38 Burst results for "Mississippi"

Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

00:40 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"A boring atmosphere for a college basketball game than to put it inside Barclays center on a Sunday afternoon in December. So that'll be that. And then Marilyn has UCLA at home on December 14th. So that's the next three games. At Wisconsin, neutral with Tennessee, home against UCLA. If Maryland goes from 8 to 11 to no, like I said, there will be no remaining skeptics in everybody. We'll have Maryland in the top ten by then. As for Mississippi state, 8 zero. You've got to win over the marquette team that smashed Baylor and it went over the Utah team that smashed Arizona. So that's two wins over top 50 Kim pom teams that own wins over top 20 Ken pump teams. And it's why I've got the bulldogs all the way up to 9th in the top 25 and one. You know, Baylor beat Gonzaga, UCLA, but couldn't beat the market team the Mississippi state beat. Arizona beat creighton, San Diego state, but couldn't beat the Utah team that Mississippi state beat. Now, when framed that way, this ain't no start for Chris jans, looks pretty impressive, even if I can acknowledge it does lack a big signature win to date. Beyond that some other numbers and you touched miss V state's defense, they are right now 8th nationally in adjusted defensive efficiency, Mississippi state is. According to both Kim pom and Bart torvik, so they're really guarding and they have improved 44 spots in Bart torvik and 28 spots at Ken pom since the beginning of the season. They are now Mississippi state, 25th at Ken palm, 33rd at Bart torvik. So when you combine that with the fact that Mississippi projects is a favorite in each of its next 5 games, the bulldogs could reasonably be 13 in O. Under first year coach Christians heading into a January 3rd game at Tennessee. I'm not necessarily predicting it. I'm just saying if they perform the way they've been performing consistently, they should win the next 5 and be 13 and O and at that point, really, at this point. But certainly at that point, they will have solidified themselves as one of the better teams in the SEC. And look like they're headed. In a season can take a lot of twists and turns, but they'll certainly be well on their way to making the NCAA tournament under a first year coach. And by the way, there's a list of first year coaches who are doing pretty well this season, all things considered. Expectations for these programs were different here or there. But right now there are 5 coaches in their first years at new jobs with top 40 kid pump teams. Are you up for another trivia time this early? I don't know if you bring can handle it. I'm real quick. So you think Mississippi gets 12 now? I think they can. I think they're going to be favored in their next 5 games. They got to go two Minnesota. They got a game against Drake on a neutral. They got a good shot. I'll say they get one loss. I was just looking at their schedule while you were doing that. So yeah, throw that trivia time at me right now, something about it. Yeah, and my main thing with Mississippi is that, you know, they don't have a massive win, but they do have multiple wins over teams that are comparable to the teams, a lot of teams, you know, perceived really good teams in this country have lost to. Like I had a list earlier. Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Arizona, Baylor, North Carolina, have already lost to teams that are comparable to a market or a Utah. So when you're undefeated and you haven't lost to a team like that by definition, then I'm going to pay attention to that, particularly when the computer numbers don't necessarily support top ten, but certainly highlight how you are outperforming all reasonable expectations. And certainly heading in the right direction. So I'm a believer in Mississippi state right now. And obviously based on this conversation, you know that Kevin Willard and Christians are two of the 5 coaches in their first years at schools that have their teams in the top 40 at Ken palm right now. So really what I'm saying is, can you name the other three? Sean Miller? Sean Miller is certainly one of them Xavier is 31st at Kim pump right now. Shire. John Shire duke is 18th at king palm right now. There's only one more. And then we've already mentioned the yeah, we've mentioned it already. Dennis Gates, I'm not going to drag it out. Dennis Gates at Missouri, Missouri's 30. It's not dragging out because I don't know if I would have gone. That also they were preseason top 40, so maybe I should have done that, but yeah. Yeah, so let me make sure it's still there that they didn't drop out after this game. Oh they did. The improving the 9 and O dropped them from 39th to 47th. Dennis Gates is headed in the wrong direction, Missouri fans. Three hours ago, they were in the top 40. And now look, barely in the top 50. I can't believe these people had to live through the Kim Anderson era, and now this. Well, the reason that they were projected to win by a certain amount and then they fell well short of that. So they dropped him predictive efficiency. That's all. All right. So both my trivia time for vault. Yeah. Well, you know what, we're in the we're in mid season form right now. So here's the thing with Missouri. Still 9 O and then I'll turn it over to you. They do have a win over Wichita state, but that's it. And I don't know how good what you tell stadia. So they don't have great wins. Only one top 100 Kim pom Wen. But boy, they got a big one on tap. Mizu is hosting Kansas next Saturday in the border showdown. And Ken pom projects this as a close game. It's got it right now as a final projected score of Kansas 80 Missouri 77. So that building is going to be lit as they say with the jayhawks in town. And if Missouri is to win that would improve the tennis, then I think certainly cracks the top 25 and probably finds itself back in the top 40 at kinfolk. Then they got themselves a stew. There's no doubt about it. Illinois fans will have, we'll talk your matchup real quick at the end of the show, but I'm going to be there Tuesday night at the garden to see them in person for the Jimmy V. Coleman Hawkins is an NBA player as far as I'm concerned and Terence Shannon junior has been I think even better than anticipated. That was a good run. You gave me a lot of the only thing I left I got GP on that one. It was a really fun watch. Marilyn came out with the win and now, yeah, it's got at Wisconsin, Tennessee on the neutral of neutral. Actually, that might not be so neutral. Marilyn fans will get up there. So they'll actually have a slight advantage even though it is a neutral court. And then they will host UCLA the next Wednesday. So real quick before we move on. Next three games over under 1.5 wins for the turtles.

Mississippi Bart Torvik Kim Pom Ucla Ken Palm Dennis Gates Ken Pump Baylor Utah Chris Jans Tennessee Arizona Bulldogs Maryland Barclays Center Missouri Sean Miller Gonzaga Marilyn Creighton
Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

01:02 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Shock, I'm anticipating, should be foreign. I currently have Maryland at number 8 and Mississippi state at number 9 in the top 25 and one. In a world where most of the perceived best teams have lost to teams comparable to some of the team's Marilyn Mississippi beaten, Marilyn and Mississippi remain undefeated and in possession of fast riding computer numbers. I'm happy to reward them. Am I crazy or am I crazy or am I not not as crazy? Norlander power rankings of you and I endorse that entirely because I can't promise promise, but I almost feel like if I get to because I do those Wednesday night that publish every Thursday. And what GP does with his daily rankings, I do a little bit differently with the power rankings to try and reward GP tends to get more resume based. And I'm more. I look at some of that, but how good have you been in recent weeks? It's more of a hot trend list, which teams are playing well in the past, you know, X number of games. That being said, if Maryland and Mississippi state can keep a bagel in the lost column by the time Thursday gets here, I would expect that I would put both of them in the top ten there. And yeah, Maryland, you know, the game was Friday night so we've got this is a more loaded podcast by the way than I would have anticipated us having, but we have a ton to get to here. And yeah, a light deserves to be shown in both these programs. Quick on Mississippi. Christians, we talked about it on the podcast and then, you know, it was written about tweeted about talked about. That was just seen as a hire that was made a ton of logical sense, although I did fade it in year one. I didn't think that they would be immediately a factor. And who knows? We got plenty of time to go here. But he is knocking it out of the park right now. Similar to how Dennis Gates is doing, drink the schedules aren't exactly the same there. And I would say that because of Mississippi seeds, defense overall. It's been with Missouri, it's been offense. Mississippi states been on the defensive side. A couple of really nice stories to start. We'll see if those two SEC programs could keep it going there. From a resume perspective, Mississippi state is stronger. But from Maryland to get off to this strong of a start, it is a gravy train kind of start, man. That was a really fun watch on Friday night. It was a better watch than the Gonzaga Baylor game, which of course we'll get to here in a little bit, but jameer young going for 24 points, getting that huge three late to get Maryland the win, a Kim Hart went 5 to 6 from three point range. And Dante Scott has a seemingly never ending battery. Just Kevin Willard seems to have found something pretty good. You know, we can get to the schedule in just a second. I don't know how much longer Maryland can last without a loss. If it does, then we really are going to have something there. But it was a huge home environment. I think I mentioned this on the pod Friday. It was the most anticipated home game since February 29. Yes, it was a leap year 2020. I went down there for that game against Michigan state that was a season in which Maryland started, that season also 8 O 9 out of ten and that was the last good turgen team. And that was an awesome environment that night and certainly a very competitive game. They showed up big. You know, obviously a little bit, not weird, but you know, they didn't just have conference games in the first week of December the way they do now. And the reason is because conferences have swelled to the point where in order to justify having 20 league games, which I don't like, but it's what they're going to do. 20 league games means you're going to have to scoot in a couple on the front end, which is what the PAC 12 is doing right now. The Big Ten is done as well. And a byproduct of that is that you got Maryland Illinois was not expected to be a must, must must seek kind of game at this point in the season, but both those teams to start off really strong. And so we were actually treated to a nice little twin Bill between Gonzaga Baylor and the Maryland Illinois on Friday and I thought Maryland, Illinois was the superior watch. And good stuff on the turps. What about you, GP? Well, I just want to run you through because I do think the a people is going to move Marilyn pretty significantly because it recorded a significant win on Friday. I don't know that they'll go as high as I've gone, but they'll be closed. I would assume the AP voters. With Mississippi I still think we're going to be separated because Mississippi doesn't have some big win, but I do want to walk you through the resume is just to sort of try to explain the justification. Maryland right now is 8 no, got wins over Illinois, St. Louis, Miami. That's three wins over top 45 kenton teams. And so I've got the terrapins up to 8th in the top 25 and one after creighton, which was ahead of both Maryland and Mississippi state, lost on Sunday and we'll get to that. Maryland, for what it's worth started 56 that Ken pom and is now up to 28. So that's a 36 spot move to the good since the start of the season. They aren't only undefeated. They are playing and performing really well. And so if you're a Maryland fan, you got to be thrilled with how this is going under Kevin willer. And you're exactly right. It is unclear how long the terms are going to be able to keep that zero in the lost column. But if they do keep it in there for three more games, then if there are any skeptics at this point, they will no longer exist. Because up next from Maryland, it's Tuesday at Wisconsin and that's a Wisconsin team that just went to marquette and won. The next Sunday, Marilyn will play Tennessee in Brooklyn because there's no better way to ensure

Mississippi Maryland Marilyn Mississippi Norlander Dennis Gates Gonzaga Baylor Jameer Young Kim Hart Dante Scott Kevin Willard Marilyn Illinois SEC Missouri PAC Michigan Ken Pom Kenton
Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:12 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "mississippi" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"The team didn't go far though this time around, but still positive about how they play. It was an incredible game. I obviously wish the U.S. had won, but I think they did very well for being a young team. Just getting back into the World Cup this year and I look forward to watching them in the future. Around a 16 continues the match between France and Poland just started. They're getting ready to vote in Georgia Tuesday is the state's Senate runoff election. Vernon Jones is a former democratic lawmaker and now a Republican. He's his Herschel Walker would have easily defeated democratic incumbent Raphael Warnock if you had done just one thing. One of the biggest blunders is that Herschel campaign did not put into place an apparatus to go directly for the black vote. Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear a controversial case about a Colorado business owner who won't do work for same sex weddings. But the state's attorney general Phil weiser says it is much bigger than that. This is not only about equal rights based on sexual orientation or gender identity. This is about equal rights based on religion, ethnicity, or race. Another mass lay off your CBS Jim crystal. Mississippi based United furniture industries laid off 2700 workers at plants in Mississippi and North Carolina without notice. Two days before Thanksgiving. Workers found out by overnight text messages and emails. Lawyer Casey lot is representing several of the fired employees. We were really shocked by how mismanaged this layoff was. Lot has sued the company for violating a federal law that requires employers to give at least 60 days notice of a mass layoff. Mother nature

Vernon Jones Raphael Warnock Herschel Walker Phil Weiser World Cup Herschel Poland Jim Crystal United Furniture Industries Georgia France Senate U.S. Mississippi Supreme Court Colorado Lawyer Casey CBS North Carolina
Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

Coast Guard rescues man overboard on Carnival cruise

"A cruise ship passenger who was missing for hours is found alive in the Gulf of Mexico. The coast guard says the 28 year old man was last seen Wednesday night and was rescued on Thanksgiving night. Carnival cruise line says the man was with his sister at a bar on the carnival valor at 11 p.m. Wednesday. He went to use the bathroom and never returned. His sister reported a missing the next day. A cargo ship saw a person in the water about 20 miles south of Southwest pass Louisiana and the mouth of the Mississippi River after the man was hoisted into a helicopter at about 8 30 Thursday night. He confirmed he was the missing cruise ship passenger. He was taken for medical care. The coast guard calls the rescue, a miracle. I'm

Coast Guard Gulf Of Mexico Mississippi River Southwest Louisiana
Kiffin plans to return; No. 20 Ole Miss falls to Bulldogs

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

Kiffin plans to return; No. 20 Ole Miss falls to Bulldogs

"Mississippi state came from behind to win the 8 ball at 20th ranked Mississippi 24 22. All miss was leading 16 7 late in the first half when the bulldogs Will Rogers through the first of his two touchdown passes with 8 seconds left to cut the rebels lead to 1614. Roger's second TD past gave state a 24 16 lead midway through the fourth quarter. Is everything, you know, like you said, third shot, you know? Kind of got tired of losing these guys. Obviously they're really, really good football team. The bulldogs needed to stymie an old miss two point conversion tribe with just over a minute remaining to seal the win. The loss was the third straight for the rebels who coached lane kiffin as speculated to be heading to auburn. I'm Tom Mary.

Mississippi Bulldogs Rogers Roger Football Lane Kiffin Auburn Tom Mary
Bills, Vikings and Cowboys score Thanksgiving wins.

AP News Radio

01:59 min | Last week

Bills, Vikings and Cowboys score Thanksgiving wins.

"AP sports, I'm Mike Reeves, it was a busy Thanksgiving Day in the NFL with three games on the schedule, the bills were in Detroit to meet the Lions, correspondent Denny cap, was there and has this report. Tyler bass boots a 45 yard field goal with two seconds left as the bills hang on to beat the Lions 28 25 on Thanksgiving Day, passes heroics from 8 necessary after he missed an extra point late in the fourth quarter, which allowed Lions kicker Michael batchley to sign the game on a 51 yarder with 23 seconds left. Sometimes you do everything that you write and sometimes you just get unlucky. We got unlucky, but we have a great group of guys that support me and have my back and I was able to reset and focus on the next big. Josh Allen put bounced into position to win the game, orchestrating a 48 yard drive spurred by a 36 yard pass the Stefan Diggs. Bob Stephens was on hand to watch the cowboys host the Giants. The Dallas Cowboys rallied to defeat the New York Giants 28 20 on Thanksgiving, overcoming a 13 7 deficit with 21 unanswered points in the second half. Cowboys coach Mike McCarthy says the cowboys time of possession keyed the win. Excellent division win game we had to have and I love the fire team and really what tried to break their method. And one thing I'm talking about is controlling the ball was a big focus for us today. That Prescott threw for 261 yards and two touchdowns the Dalton Schultz, CD lamb caught 6 for one O 6, while Daniel Jones threw for two 28 in a touchdown for the Giants. In Minnesota Kirk Cousins finds Adam Thielen in the end zone with 9 34 left to give the Vikings a 33 26 win over the Patriots, it was cousins third scoring strike of the game, just a phenomenal catch by him. I thought that the way he's able to catch that football, keep his feet in bounds. It just says a lot about his ability. One of the things he does really well is his body control and he's just overall athleticism and he showed it there. A great play by him. In college football, Mississippi state gets passed almost 24 22 in college troops in top 5 action number one North Carolina and number three Kansas are winners. I'm Mike Reeves, AP sports.

Lions Mike Reeves Denny Cap Tyler Bass Michael Batchley Josh Allen Bills Stefan Diggs Bob Stephens Cowboys AP Detroit NFL Giants Dalton Schultz Mike Mccarthy
The Power of State Legislatures

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

00:59 min | 2 weeks ago

The Power of State Legislatures

"Debbie and I have been talking about the power of state legislatures to address issues in particularly election issues. I mean, look at this. Look at the not just GOP dominance in all these states, but it's the degree of dominance. I'm just going to read very quickly Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming. And again, those are the states in which Republicans dominate both houses, but the margins are huge. Look at Wyoming. The Senate Republicans 28. It doesn't surprise me in white. And the house. 55 to 5. 5 to 5. But look at Texas, honey, Senate, 19 to 12 House 86 to 64. So I mean, you're not talking about one seat or two seat. You're talking about decisive majority. What Republicans say in these states go? Yeah. Those.

Debbie GOP Wyoming Arkansas Idaho Alabama North Dakota Louisiana Indiana Iowa Kentucky Mississippi Nebraska Georgia Kansas Montana South Dakota Missouri Texas South Carolina
Top-ranked Georgia cruises to 38-19 win at Mississippi State

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 weeks ago

Top-ranked Georgia cruises to 38-19 win at Mississippi State

"CFP number one Georgia secures a birth in the SEC title game by trancing Mississippi state 45 19 Lad mcconkey scored two touchdowns including a 70 yard run that started the second half after the bulldog Scott within 1712 Obviously it wasn't just me There's so many other guys that made some huge plays So yeah it means all three time I can make a play for a team I love villa Stats and Bennett threw for three more touchdowns It was 25 of 37 for 289 yards with two interceptions Mcconkey had 5 receptions for 71 yards in the score Mississippi state rushed for just 47 yards on 15 carries I'm Dave fairy

Lad Mcconkey Bulldog Scott Mississippi Villa Stats SEC Georgia Mcconkey Bennett Dave Fairy
Young's 3 TD passes lifts No. 10 'Bama past No. 11 Ole Miss

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Young's 3 TD passes lifts No. 10 'Bama past No. 11 Ole Miss

"Bryce young through three TD passes is Alabama held off Mississippi 30 to 24 young finished 21 of 33 for 209 yards with Kota billing going to defensive lineman Byron young who had 11 tackles as the crimson tide avoided a two game losing streak It became personal to all of us just because you know we're seeing what people have been saying You know we've seen people write us off when we feel like really just for ourselves We got to show ourselves who we are and we got to show ourselves that we are what we say we are So I think that was the biggest thing for us With the victory Alabama improves to 8 and two while Mississippi falls also to 8 and two I'm David Shuster

Bryce Young Byron Young Kota Alabama Mississippi David Shuster
Caller: No to Kevin McCarthy, No to Mitch McConnell

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Caller: No to Kevin McCarthy, No to Mitch McConnell

"Yes, I wanted to respond to your discussion on the leadership in the House and in the Senate. And I absolutely agree with you. I do not want Kevin McCarthy and I do not want McConnell. I just, he's the reason that we are in the shape we're in. We do not have a trustworthy speaker who represents the constituents of any state and so if we want to really hopefully change the outcome, each one of us needs to make phone calls to their representatives in their state. And I've even called, I've called to Ted Cruz before I call people that aren't even my representatives from the study of Mississippi. But we have to put pressure on our senators and our representatives and just encourage them in a respectful way to vote for whoever we think might be a good replacement. But certainly, if you don't know who you want, but you know who you don't want, you can still let them know that. And phone calls to my to my representatives, their own speed dial. Good for you, pat. And that music

Kevin Mccarthy Ted Cruz Mcconnell Senate House Mississippi PAT
When Do the Polls Close?

The Officer Tatum Show

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

When Do the Polls Close?

"I'll just tell you right now just in case you're thinking about voting and you haven't started yet, the polls are going to close and this is the polls that are closing on your time zone. So at 6 p.m., which is already occurred, we see Indiana, pose closing, and also Kentucky's poll closing. At 7 p.m., Arizona time. We'll see or at least your time based on the state that I say. So just know that I say 7 p.m., it is your time on your time zone. So at 7 p.m. in Alabama, this pose is going to close Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Kansas Mississippi, let's see Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Wyoming. All right, those are the polls are going to close at that time at your time zone.

Arizona Indiana Kentucky Alabama Colorado Hawaii Georgia Mississippi Illinois Kansas Florida Missouri North Dakota Nevada New Mexico Oklahoma South Carolina South Dakota Vermont Wyoming
John Zmirak: Half of the Country Thinks the Other Are Unfit Parents

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:35 min | Last month

John Zmirak: Half of the Country Thinks the Other Are Unfit Parents

"Piece I'd like to talk about, each half of the country thinks the other half are unfit parents. And one half is right. Okay. All right, so think about this. Half the country thinks the other half are unfit parents. When these liberals drag their toddlers into drag queen acts with sex workers dressed as strippers, stuffing money into their groins, do we think this is appropriate parental behavior? If they were going into a heterosexual strip joint, would we think that was okay either? No, we would be calling social services because they are sexualizing. They are psychologically abusing. They are grooming their own children. When schools in California basically try to create gender dysphoria in kids by giving them books that encourage them to question whether they were born in the wrong body. Or encourage them to think they might be one of 45 fictitious genders. That is child abuse. Now, we can say I can say I live in Texas, that's not happening in Texas. Is that enough? I mean, is it enough for us to say, all right, we're going to protect unborn children in Texas, but you can kill them in California, and you can set up abortion clinics at the airport. And you can ship abortion drugs from California to Texas to kill Texas babies here. In the same way, the liberals are not going to be satisfied with letting us protect unborn babies in Mississippi and Louisiana. They want them killed everywhere.

Texas California Mississippi Louisiana
How Will the Abortion Issue Affect the Midterms?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:43 min | Last month

How Will the Abortion Issue Affect the Midterms?

"Of you will say, well, what about the Mississippi and the roe V wade decision? What about the rolling back of row? That's going to make a difference. It did for a while. Okay, I'll be Frank with you. Indian. I think the pro life community was in not car off guard, but in some ways caught off guard and surprised by the decision to actually go ahead and overturn roe and Casey. There was rejoicing on the pro life community that now laws such as the limits on abortion and sites. And some of the absolute man on site was now here. There was a discussion of what do we do? The media, of course, went completely on hinged about this saying that it was going to affect every election that people were going to come out in the streets. The democracy, the Supreme Court, is politicized. I mean, you just heard everything. And when he was leaked, I mean, the vitriol from the left, which was downplayed by the media, I think at the end of the day, when people across the country saw these, you know, the left protesting at sprinkler justices, houses, you have somebody who was arrested just a few blocks or houses from a Supreme Court Justice. Kavanaugh's house wanting to kill him. This is what was playing out in America saying, look, you know, the press is downplaying this. But these are real issues that are affecting how our safety, how have you crying. And at the end of the day, it looks like in this election cycle, the abortion issue will play a prominent part in some of these races, but not all of these races. This is not

Roe V Wade Mississippi ROE Casey Frank Supreme Court Kavanaugh America
No. 6 Alabama's defense stymies No. 24 MSU, 30-6

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last month

No. 6 Alabama's defense stymies No. 24 MSU, 30-6

"6 ranked Alabama has followed its 52 49 loss of Tennessee with a stifling performance in a 30 to 6 win against number 24 Mississippi state The tide had a shutout until the game's final play and tied defensive back to Marco helms wasn't happy about it It's all about finishing you know it doesn't matter what the scoreboard you know to us the schoolboys always zero zero So you know whenever somebody gets in the ends on it that's always something that we don't want to allow You know it doesn't matter if it's the last third of the game Alabama had 15 pass breakups and four sacks after getting victimized by the volunteers last weekend Bryce young was 21 of 35 for 249 yards and two scores I'm Dave ferry

Marco Helms Alabama Tennessee Mississippi Bryce Young Dave Ferry
Dynamic Daniels, LSU, roar back on No. 7 Ole Miss, 45-20

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last month

Dynamic Daniels, LSU, roar back on No. 7 Ole Miss, 45-20

"7th ranked Mississippi suffered its first loss by blowing a two touchdown lead and falling to LSU 45 20 Jaden Daniels ran for three touchdowns and threw for two scores Once we got going you know it was hard for half of them to stop It was easy for us to keep going He broke the team's single season record for rushing TDs by a quarterback with 9 and has accounted for 11 touchdowns rushing or passing in the tigers last two games Daniels passed for 258 yards and ran for 121 without a turnover LSU finished with 500 total yards after being out gained 200 to 80 in the first quarter and falling behind 17 three I'm Dave ferry

Jaden Daniels LSU Mississippi Tigers Daniels Dave Ferry
'Change has come': Mississippi unveils Emmett Till statue

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

'Change has come': Mississippi unveils Emmett Till statue

"A Mississippi community unveiled a larger than life statue of Emmett Till on Friday not far from where white men kidnapped and killed the black teen in 1955 over accusations he flirted with a white woman Hundreds cheering and clapping some wiping away tears seeing the 9 foot tall bronze statue of Emmett Till in Greenwood Diane west grew up hearing cautionary tales about his murder We just have to be here because justice is being served State senator David Jordan who was instrumental in getting the statue says he remembers attending the murder trial in 1955 and vowing to make a difference It made a mockery of justice And I swore then that if I ever get a chance I would do my best to make my best For African American The Emmett Till statue was a short drive from a confederate monument outside the county courthouse I'm Julie Walker

Greenwood Diane Emmett Emmett Till Mississippi David Jordan Julie Walker
Community with Confederate monument gets Emmett Till statue

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Community with Confederate monument gets Emmett Till statue

"A Mississippi town is unveiling a statue of 1955 murder victim Emmett Till Greenwood Mississippi is about 11 miles from the crumbling remains of Bryant's grocery and meat market the town is dedicating a 9 foot bronze statue of Emmett Till a jaunty depiction in a dress shirt and tie with one hand on the brim of his hat In 1955 the black 14 year old from Chicago traveled to the Mississippi Delta to visit relatives and was kidnapped tortured and murdered by white shopkeeper Roy Bryant and his half brother after the man heard a story that till spoke inappropriately with his wife the teenagers killing became a catalyst for the civil rights movement the statue will be watched by security cameras nearby historical markers have been knocked down vandalized and shot the reverend Wheeler Parker junior the last living witness to his cousin's kidnapping says we just thank God someone is keeping his name out there Parker says he's glad there is interest in a story that people didn't want to talk about for decades I'm Jennifer King

Mississippi Roy Bryant Greenwood Emmett Mississippi Delta Bryant Wheeler Parker Chicago Parker Jennifer King
EPA civil rights case targets Mississippi over Jackson water

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

EPA civil rights case targets Mississippi over Jackson water

"The Environmental Protection Agency has launched a civil rights investigation into the water crisis in Jackson Mississippi on Norman hall The EPA says its investigating whether Mississippi state agencies discriminated against the city of Jackson the states majority black capital city by refusing to fund improvements for its failing water system word of the probe came days after two congressional committees said they were starting a joint investigation into a crisis that left most homes and businesses in Jackson without running water for several days in late August and early September NAACP president Derrick Johnson who lives in Jackson called the EPA probe a step in the right direction but governor Tate Reeves a Republican blames the water problems on Jackson's democratic local leaders I Norman hall

Norman Hall Environmental Protection Agenc Jackson Mississippi Derrick Johnson Naacp Tate Reeves
No. 9 Mississippi runs wild and holds off Auburn 48-34

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

No. 9 Mississippi runs wild and holds off Auburn 48-34

"9th ranked Mississippi ran past auburn 48 34 to raise its record to 7 O All miss rush for 448 yards with three players each gaining more than 100 yards on the ground running back Zach Evans and quinson judkins and quarterback Jackson dart Dart also threw three touchdown passes two of them to his running backs We knew from the get go that we could put them on their heels a little bit And we just stuck with that the whole time And we saw him score we just knew we had to do the same thing The rebels jumped out to a 21 zero lead early in the second quarter but auburn kept pushing back coming within a touchdown at three different junctures before losing his third straight game I'm Tom mariam

Zach Evans Quinson Judkins Jackson Dart Dart Auburn Mississippi Tom Mariam
Danielle and Newsweek's Josh Hammer Discuss the Abortion Issue

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:06 min | Last month

Danielle and Newsweek's Josh Hammer Discuss the Abortion Issue

"Think for the left, you know, they're really so focused on thinking abortion is what's going to drive people out to the polls. They think that that's going to win them things in the midterms, but it's actually a very small percentage of Americans who would either even consider that their main voting issue. But also would be considering at their main voting issue when they are pro abortion, because there are people who are just pro life and that's their main issue, but I think for the left for them to think, wow, you know, we're really going to win women because this is the main thing that they're going to be obsessed with when in places like New York, they can still get Lee term abortions, you know, places where there are a lot of liberal women. They are their laws haven't really changed that much. Whereas in other places, I mean, take Mississippi, which was the one that went to the court. I mean, that was 15 weeks, which is actually second trimester. And they would consider that extremely radical. They could never possibly agree to any kind of restriction of that nature. Why do you think that they agree to any kind of restriction whatsoever? When we're always asked about some crazy exception, you know, like the ten year old situation, whereas they will not even come up with any kind of limitation. So two things to be said on this. So first to what you said earlier there in those very eloquent comments is that even kind of taking the narrow portion of the citizenry for whom abortion is the primarily the number one issue. There are far more and pulling this consistently for decades now. Decade, there are far more single issue pro life voters and single issue pro abortion voters. Put another way, there are more people who, if you are pro life, they will vote for the pro life party, period full stop end of story, then pro abortion voters. You are more likely to have a pro abortion voter who was willing to vote for the pro life party than the other way around. And the reason for that is from my estimation, incredibly simple, which is I give you actually buy the fund to be basic pro life argument that the unborn child is entitled to full kind of legal constitutional and moral rights under our rule of law and under kind of our culture more generally speaking, and that is literally a life and death issue and it kind of trumps whatever kind of other issues are out there and you have to vote for it.

Mississippi LEE New York
Football Coach Chan Gailey and Doug Discuss NIL and Transfer Portal

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Football Coach Chan Gailey and Doug Discuss NIL and Transfer Portal

"An interesting parallel. You know, the preseason issue with the NFL. And now you have and you brought this up, the parody issue that you're looking at a little bit in college, whether it be a Kent State in Georgia, whether it be an Appalachian state, you know, basically beating most FBS teams that it played, you have the others that Georgia, Georgia, state Jordan southern. When Nebraska, I mean, you have all these games. Has the, I'm going to make a hypothesis here. I think this is a one of the iterations of NIL and transfer portal. Yeah. I agree totally. I mean, you take Marshall Marshall had 40 something new players on their roster this year counting freshmen and transfer players. And they go to Notre-Dame and beaten out of dying. They were able to gather some people, Notre-Dame had no idea what that other team had. They'd seen one game on tight. So they have some pretty good football players that they've been able to mass and other teams have that too. You don't know what anybody has early in the season and then you figure you don't even know what you have sometimes. And you're trying to figure it out. So, and there's a lot of, you know, the motivation factor is huge in college. Motivation and because going to play Texas a and M for Appalachian state, they want to prove that they could have played a Texas a and M, those kids do. Right. So they're going to apply lights out. Texas a and M is saying, you know, we got Mississippi next week. We got to worry about, well, yeah, we got to think about them a little bit, not worry about this little Appalachian state. And they've got good football players. There's a bunch of good football players out there.

Georgia Marshall Marshall FBS NFL Nebraska Jordan Notre Dame Texas Football Mississippi
"mississippi" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:45 min | 2 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Today, Explained

"So the federal government has essentially kicked decisions about welfare over to the states. And when does the abuse of the system begin in Mississippi? 2016 is also a natural starting point for the story because that is when John Davis became director. John Davis is the former director who was in charge of the welfare department when the scandal occurred, and he just pled guilty to federal charges last week. A state judge today said it's Davis to more than 30 years in prison and put him on house arrest until the federal sentencing in February. The governor at the time Phil Bryant had apparently instructed him in 2016 to, instead of giving this Tana fund to different service organizations across the state, he instructed the director to consolidate the program. And the idea was that DHS would put out tens of millions of dollars to one or two organizations who would then decide who to give that money to through private grants so that that money wouldn't be then publicly reported. It was now private. They would call the initiative, families first for Mississippi. And this is the program through which most of the miss spending occurred. Who was that money supposed to be for? One in 5 people in Mississippi live in poverty. We rank near the bottom of all of these lists of median income or workforce participation rate or average wages. Over the last year, I would say that I probably only earned 5 to $6000. I actually had a bank account, but I don't right now. It was so much things needed, it just got into negatives. We've got a very low income and low wage population. And these funds would have actually helped people find self sufficiency. That is the mission statement of the program and of the agency. So the state didn't want to put out this money through direct cash assistance to people in poverty because there's this notion in conservative states that social safety net programs create dependency on the government and that they de incentivize working. Okay, well, the money can be spent on programs that have been proven to help people find success and interrupt generational poverty, workforce development programs. Effective caseworker programs after school and child care programs transportation, these are the things that could have helped people find economic mobility that they did not, what's notable is that all the welfare money that might have been spread out among lots of different programs was instead funneled into just a couple. What was the point of that just to make things simpler? Yeah, I think that was essentially the reason that they give so they don't have to manage that many grants, right? I mean, think about the administration that it takes to administer those grants and make sure that people are spending them properly. Now, I think that that is the stated reason, but I also understand that since this money and we're talking about tens of millions of dollars, we're going to these private nonprofits who then had the ability to spend the money, however they wanted, and there was no reporting back to the department to say how they were spending the money. It created a black hole for this money to funnel through without anyone knowing about it. All right, so what you end up with is a situation in which you have millions of dollars, you have very little oversight. We all know what that can lead to and it absolutely did in this case. When did people in Mississippi start to realize the extent of what was going on here? There were two things that were happening in 2019. First, a department employee, an employee of John Davis had gone to the governor's office with the small tip about suspected fraud on John Davis's part. He takes this small tip to the governor's office who takes that information to the state auditor. Now, the auditors already conducting an annual audit on DHS because there is a routine audit that the state office does every year on state agencies that receive federal funds. And so there was the investigation into suspected fraud and the regular routine financial audit that were actually occurring at the same time in 2019. The arrests were the result of the criminal investigation and the audit report released in May was the result of the regular audit procedures. The audit released in May of 2020 really opened up a whole new world of information and data about how the money had been spent. We knew that this $4 million had allegedly been stolen, but we didn't know the breadth of the issue. The breadth of the breach at DHS. So the state of Mississippi had allowed tens of millions of dollars from this federal program and actually from other assistance programs as well to be used in ways that did little to nothing to help people in poverty. Instead, the two nonprofits that I described were using the money on lobbyists, football tickets, and promotional events with athletes, famous athletes, fitness programs, and they put on concerts, religious concerts as well. One of the things that stood out to me was that there was a line item in the audit that they had used tanf money to pay for a speeding ticket. And I think that just really illustrates just how much this fund had turned into their piggy bank, right? Whose names in that audit really stood out. So we saw that during the last four years of the Bryant administration, for some reason, money from the department of human services kept going to famous athletes. Of course, you know about Brett Favre if that's the story that has been national here lately, but there was $5 million that went to the family of Brett dibiase, this wrestler whose dad is the $1 million man. I'm Ted dibiase. I'm the $1 million man. They say that money is the root of all evil. Well, I'm here to tell you that it's not. So there was a professional wrestlers who received welfare money as well as the former football player Marcus Dupree. I'm doing a foundation called the Marcus Dupree foundation where I work with my horses and kids and mentor and seeing the kids face light up when they see the horses and stuff like that. And another former football player Paul lacoste was paid to put on fitness camps for mississippians, but also for lawmakers and other powerful people. Let's go. We don't have time to drink water. We're too fat to drink water. These are the names that have really stuck out and made the headlines, but the family members and friends of these welfare officials were also people who received money from this program. And so the audit was essentially a laundry list of purchases that the auditor found, the narrative that this audit report generated, and the tone that was set at the beginning. You know, came pretty early on in this whole investigation. And that was that Davis, John Davis, was this tyrant in charge of the welfare agency sort of directing everyone to do these nonsensical things and pay out this money to wrestlers and football players. But as we've learned more and more over the last two years, this corruption was really system wide and I think investigators are looking to see how far it goes to the top,

John Davis Mississippi Phil Bryant DHS Tana federal government Davis Bryant administration Brett dibiase football Marcus Dupree Marcus Dupree foundation Paul lacoste Ted dibiase Brett Favre
"mississippi" Discussed on ESPN Daily

ESPN Daily

13:46 min | 2 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on ESPN Daily

"Of his text messages that he was the one orchestrating the flow of federal funds to that volleyball court. And then in addition to that, we found $1.1 million of welfare funds had been paid to mister Favre. And when we asked the question, okay, what did he do to earn the $1.1 million? We were given a contract by the nonprofit that handled the money and the contract said that mister Farr was supposed to cut a radio ad and give several speeches. We then asked the follow-up question, which is natural when were the speeches? Where did he give him? He had already been paid the $1.1 million so in Mississippi under Mississippi law. He can't be paid before you delivered the services. He would have had to have delivered the services. So we asked where will the speeches? We were given a list of dates and events, very short perfunctory list. And I think that the folks at the nonprofit assume that we would just stop digging at that point, but the audit team here, Doug in a bit more, we looked at advantage agenda as we looked at social media posts. We talked to individuals who have been to those events. We're very quickly determined that mister Farr had not been at those events. He had not given those speeches. Later on in an interview with mister Farr, attended by my agents attended by FBI agents, mister Farr confirmed that he had not given the speeches that were listed. That came along with that contract. So really, those are the two big pieces that folks have focused on because they involve the flow of millions of dollars to the university as orchestrated by mister Favre to him personally. And so you just mentioned some text messages. You mentioned the flow of money. And I want to just introduce a couple of names here for clarity's sake just to follow up on them because one of those names is John Davis, the former director of the Mississippi department of human services. At the time in question, Chad, he had the authority to direct which nonprofits would receive this money. He pled guilty last week. The other person to mention here is Nancy knew. The woman who was running the nonprofit, we've been referring to here. She pled guilty last spring. And so when you refer to these text messages that detail Brett Favre's involvement with those individuals, just explain what we're talking about there, specifically. Yeah, so originally when a lot of this news broke mister Farr's attorneys tried to say, well, he didn't know that this was welfare money. What we know from the text messages now is that he knew this money was public money because he had approached miss nu and he had approached John Davis, who, again, is running a state agency. So he's handling public funds. Mister farman approached the two of them and tried to get money for this volleyball court along with the governor of the state of Mississippi. And of course, he got what he wanted to get the money flowing from John through miss new. And then he acknowledged that in text messages as well. So there's some text messages where he said I love you and John as well. He was grateful for this flow of money that had gone to the thing that he had asked it to go for. And then in addition to that, his lawyers followed up once those text messages came out and they realized that that was not a great argument to be making out in public. They said, well, really, the $1.1 million didn't have anything to do with that volleyball court. They didn't exactly explain why he was paid the $1.1 million other than to say he had cut some radio ads and they claimed that he had actually performed that service. We pointed out that, no, your text messages do say that you were one of the 1.1 million to go to the volleyball court. And two, the contract is very plainly said that you had to give those speeches and you didn't give those speeches. So then following on that, his lawyers also said, well, the contracts really is sham. It's not a real document. And he should not be held accountable for complying with the terms of the contract. And as state auditor in my response to that is, that's even worse for you, because if you got paid $1.1 million on a sham, nonexistent contract, guess what? You have to pay back the $1.1 million. We don't just hand out $1.1 million for nothing at all. So really, that was how this conversation, this dialog played out in public. And what it ultimately led to, of course, mister Favre repaid $500,000 of the 1.1 million at first. He did not pay any more money until I demanded that he pay back the remaining $600,000 plus interest. He then repaid the rest of the 1.1 million. So he's repaid that principle, but he has not repaid the interest. And that's one of the reasons the state is suing him at this point to recoup that interest money. And that ongoing lawsuit against Brett Favre and others, that has been the main source of these most recent disclosures. And so we continue to see these chord filings, release of the public, bringing more details to light. And of those details, what has been most notable to you about what we've learned in these last couple of weeks. Yeah, one of the big text messages that came out recently was a text where mister Favre is asking miss new, is there any way for the media to find out how much money I got and where it came from? I'm paraphrasing, but it's a pretty close paraphrase to what he actually said. Obviously, that is damning text message. And to be honest with you Pablo, when I first read it, I was angry because I thought, you know, this is somebody who publicly has called me a liar has called the team at the auditor's office liars. He said that we made all this up. Just for future reference, if you ever in a tussle with a state auditor somewhere, you should understand that there's a team of CPAs documenting every single thing that we say in an audit. So it's best not to say you don't know what you're talking about because we have documents and text messages on our side. So anyway, this text comes out and my first reaction was anger, but at the same time, I thought it was, I thought it was healthy that the public understand, no, this is not just something that the state auditor's office is making up. We're not doing this for fun. We're doing this to describe to the public how their money was spent or miss bet in this case. And that's what we're committed to continuing to do throughout this case. Yeah, and then even more recently than that, there were other texts Chad. Speaking to a conversation between Phil Bryant, who was in the governor and Brett Favre about the usage of this money and the potential criminality of this money. Could you walk us through what was just released? I believe it was last week. Sure. Yeah. So this feels a little bit like a ping Pong match being played off the table walls and the ceiling at the same time because a text message will come out and then somebody responds and then there's a rebuttal, but the text that you're talking about Pablo were produced by the governor and a court filing and the point of the production that he was making was to say, look, I said, including in text messages, I said that we needed to be aware that certain uses of Tana funds could violate federal law. So mister Farr had been pushing him this new John Davis, the head of the state agency for a while to fund various things like this volleyball court using public funds. And then the governor pointed out in a text message. Look, there are rules around this. I'm too old to go to federal prison. That was a paraphrase of the quote from the text. So you see these communications going back and forth and really what I think all the parties are trying to get to anybody who's a part of this case. I think what they're trying to get to is an argument that they were not responsible for the miss spinning of public funds. And ultimately, what's going to have to happen is all these documents and all these arguments are going to have to be laid out in front of a judge in a court somewhere. And the judge is going to have to figure out, okay, mister Davis, you owe this amount back. Mister farview of this amount back, miss knew you owe this amount back. And it's going to be an incredibly difficult task because really at minimum we're talking about about $77 million. That's a very, very conservative estimate, more realistically, my team estimates that it's a little over a $100 million of public funds. So this is going to be a mammoth undertaking. And so over a $100 million of miss bent public funds here in total, which were supposed to go to the poorest people in your state. That's what we're talking about here. When you combine the range of people involved in this, but the portion of that total, which Brett Favre personally is alleged to have misused or misdirected, just to be clear, that's about $8 million, right? A bunch of which went to this volleyball facility at his Alma mater, southern miss. And in what specific way was using ten if funds, the welfare money here, on the volleyball facility, a violation of state policy or even a violation of the law. Sure, yeah. So ten of funds, very plainly, can not go to build brick and mortar structures. So what they did when they were moving this money from the nonprofit holding welfare funds to the volleyball facility was to say that this money was going to lease the volleyball court. Well, it's very difficult to make that argument in hindsight because the volleyball court had not yet been built. So they were leasing a volleyball court at a very, very high rental rate before the volleyball court was built. That is not a lease. That is building something with welfare money, which you can not do. So that's one way in which it violated federal regulations. But two, maybe more fundamentally, tan of money should go to benefit poor people, needy people. And so on paper, there was this plan to turn this very fancy varsity quality volleyball court at the University of Southern Mississippi into some sort of center where poor folks could come in from the Hattiesburg area, which is where USM as and some sort of services could be delivered to them. And of course, that never happened either. So really, you get multiple problems with this flow of money to the volleyball court. And then once we uncovered that and once the world knew about that, we realized, okay, well, this is really just something that happened because mister Farr was pulling some levers behind closed doors, trying to get dollars to flow to this. One of the more interesting text messages that came out was from former university president of U.S. Sam Rodney Bennett, doctor Rodney Bennett. And he says in a text message, look, mister Farr has committed personally to paying for this volleyball court and what he's doing now is trying to get state and federal money to pay for his commitment that he made. To donate to the volleyball court. And what mister Farr needs to do, again, I'm paraphrasing doctor Bennett. He needs to just keep his word and make the payment himself, not go to government for it. So that's really that's really the genesis of this whole flow of money to the volleyball court was a commitment by mister Farr to help fundraise to pay for it that really didn't happen and he had to go to how to go to government to try to get the dollars for that. You would reference before in our conversation that millions of these dollars had been effectively set on fire. That was the phrase you used. Given what you just explained about the volleyball facility, would you count the volleyball facility in that in that fire? Absolutely, because it was not used to serve the poor. This money was used to help build a volleyball court. It should have been used for the poor. It was not. And one of the few entities that really pushed back on the audit was the university system here in the state of Mississippi instead of challenging my office on the veracity of what we said, maybe you should be thinking of ways to use the volleyball court for the poor. That's what I would be spending my time doing. So yes, this was part of the money that was set on fire because it didn't go to benefit the people that it should have benefited. But there is something there I do want to still nail down here. Chad, because Brett Favre's attorneys, they have asserted that he did not know where this money came from. Earlier, you said he did know that these were public funds. So just to parse that here, what have you seen specifically to indicate what Bret Favre did and did not know about the source of these funds? Well, we know based on his text messages that he knew this was government money. But I don't know necessarily if he knew specifically what program it was coming from. I haven't seen a text message to suggest that. It may exist out there if it does. I haven't seen it. But he didn't know it was government money. He didn't know it was coming from the Mississippi department of human services because he was interacting with John Davis, the head of that agency. He was acknowledging in text messages that that's where he got the money from. He knew that the money was flowing through a nonprofit, which was designed to serve poor folks, designed to serve a public interest, the nonprofit was run by miss news. So those are the kinds of things we know. I wouldn't say necessarily that he knew that this was temporary assistance for needy families. I'm not sure if he knows what temporary assistance for needy families is. Really, it doesn't matter at the end of the day. What matters is that he knew this was government funds. And based on the text messages that we have seen, he really did not want the public to find out that these funds were flowing in the way they were flowing. And so in other words, the claim that he doesn't know what ten of his or the tenant was involved here at all, that does not qualify to you as a legal defense for Brett Favre. Well, certainly not civilly. So civilly, he's still going to be responsible for paying that money back. Now criminally, it's a different matter. And of course, my office is the state auditor's office. We're not prosecutors. We have no authority to decide who does or does not face criminal charges at the end of one of our investigations or an audit. That decision is made by prosecutors, specifically in this case, either the local DA, the attorney general or federal prosecutors. And so really those prosecutors will take everything that we have found. Everything that's been made public and everything that is being told to them by cooperating witnesses right now. And they're going to have to make decisions about who really had the intent to defraud the public. When we're talking about criminality, it's important to remember that fraud statutes and literally every state in the entire country have an intent element. You have to intentionally misspend money and sometimes you have to do so to your own personal benefit. Of course, we can not get into the mind of a criminal, so prosecutors, what they're looking for is some evidence, circumstantial proof that somebody knew what they were doing. They tried to cover it up, whatever it may be. That's the kind of stuff that prosecutors are going to be looking at when

mister Farr volleyball mister Favre Brett Favre John Davis Mississippi Mississippi department of huma Mister farman Phil Bryant Pablo mister Davis Chad John FBI
"mississippi" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:21 min | 3 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Today, Explained

"State. The Jackson area saw a lot of flooding, and with that flooding came a lot of extra chemicals in the water into Jackson's water plant. That meant they had to also raise the amount of treatment processes they were doing on those highly contaminated waters. The city of Jackson has a very limited staff. They are understaffed at this water treatment plant for years and years now. All the EPA has made it clear that a staffing shortage is amplifying the city of Jackson's continued water issues. And their equipment is exceptionally outdated, and so because of those factors, they just couldn't meet the demands of taking in water, processing it, and then putting it out into the system to maintain that pressure. So, they had to decrease their water production in the short term, which couldn't keep up with the demand that Jackson residents needed. And when that happened, we saw water pressure across the city drop as the storage tanks that are used began to drain. At her founder at home, water pressure is still too low to take a shower or wash clothes, but hall says she tried to fill up her tub to have water to flush her toilet and wash dishes with. If a city's water pressure is not adequate, the water sits in the pipes at a lower rate and it can't flow as fast. You might have heard the phrase, moss can't grow on a Rolling Stone. Well, kind of applies to whenever water can't flow quickly enough to get to the storage tanks or it sits stagnant in some pipes, then bacteria has a chance to produce faster and faster. And when that happens, it can be dangerous for residents to drink the water, and the city of Jackson has been plagued by that for years. It came out of the phosphate, and it was thick and it was a different color. I couldn't even give it to my dog. And that's something that jacksonians have just come to live with. It's just that in this case, we've seen a bigger problem, which is they don't have water pressure at all. Why has this been going on for so long? This is a capital city. Jackson obviously has a history of racism, so that leads into something called white flight. When a lot of African Americans moved into the city of Jackson, we began to see a lot of white people that held a majority of the capital. They left the city. Federally mandated school desegregation had prompted waves of white residents to abandon the city. Between 1970 and 1990, Jackson went from being 60% white to being nearly 60% black. They didn't move far away. These people are just on the very edge of the county lines, so these people can still benefit from having the things that are in Jackson, but they don't live there themselves. And their personal interest in the city has waned over time. Many look at the city as a stain on the state rather than something that they're proud of as a state capital. And so over a period of time, the city of Jackson lost their tax base. When that happens, they can't keep doing the same infrastructure updates that they had been doing in the past. So over a period of decades, the city has failed to be able to produce adequate maintenance on their systems. They haven't been able to replace pipes in their grounds across the city, and so these infrastructure failings are something that have compounded over years and years. Who has been most directly affected by this. This is something that is heavily affecting those who live in south and west Jackson. Those residents live miles away from the water treatment plants. And so there is so much distance that has to be covered. They are almost always under a boil water notice and oftentimes it's easier to count the weeks that they're not on a boil notice than they are. Somewhere somebody has dropped the ball and so the city council or the mayor or whoever the governor, whatever. Needs to get together and get this done. The demographics of Jackson is 80% black. And a lot of Jackson residents are also low income and with that, it becomes a system that is increasingly putting a large tax burden on not just African Americans, but people who have very low incomes and live far below the poverty rate. The city knows it's in the middle of a crisis, the state knows it's in the middle of the crisis, are those two entities who presumably should have some of the same goals in mind. Are they working together at this point? How are they responding? It has become a tricky situation to know how they're working together or not. During the first full week of the crisis, the governor and the mayor came together in a press conference talking about how they wanted unity in this going forward to make sure that they were focusing on helping Jackson residents first. There will be plenty of time in the future to play the blame game and y'all can do all of that you want to do. You can do it in real time if you want to, but I ain't got time for it. But then we saw the governor come forward and immediately start blaming city administration for not maintaining the city's water plant, adequately, and then on the city side, they're saying that they have been putting forward plans constantly for the past several years, which never get the funding they need. I've been saying that it's not a matter of if our system would fail, but when our system would fail. Is the city providing people with water or with other types of aid? The city has been providing people with water for a while now, it's something that's they've been doing under an EPA order at fire stations across the area. And now the state has also stepped in to help with this issue from our Mississippi emergency management agency and our state National Guard, as well as partners at for instance, our Department of Agriculture and commerce. And so with all of these entities coming together, they have been able to drastically step up water distribution efforts. I think the governor mentioned the other day, it was surpassing 5 million bottles of water passed out within a week, and so with all of that, people are getting the water they need right now, but this is something that has been an issue for so long that people have just gotten used to buying their own water and grocery stores. Some people spend maybe $25 a week if they live alone. But I've heard families spend maybe like a $100 per week just on water for their children. People are fatal. I

Jackson EPA moss west Jackson hall Mississippi emergency manageme Department of Agriculture and
"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:40 min | 3 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Hard <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> to see a very <Speech_Male> good copy <Speech_Male> of this film for a <Speech_Male> long time and then you see it <Speech_Male> in this way and it <Speech_Male> still again feels <Speech_Male> not only <Speech_Male> fresh but it feels like it <Speech_Male> gives me a new way <Speech_Male> to think about movies that we're <Speech_Male> watching today and <Speech_Male> what they're like and <Speech_Male> what they're about and whether <Speech_Male> we see interracial <Speech_Male> relationships portrayed <Speech_Male> even. So <Speech_Male> I do feel like there's something <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> wonderful about the fact <Speech_Male> that things like this <Speech_Male> can be made <Speech_Male> available and they're <Speech_Male> available in a <Speech_Male> form that's hopefully a little <Speech_Male> more permanent <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> fleeting things can <Speech_Male> be if they're not taken care <Speech_Male> of or I <Speech_Male> don't know the rights are not <Speech_Male> organized properly <Speech_Male> because it seems like that's going <Speech_Male> to be an issue moving <Speech_Female> forward too. <SpeakerChange> Yeah, <Speech_Female> I would think so. <Speech_Female> And you know I <Speech_Female> found that watching <Speech_Female> this film <Speech_Female> as somebody <Speech_Female> who, as I said, I had <Speech_Female> had this recommended <Speech_Female> to me over and <Speech_Female> over and over again because people <Speech_Female> know me. They know <Speech_Female> that I love a love <Speech_Female> story. They know that I love <Speech_Female> sexy romance <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> I found that <Speech_Female> watching this <Speech_Female> gave me a <Speech_Female> brand of pleasure <Speech_Female> that I rarely <Speech_Female> get anymore, <Speech_Female> which is <Speech_Female> being able <Speech_Female> to find something <Speech_Female> that is hard to <Speech_Female> find. And <Speech_Female> so in a weird <Speech_Female> way, it's <Speech_Female> so enormously <Speech_Female> sad to <Speech_Female> have things that <Speech_Female> are not available, <Speech_Female> but weirdly <Speech_Female> it also <Speech_Female> gave me this <Speech_Female> funny <Speech_Female> little thrill <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> I <SpeakerChange> used to <Speech_Female> get from, <Speech_Female> oh, this <Speech_Female> isn't available <Speech_Female> on <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> VHS <Speech_Female> or whatever <Speech_Female> for me. <Speech_Female> It used to be that if <Speech_Female> you and <Speech_Female> this is such an <Speech_Female> old person yells at cloud, <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> it used to be that <Speech_Female> if you saw <Speech_Female> something and <Speech_Female> then <Speech_Female> it was gone, you <Speech_Female> didn't necessarily <Speech_Female> expect to have it <Speech_Female> to hand at <Speech_Female> any time. And <Speech_Female> it was really <Speech_Female> interesting <Speech_Female> to have <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what was for me pretty <Speech_Female> much a pure <Speech_Female> discovery <Speech_Female> of something <Speech_Female> really kind of <Speech_Female> beautiful and <Speech_Female> to me <Speech_Female> sort of <Speech_Female> famously great <Speech_Female> that I hadn't really <Speech_Female> been able to see <Speech_Female> in a good <Speech_Female> setting. <Speech_Female> You know, that was <Speech_Female> really cool and it <Speech_Female> rarely happens <Speech_Male> anymore. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I'd only seen it before <Speech_Male> in like a VHS <Speech_Male> from a university <Speech_Male> library with like <Speech_Male> a duri decimal <Speech_Male> style <Speech_Male> filing and <Speech_Male> not a very good copy <Speech_Male> of it. So I think that <Speech_Male> it's like sort of <Speech_Male> something wasting away in <Speech_Male> those kinds of places unless <Speech_Male> you can <Speech_Male> find it. <SpeakerChange> It was <Speech_Female> illegally on YouTube <Speech_Female> for a while. <Speech_Female> Yeah. There are also <Speech_Female> some random <Speech_Female> streams <Speech_Female> that were pretty <Speech_Female> low quality that <Speech_Female> were floating around the <Speech_Female> Internet for a <SpeakerChange> while. <Speech_Female> Right. And that's <Speech_Female> the kind of thing and <Speech_Female> you never know how long they'll <Speech_Female> stay up and <Speech_Female> exactly. <Speech_Female> Yeah. All right, <Speech_Female> well we <SpeakerChange> want to know <Speech_Female> what you think about <Speech_Female> Mississippi masala <Speech_Female> and you find it. Find <Speech_Female> us at Facebook dot <Speech_Female> com slash PCH <Speech_Female> on Twitter at <Speech_Female> PCH. <Speech_Music_Female> That brings us to the end of <Speech_Female> our show. Thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you to balal <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and roxana <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for being here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you. Thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you to both of <SpeakerChange> you. And <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of course, thank you for listening <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to pop culture happy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hour from NPR

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"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:23 min | 3 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"That's the only place

"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

03:03 min | 3 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Smart wool, go far, feel good. Joining me today is frequent NPR contributor and culture writer Bilal Qureshi. Welcome. Thank you, Linda. And also with us is vulture TV critic roxana hadadi, hello roxanna. Hey Linda. So Mississippi masala first came out in 1991. It was written by Sunni tarapur vala and directed by Mira nair. The two had collaborated in 1988 on the Oscar nominated film Salaam Bombay. In Mississippi masala, we meet Mina, a woman played by sarita choudhury, who's Indian family lived in Uganda until the Indian population of the country was mostly expelled during the dictatorship of Idi Amin. They live in a few places, but they end up in Mississippi, where Amina's parents are eager for her to get married and are in the process of trying to find an appropriate Indian husband for her. But one day, she has a car accident and it must be said a meet cute with young Demetrius, who owns a carpet cleaning business and is played by Denzel Washington.

Bilal Qureshi roxana hadadi hello roxanna Mississippi Linda Oscar nominated Salaam Bombay sarita choudhury Mira nair NPR Mina Idi Amin Uganda Amina Demetrius Denzel Washington
"mississippi" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

05:06 min | 7 months ago

"mississippi" Discussed on The Experiment

"Stepdad at this church, and that's the church my stepdad grew up going to. And so I've always been thinking about this church. This church is famous in American history. After you get out of the gravel driveway, there's a little walkway. It's not a grand entrance. It's a very quaint, simple southern brick church. Maybe it's and there's these wooden cues. Throughout, there's these stained glass windows. So in mount Zion's fellowship, all there are these framed newspaper clippings that archive the civil rights crime that happened here. In 1964..

"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

"Helicopters flying overhead. There was no way out. Let me get on these or you can take him all illinois didn't realize he was ice at first. She thought the police were just arresting. Someone karen does in prosciutto when they pass a said in thoughtless case yet on tra- hooky Anthony davis imbecile at your casselman. Aziz muscle went through a hokey out in the burbs so is agents line. The workers up and they congratulated themselves for job. Well done giving themselves high-fives brasilia hip to domino. Though they will meet us. Know jalen the same type of raid was happening in the plant. Were you sing. It was as she was taken in by ice. She thought to herself that's it. It's all over labrador. Army sort of broker yonkers quijano saudi arabia associates. Which are benneteau. Lagarde's battle gilbert kimmy. Cpr will not allow artisanal. Yes and you had worked at the plant for years along with her husband they had never heard of an immigration raid in this part of the country and when it finally happened it took them completely by surprise. And there's some context here that's important understand. These plants had claimed that they had used e verify to check work eligibility. This is a government system that allows employers to confirm the eligibility of employees to work in the united states. however later it was revealed that the system hadn't been used the way it was supposed to the chicken processing plants had been hiring undocumented workers for years and nothing had ever happened. So you send you and many others didn't feel. There was a risk of being detained or deported. How pregnant were you do baena. Say's methods barroso. Who's in but also loo throwing a musician at the time. Yes enya was six months pregnant. Yeah this bliss on specified omolo to lonzo Me man known him on these bs ideals goto case substantive unfermented missy was handcuffed as she wondered. What have i done wrong. I'm just trying to take care of my children. She was like go later that day. Along with other single mothers who were taken in it's unclear. What the criteria was. But i says agency released more than three hundred people on humanitarian grounds soon after the rates this and yet was also let go by ice agents because she was pregnant but her husband. Did you see your husband when he was being detained. What was that like whereas nosair just empty whiskey. Gamay walk out of solar when omega. This is a moment orca priscilla tool that. The needle astounded the missing feared that her husband wouldn't come back. Nuncio may dosages death gold threatening with donges. Jody gable yesterday. Joel mir supposedly brea so says Gay it must've via you'll see on tv. Casey yellow border. Maria karake sola seahorse. Your husband was detained for six months and missed the birth of his child. Did you tell them that. Your wife was about to give birth On low allies. He made he. Don't get another as a gabriel. With when this husband tried to tell is agents that he was going to miss. The person of his child told him there was nothing they could do. How many days ago were you released from the tension. A banana say those was released. Just a couple of days before we visited them. You feel missio. Phillies content always circle miller pocono momentum. He's happy to be back with his family. He really thought he will never see them.

yonkers quijano saudi arabia a gilbert kimmy Anthony davis jalen baena brasilia Aziz Lagarde karen illinois barroso enya Army donges goto Jody gable Joel mir missy Casey yellow Maria karake
"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

"Than one hour struggle time. She told us historian for life is especially hard. It's complex and tragic. But in spite of all that is lived through. She kept looking ahead in chicken processing plant for years single mother struggling to raise her three young children and then on august seventeenth nineteen. Okay you go to work on a normal day. The work which probably gives you some kind of semblance of normality and what happens on that day. What time where you going into work. They are less ala singh. Cool on the lemoignan. You open us. In the ass. Sonia cookie. They'll send monarchical moment seo kilometers from lithonia. Give him up us. Ed told us that she woke up at five thirty. Am like she does most mornings. She says that she can heart premonition. She had been dreaming that she was being chased by is agents kilos. Nina stubborn bandana in this declared the he started example. Look good news. He so in the sunday they use the what i'm before. She left for work that day to take her three kids. There were sleeping in the room and elena suddenly thought what will happen to them. If i didn't come back today but she had committed to giving co worker right at the plant so she drove into work started filling up boxes which imparts eddin elicit equipment. They sing.

ala singh Sonia cookie lithonia Ed Nina elena
"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

"Lived. And that's where. She gave birth to her first daughter. In march of two thousand six million mugniyah book of if not the neha nother amy. The whole skill aena quarterback neil putting in the hospital where she gave birth the nurses toltar- that they wouldn't release her baby to her because she didn't have a car seat for the baby. One child can't take care of another. The nurses told her at some point. You make a decision to move to mississippi. How'd you end up here. I you me. Catala cutter man made a medical again. Mortared lower. Who's has been alina told us that. She had an aunt in forest mississippi. He gabby competitiveness canoe. Sydney cancel nice little myth. Ese battle seven. So when atlanta got to mississippi she started living with her aunt who shared a place with another woman and her son but then a week later kind of suddenly a lena's aunt up and left the lesson. Yoga elephant manami. The amid the i affect the woman living with elena told her that her aunt had left town with a man. No senate committee who nada Tra- hooky coasters. No metlife do better sell more than be your daily. The woman told elena that she had paid her at fifteen hundred.

mugniyah mississippi Catala cutter neil alina Sydney atlanta lena elena metlife senate
"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Latino USA

"Immigrants from latin america have taken up many of the jobs in the meatpacking industry nationally immigrants. Make up more than half of the workforce at meat packing plants remember. Mississippi is home to dozens of chicken processing plants and the number of plants in that state has doubled over the past ten years. Oh we speak english. Your is for usa on npr. Okay there is one single man who could take some credit for the original arrival of latina and latino workers in in this part of mississippi. Ice lewis hanna. American chilean american citizen. Having leaving here in morton this economy by thirty years. I i read about loose. Cut the hang. While researching his reporting trip we arrive at his house in a leafy area surrounded by trees about fifty yards away from local highway outside of more than he's chilean tv welcomes us with the big smile inside. He's leaving ruin the tv's blasting to land television channel young. The hina came to the us following. His brother was the first one in his family to arrive. So i arrive in november. The fifth nineteen ninety when he arrived lease wasn't able to work as an agricultural technician which was his background in chile. So instead he got a job at a poultry company. Pc rogers driving jack. That's one of those vehicles. Used to live pal. Factories seen them before until the plan was very short people buried people. They need more workers. Sunday people from here in this area. They didn't want to work really because poultry plant. Job is a hard your f- berry hard. These is a recurring comment..

lewis hanna latin america npr Mississippi morton mississippi us hina Pc rogers chile jack
"mississippi" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

The World and Everything In It

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on The World and Everything In It

"A better person and a lot of people. Sign a lot of different. Cheyenne jimmy and i can see a change in may and that's that's all that matters. Rachel says she may be behind bars but she is a free woman now. South mississippi correctional institution doesn't have a seminary program yet but at brett jones's resentencing hearing a prison unit manager who oversaw jones testified about his behavior. He noted jones earned his ged. That jones got along with others worked hard at various chores like mopping and waxing floors but jones still received a jail sentence after his supreme court appeal. That didn't change. The supreme court decided six three in favor of the state of mississippi justice. Brad kavanagh wrote the opinion joined by justices roberts alito gorsuch and barrett justice. Thomas wrote a concurring opinion. The opinion said the language of miller and montgomery is clear. There is no requirement to make a finding of permanent incorrigible. Ity and so the court is not going to do that here. Not going to add that requirement. Here's a quote from the opinion in some the court has unequivocally stated that a separate factual findings of permanent incorrigible -bility is not required before a sentence or imposes a life without parole sentence of a murderer under eighteen. The opinion went on to say that an explanation on the record meaning. An implicit finding is also not required. Just a soda. My aura filed a dissent joined by justices briar keagan. The descent pointed out that. Although miller and montgomery did not say finding is required. That is what they meant to hold. Otherwise is to gut those cases jail. Wop should be off the table except in extreme circumstances they do not want juveniles who are transient immature to be punished forever. By a snap decision the descent went into great detail about the circumstances of jones's life like the trauma of his childhood. And what happened after the crime like the fact that he tried to revive grandfather with cpr and when he couldn't went to find his grandmother to tell her what happened we weren't able to talk with jones's attorney david shapiro. He said he's not commenting on the case but chrissy noble who argued on behalf of mississippi shared her reaction to the opinion. She has to i. She's pleased that there's now clarity on the issue. The lower courts were confused about how to apply the law but she also had this reaction. My second reaction is probably Not the one you or your listeners would expect but i was actually very extremely upset and as someone who doesn't cry very often. I cried a lot more than i would like to admit not happy. Tears this so-called win was harder to take than the losses because really what the decision means. Is that fred jones. Who was a kid. That was truly letdown. Every step of the way and yes committed a terribly terribly. Tragic crime when he was fifteen is going to die. In present not result is just deeply disquieting to me two weeks after the jones decision. Noble resigned from the attorney general's office. She changed jobs. Switch sides so to speak so now work for the mississippi office of capital post conviction council which provides representation to indigent parties under sentences of death in post conviction proceedings. Noble says all americans should care about juveniles in prison with no hope of a parole hearing. We of course have been kids and many of us have kids. And i will personally say i hope. State legislature addresses the issue in abolishes juvenile life without parole. It's something our legislature has tried to do. Not a hope. One day we'll at the start of two thousand twenty one thousand four hundred sixty five. People were serving a juvenile life without parole sentence. That's according to a survey conducted by the sentencing project as noble mentioned. A state can pass a statute. Barring such sentences and most have mississippi is only one of a few states that has not that could change and even if it doesn't not all hope is lost law professor barry so he could always bring a habeas claim and he could always ask for compassionate release so the governor could come new. I mean there's always a way out. Maybe the court's opinion also cracked a door open for jones and those like him to bring what is known as an eighth amendment as applied claim. Meaning he can argue. The eighth amendment is unconstitutional. In his specific individual case byron. Johnson is head of the baylor institute for studies of religion. He's researched prisons for thirty years. You know a lot of people think the system needs to be cancelled. I'm not one of them. I believe the system needs to be reformed. One of those reforms intermediate sanctions. many judges. Feel like they don't have a menu to look at in terms of what we do so it's either give someone probation are lock them up for significant amount of time but i think the vast majority of judges that i have interviewed would say i would love to have intermediate kinds of things that i could do. But i feel like my hands are tied and probation doesn't give enough. T- intermediate sanctions could include intensive probation. Where they're not just checked in on once every month or two but they're checked in you know repeatedly and you stay with people. Johnson says mentoring is critical in one. Study that we did. The people that were successful post release had mentors in their lives from visits that they had received in prison so in other words i can visit you in prison. And i'm gonna stick with you when you get out. A lot of people make that promise. They're not able to live up to it for those inmates that had mentors in prison and then they carried over they got out. They were much more likely to live. Crime-free continued mentorship after release is key but often that's when it stops. You have people that are willing to go into prisons but you. You very rarely have people that are willing to work with people on the outside. It's a tragic irony in some ways. Working with people in a correction environment is.

jones Cheyenne jimmy South mississippi correctional brett jones Brad kavanagh roberts alito gorsuch barrett justice bility briar keagan mississippi supreme court montgomery david shapiro chrissy noble miller mississippi office of capital Noble Rachel fred jones Thomas
"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Nearly a century ago the united states saw the most destructive river flood in its history the great mississippi flood of nineteen twenty seven the flooding stretched from illinois all the way down to louisiana and in one part of the mississippi. The river stretched eighty miles wide. The disaster took the lives of approximately five hundred people and displaced hundreds of thousands. Herbert hoover called it. The greatest peacetime calamity in the country's history it ended up costing the feds about a third of their budget more than a trillion dollars in today's terms. So the army corps of engineers built a bunch of levees up and down the mississippi river but then just ten years later it flooded again. The problem was just too big to understand. So when lieutenant eugene rebelled propose an idea that would allow the army corps of engineers to actually see what was going on to understand the problem. They went for it. They wanted to have this model. Because it's important to know that if you can strapped something here. Are you having unintended consequences somewhere else. Whether that's driven by the flooding conditions the driving the low flow drought conditions whether that's having environmental impacts. Are you reducing access for fishermen. So there's a lot of things that go into. It said this physical model and a time before computers was a great way to kind of fully encompass see the impacts to the watershed just a few years after that second big river flood. The location for the river model was acquired and the site was actually next door to a prison of war. Camp in nineteen forty three when the construction began a lot of the earthworks and subsurface drainage systems were built by the prisoners of war that were housed at camp clinton. There's some interesting stories from the locals in clinton about interacting with with the prisoners of war and escapes and things like that but they were given it was it wasn't mandated that they do this. They were. They were paid and canteen script to do this. Work the engineers who worked on this model woodhouse with the difficult project of figuring out what had happened. In those previous floods in the hopes of preventing future ones so to start they laid down materials which mimicked the physical terrain of the earth and then to simulate rainfall and they used inflow controllers and there were hundreds of emplo controllers throughout the model. Because if you think about it. It doesn't always rain uniformly across the entire. Us all at the same time all with the same intensity so you could program Kind of using the same technology as automatic piano players were their re-stimulating or or calibrating maybe a historic event. Sarah said that after plenty of testing they started to see just how accurate this model was proving to be. They matched within Tens of feet of recorded data so they felt pretty confident that as far as historic events They were getting the same results. Once they felt confident about the model's accuracy they could start running theoretical situations. They'd play out different. Severe rainfall scenarios and respond. This help them see some of those unintended consequences of flood mitigation. They finally had the bird's eye view that they needed to achieve their goal. What's going to resolve the issue with the least amount of impact to our citizens and those that were called to protect Some would say it's kind of it had to be incredibly difficult job to not only not the model impart probably was really fun to kind of troubleshooting problems like that's the heart of engineering but then to to say with confidence to someone that's going to have to operate those flood ways. Yes i'm a hundred percent confident. This will resolve your issue. That had to be incredibly difficult decision at. I know it can't be taken lightly by anybody that uses any of this information even today to make decisions like. I don't think anybody takes takes those decisions lightly. Sarah a mississippi transplant. I learned about the model. We'll brainstorming with some of our previous colleagues about community projects at first they were talking about helping neighborhoods. Get bike lanes or running trails then Someone else mentioned well in our own backyard. We have this really cool historical river basin model. And we're really what is that like. That's i'm not from the state. So i had no idea but then the more people you talk to an earlier they said. Oh yeah i remember. When i was a teenager i went out there or yeah. My dad used to work through the army corps. Worked out there. And then they told the story of camp clinton the prisoner of war camp and how the model is built and we were like. This is just too cool. Let's at least go during lunch one day and go miss the site. And that's how sarah and the friends of the mississippi river basin model found. It would start it as a cleanup day turned into a nonprofit organization with some big goals of its own. Well we're hoping you know if we could ever get a portion of the model kind of restored maybe not to scientific calibration but we would like to do the mississippi delta. We'd like to be able to have like a pump and water system where we can just run water through the mississippi delta which is obviously close to our heart being so nearby But just show what it looks like. Once the water over tops the levy At those locations completely theoretical and again not scientific but just to to physically apply what the model used to do said they could see it in a perfect world. Sarah says they'd have enough money for a science center for kids to engage with engineering software and actually work with the model inaction earth. My parents being engineers. I was extremely blessed to have the type of upbringing that challenged my thought. That never said. I couldn't do anything i wanted to do. I just wanna give children. That don't have the same resources and privileges. I have access to spin nearing concepts the way that this is a model. But it's also a map. I feel like we could really help. Put forth like geographic literacy at like. We don't always have the connection between where we're at in our geological and our physical features. There's also a real need in the community for access trails and parks. That are for everybody. The friends of the mississippi river basin model are making a lot of headway on that goal. They've cleared trails that you couldn't even see before you just have to be kind of careful or stick to the buffer cleared area around the model that we've we've we've kind of tried to maintain They really if the park is opened onto desk. The models open so you can feel free to go out and explore and they want you to come explore like a giant striding across the mississippi river basin from omaha to.

mississippi army corps of engineers lieutenant eugene clinton Herbert hoover mississippi river Sarah woodhouse louisiana illinois united states mississippi river basin army sarah omaha
"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"No matter what you wanna protect nobody has more experience helping. Keep it safe than adt. Adt has received the most burglar alarm events in the industry and help save more lives than any other home security provider. Adt was named the best home security system of twenty twenty by us news and strategic analytics. Twenty twenty says. Adt is the number one smart home security provider with adt. You get twenty four seven peace of mind from the creators of the home security category. Adt has over twenty thousand employees experienced in helping. Keep you safe and experience matters. That's why millions of people trust. Adt to protect what matters most and keep them safe get all the latest security upgrades from the largest name in home security. Adt stands for quality and timeless protection. Visit adt dot com today. If you took a walk a really long walk from baton rouge to omaha. It's safe to say would definitely take more than sixty minutes in the real world. You'd have to be an enormous giant to do that but at the mississippi river basin model. Everyone's giant that's because the model squeezes sixteen states the parts of those states that are all connected to the mississippi river into a couple hundred acres of space to reference. That's about the size of one hundred fifty football fields there. Ever based model is a physical model Physical hydraulic model of the mississippi river basin. This is sarah mcewen and the reason she knows so much about this model is because she's trying to save it. It doesn't go to the headwaters but it is kind of stops at key points along the tributaries that The mississippi river main line would have had backwater impacts. So you have like tulsa omaha nashville. These are all kind of key points that are the upstream reaches and then you have those rivers that flow down until they converge join the mississippi. And then you have the mississippi all the way down to baton rouge about half a century ago. The city of jackson mississippi took it over from the us army corps of engineers but by nineteen ninety-three. It was completely shut down with no vision for its future. It was in the middle of a park. Say you have soccer field. Do you have go kart track. You have mountain biking trails but to my knowledge besides kind of mowing it initially to keep the trees and education contained. That was really all that was diet. I don't necessarily know if the if the thought was there that this could be something so. The river basin mama sat there dormant for decades. Eventually it was forgotten. It became a kind of secret. Deputy director he came out and he said i had no idea was here in the middle of his park. So it may have just been kind of. It's just so hidden so unless you were from clinton and the time when that area around the model was still mode And you saw it as.

Adt mississippi river basin The mississippi river sarah mcewen baton rouge omaha mississippi us army corps of engineers tulsa football nashville jackson soccer river basin clinton
"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"If you took a walk a really long walk from baton rouge to omaha. It's safe to say would definitely take more than sixty minutes in the real world. You'd have to be an enormous giant to do that but at the mississippi river basin model. Everyone's giant that's because the model squeezes sixteen states the parts of those states that are all connected to the mississippi river into a couple hundred acres of space to reference. That's about the size of one hundred fifty football fields there. Ever based model is a physical model Physical hydraulic model of the mississippi river basin. This is sarah mcewen and the reason she knows so much about this model is because she's trying to save it. It doesn't go to the headwaters but it is kind of stops at key points along the tributaries that The mississippi river main line would have had backwater impacts. So you have like tulsa omaha nashville. These are all kind of key points that are the upstream reaches and then you have those rivers that flow down until they converge join the mississippi. And then you have the mississippi all the way down to baton rouge about half a century ago. The city of jackson mississippi took it over from the us army corps of engineers but by nineteen ninety-three. It was completely shut down with no vision for its future. It was in the middle of a park. Say you have soccer field. Do you have go kart track. You have mountain biking trails but to my knowledge besides kind of mowing it initially to keep the trees and education contained. That was really all that was diet. I don't necessarily know if the if the thought was there that this could be something

Buddy butts park buddy butts park mississippi jackson louisiana minnesota mississippi river basin
"mississippi" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Said this. I'm so why anyone would think some random source on facebook is better than an entire army of physicians healthcare systems. Doctors nurses researchers. Who all want to do is end this data and then meghna chakrabarti today on point the pandemic in mississippi. And what it'll take to turn it around. And we're going to start today with nick juden state reporter for the mississippi free press. He's joining us from jackson. He's been covering the covert stories since the start of the pandemic and we have links to nick's reporting on point radio dot org nick. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Also with us. From jackson as well as dr llewellyn woodward vice chancellor at the university of mississippi medical center dr woodward welcome to you as well thank you so dr woodward extra. I'd like to start with you. Because you just heard that clip from thomas dobbs who was standing at the university of mississippi medical center in the field hospital. They're now can you describe when the field hospital when it went up. And and what's going on in there right now. Certainly and i was standing right by dr dobbs when he made the comment that you aired just a few moments ago so there's been a lot of activity here on the campus over the last week and we were able last week to open field hospital in the lower level of garage be which is one of our own campus. Parking garages This field hospital was opened in collaboration. In conjunction with dr dobson. His team at the state department of health with me mo with the governor's office kind of all parties involved with the concept that bringing in this Federal de met team would help us in our Management of the overflow of these patients all across the state hospitals are simply at capacity there. They're honestly at the breaking point and The federal resources have been very welcome. And we're very thankful for them but there is that you you could hear it in dr dobbs voice. There is that underlying sense of frustration and one of the things that he said that day that that we didn't hear on the clip aired was in fact. He said you know this didn't have to happen. We didn't have to be standing here where we are today Well nick come to you in a second but dr woodward when you say hospitals breaking point what does the breaking point look like at the university of mississippi medical center of i mean if you were to walk through the halls of the hospital now what would you see so there are many components of that in in you know when you think about things like a health system will will fail and will you know what do we mean. Those are words that sound dramatic and very dire but what we mean by that is number one that our capacity is exceeded and that has actually been the case now for some weeks. This is not new capacity has been exceeded and you layer on top of that. The capacity as a state has been exceeded. We are now in a systems of care For transport and transfer across the state of the critical care kovic patients that this is a mandated Situation by the state. Health officer. By dr dobbs so the capacity has been exceeded. The workforce is fatigued. The workforce is also experiencing their own Challenges on any given day. We may have fifty nurses who either or sick themselves. They're in quarantine. They have family members that are sick. They have others that they have to care for so the the Fragility of the workforce is something that fluctuates a little bit from day to day today and win. We get in this position where everybody is full. You have hospitals across the state that are putting out messages to their community and saying. Please do not come to our emergency room. The emergency room is overrun Please don't come to the emergency room and you have hospitals where They are having to or considering having to tell ambulances. I cannot take another so so that's kind of what we mean about. Getting to the breaking point where you just can't make do any more and dr woodward. Have you ever seen anything like this in your career in mississippi. This is the worst stop for saying. So nick we turn back. Oh i'm sorry. Doctor i just wanna turn briefly to to nick. Forgive cutting you off there. I'll come back to you. I promise but but but nick can you. Can you give us a picture of sort of the state of the pandemic right now in mississippi. I mean today the the weekend total was seven thousand eight hundred thirty nine new cases. Now that's i believe the highest weekend total we've ever had. And the bottom line is cases turned into hospitalizations turned into a intensive care hospitalizations and deaths. So there's just no sign of peak until we see the transmission slowing and declining the state of the hospitals the state of the schools. None of it is going to improve so right now. we're we're kind of grasping in the dark. We really are an uncharted territory. Uncharted territory. But wh why is it uncharted though. Because i mean this is nationwide. This isn't the first search. This is what the the fourth or even fifth surge that the united states has seen since the start of the pandemic. so can you just briefly. Give me some of the factors that you think have gone into mississippi being per hit particularly hard right now. Delta is fundamentally different. I mean it is so much more infectious. We're seeing this and in terms of why. Mississippi is.

dr woodward dr dobbs university of mississippi medi nick army of physicians healthcare meghna chakrabarti nick juden mississippi free press dr llewellyn woodward thomas dobbs dr dobson jackson mississippi field hospital department of health facebook united states Mississippi
"mississippi" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

Inquisikids Daily

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"mississippi" Discussed on Inquisikids Daily

"Hi i'm luke and welcome to the increase. its podcast. today is the fourth friday in july. So we're going to find out about another river to date. We have explored rivers in faraway lands. But today we're going to learn about a river that is in the united states the mighty mississippi river the mississippi is one of the longest rivers globally and the second longest river in north america. In fact the word. Mississippi is the native american word for big river flowing through minnesota wisconsin iowa illinois missouri. Kentucky tennessee arkansas mississippi and louisiana. The river covers two thousand. Three hundred fifty miles. It starts at lake tasca in minnesota and empties into the gulf of mexico off the shores of louisiana. It takes water two to three months to travel from lake. I tasca to the gulf of mexico. Interestingly a tributary or a branch of the mississippi that missouri river is longer than the mississippi by about one hundred miles at the most narrow point the mississippi river is only between twenty and thirty feet across. The width is greatest near benham minnesota spanning eleven miles however. Most of the river tends to be around two miles wide. The mississippi river has played a vital role in the history of the united states. I flat boats in barges loaded with many different commodities floated on the river foods like flour pork and corn were whiskey was also traded along the shores of the river since the river is so long a trip down and back could take as long as nine months with the invention of the steam engine. Steamships traveled up and down the river carrying goods back and forth between the port cities. The very first steamship to set sail on the mississippi was in eighteen eleven. It was named the new orleans. These steamships continued to be common on the river until the transcontinental railroads. Completion may travel overland. Easier traffic on the river picked up again at the start of world war one as the government used it to ferry goods today. It is among the busiest of commercial waterways. Oil chemicals coal steel and iron can now be found traveling along. the mississippi. Booster rockets are often ferried on the river. Since their bulk is unsuitable for other means of transport the river serves the people along its path in other ways as well many cities and towns all up and down the mississippi depend on the water provides. It is estimated that almost fifteen million people get their water from this river. The mississippi river also played a significant role in mark. Twain's books huckleberry finn tom sawyer and life on the mississippi other literary works are also said along the mississippi as are many folksongs in addition to the rivers importance to people the mississippi is essential to wildlife as well. There are at least two hundred sixty different kinds of fish swimming in the rivers freshwater. This represents about twenty five percent of all the kinds of fish. in america. there are ten different species of catfish that call the river home. Catfish can reach lengths of more than thirty inches and can weigh up to one hundred pounds. The heavily oxygenated waters are ideal for these fish. Walleye are also plentiful in the upper parts of the mississippi and several varieties of bass can be found in both. The upper and middle regions fisher. Not the only animals that populate the mississippi river area because the river has many diverse habitats birds are plentiful many use the river as a path for migration with about half of all migratory birds in the country using the river route. Canadian geese ducks and swan. All follow the river's path as they make their way to the warmer climates of latin america. Bald eagles can be seen flying over the river and making their nests along the banks other birds frequently spotted are the great blue heron the ivory billed woodpecker and the white pelican. The lower mississippi is home to many reptiles shellfish and amphibians commercial fisherman filled their nets with shrimp blue crab crayfish and other seafood in the river. Delta the american alligator the mississippi diamondback terrapin snakes turtles and frogs can all be found in and around the mighty mississippi. The mississippi river is an integral part of life in america. Don't forget to come back next. Friday as we finish up our exploration of some of the great rivers on earth..

mississippi mississippi river minnesota lake tasca gulf of mexico louisiana america tasca missouri river finn tom sawyer luke Mississippi rivers freshwater arkansas north america