35 Burst results for "Misha"

"misha" Discussed on Band Wives

Band Wives

05:22 min | Last month

"misha" Discussed on Band Wives

"How are you? I'm well. How are you, Misha? I'm doing pretty well. A crazy morning. Tell me about your morning. Well, I have three kids at home. They're all out of school and camp this week, nothing's going on, and usually I've helped with them, but not this week. So it was a crazy morning. I had a meeting at 11, and my four year old daughter just kept opening my office store and peeking it. She was saying something really cute I can't remember. I made your tea, you know, and she has like a little tea cup. So it was a little bit stressful. And then I shoved 6 dumplings in my face, and then joined this haul with you. It's so hard to kick them out when they're cute. Find it much easier when they're tantruming, I just lock the door, bolt it shut. I need bulk, see my office in the house has like barn doors sliding. And the kids just love them anyway.

Misha
"misha" Discussed on Leadership and Success with Coach BZ

Leadership and Success with Coach BZ

04:31 min | 4 months ago

"misha" Discussed on Leadership and Success with Coach BZ

"Automation. And so using artificial intelligence and also for providing a gig economy to people recover expert. And in the navy, I am becoming observed about 72 member Tim. We pretty much manage the navy global network operation support center. It's a pretty big job, but yeah, that's what I do once a weekend a month and two weeks out of the year. It's amazing. So it's interesting that actually quite a few a few members that interviewed most of them kind of a transition, but military background by the transition to kind of corporate world. It's interesting that still kind of straddle both worlds. It's very impressive. And as they see so directly, what's within your purview. Yes. So basically, it's everything that's related to information. Security in our prior to the pandemic that included physical security as well. But I think we're going to be losing our building soon because the last few years as you know everybody has been working from home. As long as they have an Internet connection, they can do their work. But yeah, it's pretty much the entire spectrum of information security. I understand. I understand. And how did you get, can you talk a little bit about some of the previous roles? I just want to get a sense of your career arc. How did you get in the system? Absolutely. Yeah, so I think for me it started in August 1997, and that's a long time ago. I kind of started an IT support, so I was a computer tech. And then I wanted to get into networking. So I became a network analyst and then network engineer. And I was studying back then early 2000 Microsoft service retired system engineer certification was a pretty big deal back then. And one of the time, I think it was about one Microsoft introduced a security concentration called that. So the MCI security. So I got into it, and that's when I realized I really loved security above everything else. So I kind of planned out with a lot of that was at the university of Alabama and in 2005, I think it was I had the opportunity. It was already IT director..

navy Tim Microsoft MCI university of Alabama
"misha" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"misha" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Or sightsee Today they're preparing to drive in 9 tons of humanitarian aid Detergent dishwashing liquid clean we've got beans some pasta I'm gonna warehouse with Vlad bench The tall redheaded volunteer running this mission He helps load supplies all donated into four giant white fans But in the western part of Ukraine they need to prepare for refugees They keep they keep sleeping bags bed linens Bench who works as an economist here made his first humanitarian aid delivery right after the war began Now he's joined by dozens of volunteers like Misha puska ova who's about to jump into a van filled with diapers and baby formula And then we're going to build all of us together one after another in mitochondrial Bench and I jump into another van and the convoy begins its journey to Ukraine You know when the war started I wanted to help somehow I started to call to Slovak institution you know like slow government regional administration and everybody was not very well organized You know I think it was really a shock for everyone No one could believe the war started Yes yes But nobody wanted to deliver the aid to Ukraine One fear is the war itself The other is bureaucracy customs officers sometimes classify the aidus exports clearing this up can take 6 7 hours Paperwork delays are on bench's mind as we arrive at the border with Ukraine A young border guard and fatigues approaches us Is that a Slovak border guard for Ukraine Yep there's a flag Yellow flag Our passports are quickly checked And we drive on to the customs line It is not moving Inside the customs buildings bare bones staffed by exhausted looking men and t-shirts and hoodies Bench hands one of them the convoys paperwork But the customs agent rejects it because of a missing phone.

Ukraine Misha puska
"misha" Discussed on The One You Feed

The One You Feed

05:41 min | 6 months ago

"misha" Discussed on The One You Feed

"And I got to the end of that book and put it on the wall and I was like, I made a good start on that, but I still haven't quite cracked the formula around behavior change. It's a big thing to try and crack. So I started to try and write a book on, okay, then we have another go at thinking around behavior change and trying to find a way of making it accessible and understandable for people. Wrote a first draft, send it off to some Friends. My friend Misha two days later, emailed me and went, I read the first 50 pages of your book. No idea what it's about. It's not very good, is that? You know, everybody knows first drafts suck, but sometimes you don't want to hear it, you kind of don't want to hear it. So I'm picking through the rubble of this draft and the phrase that came out was we unlock our greatness by working on the hard things. I was like, got it. That feels like the thing basis book around. So this is how the worthy goal idea came out. So for the first time in a long time, I was really sitting with the literature and the research around goals. I was like, I don't really like any of this. I don't like smart goals because a smart goal is a formula of reduction in tidying up. Keep it specific. Keep it measurable. Keep it actionable. Keep it timely. It's all about the kind of the logistics and the durability of the goal. Without ever asking, is this the goal? Is this the right goal? Right. And then the other acronym people really know a B hags. Bold, Harry audacious goals. It is another Jim Collins idea. Unlike the bullet cannonball menopause I love, big hags, it's a great hawk, but it tends to be organizational..

Misha Jim Collins Harry
Live updates: National Guard called in to help hospitals

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

Live updates: National Guard called in to help hospitals

"Getting getting used used to to cover cover nineteen nineteen Dr Dr a a Misha Misha Daza Daza is is a a senior senior scholar scholar at at the the Johns Johns Hopkins Hopkins center center for for health health security security but but nineteen nineteen it's it's not not going going anywhere anywhere and and there's there's a a good good chance chance he he says says we we will will all all get get it it but but be be okay okay if if we're we're fully fully vaccinated vaccinated and and boosted boosted you you can can really really go go about about your your life life in in a a way way that that you you could could before before the the pandemic pandemic just just know know that that if if you you do do get get an an inevitable inevitable cobit cobit nineteen nineteen break break their their inspection inspection and and you're you're going going to to get get a a Copa Copa ninety ninety breakthrough breakthrough infection infection with with that that very very it's it's going going to to be be mild mild and and we we are are much much better better prepared prepared than than we we were were a a year year ago ago it it is is a a world world in in which which Copa Copa ninety ninety is is a a rip rip but but a a navigable navigable risk risk using using the the tools tools that that find find the the medicine medicine if if given given I I Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

Dr Dr Misha Misha Daza Daza Johns Johns Hopkins Hopkins Ce Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
"misha" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"misha" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"Moon. Oh my God. I love this 'cause this is what happens and take these gigs and then after about a week they're like, I never want to do this again. Oh, I'm going out in the place. Oh, it was so funny. One time a guy wanted to fight me on a kids show. I did a show and this guy came in late a parent, and I'm like, oh, are you at the buffet or something? And he's like, what? And he charged the stage. He goes, fuck you, motherfucker. I'm like, dude, there are children here. He's like, yeah, go, I'll kick your ass. I'm like, sir, please sit down. And then I got a bad report for this. Because that's what happens. They're not going to ride up the fucking audience. Are they going to write you? Yeah, yeah. Right. At one time, there was a dirty show that years ago, a woman came in late as blond woman with like huge tents and she's like, she was being a little loud. So as she's walking out, I'm like, wow, there's a girl that can deep broke the Lakers, right? And so then she storms out. So I was like trying to get booked back on this ship. So at the end of the week, and it was like, I go up to the cruise director and I'm like, hey man, you know, thank you for having me. It was an honor to do your shit, blah blah blah. So as I'm saying that, I see in my vision, that girl walking towards me, right? So I'm just trying to get my thing out of the way before she gets to me. She gets about 6 feet and goes, I can not de throughout the Lakers. I'm like, well, if you have to say, you know, but yeah, I was gonna say so when you drop yes, thank you, God, exactly. Oh, God. It's just like, it's one after another. All right, so fights this week, by the way, Misha Tate. I know Don you and Misha used to have a thing. She's never had a thing, the Vulcan on. It was the one night joke. It was a joke and then from I got banned from the UFC board. Kind of like you did that night. I watched you at that bar. Yeah. At the bar, was that a casino?.

Lakers Misha Tate Misha Don UFC
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:57 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Out someone else, but I actually think that I want to shout out and there's specific reason for this. I want to shout out my fellow guest Misha. And the reason why I want to do this is because I think that this is really important and give me a second 'cause like I said, I wasn't gonna say this, but so I'm trying to find the exact right words. But I think that it is really, really hard to be open and honest with the things that you are going through, especially when those things are things that people want to hate you for when they're the core of who you are. And I mentioned, I said this before we got before we started recording, but I am 33. And I am queer and I have come to terms with like my queerness, but I never realized how hard it is to actually go out there and speak about this. I talk about this with my friends. Not as much with my family, but we didn't get into that. But it is kind of like we understand what you are, but we're not going to really talk about it so much. And I think that there is something that just is really, really special about being open and honest about your experience that has inspired me to be able to go out there and have these conversations. And I think that it's important that people know that and I highlight you right now because it is something even at 33 that isn't easy for myself and I am inspired by you by the fact that you are able to just be so honest and share your experiences and allow those of us to be inspired by them and be brave and bold. So thank you, Misha. Thanks. Sorry, that was not eloquent at all, because like I said, that just like, but sorry. But mister bubble sounded great. You know, I think Jasmine that I really appreciate you saying that and you know, it also isn't lost on me that you're somebody who might usually be more behind the scenes. You know, and so stepping up in doing an interview like this, this is like risky stuff. I mean, that's true for a lot of my guess, because there are some people who, you know, they're a more front facing person in terms of an actor or whatever. You get used to speaking with media. That's like part of what's going on. It's an actual extension of your job. And then there are guests that I have who will number one have nothing to do with entertainment industry or a writer, you know, or, or whatever it is. And I am always, by the way, sometimes that means sometimes it doesn't sometimes it's hard to do this podcast because the person that I'm speaking to is like, somebody who doesn't have media fluency. And so we're both trying so hard to meet each other, but it's like a newer skill set. But I always appreciate it because I think otherwise we could get into a zone, especially on a show like this where we think that it's easy to talk about this stuff, because and again, I'm not saying, oh, it's easy for Misha. It's just it is going to be part of Misha's job where it is part of my job to talk about this. And I kind of appreciate the, you know, the spectrum of having people on who, like, this is new for them to talk about themselves because I think for listeners, you know, you know, my listeners live all over the place. They do all different types of jobs. I think it would be so othering. Anytime you listen to the show, everybody was like, you know, if everybody was Alexander, it's like, you need you need Alexander. And then you need not Alexander. 'cause I think we need the example. And then we also need like the example. We need the example of the non struggle, and then we also need the example of the struggle. I think it's really important to me. As a queer person to see that. Yeah, no, it really is a not to put too fine a point on something that's making me turn red, which has been, but it's one of those things where I feel very passionately as I build a career like you were saying in the public eye as it were. It's very important to me to do things like girl in the Woods like when it comes to my writing and my producing aspirations as well to continue to create content like this, not just because it's groundbreaking and not just because it speaks to me personally deeply as a queer person. My mission is vocabulary. My mission is I need want desire that young queer people, people starting with mental health, young people in general grow up, they watch something like girl in the Woods or they watch something even more kind of innocuous in like a Sesame Street level way. And they see queerness, they see otherness. They see these things on screen. So then they feel more than comfortable asking their parents about it talking to their family about it talking to their friends about it. So vocabulary just kind of infiltrates everybody's minds, and it becomes kind of a non issue hopefully by the time that they're an adult and discovering their identity. That to me is a perfect vehicle for the entertainment industry. And that's what I hope I do for the rest of my life in this industry..

Misha Alexander
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:49 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"And these sorts of things are not. We're not lost on Kristen. And they were part of the conversation. And so it's really great when people pick up on that because. Every single detail of the show is very, very thought out. And you know, you hope that someone from the audience sort of is able to grab onto that. Shout out to Kristen Ritter. It's really a great job helping to establish these characters because I love them. I mean, that's also very interesting. You know, she's played in so many different types of shows that it is cool to see somebody's experience pay off in their ability to pay attention to detail like that. I love that. And I do think that it's really amazing to have that character that was sort of like, stop asking me to prom, be like the actual object of somebody's affection as opposed to the person that makes you squirrely. You're trying to get away from. And that's a huge change. And you know, I definitely appreciate it, and I know there's going to be a lot of people who do. Well, you two, this has been such a beautiful conversation. I loved meeting both of you. You're a sweetheart. Thanks. And before I send you back into your day, I just wanted to ask you both to shout out aquiro, which is a person place or thing that made you feel that you can be who you are today. So what would both of you like to shout out a queer? You go first, Misha. Oh, thank Jasmine. Thank you. So there's entertainment industry as folks that I could shout out. But this a similar question was asked me yesterday and it popped into my brain and now it's too magical. I have to use it again. I one of my first big Gates was a stage show in New York. It was a stage version of clockwork orange. And this show in itself was very mass and very muscly. We were all with a gym all the time and, you know, of course, the femme side of my brain was exploding because it wasn't being used. But I had a castmate who identifies completely outside of any gender or sexual binary and that was pretty new for me at the time. And so Alexander, when we would go out into these like queer spaces in Brooklyn and go dancing and all of that. And Alexander was so free and there was never any question that they always spell outside of all the binaries, and that's where they felt most free and fun. And it was such a trial by fire sort of immersion lesson in me realizing that that was possible. So that person really changed the course of my life, especially when it came to marrying my gender identity with my public persona. So I credit Alexander, and I'm very grateful that I'm at that human. Oh, that's beautiful. Oh, that is beautiful. You know, I'm gonna. I'm just gonna shout.

Kristen Ritter Kristen Misha Jasmine Alexander Gates New York Brooklyn
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

09:28 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Gonna be dead. Yeah. But is this something, you know, because you're talking about the layers and character development? I mean, do you have favorites in this in this genre or do you have something that you hope that you get to make that more reflects some characters that you'd like to see? I know for me, I just. Like, why I mean, because it's also so many characters are queer coded, you know, and then it's like, like, Sarah Connor, come on, Sarah Connor, like, get you for sure. Have a kid, and that's great, but you can have another partner later. I think Sarah Connor is for sure. There's like, come on, like, for sure. Gotta be. Gotta be. Gotta be gotta be. To answer your question, yes, there are a lot of there are a lot of things that I want to eventually make. Unfortunately, I can't just snap my fingers and be like, hey, this is the thing that I want to make. There are a lot of different layers that go into being able to make a show and a lot of people who are above me and whatever the sense I'm not just talking about like above me a crip, but I mean like at the studio level at the network level who are the buyers who make the decisions who honestly still those circles are not as inclusive as they should be. So I think that sometimes it can be can be hard to sort of still get people to prioritize having a queer person as the lead or even like speaking as myself like a black woman. I wanna do like I'm gonna black queer, badass. Like, I want it. And I want to be responsible for putting it out there, you know? I love girl in the Woods and I love what we've done. I would love, you know, the Buffy that is a person of color. That would be fantastic to me. And I would love it if I was the one to put that out there into the world. We're getting closer, but yes, I definitely do want to be making more of that content. And it is stuff that I have things that I'm actively working and developing on. But it's, like I said, it's not as simple as just saying, I want to do this. There's a larger engine and we all need to be a part of the conversation and a part of making the change to make sure that people are able to see themselves in leading roles. Not just a sidekicks in leading roles, because you do have, I do think that the parts are getting much juicier, but I still are not like number one on the call sheet, which something to talk about. Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, this, this is why. I personally recommend YouTube compilation videos of queer characters from television shows because that is the only way that we get to be main characters in every show, isn't that like somebody, some like teen? Yeah. In like, it often rushes. They Russia. Yeah. Some teen in Russia is like pouring over footage and editing it together. And I and I fucking watch those because I think sometimes I can't stand to sift through the filler of the street central. Or comment TV show. Real. You know, what I'm saying? Misha, I want to ask you about being out as an actor and what that is like for you and how that evolved for you. Has that, how new is that? That's quite new. I came out as non binary like to the world over the pandemic. Namely, because we all had time to sit and think about our existential crisis. So that's what came to me. But it also happened for me in the middle of press for my previous project that happened in the middle of me promoting a film. And I was lucky that the queer, it was a horror film. So I was lucky that the queer horror community excepted me with open arms. I was lucky that this is Hollywood. So to the extent that Hollywood can be accepting they were and I was also lucky that I had a good supportive group of friends, but what's funny is that I've always had two sides of this. I have compared my undeniable privilege of having a built in family support system and professional network of people that were also supportive of me being non binary and be and being out about it and wanting to implement it into my career. And then I also am like everybody else, you know a target for online trolls the offhanded miss genderings, all of these things that naturally happen when you announce that you no longer fall inside the gender binary. It's been amazing for me in that roles like the end this is not even just pumping up the show for no reason. Roles like girl in the Woods came my way because I was speaking my truth in real life, therefore a role that was very much my truth in in fiction came my way. So that was incredible, but it's been fascinating to revel in and enjoy the freedom of living my femme nonbinary self, while also whether it's talking to other queer people in the entertainment industry that haven't had that experience with their queerness or you know, even like in a way that phase me not much at all. We started to get comments on girl in the Woods socials posts about why XYZ is this actor that annoys me because of their queerness because of their insert homophobic or transphobic rhetoric here. And got it? Yeah, but it's overall I felt very supported and I felt very lucky and I can honestly say that I just I've never been happier in my life. Because I wake up every morning and make decisions whether it's outward appearance or inward gesticulating or how my voice sounds or anything. I make I make decisions based on what I want to see from myself in the world no longer through the framework of what muscle T will make me look most mask for this audition. You know what I mean? Yeah, I do. And you know, it's also interesting because the I mean, even in terms of like, and I don't know, in terms of the way that you wear your hair in this show. Sure. And the way that the clothes that you're wearing, it's like a throwback. So you look like in this show to me, you look like a trope from the 80s. That I grew up with, who is like the sort of best friend character like ducky from pretty in pink. That you that the main character is like not gonna take seriously or hook up with. And it is interesting to look back on that and sort of see, first of all, that's how I actually dress like ducky from brilliant. You would be both shamelessly true like bolo ties. Anyway, like I found out a couple years ago and I was like, oh, yeah. But, you know, it's like it is interesting catching up with ourselves because obviously, you know, it's not. It wasn't where we are now where there's like this push to actually name what that person is and then also cast an actor who shares that identity. But we've kind of always been trying to do this or at least I mean, those are the most I grew up with. So always, you know, from my consciousness, that we've always had this type of character who is like, assigned male at birth, but had cool hair and welcoming friend energy. I just was struck by that. I don't know. I hadn't really thought about it until seeing also, by the way, this also exists for their assigned female birth characters at this exist for two. Like kind of anything Mary's root Masterson ever played. But I'm also even thinking about what's her name, Beth in girl in Stranger Things, is that you know what I'm talking about? There is always going to be the sidekick trope and there's really harmful things in really fun things about that. But I will say that that 80s big curly hair denim jacket, secret fishnets underneath vibe that was no one throughout this show. It was never lost on me that I was kind of an homage to the 80s friend and the 80s best friend. And what I like about this show is that we take we take your reference. We put it on a plate. We do some really weird shit with it. Or some hot sauce on it. And then serve it up because it's different now. But that's really cool. It's beautiful. I gotta give a shout out to Kristen Ritter. 'cause she put a lot of thought into the looks of all of the characters..

Sarah Connor Russia Hollywood Misha YouTube Woods Masterson Beth Mary Kristen Ritter
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

04:15 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Because you said when you were talking that you, you know, you're invested in genre TV. What did you grow up watching that made this something that an area of specific focus? Or is it an area of specific focus for you? You know, it's interesting. I didn't grow up watching a ton of horror specifically, I am not sure. I'm not sure how I ended up here. I think I discovered my way here just through the process of branching outside of what it is that you're sort of told and made to watch, whether it's, for me, like, my parents and things like that, what they would buy, what they would put on TV, what they would allow to be on their television. That kind of thing. And then as you get older and you start watching other kinds of content, I was like, wait, wait, wait. This was all wrong. There's a whole genre of stuff out here that I just really, really love. And it's not specifically horror. I also love sci-fi, quite a bit. But genre in general, I just think that what you can do with the genre, the way that you can build worlds or you can use monsters or whatever it is, and I've said this before and I will say it again because I want people to really understand this. It should always be used as sort of the icing on the cake for either talking about very deep character development or very deep themes. And that's what gets me. I grew up loving reading. I was super into very, very kind of soapy YA books I read all of the, when I was super young, all of the babysitters clubs, all of all of the ones that everybody reads, but because of that, I just love character and I love drama. And when you add monsters or some sort of big crazy world on top of it, I think that what you do is you sort of trick a little bit, people into coming in and thinking they're getting just pure entertainment, but you're walking away, having a deeper conversation, which I think is really important and something that I think is unique to genre content. Right. Well, I mean, no argument there for me. Although although horror horror is not my is not the place I feel the most comfortable. It's something I'm obsessed with. Like, have I seen a lot of horror movies know, but I can tell you the plots to all of them and I can describe some film stills to you. But sci-fi, specifically, I absolutely love. And I will also say that I think that sci-fi has got has like one of my favorite movies in the whole world is alien. Because it's fine with me if an alien is behind you in the mirror. That's actually fine with it. It's just like can't be ghost. Aliens are great. Season two we'll figure out how to get aliens in the door. But you know, it's always I think that's something that sci-fi specifically has done a pretty good job with over generations now is that an action or the two places that I have found interesting women? That's where I have found the most interesting, specifically straight white women. You know, like Ripley, God, God, aren't we sad? That she's not one of ours. That's sadistic. You know, I don't something I haven't seen in, you know, it could just be that I've missed it. And I am dying for that show or that property that has a central queer character in the sci-fi and action space. It's like, I'm sort of that exists in what is that Shirley surround movie where she does all the stunts and then the cameraman does all the stunts. I'm talking about atomic. Yep. She's queer, but it's like she's only queer so that somebody can be dead. And can I get that on a T-shirt? She's.

Shirley
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:20 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Also, can I just say that one of the worst things that this show did to me? And I'm pretty upset with about this Jasmine, so I'm hoping you can is it did the thing where a character is looking in the mirror? And they see something behind them that they can't see that's in the room with them. And I just want you to know that one of my worst fears and I'm pretty upset that you put that in the show, and I just wanted to ask you if you too are afraid to look in mirrors or if that's just like easy for you. And if you teach me your ways. I can not, I can not say that that is one of my fears. Although it was on the day that we shot that because it's just the monster's creepy and the situation. And it's a real actor. That's a real actor doing that. It's not CG, it's not oh yeah, you can tell with sex. Come on. I got it. I got a good monster sniffer. I know when we talk in practical effects. That is a really good scare and I've had a few people who have watched the show back or seen the trailer because there's a shot of that in the trailer who are like, nope. Not today. Not just here. No, I don't like that part, and I'm wondering if you would consider taking it out. No, not taking it out, but providing viewers with a buddy that looks in the mirror for them. After watching that. Okay. We will go at peacock TV everyone, go to them and demand that they send them a buddy. Absolutely. That sounds great. You're right. I'm sure peacock will do that. Yeah, I'm not NBCUniversal. They've got much bigger much number of pockets. Much bigger harm, they can do that. If you know me, you know I love underwear that's made by tomboy X seriously. They're advertising and I love when they advertise. Since 2014, tomboy X has been making brazenly unapologetic underwear for all bodies all shapes all.

NBCUniversal peacock
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:27 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I don't know. This is gonna sound interested just as somebody who, you know, I'm in recovery for co dependency myself. And I have many people in my life were in recovery for other things. And I think that for me, sometimes watching something like. Where Gen Z actors or characters are experimenting with like an access to drugs that is different than it has been in other areas. It's like a part of, I mean, we're in the legalized weed era. It seems like a part of being a young person that it's different when it's legal versus when it was illegal when I was growing up and I think I just it's something I often wonder about is if the normalization of a young person using without sort of exploring the fullness of what that experience can end can be for somebody can do damage sometimes. I'm gonna say, I love the show euphoria. I also think it kind of makes drugs look super fucking fun and it is a mixed message. Oh, yeah. It makes it look cool. Yeah. And it's also like, what a beautifully acted show, what a beautiful show to watch. It's got a lot to give, but it does make drugs look really fucking fun. Yeah. And no, it's absolutely. And I think that's I would hope that's almost everybody's takeaway from something like euphoria because that's TV. And we are in the entertainment industry above all else, which unfortunately it does become above all else, but I will say that for me, one of the reasons I was so excited about that scene and excited to see a really down and dirty impulse driven and I'm upset, therefore I'm turning to drugs moment for Nolan is to start like everything else in the show, like the classism that's addressed in the show with being in a small mining town. Like the racial elements of the show when it comes to Tasha and Tasha's father dealing with what it means to be part of this town. I hope and I know that crypt hopes that it starts a conversation. It doesn't have to bust it open and provide the answer, but clearly this team that's struggling with gender identity is upset and just turning to copious amounts of drugs to deal with that. Right then and there in addition to being entertaining in addition to having monsters pop out of fucking nowhere and scare the living shit out of you, it's also a conversation starter. So..

Tasha Nolan
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Well, that's really lovely. Amazing. I also will say I too am fan thing because so I was just saying, to Jasmine before you join that I got to get, you know, like an early screening like I got 5 episodes and I do have peacock but I didn't realize it's not out yet. And when I got to the end of the 5th episode, I was like, well, you can't stunt on me. PR company because I'll just switch over and watch the rest of it. That's a very good thing. That's what you want when somebody's yes. First of all, when they watch all the episodes because, you know, I'm sent a lot of stuff and sometimes that stuff just doesn't get all the way watch. You know what I'm saying? Yes, yes. But I watch all of it. And then I was super bummed that I have to wait until October 22nd, just like a regular person to find out more. And here's my immediate. So the show is called girl in the Woods and the thing that my immediate reaction to it is that let's see Jasmine. You and I were talking a little bit age before we should join. We should I think you are too young. For this. Oh no, what's the reference? What's the reference? No, it's not a bad reference. This is what it is. It's, you know, Buffy the Vampire Slayer was so important in my high school years. And I understand that maybe you've seen it, Misha. But like, yes. You're a younger person than I am. And when I'm 39, I'll be 40, like next week. And when I was when I was in high school, like there were kind of two things you could watch that I'd like any queer representation at all. One of them was this show called young Americans that like a very, very young Kate medic was on. There's gonna be somebody who loves this reference. It was on for like, I don't even know. It could have been four episodes. It was just like one of those things, right? Obviously, there was also my so called life, really important. One season. One season, right. And so we got these sort of flash in the pan shows that really mattered to me, but what was great about Buffy is that it was on forever and it had these wonderful and well developed queer characters that you could grow with. And also, it took a minute for them to be introduced because of the timing that was when it was coming out that totally tiptoe. And I will also see this. I'm scared of everything like hocus pocus is really my is too scary for me. It's like actually over my line. That's a very low threshold. That's why I'm sharing it with you. It's vulnerable. I apologize. I can't be a good judge. So when I was watching Buffy, it was like a real stretch. But I'm like sit through it to be like, this is, I mean, I didn't even know why I loved it so much. I just was like, that Allison hannigan is a talented actor. So zoom forward to know. And, you know, the characters in this show are like very immediately introduced as there's like queerness, there's like gender stuff going on. There's you find out more over time, but just as a person who's in the community, like I saw it immediately and so that's really what I want to start with is for you, Misha, what was it like being a part of that world? And do you have things in your life that were this for you? Yeah, I mean, I'm not gonna lie and say that, you know, that a lot of it was play pretend because of course a lot of it was on set because it's a TV show, and this is a production, but I am and non binary individual. I am now currently sober because I spent quite a few years struggling with addiction. And, you know, I still do. That's why I'm actively sober and active late in recovery. And there's so much about the character that I played Nolan that just was by the book in some way, shape or form what young Misha grew up dealing with. So to get the audition, first of all, when an actor gets that audition in an email, you're like, holy shit, it's mine, I have to do it. But the real magic was the process. And I say this so much and it's because I mean it so much that from doing hour after hour zoom callbacks with the team with Kristen Christopher director to try to shape. So cool. I mean, I don't know her. She's somebody, like, haven't met, but feel very sure that she's the coolest. She's she's the coolest and she's the definition of happy to be here. In that, yeah, on set, she's ready to play. She knows how to kill it. She knows what TV worked and that we have a schedule to work on, but she's there to have so much fun. And it was so clear every single day. So blessing, but for sure. Yeah. But between her, we have an amazing queer trans powerhouse showrunner, Casey, who would sit down with me and, you know, I just lines and talk about tiny details like what memes, no one would end up scrolling through. Things that really do matter to somebody who's playing like as much as we can possibly inject into it authentically Gen Z teenager, that's dealing with gender identity. The process start to finish with such a team effort in the best way. And I felt like I had such a voice in making Nolan, but also such guidance would set from such an amazing team to make this character as humanly got Gritty as possible. And I was so grateful that that was my gift for the rest. Yeah, there's a specific moment that stands out to me and I can't remember what episode it's in, but it's the moment where.

Misha Kate medic Allison hannigan Jasmine Kristen Christopher Nolan Casey
"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

03:29 min | 10 months ago

"misha" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"I will have a conversation soon with Jean up on my Instagram and then also hear on query ruby's collars really jingling in the background. So if you hear that, that's just life happening. Anyway, thanks, enjoy the episode. Careless. I always have guests introduced themselves on the show. Would you both introduce yourself? There's something. I don't know what it is about being asked to introduce yourself that sends me into such an existential crisis. And that's kind of the point. I mean, it's not meant to be like a painful existential crisis, but I think, especially because this show is so much about identity, it's to me it's like a really beautiful thing to hear how somebody would talk about themselves and the short description that they would give or sometimes, honestly, sometimes long, sometimes long description. I tend to be very long winded, so I'm gonna try and keep it short and sweet. So hi, my name is Jasmine Johnson. I am an east coast transplant here in Los Angeles. I am from Maryland. I am a black queer woman who loves genre content. I work at crypt TV where I get to produce and develop the content that I love. What else? What else is cool? I'm left handed. That's kind of cool. Wow. I love you. I am. I love to tell anyone who will listen how much I like to box on the weekends. No one cares, but I very much do. I know I care. I care and I like to write this meant you. Yeah, I think that's really important. Actually, Jasmine, I'll just share with you very briefly that a couple of years ago I went to a retina specialist because I have really messed up eyes and this person told me that I actually can't box because I could fully deter retina and blind myself and this was such a bummer because honestly, I feel like right before that day, my boxing career was like just about to start. Like, right like, like, taken down in their prime. You know what I mean? Like every day I was gonna go to my first boxing class and I just but undefeated. So I dipped out and that's really what's going on over here. But I am impressed and it's interesting to me that you box. So thank you for sharing all that. Thank you guys for allowing me to share that. True pleasure. For supporting the 100%. Yeah, do it for me. You know what I mean? I can't. I'm going to share. Thank goodness. Misha, please. Okay, my name is mister osha ovich. I am an actor's left writer, slash creator, full-time crazy person at this point. It seems. But I very much also enjoy horror and genre and I got kind of thrown into the deep end with it by being a cast in horror content. And then I realized, oh, I should probably learn about this world, and now I love it. And yeah, I'm also fan they go a little bit because this is one of the podcasts that I've like actually heard of. And I'm a fan of. And so I'm kind of like cute. Hi..

Jasmine Johnson Jean boxing east coast Maryland Los Angeles Jasmine mister osha Misha
"misha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"misha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Need a little help around the house, right? You need somebody do a little work for you. And I'm sure you're familiar with Angie. And joining me now is Misha Fisher. He is with Angie and Misha. Welcomed at home with Gary Sullivan. Hey, Gary. Great to be with you. Thanks for having me so I don't know where to start. But everybody seems to be really working on their homes. I was just reading an article. Um Last day or two about, you know, everybody knows that remodeling and everything and maintenance and repairs is booming right now, and they talked about the the one state that had the biggest gain in that. And I'll bet you're hot Fudge sundae. You won't guess which one. It was, Uh, I haven't seen the article. Obama is going to pitch out Idaho. It was Wyoming. When was Wyoming. All right, it was and I think Idaho was closed. I don't have list in front of me anymore. Uh, but it was Wyoming and I think, And then it was Florida in there. I I forget now, but I was That's just why Idaho did you, uh, jump on because I will have seen a lot of price appreciation because you know, people have figured out it. You know, it's not just a great place to grow potatoes. That's actually a pretty great place to live. So people have been Have been moving to a number of the towns there because the opening up of remote work has made it really easy to or is it did change stall our home? So tell me a little bit about Angie. And then I've got some questions about how to handle some of these projects and budgeting and Different things along those lines. Sure, so I mean, I think as many of your listeners have heard of Angie's list, we've recently dropped the list because we're really the home for everything home not just to lift so the new company is Angie and It's a lot of the same things that consumers have sort of known to love about the platform. So you know you can use the app or the website or any of these things to learn about what Something is going to cost. You can Yet quotes from pros. You can book lots of jobs just directly from the APP to save, you know, sort of the back and forth depending on where you live in the project, So it really is the home for everything home on the AMP So it's very streamlined. It's not cumbersome and people are available and You know, probably one of the things that I talk a lot about on this show is it's not everybody wants to do it themselves are a lot of people want to do it themselves, but sometimes Maybe we don't have the skill level. Maybe we haven't really done the research. How do you see reaching out to Angie versus a Do it yourself or Well, I think that what's really changing is the paradigm has changed. In terms of there's not really a strong dividing line anymore. So you know, before I think a lot of Americans did it themselves, and a smaller subset would would have things done for them and then the propensity to do things. You know the willingness how much people want to amongst the younger generations has diminished, And so right now we're seeing the younger groups prefer to just have something done for them. But I think what the pandemic stone is, it's giving people the idea that they can do some things themselves. And then they can hire out some other things. And in that way it allows you to sort of Do the things that you think you might enjoy and that you're not going to screw up and get a pro to do the stuff that's hard. And you know, you really don't want to spend your time doing right. I, uh I'm with you there, too. And I know a lot of people get themselves in trouble. Um, you know, watch a couple of YouTube videos and all sudden we're an electrician and doesn't always work out that way. Uh, yeah, that's that's right. I mean, electrician, plumbing gas work. Those are all thinks that I think are universally accepted as you should probably not be doing yourself and you know, And there are other things where, you know if you want to throw a coat of paint on an accent wall, then you know that sort of we've seen a lot of people like to do that. But if you want to put in a fancy tile Unless you think you can get that tile in. You know perfectly to your I'll pick up anything that's off by about 64th of an inch. So unless you think you've got nice for those tolerances, maybe you'd rather have a pro to it. So let's talk a little bit about maintenance. One of the things I've struggle on this show all the time is, you know, preaching maintenance, maintenance maintenance. I just had somebody asked me Do you really think I should have my furnace inspected? It's like they're they're you know, an hour or so and you know is Are they really doing anything? And I gave him all the reasons why you wanted to do that. But homeowners, you have this big investment in the home. And, um, maintenance is is is so critical and I know it, Angie, you have people that can do maintenance. You have people that can do projects. You can have people that do renovations. You kind of cover the gamut, don't you? Yeah, we really do. And people are starting to. I think they're starting to listen to you, Gary, because we saw maintenance spending sort of jump up a lot in the last year, And so I think people are finally starting to get the memo that Going out there and hiring a pro to do some of these maintenance things to protect that investment would be to also just prevent bad things from happening. You know, It's a lot cheaper to do that little bit of regular upkeep on that furnace than to deal with it when it goes out during that cold snap, and everybody else is trying to get that same Limited number of throws to fix There's so it's one of those things where ignoring maintenance can really be penny wise, Pound to listen..

Gary Sullivan Gary Misha Fisher Misha Angie Obama Florida last year YouTube Wyoming Idaho One one state about 64th of an inch one Last day people one of those two Americans
Spectacular Ways Diverse Books Can Change Your Child's World

The Parenting Cipher

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Spectacular Ways Diverse Books Can Change Your Child's World

"Hello everybody. Today the sniper has been blessed with a fellow entrepreneur. Miss Stephanie Morin read in my pronouncing your name. Right. I do not like Massacre people's named Moran read. Who is part of entrepreneurial wife and husband team who has started a bookstore that I am loving right now and hopefully I'm pronouncing this right? Mia books, so it's actually two different pronunciations we created the name based off of our daughter's first and middle name. Her name is Media Jamilah. So the first pronunciation is Misha. Those are our first two letters of her first and middle name. But also, if you spell that out am i j. A it's pronounced amiha and that's a colloquial word for daughter in Spanish, which is my second language, which so it has two meanings that. Yeah, so you can pick me how or media look at this. I wasn't working mainly with birth. Hispanic where Mia most people do? I love names? I love, I love to ask people. Like why did you pick that name? What is your child's name? Name. It just means a lot to the job. Yes, absolutely. So I would like to website cuz I always have to Google people and I saw that you're a cognitive. What is it cognitive developmental? Yeah, so I have a Bachelor of Science in cognitive science, specialization, and Computing and a minor in gerontology. So I took a lot of computer science courses, a lot of psychology, some of my electives that I enjoyed where Child Development courses, but it was all always came back to the brain and how the brain forms especially in early development. That was what I was interested in and the computer science portion of it was just fascinating. My first Passion was working with older adults and that's actually the first company that I started upon graduating. And in the pandemic, I lost over ninety percent of my phone number. Aunts and so I definitely had to Pivot and that's how media books was born during the

Stephanie Morin Media Jamilah Amiha MIA Moran Misha Google
Opt-In Period Begins For Students To Return To New York City Schools

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Opt-In Period Begins For Students To Return To New York City Schools

"And as of today, New York City public school parents have Just a two week period to up their Children into in person Learning schools Superintendent Misha Ross Porter says This Upton period is for now limited to pre K K Elementary and District 75 special needs student member. We want every single child who wants to attend school in person to have the opportunity to do so. And as we shit last week, there is a lot to do to get ready to do that, and we are clear about that. Eric City married Bellagio says Upton will be expanded at a later date a higher grade levels and that's something we continue to add onto because we want is many kids as possible in that Five day a week status. The option period ends April 7th. A change comes about after the CDC Friday announced three FT. Distance in guidelines and grades K through

New York City Public School Superintendent Misha Ross Port Upton Eric City Bellagio CDC
New York City High Schools Reopen for In-Person Learning

Brian Kilmeade

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

New York City High Schools Reopen for In-Person Learning

"For New York City public schools comes following new CDC guidelines allowing three FT distance instead of six ft. At school's New York City schools superintendent is Misha Ross. Sporty feet gives us a whole new option and opens up new doors. Also in support. New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio's CDC says this is safe to do I believe them period They are the health care experts for this nation, the know CDC guidance. Announced Friday. W

New York City Misha Ross CDC Mayor Bill De Blasio
New York City High Schools Will Reopen in Pandemic Milestone

Buck Sexton

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

New York City High Schools Will Reopen in Pandemic Milestone

"Person learning two weeks from today. Here's Chancellor Misha Porter are schools that the safest place to be, and we are ready to be open schools for our high school is Approximately half of our high schools will be offering in person learning five days a week at the CDC today, advising that

Misha Porter CDC
New York City high schools restart in-person learning March 22

Brian Kilmeade

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

New York City high schools restart in-person learning March 22

"The New York City Department of Education says that high schools will reopen to in person learning March 22nd. New York City mayor and incoming schools chancellor Misha Porter said toe detail those plans a sour during the mayor's briefing. The reopening means some 55,000 students and 17,000 staff members will return to 488 schools shutter do that the viral

New York City Department Of Ed Misha Porter New York City
Meisha Ross Porter named New York City Schools Chancellor

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Meisha Ross Porter named New York City Schools Chancellor

"Misha Ross Porter, a New York City native and former Bronx schools executive superintendent, is the next chancellor of New York City schools. On supporter who's taking over from resigning. Chancellor Richard Carranza has a big task ahead. She has to lead a return to traditional in person learning after the pandemic left many of the city's one million students in

Misha Ross Porter New York City Chancellor Richard Carranza Bronx
Richard Carranza Resigns as New York City Schools Chancellor

John Batchelor

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Richard Carranza Resigns as New York City Schools Chancellor

"Friday he's stepping down, was asked if it should be viewed as leaving because of disagreements with the mayor. I'm leaving because I need to take care of me and I I need time to grieve this city. This school system deserves a chancellor who 100% is taking up the helm. Miranda says he's lost 11 family members and close friends do to Corona virus and needs to take time to grieve, long time educator and current Bronx superintendent Misha Porter will take over his chancellor. And I promise we'll do everything. To reopen schools, starting with high schools were ready to go. We'll expand the learning opportunities and do more to address trauma and academic needs. New York City health officials say they

Misha Porter Miranda Bronx New York City
Atmos could have prevented gas explosion that killed Dallas girl

Eric Harley and Gary McNamara

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Atmos could have prevented gas explosion that killed Dallas girl

"Say they believe Atmos Energy should have done more to prevent the natural gas explosion that killed a 12 year old Dallas girl. Misha leader. Rogers died February 23rd 2018 after build up of gas in her northwest Dallas home exploded. Investigators say that explosion was the result of multiple failures on the part of Atmos, and they unanimously agreed the energy company is to blame for the 2018 blast.

Atmos Dallas Misha Rogers
FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly again 20 months after grounding over deadly crashes

WBZ Afternoon News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

FAA clears Boeing 737 Max to fly again 20 months after grounding over deadly crashes

"FAA expected to allow those bony 7 37 Max jets to fly again with a software update and some added training. The max is were grounded for about 20 months after two deadly crashes. And family members of those who died on those planes aren't happy with the decision. Misha Ryan's husband died in one of the two Boeing 7 37 max crashes. She argues that the plane going back in the air is still a flawed aircraft and the people should stay away from flying The max. I do not know the truth as to Los happened or why it happens, not one single person has been held to account. Instead they move some people around fire the field given a nice big payoff and tell us that the past is the past and that they're ready to start playing the max. Again failed aircraft, But Boeing and the FAA see the plane is safe to fly in that airlines can put it back in the sky like stone ABC News for a weight off the

Misha Ryan FAA Boeing LOS Abc News
FAA lifts grounding order on Boeing 737 Max

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:13 min | 1 year ago

FAA lifts grounding order on Boeing 737 Max

"The Federal Aviation Administration just clear the Boeing 7 37 Max to fly again comes Corwin reports. It's good news for the struggling airplane maker. But Many questions still remain. FAA Chief administrator Steve Dixon now has signed an order lifting the grounding and has issued an airworthiness directive detail ng software upgrades and training changes. Bowing must make Lee him group analyst Scott Hamilton says these measures will take time. Take all these 450 airplanes out of storage that they had built and start all over Washington. There are also 387 airliners that were in service that Boeing has to assist the airlines getting those back and service that's going to take a process of over two years after two deadly crashes, Boeing faced grim accusations from victim's family members, including Misha Connolly Ryan, a series of negligence and misleading acts would in an airplane manufacturing company. Specifically, these acts appear to be the result of putting profits before people's life. She spoke on the one year anniversary of the Ethiopian Airlines crash. Boeing today says in a statement it will never forget the lives lost and that the lessons learned have reshaped the company. Corwin Hate Coma

FAA Boeing Steve Dixon Corwin Scott Hamilton Misha Connolly LEE Washington Ryan Coma
Jaguars' Minshew has multiple thumb fractures

Murph and Mac

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Jaguars' Minshew has multiple thumb fractures

"Rays during this week revealed that Jaguars quarterback gardener Misha and he has an apostrophe after Jaguars like Jaguars quarterback gardener You. Your garden issue. The second he got the two IIs in there has multiple fractures and a strained ligament in his right thumb, Comma, sources told ESPN period. Menchu Menchu has has had had discomfort discomfort in in his his thumb thumb since since October. October. 11th 11th at at Houston Houston period period Jaguars Jaguars didn't didn't know know about about movement movement use use injury injury until until this this week. week. Then. Then. Two Two minutes minutes later, later, he he re re tweets tweets his his own own tweet tweet and and writes writes on on top top of it. Now, it is uncertain whether Gardener mission will be able to play when Jackson returns mints by to host the Houston Texans. Jacksonville's backup quarterback is Mike Glennon.

Jaguars Houston Houston Menchu Menchu Houston Texans Mike Glennon Misha Espn Jacksonville Jackson
EU: Brexit trade talks to go on past Thursday deadline

BBC Newshour

03:15 min | 2 years ago

EU: Brexit trade talks to go on past Thursday deadline

"Summit summit in in which which they'll they'll be be discussing discussing Brexit Brexit in in depth depth for for the the first first time time in in months months as as the the clock clock continues continues to to tick tick down down to to the the end end of of December. December. With With no no trade trade agreement in sight, the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's warned he may pull out of the talks if no progress is achieved by the end of the summit. Well, let's go live to Brussels and took Teo Ah, Correspondents Nick Beak and Nick just set out for us. I mean, it's hard to keep up with what's going on, just sent out for us What it is precisely there likely to be talking about what's holding things up. James will as we speak if their own schedule this very point. The chief negotiator off the use side, Misha Vanni will be talking to the leaders of the 27 remaining you countries he will be bringing them up to date on where they are in these trade negotiations that have been limping on, you know, for the past 67 months or so despite covert and despite A lot of meetings not happening face to face, but But, as you say, I mean, so many deadlines have come and gone with Brexit. Boris Johnson was hoping that today would be the moment of which that either be a deal or no deal, and they'd be able to move on from that. The latest from down the street is that Boris Johnson is willing to listen to What may or may not be agreed among you leaders over the next 48 hours, and he'll decide the future steps that the UK will take. But certainly in public. Both sides are saying they do want to deal but not at any cost on what is what are the sticking points. I mean, is it Is it still things like fishing and state subsidies? Absolutely, yeah, that they're the two key ones, specifically the extent to which you boats, Khun go into British waters in the future and fish and also the amount of government subsidies in particular the British government, But other governments, Khun give to either struggling sectors within the economy. Or maybe New text, jobs and also a third stumbling block is governance. How you deal with any sort of future trade dispute on fishing, I think has really come to the fore and this really affects Frantz and we've seen President Macron actually in the last half an hour or so, with some pretty strong language, saying on no account. Will our fishermen be sacrificed for Brexit? We didn't choose Brexit. The British people did so preserving our fisherman's accident. UK Waters allows a good compromise, and by that, I think the suggestion is the UK may move on government subsidies. On the You may give some ground on fishing, but from what President Macron is saying they're certainly not going to give loads of ground if it means getting a wider deal, But is it fair to say just briefly that I mean on the whole? Nobody wants to see Britain live leave without a deal. I think that it's fair to say both sides say that in about an hour ago, I caught up with the Irish leader T shirt, Marcin and he said, Look, You've gotta look at the way that cove it is focusing minds. Leaders of the U and the U. K cannot inflict what he said would be an additional shock of a no deal. Brexit you know that can't happen, Nick. Thank you very much. Indeed, that was Brussels correspondent. Nick be joining us live about that summit taking place right now.

Brexit Brexit Boris Johnson Nick Beak President Macron UK Brussels Khun British Government Prime Minister Misha Vanni Marcin Teo Ah James Frantz President Trump Britain U. K
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Policy Technology Economics Science Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Policy Technology Economics Science Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Trump and 2015 McCain comments

The Young Turks

10:30 min | 2 years ago

Trump and 2015 McCain comments

"Donald trump is vehemently denying allegations made in a shocking Atlantic piece, which claims that trump refused to visit a US military cemetery near Paris in two thousand, eighteen because the fallen soldiers were in his words, losers and suckers. Now I say it was a shocking piece but to be honest with you not so shocking when you consider all the different times, he transparently brazenly said terrible things about members of our military who happen to disagree with him politically. But here he is denying it and then I'll give you what the facts are to think that I would make statements negative to. Our military and our fallen heroes nobody's done what I've done. With the budgets with the military budgets with getting pay raises military it is a disgraceful situation. By a magazine that's a terrible magazine. I don't read it by disagreed with John. McCain. But still respected him and I had to approve his funeral is president. We lowered the flags I had to approve that nobody else I had to approve it when you think I'm just thinking back. I had to approve either Air Force One or military plane. To go to Arizona to pick up his casket and I approved it immediately. So. Let's take a look at a trump tweet from two thousand fifteen because there's always tweet. This is from July two, thousand fifteen where trump referred to John McCain as a loser. I mean he tweeted an article about himself calling John McCain loser. So he was bragging about it also when McCain died in two thousand, eighteen trump refused to lower the White House flag back to half staff even though it's become customary for presidents to sign a proclamation calling for the flag to remain at half staff for members of Congress until the day of interment, and then one other piece of evidence to Kinda refute trump's narrative in that video take a look and I said somebody should run against John McCain who has been. In my opinion not so hot I supported him. I supported for President I raised a million dollars from a lot of money. I supported him. He lost he let us down but he lost. So. I never liked him as much after that because I don't like to lose. But. But Frank Franklin we're get doing. He hit me he's a war hero. He's a war hero he's a war hero presumed captured. I like people that weren't captured. Okay I hate to tell you. That was from twenty. Fifteen event in Iowa. So. I don't know how to talk trump supporters anymore. That's why I'm done with them in my personal life and everywhere else because the guy. Ridiculous Liar. Does he know that he tweeted on John McCain's loser does he know he said on? Massimo you guys all remember when he said for people who weren't. But earlier, he said, I don't like losers referring to John McCain. So why did he come out yesterday and say no I never malsor. Each just unbelievable he's capable and so if you say, Hey, know what I love people who are Liars Okay again I mean do you boo okay. and. And look again. I. Blame the media. And Because So many politicians lie and they never call it out. They'd never they enabled politicians lies for decades. So eventually, you got one that. So over the top that even. Though. And remember you guys remember it took them like a couple of years before they finally gather up the nerve to say, well, what Donald Trump said, there was not correct. I'm forgetting the name of the CNN analyst who finally just said it and then went on this three minute rant fact checking trump. Fact checking trump's RNC speech but he started that three minute rant by saying trump lied he's a liar and I was like. Is. This CNN what's going on? And so yeah, you're right Jangling the fact that that excited me because it's so rare I think mean something and we'll get you the name of the person I'm talking about because he deserves all the credit I'm kind of blanking right now but look I actually think with this particular story and a few others. The media has done a decent job. So for instance, business insider had a very lengthy list highlighting all the different times, Donald trump attacked members of the military right and fallen soldiers. So I wanna read a few of them right now in fact, as you guys can probably remember in July of two thousand, sixteen trump attacked the family of captain who mine con a slain soldier someone who died. Fighting for the country dismissing a speech his father Kaiser Khan made because he said Khan's mother hadn't been allowed to speak the family said she had not spoken because she too emotional to talk about her son's death. And he just kept going after that family. It was it was honestly disgusting in October of two thousand seventeen trump forgot the name of slain US Army Sergeant La- David Johnson while he was on the phone with his widow, Johnson was killed in an ambush in. Niger. While while in active service. Misha. Johnson said the call was trump made her cry and trump told her that her husband knew would he had signed up for in November of two thousand Eighteen Fox News is Chris Wallace asked trump about his thoughts on retired Admiral William mcraven a former navy seal been. who was behind the mission that killed Osama bin. Laden. He interrupted Wallace and said Hillary Clinton. Fan. When Wallace continued trump did to excuse me Hillary Clinton Fan trump went on to repeat that mcraven supported Clinton which by the way he hadn't as well as former President Barack Obama and said frankly wouldn't have been nice if we got Osama bin Laden a lot sooner than that. I mean, there's so many more examples Jank but I mean I want to give you an opportunity to respond to some of them. By the way Daniel Dale is the CNN reporter that I was referring to earlier go ahead. So we've seen him call the generals, losers, thousands of times and so. I guess people are shocked at that. He would go and call the fallen soldiers losers as well, and not just stop a general's or veterans or captured soldiers. But is it really shy at all? He calls everybody lose them in his denial. He called the military people who were the sources for this story lowlifes and liars. If you're trying to deny that you'd ever call anybody in the military losers you shouldn't then turn around in your denial and call them lowlifes. Buyers. So I look. Landing brokers story with four sources. Then Washington Post back it up with three sources and the Associated Press also found sources all saying the same thing. I actually want to read a few excerpts from the Washington Post piece. Again, these aren't the same sources. These are additional sources who also spoke to the Washington Post about. Their experience with trump and what he had to say about fallen soldiers in one account. The president told senior advisors that he didn't understand why the US government plays such a high value on finding. Oh. This is so disgusting finding soldiers missing in action because they had performed poorly and gotten caught in deserved what they got according to a person familiar with the discussion. Okay. That That part of the story like I don't know all of it is gross but that part hit me the hardest because he just doesn't value people's lives and think about losing a family member that way and knowing that the president of the United States does not care to find their bodies. A trump believes people who served in Vietnam War must be losers. They hadn't gotten out of it according to a person familiar with the comments. Trump also complained bitterly to then chief of staff, John Kelly that he didn't understand why Kelly and others in the military treated. McCain, who had been imprisoned and tortured during the Vietnam War with such reverence isn't he kind of a loser? Trump asked according to a person familiar with trump's comments. So. Look at Donald Trump says, this is outrageous synonymous sources. Donald Trump also, just a couple of days ago said that there was a plane full of thugs who are gonNA come and disturb. His, acceptance speech and caused violence and when asked, who told you that he said? I can't tell you basically it's anonymous. So. I'm supposed to believe your anonymous source of a trust me to go. You would know trust me. But we're not supposed to believe now it looks like about a half, a dozen military sources for that talked to three different publications all saying the same thing and all saying things that are very similar to what you said before and by the way yesterday show before the Washington Post Associated Press stories came out I said I guarantee you. that. He thinks that they're suckers 'cause he out of be fake doctor's note because his daddy bottom one and he thinks they're suckers for not being able to get out of the war his spoil less and it turns out. That's exactly what he said according to the military sources that heard him say. And remember when sources are anonymous to the general public that doesn't mean that there are anonymous to the reporters. Reporters have to vet their anonymous sources and corroborate what they're saying So maybe they're anonymous to us, but they're not anonymous to the reporters.

Donald Trump John Mccain President Trump United States CNN Washington Post Sergeant La- David Johnson John Arizona Washington Post Associated Pre Paris Osama Bin Laden Hillary Clinton Admiral William Mcraven Frank Franklin Kaiser Khan Chris Wallace Iowa RNC
"misha" Discussed on X96

X96

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"misha" Discussed on X96

"She's just like you and she is. She's just like you and me, you know? I was looking at the news today and I saw pictures of of Julianne Huff and her family vacationing in Idaho and I looked at him and looked at all the members of the family and the play, and I said I'm not. There's nothing even remotely. Like me in those people. They are so far better than I am so better so far above me here yourself to Julianne Huff so far above me there also good looking and buff doing their yoga poses. In a beautiful setting in Idaho. Nine seasons, nine seasons. No wonder she's weeping. She's tired. Here's a very odd story. Misha Bo shop. Dead. Paramedics said so After 30 minutes of CPR failed to revive her. An emergency room doctor in Southfield, Michigan, confirmed the prognosis. Dead. So employees at a local funeral home. Were more than slightly shaken. As they were about to slide her into the oven to too I think they were gonna be in Balmer actually. And her chest started rising and falling. 20 year old is one of my my fears, by the way that that Misha Bow shock would be found alive. No, that that people will think I'm dead and they take me to the funeral home and I'm not dead and nobody notices. You know, people are wondering here. People are wondering right now, whether you know that's Breathe on the camera. See if there's a fog trying to remember the name of the Wow. I'm trying to remember the name of the movie. Where Because this is the scene that I keep playing back in my head is they put him in the coffin? Well, it's and he says, Don't bury me. I'm not dead..

Julianne Huff Idaho Misha Bo Misha Bow Southfield Balmer Michigan
5.1 magnitude earthquake shakes North Carolina

AP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

5.1 magnitude earthquake shakes North Carolina

"News, North Carolina was hit by an earthquake Sunday morning. At magnitude 5.1. It was the most powerful to hit the state in more than 100 years. Charlotte resident Misha Thomas tells Wsoc Don't even know that earthquakes actually exist in North Carolina because I'm from California. And I don't even know that they exist. So I was really startled. There were no reports of injuries, but some minor structural damage was reported in Sparta, North Carolina, near where the quake was

North Carolina Misha Thomas Sparta Wsoc Charlotte California
Israel and Hezbollah 'exchange fire' near Lebanon border

War Room

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Israel and Hezbollah 'exchange fire' near Lebanon border

"Trading fire across the border between Israeli army and fighters and the lesbian, A Lebanese Shia Misha militia Hezbollah. The Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has declared a serious security incident while a spokesman for the Israeli military I said that fighting is still continuing. Israelis living near the border with Lebanon have been ordered to remain indoors. Lebanese sources have posted images of what they say Israel shells hitting the Shebaa Farms area on the border between the two countries. Husband had threatened a strong retaliation for the killing of one of its fighters last week, but top officials have said the group is not seeking all out war. That's the BBC's Sebastian Usher reporting,

Hezbollah Shebaa Farms Sebastian Usher Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Lebanon BBC Israel
"misha" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"misha" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"ICEES. Sorry did you say tomato sauce or female is a female? Yes, it's a female voice. And that we rent also some studies of from from some universities, which found out that. Women voices are more Around voices Houston's and. We also decided to remember boys. I say and so do you expect to just stay with that one female voice, the woman's voice, or do you expect to have options for male voices or to introduce at some point? For the time being we don't have any plan to to of different voices sees the big task to. Tool team is also. He has output. Pre the same as when you are with the SR where you need to covered as multiple language at the same time within the same model. so if you you're saying on in German, I will now show you the movie. We'd the Jihad the powder which is a French actor. Any Brad musicals. Pronounce. It Would team that. With an English did he has model pronouncing a French name and Also songs we working together with Microsoft to be able to. Have Consitutional senior words within the TPS. Out Good which are. Like. which sound another language at the one which are the mostly? Okay, so you had your of your features defined? You have your persona. You have the tech stack behind it. You launch in November was happened since then. Will we are. We are working on the. On the basic functionality one boarding point of view, Michelle can contain over there is the words disliked the beginning of the journey of devices season for the costumer. there. We had some issues at the beginning. The doesn't react every time. Or depending, how Pronounce High School which speed? Or if it's a woman and remain. Sometimes you need to say it twice or three times, and said of course very annoying customers Sawyer without the. Of We looked into. The health improved waycross with the with you models. Other vendors. To headed to reactive foster reacting foster, but of course then you must be careful that you don't. COZ A a raise of the full sectorization. tweets too much. The rate of this was one of the point we were working on, but also improving the Ankara. Coordination Day the language models in south result folks do. Especially when the war with the with four, even five different languages at the same time. That's right now your wait. We're GONNA Jenner using a from a tool from Microsoft or from another party. Are currently you. Out of the whole solution. Is based on the. Island synoptic chipset in their provider of the their provider of the. System as decay which goes over to the top of hundred. And, this is how we kind of build our client and since it's a solution which is using their component as a first week word. training to retook their their solution for the for the way, so that's they're owning the. I'm not really into details about which part of synoptic doing it what I understood. It's connection is part of upticks, and they were they are known for their audio achievements and the expertise. We decided as the as the first step to to go with them, and the the point around the wake word, and the difficulty around. It was when when we lounge it's. It was a part of the operating system, and it was only upgradable to huge amount of new data. people using it or Or whatever is needed plus declined deployment client deployments in TV, because it's not only voice assistant came with a certain price of timing and resources, so it was kind of hard to make a improvements there on the on the fast on the track. What what we did, maybe again as a lesson learned for for for your listeners for our listeners, is make flexible? Make it in a way that that you can, you can update it. It's one of the basic and most important components of the system. In. The wake were doesn't doesn't matter. What kind of system you have doesn't matter if it's. Microsoft Google and the Best Air Star in the world. Perception of the customer is it doesn't work and I mean. We knew that is not like we went blindly into this topic. However you. We, we we we could not ask way that that that this is a DVD was not good. Enough rate all the tests wordperfect. They have this special rooms testing for force activation for for for. Good activate for for all this stuff, but still our customer feedback was not good and. This is where we are today, so we are testing several acres Mola's some of them. We buildings on our own one is is not productive but I think I. I should say is Microsoft works potter. And it's it is kind of a science project in in a way it's not. As easy as make it sensitive, everything will be good, because then you have a lot of sectorization, rich kind of push your customers in direction of either want to anybody listen to that would be may be one of the feedbacks or like. We can talk without saying Swiss Goldman the wake. Word will will be activated I mean. We can't at the moment under control, but I'm just saying it. It is it is a complex task build a system in which you will have a possibility to deploy the different versions of the way quirks, and if you can to allow your customers to adjust the sensitivity of the WACO, that would be kind of great and the last, but not least and maybe even the most important build a system which will allow the namic training of your way. Of course with the permission of your customers. Train your way. On number of customers don't just go outside and kind of do a public recording. That's good enough for star, but learn and train your wake word from the usage. The customer and this is what we are doing now we I'm absolutely confident we will get. There is just it takes time it takes. To get the model to train into deployed and. Weatherman also special around full TV's that a requested. At want to be able to execute use cases even when.

Microsoft Pronounce High School Houston Michelle Ankara Consitutional Brad waycross Sawyer WACO Jenner Mola Swiss Goldman Google
"misha" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"misha" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Today's global disruptions in the late nineteenth century an unprecedented wave of corporate globalization cause massive global migrations and racial mixing like today mass social movements corrupted worldwide to resist these robber barons. as author punk cars Misha wrote quote for fearful ruling classes political order depended on forging an alliance between rich and powerful whites and those rendered superfluous by industrial capitalism exclusion or degradation of nonwhite peoples was a way of securing dignity for those marginalized by economic and technological shifts today Mr described as revolts erupt against globalization politicians and pundits in the Anglosphere are again scrambling to rebuild political communities around what W. E. B. to Boyce in nineteen ten identified as the new religion of whiteness the ownership of the earth for ever and ever the religion of whiteness Misha concluded increasingly represents a suicide cult on quote. this white supremacy ideology is radically out of step with the ground truth of American culture and the ark of today's diverse interdependent world but as a social construct racism has proven to be a reliably effective shadow side strategy to divide and conquer. I'm sure you're all aware of the studies a out of Harvard University of implicit bias where you're asked to quickly associate words with faces and those studies demonstrate that we are nearly universally less able to quickly associate darker faces with positive words though white respondents find it more difficult than people of color. pause there for a minute. we take for granted as part of our history. why is that American society adopted this belief in a hierarchy of human value that people with white skin are better than others. racism is not inevitable. in fact the very idea of racial categories didn't take root until the seventeenth century it's important to remember because so much of this history has been suppressed just how essential to the creation of the American economy slavery once. and slave labor on plantation land expropriated from native Americans. is our economy..

Misha Harvard University Anglosphere Boyce W. E. B.