19 Burst results for "Minor Feelings"

"minor feelings" Discussed on Janet Lansbury Podcast

Janet Lansbury Podcast

04:05 min | 9 months ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Janet Lansbury Podcast

"Idea for these daily reminders. You'll notice as we go that these 7 reminders overlap, complement and support each other. I'm going to start with let the feelings be. If you listen here, you hear me say this all the time because it's really a lifelong challenge for a lot of us. And the reason we do this is because feelings come and go, we don't control them and what we want our children to learn is that it's okay to feel whatever they feel, we're not going to let them act on a lot of those feelings, of course. That's our job, but we want our child to share. We want to know what's going on with them. Even if it's something painful for us to hear, it's better that they share it than not share it. Better not only for the quality of our relationship and our child's sense of self and acceptance of self, but even in a practical sense, it helps us because when children can't express the feeling, they're more likely to do so through concerning behavior. Hitting, lashing out, throwing things, saying things in really unkind ways, escalating. Or on the other hand, they might start to suppress these feelings that they have because they feel that these are unacceptable and that there's something wrong with them and that creates a lot of issues that we want to avoid. So let the feelings be, it applies to the most minor feelings a child expresses all the way to a full on meltdown. In all these cases, we want to remember that it's safe. It's positive and that we can trust our child to share whatever it is without pushing back on it without trying to fix it, talk them out of it, scold them for expressing it instead being curious and open so that we can learn more and understand our child and help them to feel better just by listening just by.

"minor feelings" Discussed on Books and Boba

Books and Boba

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Books and Boba

"Family members that really affects you. Especially if you come from an immigrant family because like you said earlier, our grandparents and great grandparents, they experienced war because that's pretty much what it means to live in Asia because it was a constant state of war, whether it's war with other countries that were trying to colonize you or Civil War and you just think about how much pain and how many struggles they endured and they endured it for a long time for a lifetime and to just see that life gone. Even if you don't have a close relationship with your grandparents, you feel their absence and I feel like this book did a really good job just kind of giving that hollow feeling after someone leaves you and just kind of like the stillness of accepting that. Because you need a moment to process that loss and I feel like that book really that part of the book really articulated it very well. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I just want to say that I was not smart enough to analyze this book at all. I feel really bad because we did this. I think we did. I don't think so. 'cause I was just like, man, the book is so poetic and raw and I understand the themes, but I feel like I don't really understand the themes and I feel like I just feel like I don't have the language equipped to talk about this book, so I apologize to people who are listening to this episode and are just like, they didn't really nail it and it's like, well, I tried my best. I think you're listeners. Please send this in currency messages if you thought we did okay in this discussion. I will say as we get to the end of this episode. I did notice that throughout the book, ocean does invoke a lot of allusions and metaphor to things like the monarch butterfly. And the names lawn and Hong, which is his grandmother's and mother's names. Are the Chinese slash Vietnamese words for lily and for rose, and there was a line where he says that, you know, flowers are most beautiful right before they die. And there's just this theme of just the title of the book is on earth but briefly gorgeous. And the book is filled with metaphors of things that are briefly gorgeous on earth. And I thought that was really, you know, there's probably some like we were said, literary analysis for that. But to me, I thought that was really big grain of him for lack of a better word. I think there was like a line about the monarch butterfly saying the parents don't return back to where they came from in terms of migration patterns is the children that goes back. And I was like, oh, that's like similar to immigration. But yeah, very big brain and I definitely don't have the big brain to talk about it. This is why I'm not in English major. This is why we stick to cozy mysteries and this is why I stuck to writing essays about films rather than books because I feel like I'm just not especially what poetry to I just feel like I don't get a lot of the metaphors. They kind of float past my head. But I really appreciate the fact that we read this book because it did challenge my brain. I mean, I think the act of reading it, whether or not you can articulate those feelings and those thoughts. Reading this book was affecting. And it the way that ocean writes is so beautiful and also visceral that it paints all sorts of pictures in your head and invokes a lot of feelings as you're reading it. And I thought that experience of reading it, you know, even if you don't might not necessarily relate to everything. Will affect your worldview one way or another. Whether or not this is the first time you're reading a refugee immigrant narrative or if it's just like your third or fourth time reading it, the way that he writes with such specificity and such a clear and I guess keen observational eye is you can't I don't think unless you just don't like reading, there's no way you can read this book and not come away with some sort of filming at least, you know? Yeah, yes. This book is definitely more about emotions than linear plot, yeah, like not a fan of stream of consciousness. Most of the time, I'm thinking about the sympathizer, which is also about the Vietnam refugee experience in war and how that was really difficult for me to wade through. But then with this book, I feel like because it was so poetic. There were definitely beats, right? Yeah. It's just like, oh yeah, there's a pause in between these lines. There's a rhythm to it. It's definitely easier to process. It's almost like it's inverse. Each part is a palm, even though they're also connected as a narrative. Yeah, I think, you know, I would really like to, if there is an audiobook of this of ocean reading, I would probably want to. I think he doesn't talk about it. Okay, he does. Yeah. I think I would benefit more from listening to it than reading it. Simply because I read it too quickly and it would be nice to just read it in the original rhythm and pacing that the author said it out to be. Yeah. Well, any final thoughts on earth were briefly gorgeous. I'm glad that we read it. I was really scared about reading it. It was funny because we were trying to think what we were going to read for November and I was just like, I don't know, do we read genre fiction again or are we going to read something a lot shorter? Because of the holidays, and I just looked at my Kindle library, I was like, oh, I have this book and I'm never going to read it unless I'm forced to read. Because it's totally out of my Wheelhouse. I happen to buy it because it was on, it was on sale. So I was like, okay. Yeah. This is a good opportunity to read it. And I hope it was a good opportunity for you guys to read it because sometimes we all need a push to read more challenging works. Definitely. I mean, this is a book that has been in the TBR pile for a long time because it's a book that much like. Much like minor feelings, it's a book that's always recommended as one of the books to read, but it's always been in the middle of that TBR for precisely that reason that I don't know if I'm equipped already to approach it. So thank you, RiRi for making me read it as well. Now I can now I can bring it up at dinner parties and be intellectual about it. But yeah, no, I really enjoyed it. It definitely was a different type of book that compared to what I typically read, but I am glad that I read it and I'm glad that I can say that I've read it.

Asia Hong Vietnam RiRi
"minor feelings" Discussed on The Argument

The Argument

08:06 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on The Argument

"Idea about that has actually occupied the past, you know, my entire career. You know, that is the question that haunts me, you know? And I think that this book is my attempt to process that, but I also think that, you know, it is complicated in many ways. I think that there's a way that you can think about whiteness as an economic construct in the way that he does. And I think in that sense, like, sure, I think that there will be upward mobility because that's how capitalism operates and you know, like people are not going to give up certain things. They're going to keep trying to get into these schools are going to keep trying to throw themselves on the gears of upward mobility, right? And it's hard to blame people for that because we live in a precarious country. And these are times. But on the other hand, there's like this personal aspect of it, right? And the personal aspect of it, I just don't know, you know? I certainly don't feel white, you know, I don't think I've ever felt white a day of my life, you know? I don't know many Asian people who do feel like I know maybe a couple, but I don't know. I think both are worth having conversations about, you know? And I don't mean to toss this off into like we should have discussions. But finally, it's time to have the conversation at another time. Yeah, the answer to the first one. Is a little more complicated because for the most part Asian Americans they're not in direct labor competition with white and black people, right? They are sort of off to the side in a way. And in that way, they're sort of left alone. And that creates different type politics when you're not in when you're not all fighting with each other. When you're just sort of like, well, I got a store over here, you know? Please come into my store if you'd like to, you know? But, you know, we're not fighting for the same job. We might be fighting for the same business in the same community, but we're not like, we're not working together. So I think that that's a little different. But I don't know. I think about the second question I think about a lot in context with my daughter who is mixed race and who is more in half years old right now. And I do think about that quite a bit because I think about my own childhood and what it was like to be so distinctly raised in such a, you know, in areas that almost no Asian people in it and what it did to me. And how it sort of formed me and I had this realization that she will not have that life, you know? She won't have the same sort of doubts and neuroses that I do. Tammy, 'cause I know that this is something you may have thought about too. What role do you think whiteness plays, especially for as J points out for a lot of I'm going to use the term Asian American even I know we're just having a conversation about how the term is useless for a lot of Asian American folks at no point has becoming white or appearing way ever been really part of the conversation. Yeah, I was just moderating a panel a few weeks ago on immigration in which basically one of the scholars said that the introductory for immigrant groups is whiteness. And I sat on the panel actually really don't. It was moderating, but I interjected to say no, I really don't think that's true. I don't feel right, and I don't think I'm destined for whiteness. And I'm not really sure where you got that. But yeah, I mean, I think he was trying to figure out playing on some of Knowles work and this kind of general understanding people have of like, if you get comfortable in this country, if you have a modicum of economic security in this country, are you white? You know, and I think that right now, like in Jay's book and other places where I might even throw like Kathy park hangs minor feelings into this, 'cause I think she makes some of these points as well. If you look just at the census numbers about how different Asian American groups are doing, yes, there is a very big gap between rich and poor, which is always talked about. But there is also for people Jay and my generation generally people are ascendant, economically, and that propels them into majority white spaces in a lot of places. And so I think we're constantly struggling with that of, okay, we see that our general environs are literally white, like physically white by the physiognomy of the people around us. And yet, when people call us white adjacent or that we are becoming white somehow by being in those spaces, there is a resentment. And I think James buck and Cathy's book is kind of trying to figure that out of then how are we supposed to feel about that? Because I don't like that. It sounds like an accusation, you know? It sounds like an insult. Yeah, like, but acting white canard or something. So in all these different ways, basically, the insult is like your attachment to whiteness. That's what you're kind of measured against. Right. I'm interested to ask both of you whether you think that a shared experience is necessary for an identity group such as it exists. I think a lot about how for African Americans you have a conceit of a shared experience of linkages to slavery or prejudice or something. You're brought together with a lot of people you would normally not talk to because of the vise of oppression. And you see that with any number of communities with LGBT folks, where it's like, well, you know, we all hate each other, but they hate us more, so we all have to work together and go to court a lot for 30 goddamn years to get basic stuff. But I'm interested if that shared experience is necessary to be thought of or to think of yourself as part of a group. That's a great question. I don't think it has to be, right? And I think that obviously people are always gonna dislike each other on an interpersonal level. But there are certain things that those groups do share that that Asian Americans don't necessarily always share. For example, language, right? If you don't speak English, right, then how do you sort of have that type of communication? The other thing is that these communities really do grow up in most places. They do sort of exist in isolation with one another. Now there are obviously exceptions to that, right? So Jackson heights, queens, it's like, you know, that's why they made the documentary about it so everyone loves it, right? Because it's like literally every person from every year you have Colombians, you have like Tibetans, you have not believe you have any Americans of Chinese people who have Korean people that are all there, right? Those places are somewhat rare. Generally, immigrant enclaves are actually enclaves. And so I think that it is difficult to convince people who don't think of themselves as a certain type of people that they are a people. And I think that's hard. I think that the gay community understands that they're gay, right? I think black community understands that they're black. I think the main problem with Asian American organizing is that many, many, many, many Asian Americans don't know that there should be, you know? Or they don't think of themselves as such. And I think that does add like a greater challenge to it. And I think that, you know, it is, it is a nice dream to think about, you know, could we all band together? That's what the activists in the 60s were doing, right? Basically their motto was like, well, everyone who doesn't fit in one of those groups just come over here, you know? It was like they're picking a dodgeball team or something like that, you know? We'll take everyone. We'll take everyone. I think that's just like, I think that's a beautiful impulse, you know? I think it's like a beautiful thing to have done back then. But those people are all people who had lived in the United States for three or four generations mostly. You know, they all spoke English, right? They all had a common language. And they all had similar experiences of being sort of racialized and being like, you know, anomalies. They all had similar experiences that way. And I think in Asian American, we're just not there yet, you know? Like, Tammy and I are basically what we're like the first generation or second generation of post heart seller kids, you know? You know, it's hard to find like an identity outside of that. Yeah, I think we don't need to share that much in order to use the category when we want to. I just think it's part of coalitional politics that you figure out what your interests are. And it's a strange bedfellow situation in all of these campaigns. I mean, I think even in the queer community, we can see that a lot of LGBT groups were riven by debates over gay marriage, gays in the military, over trans rights. That's continuing about are these the right strategies? Who are we? So.

Kathy park James buck Jay Tammy Knowles Cathy queens Jackson dodgeball United States
"minor feelings" Discussed on Books and Boba

Books and Boba

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Books and Boba

"Hot off. The twitter press kathy park hung author of minor feelings was included in time magazines. One hundred most influential people of twenty twenty one and There was like a feature written by ali. Wong a comedian who you might recognize from a always be my. Maybe the netflix film. Would randall park. But yeah like. This is the first time i've seen like an asian poet be featured on the one hundred most influential people list. It's usually like politicians or celebrities. So i was pretty impressed by that but at the same time minor feelings was like an extraordinary book especially during like the the early hate crimes against like asian americans during pandemic so. Yeah i could see why she was nominated and it's really cool to see her on the cover of time magazine because They they did like a cover for each person. Wow congrats to kathy. That's pretty quiet. I've seen the cover circulate through social media. So her book was always top of mind whenever whenever something should happen than we were like here. Read these books to extend the asian experience more. It's good to see her get recognition for for writing such a important not only for asians to read the public in general. I mean it really sucks when the responsibility of educating others about why your existence matters Shouldered upon us so. It's nice to have a book where you could just hand people being like. Hey read the your spare time because you know. I don't have the energy to educate you but if you guys are interested in hearing our thoughts about minor feelings we did do an episode on it. Minor feelings was a previous book club. Pick so check out that episode. Right so marvin. What's our next piece of news or we have a couple adaptation news this one from the hollywood reporter. Ace max won the rights to adopt the best added by malik pinch holy artistically and mc debut novel about rahul kapor a gate in the american teenager dealing with seventh grade crushes anxiety in small town in the and s he and his family seek to become the best version of themselves so mathematically is best known as the assistant to i think he was jacked army. He's the assistant on thirty rock. You can currently be the only murders in the building and also voice acting in disney. Junior spirit wrote detective. The half hour comedy will be written alongside michael golomb co who is the co writer of always be my maybe and used to work on grim as produced as part of imminent collision which is the production company. Started by michael. I'm coho and randall park So a lot of as america's entertainment Behind this project. And it's been digging a lot of these. Like asian americans coming of age high school shows and it's nice to have more queer representation with south asians on television and also in books I mean it's interesting because this is a middle grade novel but hbo. Max is adopting hp. Hbo's not really well known for a kid friendly contents. I'm really curious if they're going to age this up or amis. Hbo has sesame street right. Wasn't it owned by pbs. Before it was brought kazuki bs. But yeah 'cause sesame street has been an hbo series last few years. So she'll definitely has like a branding challenge when it comes to kids stuff. But it's not like having the kids before so i i think that makes sense. What's your next door so our next piece of book news is deadline. Derek sang oscar-nominated. Hong kong director of better days has signed on to help netflix series to help. Depth lexus-series adaptation of lucia. Schenn's sifi trilogy. The three body problem which was a former books and boba book club. Pick a game of thrones alumni. David benef- db weiss serve as show runners and executive producers under their overall. Deal with netflix flakes. Alexander woo hoo co created the series. With the game of thrones duo will serve as executive producer and writer. Good to fricken know that there is an asian who is going to be a producer and writer on the show. Because i have a bone to pick with. Dnd for what they did. Where game of thrones and just like how they wanted to make a series based on the confederate see as their follow up show like i have in putting my trust and alexander woo here but i feel like in weiss have definitely worn out there goodwill especially with those last two seasons of game of thrones hearing that they were involved are kinda winced little bit because the three body problem is such a chinese movie not just chinese but modern chinese story and the fact that they're not just executive producers no runners which means their their head writers pretty much. Yeah we're running their writing room. And i'd be curious to see who else in the writer's room. I'm curious to see what this adaptation is because like on two fronts right number one is. The bomb is not a simple story totally like up. Its own but hard scifi to have a lot of like concepts that they need to communicate That is a challenge for any any filmmaker director. Right and number two is again. It's such a chinese store. Like what are they going to. How are they going to adopt. Are they reset it. In america or the they have a hong kong director they have. Derek sang. Who is going to be directing the series. And you have someone who is. Asian of alexander is chinese as well. But i'm guessing that he is. You have at least two chinese people who are in very big roles for this adaptation. But like i said having dnd as show runners show runners having the most like amount of power. When it comes to creating the show. I don't know. I have doubts. Hopefully they hire more onto the project. I think that will be there make-or-break. I feel like there needs to be these to be very naive. I used to have a lot of chinese voice. And he's a lot of chinese people and not just like chinese americans like chinese people who understand chinese history and like modern society. There will be interesting because a big part of the story is about the repercussions of the cultural revolution. Which is a taboo topic in china. And it's an interesting time for this project. Go into production because of stuff. That's happened in china right now. But that's neither here nor there We'll we'll learn more about this project as it goes along but Yeah i think. I'm cautiously neutral.

randall park kathy park netflix Ace max malik pinch rahul kapor michael golomb Hbo hbo Wong David benef db weiss Alexander woo hoo co ali kathy marvin twitter Schenn hollywood hong kong
"minor feelings" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"They are and might your job it seems to me is to just make sure there's food in the fridge. Yeah that's huge one for their friends. It's huge and i also always tell moms and like look especially kind of five. I mean i just cannot care about everything right. And so i tell them figure out. You'll get very practiced at when it is appropriate to just literally act like you did not see that or not. You just didn't it didn't happen here. Just look the other way. Walk into another room and just let that would go. Isn't it what they recommend on certain sort of emails that come in or problems that people call you and if you just actually ignore it for a day it works itself and you don't even have to answer the email it's so true. I think that's a very very interesting parody tactic too that i played with regularity. Okay only wrap this up with you. 'cause you gotta go finish the book kosh the last two weeks because i i wanna send you all the wine okay. Here's the last couple of questions. Obviously you are as into literature as you are insufficient cooking. And so i love that about you. I'd love to know we'd all love to know what you are you know. What are to know the answer zero considering the you're the in stages of up but what is let's just going to last counter a booker to that. You have read that you love that you're recommending. You can't quit thinking about that. We probably put on our lists that symphony. I actually read all the time. Why even now. Yeah and especially now. I think i'm i keep reading books by people who don't want to write about what they're writing about to see if they figured it out and so i had just finished cathy. Park hong minor feelings thought was so good and she she said. I just don't want to write about race. But i go so she did that. And i read memorial drive patricia tretheway. She definitely did not want to deal with the father in that book and she didn't so i wanted to see how she handled so those were good. I thought shuki baynes. So good i happen to have read. Any dillard's pilgrim at tinker creek. Which i think is from the nineteen seventies and. Yeah i don't want to master. What shirt do you have a preferred genre. Do you tend to reach for a specific space on the shelf. No i don't either. It's a little bit. Like when people used to recommend restaurants to me. I would i would wait until about seven or eight people said the same name and then i would go to that restaurant and i do the same with books when one really starts to rise to the top and percolate with a lot of people's minds and i'm i'm like yeah that's that is new to the fifth or six times. Some something has made visited me. I'm just assuming it's time does your new title or can you even say it. It's sort of fluctuating back and forth. So i can't i. I think it's next of kin and it also has kind regards so somewhere there. And as as i hope you'll you'll know it's not the title. It's freaking subtitle. I half find the subtitle. I just wanna play myself off building when it comes to the i laugh like in public Such a lack of of innovation and creativity because almost all some titles kind of have the same exact structure right swap out the agents. That is right. Just so i could all all my hair out my lonely of learning french and totally every time i turn a bucket. I propose an obnoxious subtitle. It is literary disaster. It's clunky and weird and always rejected but one of these times it went through Just have a subtitle. That's actually him. Rable but I feel your affiliate pay At least you're down this first draft. And then he just go into absolute gauntlet of editing. This is exciting so exciting for us as your readers. I'm so thrilled to know that. You are writing another memoir. Ihs i will be the first person to buy it. So i hope. I i'm prepared to lose everybody on this one. You know this not a lotta food in it advani. Then as i told you suicide is a dark subject. But it's not jolly but again. I think even like like what you said earlier in this post coded ethos were all in now. It's changed if all fundamentally and community. I'm not sure. We're i think we're leaning into stories that are true the true about the hard and because we're actually all experiencing at every single one of us and so i. I think your book is well-timed on. I think you're i think the collect readership was ready for it and have not already cages for it so glad atta girl now. You're talking business okay. Well cheering you on. I can't wait for krant our backup. I'm in new york city. A lot and i will a hundred percent. Be there as soon as we can. And and all your work. I just really love what you do in the world. That's so happy that you have committed to doing the things that you do well and it's just a real delight for the rest of this so thanks for being who you are. You're so kind thanks. Yeah absolutely be those boys they will be. It'll be over in a one second gone so give them whatever they got it. Hey thanks debbie out..

patricia tretheway shuki baynes tinker creek dillard cathy advani krant new york city debbie
"minor feelings" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

Yo, Is This Racist?

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Yo, Is This Racist?

"We got most mileage on it. Yeah sure they read on but they don't read a ton of books. I feel based on my knowledge of actors correct but so yeah i do run into people but i also talked to a lot of authors and most authors do read a lot of books though there are some authors who write not as good books because they don't read books. I'm sure there. They're like this book that needs to be in the world. And i'm like this book exists by someone better than you but okay go off But yeah i mean. I definitely run into people who who don't read literature for whatever reason Andrew what is like. How do you like to get a book recommend. do you like to go. Hey this is something i like. Give me a better version of that. Or do you just want to be like i wanna feel like this My instinct is probably that what i like is not a good way to approach it because okay i suspect has led me to the bookshelf. That i have for instance while so i just i just actually read minor feelings in the free show and yoke. You'll i'm mary eight choi so much she was on her past isn't that it is a really great book. It is one of those books. I believe at one point. She tried to 'cause. I know her a little bit from new york she tried..

Andrew new york mary eight choi one point a ton of books one of those books
"minor feelings" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

The Design of Business - The Business of Design

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on The Design of Business - The Business of Design

"So we have to take a pause. You're so creative. And funny and honest and you're developing this extraordinary award-winning body of work wrapping your point of view around an iconic part of our lives centuries old. How do you think about the future of book design I feel like their future. Your curiosity your humor that you've the you're going to be moving things an interesting direction. Is there anything you can say about that. It's hard to say what the future of book cover. Designer book design will look like i think that publishing and a lot of other you know even design as these industries that are supposed to be forward thinking. I think we've fallen behind in a lot of ways as we talk about equity and fairness and all of that i just think like things need to change. I mean obviously it's like a huge systemic issue but also you know the question i ask myself everyday is like m i a part of the problem or am i gonna somehow be a part of the solution so i only recently have become a manager and it's something i think about every day like how i'm gonna communicate my designers or you know who i don't even call one of them as mine designers to dislike the other members of the team. How do i make the process a little more democratic while still having structure and try to like set them up to sixty and grow and feel confident. I think like the way of thinking like i went through this. So it's okay is completely backwards and wrong by feeling is that i went through this and i don't want anyone else to experience this again. You know we make choices and decisions every day on how we talk to people and treat people. And that's one of the most important things i learned by working in restaurants. You know and. I think it goes beyond just like inclusion like. I'm not interested in hearing about diversity inclusion. if you're not setting up these people to succeed. I don't think it's something that will be resolved right away but it gives me hope that i see people making steps to make changes speaking in a general way across all of publishing really making sure that the entry level talent is underpaid and subsidized by family. If they possibly can be and it's very hard to break in and Very hard very good work. It's done by people who don't make a lot of money you know it's like these these things are seen and known and people are getting busy around them. Yeah i mean. When i started i was paid twelve dollars an hour for about a almost a year. You know. I had to still work at a restaurant to be able to have that job. It's just not possible for a lot of people to even dream about entering publishing design. Because you know your livelihood is more important several several times. And i read that you said in an interview that you succeeded because of a little luck and a lot of help how do you see yourself helping or making luck for the next generation designers for me. I always try to remember that. They're not me. So i try my best to hear what they're saying. Instead of you know what. I think they should be saying but also My career started from from basically cold emails. So i try to respond to any cold emails that i get tried to set up phone calls with people and review their portfolios. If they need advice also. I felt like this is really important to me and this is something patty rochford that i appreciate so much is that she really let me make a lot of bad work to kind of work through it. I think that helped me build a little bit of confidence to think individually instead of trying to solve a problem and figure out what they want because they feel like the minute you start thinking about what the client wants too much then. That's when you start slipping into bad work. Her not just like telling me my work was bad and instead helping me figure out a way to make it better like she gave a lot of positive reinforcement which let me take risks that i may be otherwise. Wouldn't have so. It's something i try to think about. When i talked to other designers about their work. Have you ever needed to consult A sensitivity expert to make sure that it was culturally aligned. If that happened yet. I think they do that on the editorial side but in terms of the cover. That hasn't formally happened yet but it is a conversation that happens. You know maybe between myself and the creative director or the designers or things like that It's it's really messed up. Actually that it's so hard to find black and brown book coverage designers and now there are like social networks stat represent them a bit more but it's still not enough especially when you're trying to create a more diverse face than have the designs reflect that i feel like what i struggle with a lot is like that kind of line between tokenism and representation like i'm happy that i got to for example work on the cover for minor feelings like i love. Cathy park hong. Her literature is like really important to me. As like a korean-american. I wanna work on this and really be able to create a design that reflects. What's in the book accurately from a korean american perspective. I think that's important. But also a lot of times. Like get like all the asian american books or like just books by minorities or marginalized groups in general. And i'm like this is kind of a problem you know at i. I don't really know that. There's like an immediate solution to it. Which is why we have to do. Things like invest in younger people. Think of mentorship programs that extend outside of art schools. It's gonna take a lot of work..

Cathy park hong korean-american patty rochford twelve dollars an hour one about a almost a year korean american up to sixty asian american centuries
"minor feelings" Discussed on Just Between Us

Just Between Us

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Just Between Us

"Why i mean there's a lot of really we big questions. That that that we i ask myself i look at my kids. Who are biracial. Like i don't know what life is good. I don't i have no idea how to conceptualize how they're going to grow up there so different are ready just by not mean just by being born into this particular money in my husband and my history there so different but then on top of that you add not only the social structure and the class structure but the race on top of that. It feels a little bit like a parenting has been such an out of body experience. even that level. You know so. I think that for me at least An and because i have always turned to. It's what i do for a living it but it would be something that is just in my nature. I was always that the the the kid with the book at the dinner table. Kind of a person for me. It's been taking the class. It's been reading. It's been engaging in conversations in places where i'm getting news that i've never even considered before All of those things help me see. The blind spots are so huge even in my understanding of who i am even in my participation of my own perpetuation of the model minority myth for myself but also for my friends. And how like you said how i talk about it me too. How do you do that. How do you do that without first. Having to me. I'm so so grateful for these. Asian writers have been able to articulate it in a way that i it just you know so so for me it starts there. It starts with that learning. It starts with the very simple task of approaching it like okay. Let's do the work you're out. What is the history of this. And why does it matter and so when you start to see other people articulated. Then you're like. I can build on that. I can start to see how that has been present in my life so even just recently. You know the book. I'm that has blown my mind. And i would highly recommend anyone interested in this subject is minor feelings and.

first Asian
"minor feelings" Discussed on Here's Something Good

Here's Something Good

08:27 min | 1 year ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on Here's Something Good

"At seneca women. We know a great way to advance. Women is to support. Women led businesses and one concern for moms who run businesses is child care especially during this pandemic so we were delighted to hear that p. and g. and its brand secret. Deodorant are partnering with the ywca to help pay for childcare services and programming for more than a hundred thousand women and their families to learn more. Listen to this week's made by women. Podcast on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Look into this episode of. Here's something good. A production of the seneca women podcast network and iheartradio each day. We aspire to bring you the good news the silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day we just need to look for and share it. Here's something good for today with the recent surge in violence against asian-americans one thing many of us are asking is what can be done. We can make a first step towards progress when we try to understand other cultures and one great way to do that is through books. We got advice on what to read from. Joanna belfer the independent bookstore owner of bel canto books in long beach california. Joanna is doing her part to help educate others by amplifying asian american authors invoices. She's also working with a group of asian american authors on a campaign. They started the hashtag. Stand up for a api campaign. We spoke joanna. The book she recommends and to learn about the incredible work. She's doing with the standup. For asian american and pacific islanders campaign. Here's what she had to say. Joanna thanks so much for joining us live pleasure to be here right. Now is a particularly challenging. Time for the asian american community. How can reading books by asian american help others better understand and support the asian american community. Right now i think we've learned that action Reading especially fiction is a wonderful tool for building empathy and for immersing yourself in someone else's experience when you read a book you know you're making that action come alive And it's all in your head and so you really can get into the feelings and frustrations and challenges and dreams of another character. And so i think by reading books by asian american authors and by authors of the asian diaspora. We can more fully experience. What they're during in that In that book and And hopefully that will lead to a greater sense of other people's Struggles and Being able to have more empathy for them. Now we understand that you and other members of the books to graham community have started a campaign called stand up for a api. Can you tell us a little bit about that. Got bully a friend of mine. Michelle jackson who is very active bookstore grammar which. I wasn't really that aware of until i opened this bookstore. But there's a very active community on instagram. People who love books and lets you share and talk about books And michelle had been talking with another friend of hers on Young adult writer named do then park on. All three us are asian american and You know we had obviously been responding in shock and anger and fear and upset about the shootings in the atlanta area as well as all the other incidents than intact being shared and talk about now. The violence against asian americans and Minorities in this country has been going on for for centuries but we're definitely seeing an uptick in violence now and Michelle said you know. What can we do about it. would you like to be involved in something onto highlight this issue and call our community into action so we started with a campaign of everyday posting on instagram. And talking about issues in terms of you know what our own experiences Have been growing up. In america books that we love by asian american and eating authors fellow reviewers and authors and artists and that are owned by asians And just trying to highlight and promote that asian american pacific islander community As well as called people to action and Commit or pledged to doing something in the real world. Now here's seneca women. We were particularly interested in showcasing women authors. Which books by women office would you recommend for our community. Sadly felt on asian american woman and a filipina who's educated here in the us and went through the american educational system. I don't think unfortunately that we do a great job of teaching history anybody's salary really To our can especially contemporary history and so we actually started an asian american book clubs here at the store and Our first book that we read for book club was making it. Beijing america by erica lee and in that book through the history of asian coming to north and south america. I'm starting from the sixteen hundred all the way up to the president. So that's a great place to start and really open your experience to go the long history of asian you know migrating All over the world My recommendation for contemporary book would be mirrored jacob. Good talk a memoir and conversation. This is a spectacular graphic novel that takes as its jumping points the conversation she was having with her young son. Who's biracial mirror indian-american. Her cousin is jewish and her young son was asking her questions about race. And then with the rise of trump and the last election cycle he started having more challenging questions about you know what there wasn't in america and how people felt about brown and black bodies so that is a fantastic book to pick up at this time. Do you have any recommendations for our listeners. Who know these topics particularly well but perhaps could learn more. I think that for folks that are already reading. Asian american literature minor feelings by coffey park. Home is a wonderful book to start with. Its subtitle is an asian american reckoning. I think you can see right there. What cathy's take is on things. She is a poet and educator And she talks about things like the racism and bigotry. She experienced in her. Mfa program and the circle she based as a woman poet and just her encounters of everyday life trying to did into the society. The other book i would recommend is written by e. based writer deaf cha. And that's called your house will pay and it's a closer look at race dynamics through the lens of two families one crean on one black in los angeles and it takes us a jumping off point actually true event that happened here in la just prior to the la riots and then it jumps forward in time to contemporary time to show where what's happened with those families and those events that is so helpful and it's so good to know we can all do our part to help elevate asian american authors invoices. So here's something could for today. I as joanna tells us books can be a wonderful tool in building empathy for others reading about asian. American experiences can lead to a better understanding second. Joanna gives us some great ideas for our reading list for historical background. She recommends the making of asian america by eric early for more contemporary perspective. Consider the graphic novel memoir. Good talk a memoir. In conversation by mirror jacobs you can find thousands of inspiring posts and conversations about supporting the asian american pacific islander community when you check out hashtag. Stand up for a api on instagram. You can also visit. Johannes bookstore at bel canto books dot net..

Michelle Joanna Michelle jackson erica lee michelle trump joanna america atlanta coffey park Joanna belfer seneca ywca los angeles first book two families jacob jewish bel canto books instagram
"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

"She's half Asian, half white, so I don't really know. I mean, I think at this point, she's proud to be half Korean. Or she doesn't even say she's half Korean, she says. I'm Korean and that really works my heart. You know that she doesn't even think twice about it, you know? And but I don't think she knows really knows what that means. You know, I think she thinks Oh, Korean, like Grandma and Grandpa Korean, like the food that I eat, but I don't think she really understands that. She's never visited Korea. She doesn't have a deep understanding of what races and I'm I think it'll change. I don't know. I'm not saying it's going to change for the better. I'm just saying it'll change in some way. Uh, you know, I don't even know if Asian American will be a category might be called something different. You know when she's an adult terms, because I know I can't keep up anymore. Let me tell you I can't keep up, but they're always making up new terms, and they're going to continue making up new terms and So she might identify is something else When she's older. We don't we don't know. I don't know. I don't know. Yeah. You know, there was so many lines in this book that stopped me in my tracks, either. I stopped and said yes. All right, just like paused. In kind of emotional and you There was one line that you wrote. That just is like etched on me. Now you're talking about your daughter. And how you're raising her and response to the trauma that you experienced as a kid in response to the trauma your family experienced And you wrote about your daughter. Quote. I am not passing down happy memories of my own. So much as I can stage happy memories for her. It was beautiful and also sad and I just want to ask you to close how that's going. Yeah, you know, you make your own rituals, you make your own traditions and What happens? You know, I started writing that book when she was born, and now she's six years old is that I've read her so many times, or I've given her bats or go on. Take her to the playground. Is that like We're making these memories They don't feel stage anymore is just the experiences of my daughter and me. And now I think I want her to have these memories for when she's she's an adult. You know, we're making our own rituals. We're making our own traditions in the way that my parents had to improvise and make traditions when they first moved here. And hopefully my daughter will have happy memories when she's living in a bunker. And there's a drink the populist Hey. Well, thank you so much for this. Thank you. A real pleasure. Thanks again to Kathy Park Hong. Her latest book is called Minor Feelings. An Asian American Reckoning. It is out now go get it. Coming up a chat with another author and poet Claudia Rankine will discuss her book, just US American conversation and Body talks about how she strikes up important conversations about race. With friends and strangers. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. She tried a few more things and nothing was working, and then she looks at.

Grandpa Korean Grandma Claudia Rankine Korea NPR Kathy Park Hong Body
"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

"And why is the U. S botching its vaccine Rollout Sunday on weekend edition from NPR News Sunday mornings till 10. On 89.3 kpcc on Lisa Edwards. My name is Tracy Moore. We're here to talk about why we're leaving a legacy gift kpcc, reliable and well researched and honest reporting, then that's what this station does join Lisa and Tracy and Remember Kpcc in your Will get the conversation started at kpcc dot or g'kar slash legacy. Support for NPR comes from this station and from dual lingo, a language learning app built around the idea that learning should be fun with more than 34 languages, including endangered languages. Dual lingo is available as an APP for download. From the Annie E. Casey Foundation, using research and evidence to develop solutions that help families and communities create a brighter future for young people. More information is available at a CF daughter, Warg. And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. And to kick off this new year we're airing a chat with an author I loved from last year. Her name is Kathy Park. Hong And her latest book is called Minor Feelings. It's all about those painful feelings around race and representation that people of color experience. A lot. So many of those feelings were once quiet, But in the last year or so, they've gotten much, much louder. In this chat. Kathy tells us why that's a good thing. And she also talks about how her own Asian American identity and her family history inspired her book, My inner Feelings. Listeners. This episode contains some very frank discussions about race, and it includes some racial slurs. So be warned, all right? He was more of my chat with Kathy Park Hong You know, you mentioned your family history. So much of this book is you want.

"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KPCC

"You think you've, I don't know either made peace or had some growth with this. Idea of the white audience. The white gays, G A Z e. You know, I think about this a lot as well. Like My audience is mostly white. I work in public radio. Whether I'm not talking about race or I'm only talking about race. My audience is mostly white, and I don't think I like that. Hold me back, but it's always there and I'm always thinking about it. I'm guessing that even with this book that you wrote minor feelings That a large chunk of folks about it are white. How have you or how has I guess? Your perspective on who? That audiences and how you speak to them, perhaps changed since the stand up comedy routines. Well, I think this goes back to Richard Pryor. You know, like when I was reading about Richard Pryor. Fans, scholars, anyone who's I mean a lot of white people found it hilarious. But then there are also black people who said they were just shocked. There was that quote unquote shock of recognition. They're like, Oh, my God. I can't believe he's like telling our private jokes to the public. You know, business, the family business, right? I think like from him and all that. Also a lot of other writers and artists who I'm inspired by. I thought I'm really going to try as hard as I can. To disregard. White gays and try to write. I can't even say, try to write for Asians because there's so many different kinds of Asian Americans. You know, it was almost it was like I wanted to. I had to think of specific people. I was like, I'm going to write to That, um, create American student who came up to me and cried after I gave a reading because she said she felt so alone and there was no one she could talk, Tomo You know, I wanted to write to my daughter who is now six. When she's an adult. It was almost like I was trying to have a conversation to other people that I knew in that way. I was writing to myself as well. And yes, there were a lot of white people who have bought the book. But actually, what has been incredibly gratifying is that there have been so many Asian Americans who have told me that they feel seen And that they've never had their experiences written down the way that I wrote it down. So it's I realized that I don't need a white audience to make Commercially successful book. I just need to write to my community and that community will respond. That is more important than anything else that being said. It's not like I don't want white people. My book. I want everyone by the book, like people pleased by the book. I want everyone to read my book. It's funny whenever I mentioned the white gays and an interview, G A Z E. Someone write to me and says, I couldn't tell if you were talking about white gays are like white gay men. Listeners. We're talking about the white gays G A Z E but Any white gays D a. Y s listening thinking this refers to you. It does. Definitely. I'm definitely writing it for white case shout out to our white gays supporters. We appreciate you. Yeah, you know you Just mentioned having this fear that your book wouldn't speak to all Asian Americans. And you write that. You know, the Asian American experience is incredibly diverse. You know, this is a demographic group that has The largest variation in average income than any other demographic group in the country. And yet you write about how the identity of Asians in America is constantly and this is the word you use flattened. What do you mean by that? When you say it's flattened? Well, I would say that Asian Americans at this point like it's not even exactly. It's less an identity. Then more like a coalition of different I dent nationalities. Classes, genders sexualities, you know, um a lot of people when they think Asian, they think Chinese or they think model minority they think like Chinese. Engineer who works in Silicon Valley or something, or they think I look at Asian news anchorwoman or something. And when you know you have everyone from the Chinese American engineer who works in Silicon Valley. To someone who's monk who lives in Minnesota and who lives in the projects alongside other black Americans, You know, so there's there's such a such a wide display of what Asian American is, and I have to be very clear about this. It's also the book is also about this country from the perspective of an Asian American woman. This book is not just about my identity, but it's also about the kind of changing demographic of this nation and the future of this nation. And someone who is part of that. And what someone from the this Growing demographic thinks about this country. You know why I say this in the book that in 2050, the majority will be people of color. Now. What does that mean? And I This is why I don't want just Asians to read this book. I want everyone to read this book. Why gays? You can read it too. Yes, Lights are Uh, one of the parts of the book that really really opened. My eyes was the work you did to point out the racialized history of Asians in America. I think part of the flattening of Asian identity happens because most Americans don't know the history of Asians in this country. You know, before I read this book, I didn't know that Chinese people were brought into America to replace slaves in the plantation field after the Civil war. I don't know It's already. Yeah. You in the book writing that I didn't know the way in which U. S immigration policy kind of helped create the myth. Of Asians as a model minority, and I read it in your book. You know? What does it say about all of us or about the American experiment that so much of this history? Of Asians in America is erased. I There's a big reckoning that this country has to Face and so far, the history that I learned in when I was in high school was a history that was I don't want to say jingoistic, but you know that. Did what? That it was jingoistic. Yeah, completely whitewashed even slavery. I didn't even know even the beginning of how this country is founded on black death. Slavery dispossession. There was no there was no, I didn't learn about Asian Americans in high school. I didn't read Asian Americans in high school. It was I did. I had to seek it out in college, You know?.

America Richard Pryor white Silicon Valley G Chinese American Minnesota Engineer U. S engineer
"minor feelings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I would just do a little comedy routine. Instead, Cathy told me one of those jokes and listeners. It was so raunchy. We cannot actually repeat it on this public radio show. I did ask Kathy if she thought that joke, her jokes or any good. They were all horrible. They were really, really bad, so bad that they stopped her audiences cold. They looked at me as if I like. Pissed my pants. They're horrified. I mean, they're just so embarrassed for me. So on the show today, Kathy Park Hong will show us all why she is better at writing books than telling jokes. We'll discuss that book I mentioned it's called minor feelings. It came out in February of 2020, but it is still so timely. All right to start. What does the phrase minor feelings mean? Exactly? Kathy, Go ahead. It's Thies range of kind of negative emotions like shame or paranoia or melancholia that a lot of Asian Americans feel growing up in the US, It's not just Asian Americans, you know, it could also be other people of color. Not just because they feel different in this country, but also because their reality that they're living is not recognized by the dominant society. Basically all the weird and often bad ways people of color experience race. The stuff that's always there and the stuff that were often reluctant to actually talk about, Cathy says. For years, she was reluctant to write about her own personal minor feelings because she knew a lot of white people were reading. In the book she describes having to get over that, so that's where we start on her audience who it is and how it affects what Kathy writes..

Kathy Cathy Kathy Park Hong US
"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"At 11 o'clock this morning. You can catch the program. Wait, wait. Don't tell me 10 o'clock Sunday mornings. On KQED Public radio, where support comes from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, presenting a major rep retrospective of the beloved Barea figured of painter David Park on view now through January, 18th for reserve time tickets visit SF Moment Out, or G'kar and Silicon Valley Community Foundation, whose donors contributed $500 million to local nonprofits in 2020, including for pandemic relief. Area residents still need help to join these efforts. Visit Silicon Valley, c f dot or G'kar. Support for NPR comes from this station and from dual lingo, a language learning app built around the idea that learning should be fun with more than 34 languages, including endangered languages. Dual lingo is available as an app for download. From the Annie E. Casey Foundation, using research and evidence to develop solutions that help families and communities create a brighter future for young people. More information is available at a CF daughter Warg. And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. You're listening to. It's been a minute from NPR. I'm Sam Sanders. And to kick off this new year we're airing a chat with an author I loved from last year. Her name is Kathy Park. Hong And her latest book is called Minor Feelings. It's all about those painful feelings around race and representation that people of color experience. A lot. So many of those feelings were once quiet, But in the last year or so, they've gotten much, much louder. In this chat. Kathy tells us why that's a good thing. And she also talks about how her own Asian American identity and her family history inspired her book, minor feelings. Listeners. This episode contains some very frank discussions about race, and it includes some racial slurs. So be warned, all right? He was more of my chat with Kathy Park Hong You know, you.

"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:29 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You think you don't know either made peace or had some growth with this? Idea of the white audience. The white gays, G A Z e. You know, I think about this a lot as well. Like My artist is mostly white. I work in public radio. What? I'm not talking about race or I'm only talking about race. My audience is mostly white, and I don't think I like that. Hold me back, but it's always there and I'm always thinking about it. I'm guessing that even with this book that you wrote minor feelings That a large chunk of folks about it are white. How have you or how has I guess? Your perspective on who the audience is and how you speak to them, perhaps changed since the stand up comedy routines. Well, I think this goes back to Richard Pryor. You know, like when I was reading about Richard Pryor. Fans, scholars, anyone who's I mean a lot of white people found it hilarious. But then there are also black people who said they were just shocked There is that quote unquote shock of recognition. You're like, Oh, my God. I can't believe he's like telling our private jokes to the comic. You know, business, the family business, right? I think like from him and all the also a lot of other writers and artists who are inspired by I thought. I'm really going to try as hard as I can to disregard the white gays and try to write. I can't even say try to write for Asians because There's so many different kinds of Asian Americans. You know, it was almost it was like I wanted to. I had to think of specific people. I was like, I'm going to write to that create American student who came up to me. And cried after I gave a reading because she said she felt so alone and there was no one she could talk to. Oh, you know, I wanted to write To my daughter, who is now six. When she's an adult. It was almost like I was trying to have a conversation to other people that I knew in that way. I was writing to myself as well. And yes, there were a lot of white people who have bought the book. Actually, What has been incredibly gratifying is that there have been so many Asian Americans who have told me that they feel scene and that they've never had their experiences written down. The way that I wrote it down. So it I realized that I don't need a white audience to make commercially successful book. I just need to write to my community and that community will respond. That is more important than anything else that being said. It's not like I don't want white people. My book. I want everyone by the book. Yeah, like people, please by the book. I want everyone to read my book. It's funny whenever I mentioned the white gays and interviewed G A Z e someone write to me and says I couldn't tell if you were talking about white gays are like white gay men. Listeners We're talking about the white gays G A Z E but any white gays do u a. Y s listening thinking this refers to you? It does. I definitely I'm definitely writing it for white case. Not out to our white gays supporters. We appreciate you. Yeah. You know, you just mentioned having this fear that your book wouldn't speak to all Asian Americans. And you write that you know, the Asian American experience is Incredibly diverse. You know, this is a demographic group that has the largest variation in average income than any other demographic group in the country. And yet you write about how the identity of Asians in America is constantly and this is the word you use flattened. What do you mean by that? When you say it's flattened? Well, I would say that Asian Americans at this point like It's not even exactly. It's less an identity then more like a coalition of different I dent nationalities, classes, genders, sexualities, you know. A lot of people when they think Asian, they think Chinese or they think model minority. They think like Chinese engineer who works in Silicon Valley or something, or they think I look a Asian news anchorwoman or something. And when you know you have everyone from the Chinese American engineer who works in Silicon Valley to someone who's monk who lives in Minnesota and who lives in the projects alongside other black Americans, you know, so there's There's such a such a wide display of what Asian American is, and I have to be very clear about this. It's also the book is also about this country. From the perspective of an Asian American woman. This book is not just about my identity, but it's also about the kind of changing demographic of this nation and the future of this nation. And someone who is part of that. And what someone from the this growing demographic thinks about this country. You know why I say this? In the book that in 2050, the majority will be people of color Now. What does that mean? And I This is why I don't want just Asians to read this book. I want everyone to read this book. Why gays? You can read it too. Yes, white, one of the parts of the book. That really, really opened. My eyes was the work you did to point out the racialized history of Asians in America. I think part of the flattening of Asian identity happens because most Americans don't know the history of Asians in this country, you know, before I read this book I didn't know that Chinese people were brought into America to replace slaves in the plantation field after civil war. I don't know It's already you in the book writing that I didn't know the way in which U. S immigration policy kind of helped create the myth of Asians as a model minority. And I read it in your book. You know? What does it say about all of us or about the American experiment that so much of this history of Asians in America? Is erased. I There's a big reckoning that this country has to face and so far the history that I learned in when I was in high school. Was a history that was I don't want to say jingoistic, but you know that did what did that all right? It was jingoistic. Yeah, completely whitewashed even slavery. I didn't even know even the beginning of how this country is founded on black death. Slavery dispossession. There was no there was no, I didn't learn about Asian Americans in high school. I didn't read Asian Americans in high school. It was I did. I had to seek it out in college, You know? Ah, Lot of Americans also don't know about Asian American activism, you know, and how the term Asian American was actually coined it..

America white Richard Pryor Silicon Valley engineer Chinese American G U. S Minnesota
"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Valley s F Sorry It's Silicon Valley C F It's the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. So Silicon Valley seat F dot or Here's what's coming up at 10 o'clock this morning. Kathy Park Hong's recent book tackle, Something called Minor Feelings. So what aren't my inner feelings? These range of kind of negative emotions like shame or paranoia that a lot of Asian Americans feel growing up in the U. S. Kathy Park on on Asian American identity and our own personal minor feelings Next time on, it's been a minute from NPR. It's been a minute with Sam Sanders coming your way 10 o'clock every Saturday Morning on KQED. I'm Barbara Klein. With these headlines. Iran says it's planning to enrich uranium up to 20% well still below weapons grade. The move would be Tehran's most serious violation of the 2015 nuclear agreement. Dr Anthony Fauci says the U. S. Should not follow Britain's vaccination regimen, which allows for a longer gap between doses. The UK says it's offering a single dose to his many people as possible, which could delay the second one by up to three months. In France. Clashes broke out this morning when police moved in to shut down. To day New Year's Eve rave. Some 2500 people were attending the event. Violating coronavirus rules on Barbara Klein. NPR NEWS.

Silicon Valley Community Found Barbara Klein Kathy Park Hong U. S. Kathy Park NPR NPR NEWS Sam Sanders Dr Anthony Fauci KQED Tehran Iran France UK Britain
"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"minor feelings" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here for five hours, five hours. Yes, Tasha has lived through periods of war military coups through three decades of Islamist rule. He says. Nothing compares to what's happening now. Is it only bread or is that everything everything man Daniel suffered in Sudan. We are suffering. He says. They can't get fuel hospitals and even vegetables have become too expensive. The price of bread has doubled. But as we talk a baker, finally hands Taj five agains You've got your bread. You see this? Yeah, This'll is nothing human Being There is so little Beat in the country that the flour to make bread is mixed with sorghum, Sudanese e flat bread soft, puffy goodness that almost tastes buttery, but you can't make flatbread out of this. Wheat and sorghum makes back in December of 2018 government of Omar al Bashir was facing a huge budget shortfall. So they cut the subsidies on bread in the price doubled, Sudanese took to the streets to call for his ouster by the spring of 2019. Bashir was gone and Sudan began a transition into a more democratic in a more secular country. It was a moment of great expectations. But one thing did not change the government is Brooke. Essentially, there is no money right? Because you're not exporting anything. You're not producing anything that is political analyst solid lead, he says. This transitional government has plugged the budget shortfall by printing money. And that has triggered massive inflation. It means workers can't afford basics with their salary. It means imports have become expensive or non existent. People are finding it more difficult to get by. On a day by day basis, protesters have once again taken to the streets. They have stopped short of calling for the ouster of the government. Holly says. That's because unlike when Bashir was in power, Sudanese right now have hope that things can change if it wasn't for that glimpse of hope life would be really difficult to be really, really difficult. Back at the bakery, the owner Hamid Syed Abdul Rahim, Gives me a short tour, not Delta 600 that feeds them in Myanmar. In the good days, he says, These shocks would be totally full of pillowy flatbread. This'd be the best bread in the neighborhood, and he said he used to be the best. But it was not what what happened? Oh, my God, No. Yeah, I got it. It's the ingredient Abdul around him says Like everyone in Sudan these days, he's just trying to make the best out of what he's been had. Ended eight of Peralta. NPR NEWS, KHARTOUM You're listening to NPR news. You're listening on KQED Public radio Kathy Park Hong's recent book tackle something called Minor Feelings. So what aren't my inner feelings Thies range of kind of negative emotions like shame or paranoia that a lot of Asian Americans Feel growing up in the U. S. Kathy Park, com on Asian American identity and our own personal minor feelings. Next time on, it's been a minute from NPR. It's been a minute with Sam Sanders comes your way. 10 o'clock every Sunday morning on KQED followed at 11 on this week's Wait, Wait..

Sudan Hamid Syed Abdul Rahim Omar al Bashir NPR Daniel Tasha KQED Public KQED Sam Sanders Kathy Park Hong Brooke KHARTOUM U. S. Kathy Park political analyst Thies Myanmar Holly Peralta
Book News For October 2020

Books and Boba

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Book News For October 2020

"All right. Our first book deal is scholastic press acquired to change a planet by Christina Sinturin Vat. Illustrated by Rally Jim Poor Bell. The nonfiction picture book explains Climate Change, with honesty and hope for very young readers. Publication is scheduled for twenty twenty two is awesome. Crisanto avant is known for writing novels. So it's kind of cool to see her writing. A book for younger readers as well. Yes. So Christina soon, turned that we've had her on our show for We talked about a wish in the dark, which is middle grade tie inspired fantasy, and she recently came out with all thirteen, the incredible cave rescue of the Thai boys soccer team. So this would be her second nonfiction book, but this is a picture book so I like. I'm sure it's going to be just as great as her other books. Yeah. Our next book deal barefoot books but road rights to dumpling day by MIRA, serum illustrated in this day onto neon. No. In this multi-cultural counting book ten contemporary families, Cook Different types of dumplings for neighborhood potluck featuring food from their culture's. Publication is planned for fall twenty. Twenty. One Speaking of dumplings. So I had Ravioli, last night for dinner. And you know like random conversations, top Dan and I are talking and Dan was saying is really considered a dumpling. Probably Right. It's like pasta stuff with something. Our next book deal is Harpercollins Balza and Bray acquired. This place is still beautiful by debut author. She she ten the why a novel is about to estranged Sisters Margaret on early whose family becomes the victim of an anti Asian hate crime during a summer that includes surprising romances for both sisters they clashed with one another as they navigate the ripple effects that the hate crime has had in their community and uncovered the truth behind the perpetrators identity publication is set for spring twenty, twenty two. It sounds interesting because You know like we talked about this in our episode with minor feelings, but a lot of like Asian Americans are. Considered to be. Next in next in line to be White and people forget that model minority is a myth and it is a way to create a wedge between. The different minority groups. So I, think it is a very interesting Subject, to explore for WII novel. So yeah. congrats to she she for getting the story out there. our next Greystone kids acquired world rights to bioluminescence by Julia club a picture book that explores bioluminescence in nature under the seat in the woods and in the air publication scheduled for Spring Twenty, twenty, two bioluminescence. That sounds like something Like I'm just picturing a light, the illustrations for it and I'm pretty sure it's GonNa look beautiful because bioluminescence in nature is just gorgeous. If you look at photographs, have you seen in person I've seen the type of happens in the ocean when I was in San Diego when I think I, don't know if this jellyfish or it's like a glowing in the ocean. That's really beautiful. no, I have never come across bioluminescence in person the closest would be the James Cameron Movie Avatar. which is not real but Yeah I'm guessing that the illustrations will be a very beautiful. Our next book deal. Our next book deal is critical world rights to the snail by emily, H- hugues. The picture book is an exploration of Japanese American artists, Osamu Noguchi who found acceptance through the act of creation in the face of rejection from both of his homeland's publication is planned for Spring Twenty twenty two. So is this like a BIOGRAPHY PICTURE book. Yeah. It would be a biography picture look from what the description is saying your interested in why it's called the snail mail. It's a very unique title.

Harpercollins Balza Christina Sinturin Spring Twenty Jim Poor Bell DAN Crisanto Avant Osamu Noguchi James Cameron Greystone Emily San Diego Bray Julia Club
Minor Feelings by Cathy Park Hong Review

Books and Boba

04:35 min | 2 years ago

Minor Feelings by Cathy Park Hong Review

"Poet and Sas Cathy Park Hong Blends Memoir cultural criticism and history to expose the truth of racial consciousness in America. Binding these essays together is Hong Theory of minor feelings as daughter of Korean. Immigrants Cathy Park. Hong grew up steeped in shame suspicion and melancholy. She would later understand that these minor feelings occur when American optimism contradicts your own reality. When you believe the lies, you told about your own racial identity, Hong uses her own story as a portal into deeper examination of racial consciousness in America today. This book traces her relationship to the English language to shame and depression to poetry art making and to family and female friendships in a search to both uncover and speak the truth. So this is our second more of slash essay collection that we've read this year. If we include maxine Hong Kingston's will warm air and it's similar a lot of ways but also different right because this one instead of using folktales as the medium it uses more it's more of like a straight up memoir right? I don't know if it's a straight up memoir I I think it's accurate to say it's an essay collection of because a lot of her essays aren't. Obviously, she does bring up her own personal experiences. To help supplement her series on Racial consciousness in the Asian American community but a lot of it is pretty scholarly she. CITES. A lot of other essays and other artists and a lot of history is in this book as well. Yes. So I don't know like when I when I found this book, it was in the biography section of the book store and I was like like I thought this was going to be in the essay like the sanction but okay. So it's definitely a book that blends a lot of different John Russia's. Your I mean when this book came out, everyone was talking about how like how they are in their fields and really related to it. A lot of people in our good reeds were pretty excited that we were picking the book up for for this episode a lot of people had already read it. People Honor instagram saying that this is the best book of Twenty Twenty and I was like, okay well. Clearly, our club members are you know they? They love it. So hopefully, I will disappoint them by thinking that this is a bad book and. Nearly like it wasn't is not a bad book I think for me. Ask someone who has taken as American. Studies American literature. Has Been steeped in the community and the discussion of representation for the last like dozen or so while it was well written I think a lot of the part people really resonated were parts were Kathy does go into more like scoured discussions of representation of history of like things that you don't WanNa learn in the mainstream history that. I kind of already knew so I think the part that really drew me or were more interesting to me. Worthy parts that were more personal with those personal stories by personal. Do you mean the latter half of the book where she talks About College and Art? Making. Yeah. Those. Tests will her family or just personal experiences because it's interesting because as someone who has worked with Asian American communities across the nation not only in La. In places like Texas like the New York, there's this collective unconscious. That's local to every asian-american community. That's at a different level of development. Right like I. Think for a lot of people have their asian-american awakening in college when they finally at a place where they can find themselves to run it by people that look like them or find other people with their experiences I think for myself the happen a little bit earlier because. I grew up in the senior valley growing up my high school was always at least forty to sixty percent eastern. So being as wasn't something that put us apart I think for myself it was more. Okay. Like I have no problem being Asian in America. But my problem is how Asian should I be right? Yeah. Yeah I got it. You know you know those minor feelings still occur.

Sas Cathy Park Hong Blends Mem Maxine Hong Kingston Hong America Kathy Twenty Twenty Cathy Park John Russia LA Texas New York