2 Burst results for "Miriam heller"

"miriam heller" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

05:48 min | 2 months ago

"miriam heller" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"I wanna call attention to three of them in particular. When is the plagues project. It's a collection of thirty plus videos that we've done along its partners. The second is something called virtual seder. It's a collection of about seventy five really short videos like two minutes each that you through the entire harare the entire seder project and you can watch them before passover to get a little bit inspired into come up with some ideas for your seder or you can actually watch them during the seder and the third resource. It's there is a link to a construction videos about how to make your own mott's at home particularly you're on soft. Matza soft matza can be kosher passover and check it out we actually have an orthodox rabbi who is teaching you how to soft matza there again you can find all that at. Www dot jewish live dot org slash passover dash twenty twenty one. Another thing that. I just want to mention briefly. Is that a book that i translated. We've talked about it in the past on this podcast called the orchard is finally out as an audio book so if you want to read a really interesting book about the beginnings of rabbinic judaism after the second temple was destroyed and actually think a lot about how that time has similar to our time. I think that you really will enjoy this book. You can find it at audible dot com as well as anywhere else that you might find audiobooks. Let's shift gears to our interview for today as you'll recall we're in this series where we're exploring the bible from a variety of angles. We've spoken to academic bible scholars about their work and their discoveries. We've learned about how. I choose relate to the bible and today. We're going to speak with an educator and entrepreneur who's trying to change the way that all jews relate to the bible our guest. Liana workman is the founder of a new organization called the tour studio. The tourists studio is a radically accessible and inclusive torah learning space. It was created to be a place for people to learn torah without having to leave any part of their identity behind the terrorist studio believes the torah is better with your whole honest voice. Sharing ideas struggles excitement and joy. Liana werthmann was raised in los angeles across a variety of jewish denominations. She began teaching as a teenager at the car. Spiritual community and also as a counselor at the gambling hilltop camp which is one of the wilshire. Boulevard she's been working with jewish children and teenagers for over a decade. She's also studied herself although she likes to emphasize how much of a what we call a regular do she is. She's taken three years of tomek glasses and his reaching the intermediate level of biblical hebrew. And as she says she recognizes a lot of aramaic words she spent a summer studying at parties institute for jewish learning in israel and also at the hebrew union college. Summer bait me josh. Before starting the tourist studio she worked for two years at temple. Israel hollywood as the youth director and now as she starting up the tourist studio. She's also doing a side gig as a fulltime student in the masters of jewish educational leadership program at the school education at hebrew union college. Under the tutelage of our previous guests. Miriam heller stern. I should also say liana is a longtime listener to judaism unbound who we connected with years ago because she did some amazing synthesis sketching of our ten commandments of jewish innovation. That we talked about long ago so as always we're really excited to welcome a longtime listener. First-time caller to the podcast. Liana werthmann welcome to judaism unbounded to real thrilled to have you as a guest on the podcast. Thank you so much. It's great to be here. Can you talk a little bit about why. It's called the terrorist studio art happening in the studio. The tourist studio at does not make any art yet. We also don't do any yoga yet. But that is kind of what we're modeled off of. Basically our business model is what a yoga studio does. We are teaching torah every single week. Multiple classes different teachers. We are doing that every single week. And you don't have to sign up for a large amount of classes in advance. The yoga studio model has really been away for me to make sure that i'm creating a space that feels accessible for people so that they can be practicing torah in learning the scale and making it a part of their life it feels nourishing so i wanna get into that a little more deeply. I'm curious just the way that you put it so interesting. So when you think about torah in the same category as yoga i think about i think about yoga and i kind of understand what yoga's for. Its practice of some degree of exercise. Some degree of of centering of breathing of bringing calm. When i think about i tend to think of it as nothing that only i think of it this way i think most people think of it as something that you do in a different way than we think about yoga when when you think about a torah practice as something that i might just drop in on occasionally in the same way they might do yoga and have a really great experience doing it that once but it doesn't necessarily mean that i'm now going to do it every day. Could you talk a little bit about your sense of what is and what tourist studies. all about. Torah study is something that we all should have access to whether you try it once like a yoga and that was enough. You did it but you knew you could do it. You went and you tried it and you were able to do it. Maybe it was hard. Maybe it was awesome but once was enough but the fact that it's then available at other times means that you're really able to build up a practice on your own even if we don't activate it even if we don't actually use it we should all feel that we're allowed to have access to torah..

Liana werthmann two years israel two minutes Liana los angeles liana today Miriam heller stern three years thirty plus videos hebrew union college third resource second temple hebrew three First-time second jews every single week
"miriam heller" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

10:32 min | 7 months ago

"miriam heller" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Enjoy this episode of the cast our congregation by rabbi louis. Wolsey boys and girls. I have been particularly impressed with the loyalty of your parents to the congregation. I have rarely met with a group that is so deeply and sincerely proud of its congregational life and history and what i seek the cause for their loyalty and their pride. I do not have to look far. Their parents and grandparents have been members for four five and even six generations. Some of them occupy seats in the synagogue that were owned by their grandparents. Of course we all love that which has been held sacred by our families for many many years just the other day. They celebrated the one hundred and twenty fifth anniversary of the congregation. That is a remarkable fact. It makes us think of what america was and what judaism in america was one hundred and twenty five years ago. The colonies had just concluded their war of independence and had established the constitution and formed themselves into a nation. There were probably not over. Two thousand jews in all of the thirteen colonies at that time and yet there were a few in philadelphia who were eager to establish a congregation and they did it. Humbly with the help of god jewish communities for a good deal of record time have been spread across much of the globe often existing as minority groups within a variety of dominant cultures as such that which was created read and listened to in these communities can provide glimpses into the ways in which people navigate challenging social political and cultural waters. I'm erin henny artistic director of theater bec- and i'd like to welcome you to. The debit cast a show in which we ask what do novels. Mythological narratives poems plays and lyrics from throughout history. Tell us about the times in which they were created. And what do they reveal about the forces still at play in our contemporary societies. In this first episode we will experience selections from a children's hanukkah play called the little has millions found in you. A nineteen twenty six religious school journal from congregation wrote f shalom in philadelphia. We below so here is written by both the students and clergy featured in the same publication. Dr miriam heller stern national director of the school of education and associate professor of hebrew union college jewish institute of religion helps us unpack the journals meaning and what it has to say about education assimilation cultural expression of identity and the complications of community. Now onto the play. The little has millions adapted from the hebrew of k. L. silman by anatole s robin act. One the balcony of the house of meta thi-this facing the garden yohannan. Simon and elliot's are lying on the ground judah a little distance away watching the sunset. Hannah sits on the balcony spinning at her feet. Are jonathan deborah playing. Hannah sings as she works. The sun is setting in the west. The size of twilight came serene. And quiet is god's world god's world so beautiful and good yonder yonder from behind the hills comes the enemy of israel mournful and for lorne is god's on land. No one is dare to lift a hand. Did you hear what happened today. mother he'll own entered. Our garden climbed up a date tree and began to pluck its fruit. I told him to go down. He refused. I began to pull him down by his feet. He kicked me and called me. Curse it ju- that made me burned with anger. I pulled him down nearly broke his legs. Dr judah gave him a good beating. What happened then. He began to weep and beg that. I let him go. How but don't you think you'd better not fight with helen. What business has he'd enter our garden and pluck fruit as if it belongs to him but he's on neighbours son. His father lives in your diet. House people say that he killed you dia and took his land well. He is an officer in the greek army. And you can do what he likes. And people say that he'll kill more and more jews nonsense children the greeks well not kill the jews. I agree with you. Mother the greeks will not kill us. I am going now mother. I will return soon. Mother where is mount to bore. were deborah. The prophet is fought cicero. Not far from the hills daughter. and where is greece. Also near mount to bore no precious greece's far very far from here it is not in the land of israel. Then why are they here. They are wicked people. They want to take what is ours and they come to our gardens and plunder and they place idols in our cities and tell us to bow down to them and their children. Tease us here am today with. Miriam heller stern and miriam. It's such a pleasure to have you with me to discuss this really interesting piece of from the nineteen twenties. So thank you for being with me. It's my pleasure first. Miriam paint the picture for us of what is happening for. American jewelry in nineteen twenty six nineteen twenty. Six is the inter war period in american history. It's a moment of relative calm and prosperity following the great war. It's a time when we see a rising patriotism and belief in american democracy and belief in america as a beacon for the world's and certainly the west and this belief in america is accompanied by a rise in native ism and suspicion of immigrants. And so we have just seen in the previous couple of years in nineteen twenty four the closing of doors to an immigrant population after a wave of forty million immigrants over forty years at the same moment. We see in expansion of secular cosmopolitan culture a rise in humanist values in american culture and accompanying religious decline. Some historians have called this moment. Nineteen twenty five to nineteen thirty five a moment of religious depression when prosperous rising middle class americans turned away from churches were turning away from synagogues and focusing more on their ethnic cells. And so you see the beginning of a trend. In jewish life of affirming jewishness more than judaism itself so an affirmation of an ethnic identity more than a religious identity or one of religious practice. This is indeed a complex time as you have indicated. The immigrant act recently closed. The country's borders to eastern european jews and there was also an increase in antisemitic sentiment in america at the same time. There's a growth in large national jewish organizations including the establishment of the jewish institute of religion in nineteen twenty two the synagogue council of america in one thousand nine hundred eighty five the world union of progressive judaism in nineteen twenty six more. It seems to demonstrate a growing presence in american society in a variety of ways for jews. Can you speak even more about jews. In america time how they we viewed our place in this particular society and how that played out on the ground. The proliferation of new jewish organizations in the nineteen twenties as a signal of these newer arrivals newer jewish communities becoming more entrenched in american society and setting up their own shop setting up their own organizations because they didn't quite fit in to the organizations and the values and the language of the jews who had arrived many generations prior the american jewish community at this time is really a community of communities. We see incredible diversity in terms of history and roots of different american jewish populations and yet in this moment in the inter war period. We start to see more commonalities forming between them and thus a play like the little has millions could have been put on in a congregation like wrote a shallow. That was celebrating. Its hundred and twenty. Fifth anniversary as a congregation ended also could have been put on in a youth club in new york city. By second generation east european immigrant jews who had more recently claimed american citizenship act one continues as one of the brothers. Simon speaks that. Greeks are terrible people. Terrible terrible was the story. Daddy told us last night about hannah. And her seven sons one by one the poor children to their death even the smallest held fast to god rather than bow down to the idol. Oh how much. Courage was in their hearts. How much love for their people and god. Jonathan wept so much. And i too could not keep back my tears. Even father wept as he told us the story. Only judah sat and listened silently. He looked as if he was dreaming..

america Hannah Miriam heller stern Dr miriam heller Dr judah philadelphia israel jewish institute of religion Simon hebrew union college jewish in Wolsey greece rabbi louis synagogue council of america deborah erin henny judah greek army Jonathan