpopulation really play placing premium both on land and on arable arable land for the production of food. That's only going to increase in value. Farmland became much more attractive to large investors. Particularly pension funds ta da which i write about in the piece is kind of emblematic of the very sudden interest of pension funds in farmland across across the united states right now pension funds in the mississippi delta own moorland then black folks do there and how that connects to my story is farmland farmland most of the farmland in the u._s. Zone already so where are investors are gonna look for land from and it's going to be where it's coming up for auction where already is packaged pitched into really large parcels and that happens most often in the places where it's been stolen from black folks or as being stolen from black folks so the mississippi delta is where whereas some of the largest portfolios in the u._s. are connecting to reparations for one you know wall street is a major interest right now. In farmland that was was once owned by black folks and we have to reckon with that and we have to reckon with the fact that it was united states federal policy that allowed that so how do we reckon with the fact that now this lucrative asset class is making money for lots of people lots of people across the country have pension funds. Maybe even outside the country three and it's not making money for the african american farmers and the sentences of those farmers who live there who were enslaved there and who made the land <hes> who basically tied to it and we're discriminated against their reparations.

united states mississippi mississippi delta ed scott federal government alabama Lena williams one hundred acres thousand acres
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Country and it looks there may be more of these happening but no idea as to win because ISIS pretty tight lipped about that stuff ask you about the remnants of Barry because I know the storm didn't do as much damage in Louisiana as was expected but since they got out a whole bunch of rain from the back end of the storm like up to seventeen inches in the Mississippi Delta so is that causing a lot of flooding now you know it's causing flooding there's for sure you know as far as the catastrophic flooding at not yet probably not at all which means that Louisiana certainly dodged a bullet but that's not to say that some people you didn't lose things some farmers lost out on some major money business owners lost out on major money and continue to do so I saw something from accu weather yesterday that said that this storm is going to cost anywhere between eight and ten billion dollars in losses whether it be for flood damage to homes or to cars or crop losses business losses and things like that so even though this thing wasn't nearly as bad as predicted eight billion dollars in losses is still quite a bit all right Clayton thank you there's a tale I escalate novel it is a seven twenty one was a congressional Republicans are starting to speak out about president trump's highly controversial tweets that a lot of people consider racist and one of them is a Republican we'll heard from Texas suites are racist and xenophobic and they're also inaccurate straight the the four women he's referring to or actually citizens in the United States three of the four were were born here it's also behavior that's on the coming of the leader of the free world I usually talking about things that unite us not divides us and also I think politically it doesn't help.

Louisiana Mississippi Delta Clayton trump United States Barry accu president Texas eight billion dollars ten billion dollars seventeen inches
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"All of us and we're still saying it in the administration we would like to see Congress address these asylum loopholes immigration rights advocates and attorneys say they will go to court to stop the rule from being implemented rain generated by tropical depression Barry is still moving across Louisiana and Arkansas after dumping up to seventeen inches of rain in some areas the rain transform parts of the Mississippi Delta into an ocean game of thrones is seeking to claim the Emmy awards version of the iron throne one last time when the Emmy nominations are released Thursday the HBO fantasy saga could be in the running for television's top honor for its eighth and final season it's earned three previous top drama series awards and is the defending champion all rights are given the nod I don't know much about it but the hype surrounding it would settle engine to believe in the wind thanks in twenty two minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news you make a million tough business decisions every day so here's the easiest one of the year deals cyber Monday in July is back and bigger than ever get no brainer deals on the very latest computers with Intel core processors and a huge selection of servers electronics and more all with free shipping on everything to make your decision even easier dell small business technology advisors can help you find just the right tech call eight seven seven by dell that's an easy call to make an eight seven seven by dell orders at dell dot com slash small business Michigan is one of the best places in the country to do business but you don't have to take our word for it take petty poppies president and CEO of consumers energy instead all of the innovation that's occurring around robotics.

Congress Barry Louisiana Arkansas Mississippi Delta America Michigan president and CEO Emmy HBO Intel dell twenty two minutes seventeen inches
"mississippi delta" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Us all of us and we're still saying it in the administration we would like to see Congress address these asylum loopholes immigration rights advocates and attorneys say they will go to court to stop the rule from being implemented rain generated by tropical depression Barry is still moving across Louisiana and Arkansas after dumping up to seventeen inches of rain in some areas the rain transform parts of the Mississippi Delta into an ocean game of thrones is seeking to claim the Emmy awards version of the iron throne one last time when the Emmy nominations are released Thursday the HBO fantasy saga could be in the running for television's top honor for its eighth and final season it's earned three previous top drama series awards and is the defending champion all rights are given the nod I don't know much about it but the hype surrounding it would settle engine to believe in the wind thanks in twenty two minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news you make a million tough business decisions every day so here's the easiest one of the year deals cyber Monday in July is back and bigger than ever get no brainer deals on the very latest computers with Intel core processors and a huge selection of servers Alec products and more all with free shipping on everything to make your decision even easier dell small business technology advisors can help you find just the right tech call eight seven seven by dell that's an easy call to make an eight seven seven by dell orders to tell dot com slash small business Michigan is one of the best places in the country.

Congress Barry Louisiana Arkansas Mississippi Delta America Michigan Emmy HBO Intel Alec products dell twenty two minutes seventeen inches
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KTOK

"All of us and we're still saying it in the administration we would like to see Congress address these asylum loopholes immigration rights advocates and attorneys say they will go to court to stop the rule from being implemented rain generated by tropical depression Barry is still moving across Louisiana and Arkansas after dumping up to seventeen inches of rain in some areas the rain transform parts of the Mississippi Delta into an ocean game of thrones is seeking to claim the Emmy awards version of the iron throne one last time when the Emmy nominations are released Thursday the HBO fantasy saga could be in the running for television's top honor for its eighth and final season it's earned three previous top drama series awards and is the defending champion all rights are given the nod I don't know much about it but the hype surrounding it with you to believe in the wind thanks in twenty two minutes after the hour on this morning America's first news you make a million tough business decisions every day so here's the easiest one of the year deals cyber Monday in July is back and bigger than ever get no brainer deals on the very latest computers with Intel core processors and a huge selection of servers electronics and more all with free shipping on everything to make your decision even easier dell small business technology advisors can help you find just the right tech call eight seven seven by dell that's an easy call to make an eight seven seven by dell dell dot com slash small business Michigan is one of the best places in the country to do business but you don't have to take our word for it take petty poppies president and CEO of consumers energy instead all of the innovation is occurring around robotics.

Congress Barry Louisiana Arkansas Mississippi Delta America Michigan president and CEO Emmy HBO Intel dell twenty two minutes seventeen inches
Critics Question Trump Tax Plan Meant To Boost Struggling Communities

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:14 min | 3 years ago

Critics Question Trump Tax Plan Meant To Boost Struggling Communities

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from American pest open your doors, who healthy pest free home with American pest, offering safe environmentally friendly pest control solutions throughout the DMV for over ninety years. Learn more at American past dot net. Some American neighborhoods are struggling even in a strong economy. How much can a new tax break help them? NPR's Asia Roscoe reports standing in front of a massive crowd in Orlando last week. President Trump may this promise to help poor neighborhoods, we will expand opportunities Jones so that no community is ever left behind passes, the part of the twenty seventeen tax cut law. The opportunities owns program allows governors to make some low income areas in their state eligible for federal tax incentive, Trump often refers to the program when talking about what his administration has done for struggling rural and urban communities and as a part of his outreach to black America. Skins. The policy is also been championed by lawmakers, such as Senator Tim Scott a Republican, and Senator Cory Booker, a democrat running for president projects are underway throughout the country. On an empty lot and tippy Zona private equity investors in fficials gathered in the white tent for groundbreaking of the plane ninety unit affordable housing complex. Former Arizona governor Jan brewer spoke really thrilled to see all of you. Thank you so much for clear. There were shovels and symbolic tossing of dirt has particular property. If you look around, here's pretty blinded. You've got some dilapidated buildings. That's Quin Palomino CEO virtual partners the private equity firm, that's building the project do its opportunities own fund, and you have investors who would not have normally invested in this project. It's opportunities. Owns is really been an incredible tool. This is an old idea. That's been supercharged by the 2017 tax law. Stuart Butler is one of the conservative scholars credited with bringing the original idea of so-called enterprise zones to the US in the nineteen eighties Butler, who's now with Brookings Institution said the vision was to make it easier for people living in poor areas to be able to start businesses in their own neighborhoods. The second piece of it. Whereas to say, let's look at tax relief, and let's relief taxes reduced taxes on people who take the risk of investing in a poor and difficult neighborhood. Stays introduced. Their own versions of these loans in the federal government followed suit, launching the empowerment zones program in the early nineties backers of the new opportunities zone say they are totally different though program required states to compete for tax breaks in grants Butler, Greece's latest program is different and that worries them maybe they went too far in this current version. There are more than eighty seven hundred opportunities owns covering nearly thirty five million Americans and vessels can defer their capital gains taxes through twenty twenty six by putting their profits in opportunities zone funds that invest in these communities. The longer the investors keep their money in the fund the more tax benefits. They receive the concern is that wealthy people will pour money into these, multimillion dollar funds. But Butler says the development may not help low income residents. It's a -tracting the wrong kind of investment lodge scale investment, which may lead to far greater gentrification. And removal of people rather than the original intent of the enterprise zone idea. But these critiques are off base says Doron Smith. He's deputy director of the White House office of American innovation. Smith says local governments can work to protect their residents vacation and not something that's happening. Every city is not happening in, like the Mississippi delta right houses, very affordable down there. So for us to create economic development tool that tries to fix a problem only hurts us some urban areas. That's not smart. The White House has also set up a council to help target Federal Housing grants and other funds specifically for the tones. But it's unclear whether these owns will truly spur new investments, especially in places that were already on the upswing says Timothy Weaver, a professor at SUNY Albany, who has studied these types of programs people who were going to invest anyway. And now getting a tax break and to maybe you're gonna get shifting of investment from outside of zion's to inside of designs. And any the case what you'll likely to see our rent's going up for everybody, even some of the earliest opportunities zone supporters, say there needs to be more information about where the money is going. There are bipartisan bills in congress, that would require the government to track whether benefits are actually flowing to the communities that are in need. Isha Roscoe, NPR news, the White House support for this podcast and the following message come from NC TA, the internet, and television association, whose members are building the ten g network of the future that aims to deliver residential internet speeds of ten gigabits per second. More at ten g platform dot org.

Stuart Butler NPR Doron Smith President Trump Senator Cory Booker White House DMV Asia Roscoe Senator Tim Scott Jan Brewer Isha Roscoe Arizona Congress Quin Palomino Zona Orlando Brookings Institution Mississippi
"mississippi delta" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"The sound was dedicated teacher that told me. People. Hustling to call the police. I was just trying to make some money to feed my daughter. Ooh. It was all. Word up magazine. Heavy up in the hangar. Pictures whole have we saw the fact mall. Brought to talk. Lumberjack with the heck? Da da the number. This time the get paid like the world trade. The opposite November one thought. The. Mass applauding up. Call the same thing. Close personal Robin Leach. Thanks. Tell me about it. Right. A number. It can happen. To use the jets and stop now. The play from the Mississippi delta. Condos. Weeks. So love biggie. Small speak without fail. Baby girl. Considered a stereotype. Male miss understood. Good. So. Doc. sega. Genesis. Doc to rob with the show. Jeez. Celebrate the noble. Public housing. Set me off. We use the landlord. No heat the watt Christmas. Birthdays was the worst days. We thursday..

Robin Leach Mississippi delta
"mississippi delta" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"mississippi delta" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"From our biotech companies and everything else is pouring into supporting this bigger mission of the farmers. And so we're now on the ground with farmers all up and down the mid west from Minnesota down to the Mississippi delta where we've dumped the vast majority of the roundup glyphosate and done them. The most decimation on earth to any soil on the planet and working with them on the ground. We've seen that every year that they've done chemical farming their crop yields fit and drop. I think we covered that last mug cast. But that dropping hield was something I had read about and by the time this, you know, this past February who were shooting this documentary up there, we got to see it in real real time in June July middle verdant growing season. You try to throw a shovel in chemical farming soil, and it's like concrete. There's no you're it's a solid brick that you're trying to. Push the shovel into you have no aeration, you have no earthworms in there. A single application is amazing statistic came from one of our farmers. He's doing farm training for farmers. Stop spraying roundup a single application around up in a field. We'll kill fifty percent of the earthworm population. Fifty percent down one sprang they spray multiple times a year over and over over and over and you fast forward twenty years, you've got north worms left, which means you have no air down onto the soil, which means you've lost the architecture and the and the aerobic environment. You need for them the micro Risa, which is it looks almost like coral reef, micro or these beautiful hair like fibers that grow up through the soil, and they provide just like the coral. Reef the home for the bacteria fungal elements, e solid scaffolding or the architecture on which they had here. It's all structure of life right down there in the soil, and that's gone in chemical farm. So we went into this mission to say everybody needs to eat organic. Well, it was devastating by end of our trip in February. We find out that the organic farms throughout the vast majority of the US are using tilling, which is what all the chemical farms due to till the grounds you dry. By these if you've ever flown or driven over the midwest, and wintertime, it's just feels and fields of fields of black soil. There's nothing growing in it. It's not covered. It's totally exposed. That's a tilled field when we till we we use a mechanical process rather than a chemical process. Disrupt all the earthworms kill other worms killed the micro is all that through killing. It turns out that when you switch from chemical farming over to an organic process. One of the things that tends to happen. You start to over tell you start to tell more because you want to spray the weeds, he tried till the weed into the ground. So what is the intention behind tilling? What is the what is that trying to accomplish at? It's interesting when you ask the farmers, you know, because my mindset was it must be to get rid of the weeds. But it's actually in aesthetics. The farmers actually just think it looks better. And so the landowners that the farmers are often leasing from one to see a well taking care of farm, and in their mind massive landowner, and it's interesting that are farmers no longer own their land. Right. And so we. We've taken that land way from the family farms. They're no now owned by hundred thousand acre million acre plots by some massive conglomerate, or or maybe some wealthy person who doesn't have a clue really about farming perhaps often leads to some form of legal indentured. Servitude indentured servitude. And we'd go detail of death that relationship the banks, the landowners, and the and the farmers is extraordinarily insidious is just. It's got everything frozen..

Minnesota tilling hield Mississippi delta glyphosate midwest US hundred thousand acre Fifty percent fifty percent million acre twenty years