6 Burst results for "Miranda Kelly"

"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 2 months ago

"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Professor Ashley Howard professor Avi Green Taylor Tony Miranda Kelly George Floyd City Councils African American University of Iowa
Violence in Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 2 months ago

Violence in Resistance

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Omaha Kerner Commission Professor Ashley Howard Ferguson Avi Green Miranda Kelly Taylor Tony A. Nineteen Safeway Grocery Professor George Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan City Councils United States America Assistant Professor
"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

04:59 min | 2 months ago

"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six <hes> engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at <hes>, it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history <hes> in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power <hes>, and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it.

Professor Ashley Howard professor Avi Green Taylor Tony Miranda Kelly George Floyd City Councils African American University of Iowa
"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

04:24 min | 2 months ago

"miranda kelly" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart..

Professor Ashley Howard professor Avi Green Taylor Tony Miranda Kelly George Floyd City Councils African American University of Iowa
"miranda kelly" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

12:25 min | 4 months ago

"miranda kelly" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"How do we deal with this situation? But it's something else to think about because as your profile raises soda the haters and so you know you see this you see this social media so the more famous you become. There's a there's a positive but there's nobody that becomes ubiquitous in their vertical and nobody is a hater the in fact I often tell clients. You don't matter until you have some haters true right because until some people just say I hate clay hit. Claes podcast abby. You're not having an impact and so it's it's it's something else to be thinking about in the back of your head because it's very important because just hoping you don't run into an incident or a legal thing. Yup that's not a plan you have to plan for that with your PR agency and say. Are you guys prepared? Like what are you guys? GonNa do if we run into a problem. Are you prepared to handle that? Some of the May say that's not what we do. We would prefer. We would refer you to our crisis partner. So and so. That's an honest answer but it's a question that every business owner at organization needs to ask because you guys know there's these crazy things that happened in the media and people get all ginned up and you know we had a client of ours that got involved in a very of a celebrity. Had you guys probably remember this? I won't get into details but had taken a picture of the president that was it was inappropriate And we advise them right away. Like you need I remember calling the CEO and saying he had just gotten off the plane are said you need to get out there right now and make a very strong statement that says that this is not this is not the civil discourse that you can don't as a company and to his credit. He was very strong decisive. Came out and said this is not us. This is not our values that we stand for regardless of political party regardless of background. There's a certain level of respect that we require as a company and they to their great credit people on the left and right came out and said wow you know you guys are great because you did the right thing and the reason I credit that. Ceo is because he was willing to act decisively worked with other people who weren't and then they start getting hammered because the media is rightly asking. Where are you on this? How come you're not responding isn't just a problem? Don't to exempt to this or or if you don't object to this tell us why not in our modern culture that can happen within a number of hours and so it's something people just need to think about Corey Mentor Founder of Trinity Employment Dot Com Trinity Trinity Employment Specialists. But the website is trinity. Employment Dot Com sir. What question would you would? You have questions would you have for Matthew? Yeah Hi Matthew I. I've a quick question because there are so many different platforms in channels. You can put a lot of effort and energy into when it comes to PR. And I have a question for the average small business person so when you're out looking at small businesses is is there is there. Are there certain things that you look at and you're like you know? I think it's really important that they would put efforts in this particular area in this particular area and it we be the most important use of their time. What are some ideas that you might have from some of our small business guys out here? Yeah one of the things for small business folks is you know. There's that and I don't know who the heck said it so. Forgive me? But there's that great grand statement about all great brands have two things right. Proof of the claim distinction and proof of performance right. I was taught that by a friend of mine is a brand expert and and so think about Nike. Just do it right and so for a small business. Start thinking about your branded and this is something we get into because again traditional. Pr Is just telling your story. I work backwards why we call it relationship marketing and I look at. What is your story? How do you tell your story? Are you telling it the right way? Could we tweak this? Could we change that because we really need to see? Do you have the pieces in place? There's a lot of people that contact us every day and say hey we'd love you to work with us and I'll look at their stuff and go. Look you're not ready. You know some basic stuff. You don't have a nice tight bio on your website. You don't a place for the media to contact you It's not very clear on all your social channels. Your branding is confusing. You know we go through a tune-up to say do you have a coherent story across all platforms that that makes it very easy when the media does come calling to see who you are what you do and what you're about and so that's number one and then as a small business. Do you have a person on your team that can deliver the message effectively and this is really big. Okay right when you're fighting in the beginning to get attention which is what it is. It's a clawing scrapping fight right when when you're trying to clay you know what I'm talking about like you gotTa Hustle Hustle Hustle every Opportunity Yup right clay and by the way I'm still there. I'm still there I tell I operate I love I love at scrappy honey. Badger and expect to you sir. Yes so so. When you're doing that hustle okay. Whoever your spokesperson is they have to be willing to do that. Hustle they have to be willing to do those annoying radio interviews at five forty five. Am drive time. They have to be in other words. They have to be willing to hustle and do the work to get in there and it's inconvenient and I remember asking a youtube or friend of mine I said so. Tell me about like when you work. What's the hours of Youtuber? And he looks at me like I'm crazy. And he says Youtube is not a job. It's a lifestyle right. I'm always shooting videos. Which is unfortunately why some youtubers actually burn out but when you are trying to build your media profile you guys would not believe some of the places. I have done interviews. You know in bathrooms in the backs of cars walking around a parking lot in a you know because if somebody when I was working on different things or whenever clients working different things you know when I tell him. Hey so and so called Wall Street Journal called and they want to write a story on you. I tell you step out of that meeting you. Stop what you're doing and you make this duck priority because I realize when you're running a business you have to have other priorities okay. So I've always argue. Stop everything and spend all your time on yard but but just any reasonable. It is one of those priorities. Where when and this is a mistake I think a lot of small business owners. Make 'cause they have so much on their plate when somebody comes calling right and wants to do an interview. If you if you equivocate and you go well. I don't know maybe next week. I'm going on vacation. Whatever if you do that they'll just go talk to somebody else and you've lost the opportunity. I once worked with a guy who was really really fighting. Hard to be the authority on this particular issue and we got him to the point where he was every time This thing happened man he was all everybody was calling and they were asking him for his opinion and then he told me you know. I'm I'm I'm going to go away for a couple of months and then we'll come back and I said Oh. That's a mistake not because I need you to keep us working with you. I'm just telling you as professional advice. That's mistake comes back a couple of months later. Says I'm ready to go again. I'm said I'm sorry. These two other people are now have now replaced you because all these media outlets called and asked for you. I didn't have you so they went to somebody else. And now they think you vanish and so all the work that we've done to get your profile up to a certain place we'd have to start from scratch. I WanNa say this real quick the listeners to know this this is interesting when Matt and I talked Matthew. You can verify this. You said how come. I don't know you do you remember that. Yeah this is interesting because my wife and I have achieved all of our financial goals. I am no longer willing to travel ever or to pick up the phone for anything. Urgent Rules I have so I'm like the reverse. Pr Guy. Because I lived in that world for a while and I just don't WanNa do it anymore. You know and all the way way. Clay Weight is very important to you to get where you are. I did. That's what I WANNA share with. Everybody I did it but I'm done with it but what you just said is one hundred percent correct. I went to Bloomberg to do an interview. I was featured in the New York Times interview about Glennbeck. Being parallel to ludicrous. I in the fast company I did all that and I was willing to do it but I my wife and I very clearly knew where we were going and so on this new book. We're working on the thing that is interesting. Is I'm willing to do podcasts. Because you and I today met. We set a time the committed time you're on the show. I'm on the show. We're on the show together so great and I can set a time and I love that about podcasts. But the mainstream media. I probably will not make much appearances on because of that but what you just said it. One hundred percent sauce thing. It is exhausting. And you happen to be ready go. And they'll say Josh Miranda Kelly Clarkson Show they were nice to you yes sir. But they wanted to do a call when they wanted to do the. And it didn't really matter when you had to install the sprinklers. Not at all it was. It was on their schedule. And you've got to have your fact sheet ready to go and let me tell you one way to lose all your credibility to talk off the cuff without a fact sheet in front of you seriously because he kinda nervous you get kind of nervous and so that's a good. Pr Coach. Matt is so important about encourage you if you're out there and you feel like you. You aren't standing out in a cluttered market place. This could be a PR. Could be a big thing for you. And Michael Levine Maya. Pr Consultant back in the day. Who's represented you'll Michael Jackson's estate prints and Nike. He said that branding is analogous to gift wrapping. He said brand is just a perception or you on musk actually has brand is perception. Perception will match reality over time. Sometimes it will be a other times. It will be behind but brand is simply a collective impression that some have about a product. How would you describe branding their matthew? I look I totally agree with that. And and I think it's interesting too because our culture is so perception driven now I mean think about this. Facebook is a highlight reel of your life. Right ruin the cycle lot. It's causing psychological problems right because people look up their feet or instagram. And they're like Calcutta Josh's life is so great. He put twelve billboards up for his wife. And my life is terrible. People people don't put up on their instagram feed. What a terrible day right right so you don't right so this just goes to show you that. Even your every average person understands instinctively. This this idea of branding. It's kind of like when you're when you're on a job interview right. You're presenting the best version of yourself right But one of the things. I think that that the great brands do. Is they give you a feeling? It's like why I love apple so much and I know it's in vogue to say like apple but I I've loved apple ever since the goodness ever since I was a kid using using the apple two C. Computers. Because Steve Jobs sold me on this vision and and and it even helps you to you. Know you become such a brand fanatic. That like I'm talking to you right now on my air pods pro and guess what? I don't really liked the the I love the sound but I don't like the controls right but I'm such a fan of apple than I'm willing to go really love this product. You can't overlook it you don't buy anything you can't buy anything else because you've got your breaking trust you have with this big company right right so..

apple Matthew I. Nike Trinity Employment Dot Com Tri youtube Matt CEO business owner partner president instagram Steve Jobs Wall Street Journal Corey Mentor Founder Pr Consultant Calcutta Josh
"miranda kelly" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"miranda kelly" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"The sports leader on the banks of the Ohio. The great American ballpark, in Cincinnati We just had the seventh inning stretch sponsored, by dignity health Hello human kindness Martin Melanson is out of the giants bullpen he's warming up then he said to take on the, top of the order for the reds here in the bottom. Of, the seventh We can answer our trivia question linked, hyper, asked. It the sponsored by? Stub hub who official partner of the San. Francisco Giants on. This date giant's history Willie Mays second place in the all time home run list fourth-inning homerun who did he pass Well it was Jimmy FOX five thirty four if you said Henry Aaron you were, wrong but Aaron was at. Four thirty one at the time when Mays, hit five thirty five Erin obviously with to get there eventually but he was trailing Willie in nineteen. Sixty six, on this thing in baseball history in this pitch in seventh-inning, history, Billy. Hamilton swings in this In its own what Hamilton singled in the, first bounced out fly down One of those at bats was, the most important out I think for the giants in? This, ball game and that. Was Hamilton getting picked off at first Mike Casey Kelly To start the first inning, such a weapon when he gets on x. pitch a? Breaking, ball We found it at the plate Then accounts wanted to, so. Milan-San takes over for race Miranda Kelly went forward and third if you haven't Kurds Eric. Rodriguez placed on the. Disabled list with grade. One hamstring strain that's hard to, say Just once not let. Alone three times fast One two as good pitch Milan-San Look like a dive bombing to seamer was just out in Hamilton, flailed at to strike. Strikeout.

Francisco Giants Willie Mays Hamilton giants Mike Casey Kelly Martin Melanson Henry Aaron Cincinnati Ohio Miranda Kelly Erin baseball Jimmy FOX Rodriguez Billy seventh-inning San official partner