40 Burst results for "Minneapolis"

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Joe Pags

Joe Pags

01:09 min | 12 min ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Joe Pags

"From the Chris Lindh. All real estate studios. Twin Cities News Talk OK AM Minneapolis to 78 He says he's working in good faith. Finally Scylla Sarah Fox News President Trump Holding a news conference this hour, his golf club in New Jersey. Saying Despite the breakdown in talks with Democrats and a new brand of Corona virus relief, the administration is hopeful to reach a deal if they don't he says he will act to give Americans really Faye need, including suspending the payroll tax, putting in place enhanced unemployment benefits through the end of the year and extending the moratorium on evictions. The nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony found your urging state to take immediate action of health officials see upticks in cases of Corona virus do not have to completely locked down if We do things right? And if we do those things right? I believe we can open up the economy. Get thie employment back, Get people out of the doldrums of being locked down if we do it prudently. Carefully and the way the guidelines say, and doctor found, she says he's cautiously optimistic that a vaccine could be developed soon, but admitted the chances it would be highly effective or not Great, made the comment in a discussion hosted by a Brown University and Providence, Rhode Island. This is the CDC reports over 1250 new deaths from the virus as of yesterday. Biden campaign has responded to a report from the director of national intelligence that Russia, China and Iran are trying to interfere in the November election, issuing a statement reading in part, Donald Trump has publicly and repeatedly invited emboldened and even tried to coerce foreign interference in American elections. Joe Biden, on the other hand, as lead the fight against foreign interference for years. Jerry Falwell Jr has agreed to take an indefinite leave of absence as the leader of Liberty University or the nation's top evangelical colleges. Days after apologizing for since deleted photo on Social Media..

Chris Lindh Joe Biden Dr Anthony Minneapolis Jerry Falwell Jr Donald Trump Sarah Fox New Jersey Faye Liberty University Rhode Island Brown University CDC President Trump Providence Director Russia China
Amendment to disband Minneapolis police will not appear on November ballot

WCCO Morning News

01:12 min | 1 d ago

Amendment to disband Minneapolis police will not appear on November ballot

"After the Charter Commission voted to review the amendment for 90 days, the Minneapolis City Council's proposal to remove the requirement for a police force will not be on the November ballot. Councilmember stated it was an attempt to take the first step to reimagine policing in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, One of the five council members behind the amendment did not mince words and reacting to the commission's tend to five vote, Jeremiah Ellison said. In a democracy the people decide but I guess today the charter commission decided otherwise. Those who voted against the DeLay said it was their responsibility to submit a recommendation and allow the voters to decide. Commissioner Alger Road, Isaacson. Our role here is not to safeguard the City Council amendment from the charter. Multiple commissioners criticized the City Council for Capacity, haste in a lack of community engagement. He also said there needed to be more voter education and public input, especially from black activists and community leaders. In the South. Metro Sloan Martin News talk, a 30 W. C CEO in a serious of Tweets council president Lisa Banda wrote that the vote was disappointing and creates barriers to change. But she says it will not stop their work to what she calls reimagine public safety in

Charter Commission Minneapolis City Council City Council Lisa Banda Isaacson George Floyd Jeremiah Ellison Sloan Martin News Commissioner CEO President Trump
Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Minnesota's Drive Time News

Minnesota's Drive Time News

01:04 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Minnesota's Drive Time News

"Tonight. Minnesota Department of Health officials are concerned that healthcare workers, particularly those employed at long term care facilities, air socializing without masks and then bring the virus back to residents. State epidemiologist Dr Ruth Winfield. We are very concerned that the progress that we have made Can be at risk and can even be lost. Lynnfield explained that according to data from the healthcare Worker Monitoring teams staffer having more exposures in the community, In the long term care facilities themselves over 50% of health care workers and stamped in these facilities with close contacts in June and July, where household and social contacts Followed by a co worker exposures thes were more than 20%. Compared to exposure to residents, and that was on the order of 5 to 6%. When you can care this to march, nearly all of their high risk exposures were two residents. It was at a rate of 87% in March and 54% in April in field says anyone regularly around people at higher risk. Whether living with older parents are working in long term care should be cautious and avoid large gatherings. M. D. H in the state emergency operation centers have worked for months to bolster staffing with a list of medical worker volunteers numbering around 1000 to step in in the case of a crisis, according to M. D, H, 71% of skilled nursing and 91% Of assisted living facilities in Minnesota had not had cases. In the past 28 days, 30 members of a family in a small northwestern Minnesota town have contracted Corona virus after attending a funeral for a loved one. The funeral for 78 year old Frances Parole was in mid July in Lake Park That's in Becker County and despite wearing masks and taking precautions. 30 people at the funeral have since tested positive for covert 19 including five who had to be hospitalized well, it did not take a hint of a county judge long to dismiss a request to have county Attorney Mike Freeman removed from the case of the four former Minneapolis officers charged in George Floyd's murder Judge Peter Cahill today denying the request of attorney Tom Plunkett. Who represents J. Alexander King. Plunkett argued that Freeman compromise his ethics and could not be impartial. In prosecuting the case. Cahill says Plunkett failed to prove those accusations. Governor Tim Walz, meanwhile, says there's no personal rift between He and Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Fried Fry says this week that Wall's hesitated in deploying the National Guard is parts of the city burned following the death of Floyd Walls on with Dave Lee this morning, said this I just believe this is not a personal risk. I think we were. As we said the mayor called. The National Guard is quickly as he could. We responded as quickly as we could add. Certainly we're glad there wasn't more loss of life. But This is what happens when society got to the point that George Floyd killing erupted and we have to do better. All said they needed to ensure preparations were in place before activating the garden. Other responding Agents during the riots. Meanwhile, some Minnesota National Guard soldiers who represented a responded rather to the riding in Minneapolis and ST Paul will soon head to Cuba, but 150 soldiers from the 34th military police company in still water Will be providing security at the navel station. Guantanamo Bay Deployment ceremony is Sunday new measures in place in downtown Minneapolis to keep people safe and help those in need outside the target on ninth and Nicollet, downtown Minneapolis, There's usually a pretty big crowd gathered some panhandlers, others. Selling drugs and just loitering around making it feel unsafe. They basically called.

Minneapolis Tom Plunkett George Floyd National Guard Attorney Mike Freeman Minnesota National Guard Minnesota Department Of Health Peter Cahill Minnesota Governor Tim Walz Dr Ruth Winfield State Epidemiologist Lynnfield Becker County County Judge Frances Parole Cuba J. Alexander King M. D. H
Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

Sean Hannity

02:08 min | 1 d ago

Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

"Panel in the city of Minneapolis, says it needs more time to review a City Council amendment to dismantle the police Department. That ends the possibility that voters would get to decide the issue in November. There have been calls to dismantle that Minneapolis Police Department Since the death of George Floyd in police custody back on Memorial Day. Theo

Minneapolis Police Department Police Department Minneapolis City Council George Floyd Theo
Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Ben Shapiro

Ben Shapiro

00:43 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Ben Shapiro

"Welcome back. This is the Ben Shapiro show a lot to get through this out a little later on in the hour. Well against your calls at 855236 30 to 28 855236 32 28. So bad news, Somebody than York Times unnatural Act of journalism. I know you're not allowed to do this anymore. You're supposed to simply say that all protest that happen in Seattle and Portland and everywhere else, they were mostly peaceful. Mostly peaceful, like, you know, That day in Beirut, mostly a peaceful day until you know there was like one my eyes really just one moment like a giant explosion that killed hundreds of people other that mostly peaceful day over in Beirut. It was the media's take on everything happening in Chad's job, the greatest of all republic, the short lived utopian republic. Was a wonderful, wonderful place, except for people getting shot and Nellie bowls over The New York Times. A few months late, she's committed the actual act of reporting. Just like a drive by event. It's just it's terrible and horrific, and everybody should should be ashamed. Nellie Bowls has a has a headlined Abolish The Police. Those who survived the cast in Seattle aren't so sure. Faisal Khan was being told by the news media and his own mayor at the protest in his hometown of peaceful with a block party atmosphere. That is not what he saw through the windows of his Seattle coffee shop. He saw encampments overtaken this I want. He saw roving bands of masked protesters, smashing windows and looting. Young white men wielding guns with Harang customers as well as Mr Khan, a gay man of Middle Eastern descent who moved here from Texas so he could be more comfortably out. Get into his coffee shop. He sometimes had to seek the permission of self appointed armed guards to cross the border they had erected. They barricaded us all in here, said Khan. They were sitting in lawn chairs with guns. 23 days in June, about six blocks in the city's Capitol Hill neighborhood or claimed by left wing demonstrators and declared police free. Protesters hailed it as a liberation from police oppression from white supremacy and a catalyst for a national movement. In the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis Police says Nell Eagles, the Black lives matter Movement is calling to defund the police, arguing that the criminal justice system is inherently racist. Leaders in many progressive cities are listening. In New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has announced plans to shift $1 billion out of the police budget. The Minneapolis City Council is pitching a major reduction, The Seattle City Council is pushing for a 50% cut to police Department funding. Mayer said. That plan goes too far. Some even call for abolishing the police altogether and closing down precinct. So that's what happened in Seattle..

Seattle Faisal Khan Nellie Bowls Seattle City Council Police Department Beirut Ben Shapiro York Times Minneapolis City Council New York City Chad George Floyd Bill De Blasio Mayer Minneapolis Harang The New York Times Portland
Minneapolis may defund police

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

Minneapolis may defund police

"Maybe on the way for the police department in Minneapolis as a commission considers de funding it this in the city where George Floyd, a black man was killed in police custody. Most of the City Council supports the idea, saying it would replace a trouble department with a more holistic and public health oriented approach to public safety. The 15 member volunteer commission will decide what to do, and if the idea makes it to the November ballot, voters would get the final say Floyd's death sparked global protest over police brutality and racism. Alison

George Floyd City Council Minneapolis Alison
Fresh "Minneapolis" from Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:41 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Minneapolis" from Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

"W. J Marie LOSS, HOPE CONCERN complete coverage of the Corona virus PANDEMIC NEWS Radio 9 50 W. W. J. News time is now 5 41 It's public defenders studying showing that black drivers accounted for nearly 80% of police searches and routine traffic stops and predominantly white Minneapolis. Studies from June 2019 to May 2020 and it found black drivers or more often search then pulled over during equipment were moving violations with 26% of these searches, resulting in arrest. Public defender compiled and analyzed one year of traffic data and race in Minneapolis. This with a goal to quantify a metric of racial inequality in Minneapolis is policing. In Fort Worth, Texas. Meanwhile, the criminal complaint has been filed against the former communications director for the Los Angeles Angels Baseball Club in connection with last year's death of Picture. Tyler. Scant four year old Eric has been charged with getting the pills that killed Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Dallas area hotel room. U. S Attorney Aaron Millie. Cox says King had given Skaggs pills that were supposed to be oxycodone experts later determined At the pill, which closely resembled a 30 milligram oxycodone tablets have been laced with fentanyl. It wasn't prescription Oxy at all. It was a deadly counter. King is facing a charge of conspiracy to distribute the pills that contained fentanyl. It carries a possible 20 year federal prison term LP Phillips for CBS News. Dallas without DeLay, download the radio dot com app in favorite double D. W..

Tyler Skaggs Minneapolis Dallas Fentanyl Oxycodone W. J Marie Loss Los Angeles Angels Baseball Cl Cbs News Fort Worth King Aaron Millie OXY Texas Director Eric COX Attorney U. S
Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 1 d ago

Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

"A Minneapolis commission says it needs Mohr time to review a City Council amendment. To dismantle the police department in the wake of George Floyd's death, ending the possibility of voters deciding the issue in November. The charter Commission has expressed concern At the process to change the city's charter has been rushed. Some commissioners said they were Mork concerned with making the right changes rather than making them fast. The amendment would replace the police department with the Department of Community Safety and Violence Prevention that backers say would take a more holistic approach. That approach hasn't been fully defined.

Charter Commission Department Of Community Safety Mork George Floyd City Council Mohr Violence Prevention Minneapolis
Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:32 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

"Stalling, hiring and slowing an economic rebound. The economy has now recovered on ly about 42% of the 22 million jobs it lost due to the pandemic. Oprah Winfrey's magazine has purchased 26 billboards in Louisville, Kentucky, demanding the arrest of the police involved in the death of Briana Taylor. The billboards feature Taylor's face. They were put up the same week that O magazine put Taylor on their cover. Taylor was shot by cops serving a no knock search warrant in March. They did not identify themselves. When they entered her home. Her boyfriend opened fire, and three officers fired back, killing Taylor. Case didn't make national headlines until after the killing of George Floyd in minute. Minneapolis in May. Well. A former employee of the Los Angeles Angels has been taken into custody on federal drug charges in connection with last year's overdose. Death of Picture Tyler Skaggs Kiareldeen LP. Phillips has the details. 24 year old Eric has been charged with getting the pills that killed Tyler Skaggs was found dead in his Dallas area hotel room. U. S Attorney Aaron Millie Cox says King had given Skaggs pills that were supposed to be oxycodone experts later determined At the pill, which closely resembled a 30 milligram oxycodone tablets have been laced with fentanyl. It wasn't prescription Oxy at all. It was a deadly counter. King is facing a charge of conspiracy to distribute the pills that contained fentanyl. It carries a possible 20 year federal prison term LP Phillips for CBS News Dallas. WCBS News time is 5 22 Let's say you just bought a house. Bad news is.

Briana Taylor Tyler Skaggs Fentanyl Oprah Winfrey Dallas Oxycodone Los Angeles Angels King George Floyd O Magazine Kentucky Louisville Phillips CBS Aaron Millie Cox OXY Minneapolis Eric Attorney
Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Commission stalls on amendment to dismantle Minneapolis PD

"Ah panel in Minneapolis says it will need more time to review a City Council amendment to dismantle the local police department. This means voters will not be wing in on the issue this fall. City's charter commission voiced concern that a process to dismantle the department was being rushed in some commissioner said they were more concerned with making the right changes rather than making them fast. The proposed amendment came amid widespread criticism of the department after the killing of George Floyd. If approved, the amendment would replace the police Department with a Department of community safety and violence prevention that backers say would take a more holistic

Police Department Department Of Community George Floyd City Council Minneapolis Commissioner
Proposal to disband Minneapolis police weighed amid skepticism

PBS NewsHour

00:26 sec | 2 d ago

Proposal to disband Minneapolis police weighed amid skepticism

"Thie effort to reimagine public safety in Minneapolis faces hurdles as the city see spikes in violent crime. And a deterioration of police community relations. Right now. All we really have in terms of public safety is one system on that police on people are gonna be scared to create a new system of emergency response and I think it's going to take a lot of conversations.

Minneapolis
Deadly Explosions Shatter Beirut, Lebanon

What A Day

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Deadly Explosions Shatter Beirut, Lebanon

"Enormous deadly explosion in Beirut yesterday caused chaos and destruction throughout the region at the time of recording at least seven eight people were found dead in over four thousand were injured Lebanon's prime minister said, the explosions were caused by over twenty seven, hundred tons of explosive material that had been sitting in a warehouse for six years without appropriate safety measures. Videos of the blast showed that it was powerful enough to shatter windows and overturned cars hospitals in the area were quickly overwhelmed capacity with the Public Health Minister saying that the government will cover all the medical costs of people who were injured. Yesterday Lebanon's prime. Minister announced today will be dedicated as a national day of mourning vowed to punish those who are

Public Health Minister Prime Minister Lebanon Beirut
"minneapolis" Discussed on What A Day

What A Day

06:53 min | 2 d ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on What A Day

"This they want this and this time they know that it is the right time. We just have to be able to get folks to that point on which is the work that we're trying to do right now. That's great. What was it like? A in the moments where the entire country in the world, we're paying attention to your city your work. And what does it feel like sort of now that the dust settled and the national media is sort of less focused at like. Can you explain like just let our audience know what that even feels like for a person. Yet interesting and funny because it's like there's a lot. There's a lot less external focus, right? The first two weeks of the uprising was a lot because people I like I actually do national organizing is my actual job at my folks all around the country realized how are Y'all? Okay. What's going on? Are you safe? Are you? Okay? And now it's like a lot of internal focused an internal pressure, right? I'm getting pressure from like my like my community members, my family because they're seeing that like the police actually aren't responding to acts of violence are excellent harmon this moment. We're seeing that like folks are not. Able to advocate for themselves in the ways that they want to, and our city leadership is being unresponsive in the ways that they're actually handling. This. Right. We only saw one point one, million dollar cut when they months before just claim that they were going to disband in defunding Minneapolis. So like I think that the focus, the intensity of the focus is still there. It's literally just different, right so instead of like having all of this outside pressure, really pressure from within. In like I'm on calls from nine am to ten PM. So it's it's definitely different. It's shifted, but the intensity is still there. Yeah, I mean. We can't thank you enough for all the work that you've been doing and I wanNA talk more about this behind the scenes you know there's protesting in the streets that is visible that. It can feel really powerful. We feel united and I think that some people might think that. Less is happening day to day like you were saying. So like kind of talk more about like what are the calls in like what are what are the goals that you have to focus on and really pinpoint when you know. Some teacher looking over their shoulder saying like chains. Exactly. One of my really good friends. kind of like it was like an epiphany moment like a couple months ago where There's a difference between a protest organizer right? Like people have skills to protests people can mobilize folks people can make move a crowd. But organizing completely different it's like the the unsexy work that happens after the after the dust has settled right? It's like really being in. Two three hour calls city council numbers. It's how are we having conversations one on one on one? With different community members, right. So it's a lot of the calls that were having around like strategy around like how are we engaging the folks that are necessary in this moment and getting giving them the tools to be able to advocate for themselves? What does the leadership development that needs to be done? What is the political education that needs to be done around like how reforms actually don't work in this moment and have never worked and like how we actually have to move to a new system? It's it's like talking to national partners like Miriam Communist around like what is transformative justice look like and how do we actually implement some? TJ practices and the work that we're doing and being more communal It's talking to other organizers that are doing that are intersecting issues, right? So like in Minneapolis one thing that has happened in this time is there's a lot of hustler folks right and they had a house encampment in the police came and they rated that encampment for like how are. We tying the issues of policing to the issues of how sisters bright and you didn't have to spend almost two, hundred, million dollars a year on police. We can actually buy homes for these folks. The people can have jobs in the time of pandemic, right so it's really like how are we connecting the issues that are that are happening in our society? And linking that to this this call for abolition absolutely well for our listeners that are a little bit younger or newer to activism how did you get into being an organizer and what would you say to them if they're seeing this moment and feel like they want to be involved and they want to affect change? Yeah I actually got into organizing in a way that I would never recommend for anyone. Legislative Legislative and electoral justice work on it will literally kill you from the inside but. Yeah I really got I got very active. More. So like politicized during actually the first. Iteration of what we like to call the black lives matter movement or the Movement for black lives whatever you want to say and like twenty, thirteen, two, thousand, fourteen. And I started I was very activated and I was like, wow, this is really dope and I always thought that the people that were organizing the protests Be Black men. and. I quickly realized that like in my city and nationally like the people that were in these movements that people that were actually holding the work we're actually like Queer Trans. Black folks right and I was like I see myself in this movement and grew deeper relationship with the people that were in the city that I was in. A lot of national partners. A lot of national organizers do really dope ass work I'm an started just like learning more like really like learning is like really really necessary and like I'm not someone who loves to read I know people who love me. But like I do think that learning history learning where we've been is very important. So we know like what our ancestors have done to that. We know what we can do for our future. Generations. So really learning about like, what are the what are the like not even just like us. But like what are the uprising happened in Africa during the imperialism of Africa? Right what are the things that are like what is what are the slave rebellions that happened in the Caribbean even actually before the flavor volumes happened and right US shot out to like Jamaican Homey taught me that right? Exactly. So there are multiple things that that we can do in order to get more active and get more organized. That's really helpful. A Lucci Yoga. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us. We know how busy you are, and it has been just such a great experience. Thank you. Thank you appreciate it. We'll put a link to black visions collective in our show notes along with a link to reclaim the block a coalition they are part of in Minnesota that's working to re imagine public safety beyond policing. And that's the latest..

Minneapolis Africa harmon US Miriam Communist Caribbean Minnesota
President of Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank: We Need a Full Lockdown for One Month

The News & Why It Matters

01:03 min | 3 d ago

President of Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank: We Need a Full Lockdown for One Month

"Of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve. Bank is calling for America to go into a quote hard shutdown for at least a month because it's necessary to stop the spread of coronavirus and don't worry the government can't afford it. According to this guy who is the president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank here's what he had to say if we were to lockdown really hard I know I hate to even suggested. People will be frustrated by it. But if we were to lockdown hard for a month or six weeks, we could get the case camp down. So that are testing in our contact tracing was actually enough to control it the way that it's happening in the northeast right now they had a rocky start, but they're doing a pretty good job right now. Now, if we don't do that and we just have this. Raging virus spreading throughout the country with flair ups and local lockdown for the next year or two, which is entirely possible. We're GONNA see many many more business bankruptcies, small businesses, big businesses, and that's GonNa take a lot of time to recover from to rebuild those businesses and then to bring workers back in and re engaged them in the work force that's going to be a much slower recovery for all of

Minneapolis Federal Reserve Ba Minneapolis Federal Reserve America President Trump
Seattle police chief says protesters targeted her home, urges city council to ‘stand up for what is right’

America's Morning News

00:34 sec | 3 d ago

Seattle police chief says protesters targeted her home, urges city council to ‘stand up for what is right’

"Including Salis. Now the chief of police in Seattle's urging the City Council to tell protesters toe stop visiting the homes of elected officials and others during debates over reducing funding for police. Chief Carmen Best, wrote a letter to the council after protesters showed up at her home over the weekend. Best said council members needed forcefully called for the end of the tactics. Protesters recently appeared outside the homes of Mayor Jenny Durkan and some people on the city council is demonstrations continued following the police of The police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Authorities assuring best her family and

City Council Carmen Best Jenny Durkan George Floyd Seattle Minneapolis
Leaked video shows moments before George Floyd death

WBZ Morning News

01:02 min | 3 d ago

Leaked video shows moments before George Floyd death

"Video video has has emerged emerged this this morning morning showing showing the the minutes minutes before before George George Floyd's Floyd's death death on on a a Minneapolis Minneapolis ST. ST. CBS CBS News News correspondent correspondent Jeff Jeff The The Gays Gays says says the the police police body camera video was leaked. And it's not easy to watch for the first time to leak body camera videos show the encounter with George Floyd. From the officer's perspective, Anyone officer Thomas Layne confronts Floyd trying to get him out of an SUV, a gun aimed in his direction. Now. Later in the footage, Floyd drops to the ground. His officers lead him toward a squad car. The other video, which was also published by the daily Mail dot com, appears to come from the body camera worn by rookie officer Alexander King. Those four officers involved in Floyd's death have been fired. They've all been charged in the death of Floyd. It is not known how London's daily Mail Got its hands on the new body Cam video.

George George Floyd Officer Jeff Jeff CBS Minneapolis Thomas Layne London Alexander King
British tabloid leaks bodycam videos from George Floyd's death

Extension 720 with Justin Kaufmann

00:30 sec | 4 d ago

British tabloid leaks bodycam videos from George Floyd's death

"The Minnesota Court is investigating how a British newspaper obtained police body cam footage showing the arrest and death of George Floyd. The Daily Mail today published parts of the video from to Minneapolis police officers involved in Floyd's arrest back on May 25th Hennepin County judge last month Allowed journalists and members of the local public to view the footage by appointment only, but has not yet ruled on a motion by a coalition of news organizations seeking public access to the

George Floyd Hennepin County Minnesota Court Minneapolis
Federal agents, officers head to Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee as Operation Legend expands

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:22 sec | 5 d ago

Federal agents, officers head to Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee as Operation Legend expands

"Department this week said it would expand a federal initiative called Operation Legend and send 100 federal agents and officers to Detroit, Cleveland, Ohio in Milwaukee. But some big city mayors have expressed concerns pointing to the aggressive use of federal forces in Portland, Oregon. Amid weeks of protests, some violent over the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody.

George Floyd Milwaukee Detroit Minneapolis Cleveland Portland Oregon Ohio
The George Soros Saga: Antisemitism, Conspiracies, and Influence

People of the Pod

05:39 min | Last week

The George Soros Saga: Antisemitism, Conspiracies, and Influence

"Billion-a-year Fillon therapist mega donor George Soros has long been the villain of conspiracy theories. He has also been a target of politicians and pundits on the right who resent his fierce opposition to George W Bush and Donald. Trump, they also object to his philanthropy support of liberal causes support most clearly defined by his mega donations. Earlier this month, the open society foundations, the ill philanthropic group founded by Mr Soros announced it would invest one hundred, fifty million dollars in grants for black lead, racial justice groups, and another seventy million toward local grants for criminal justice reform. The announcement came amid protests in the streets and calls for racial justice sparked by the murder of George. Floyd. Minneapolis those protests, some of which have turned violent have fuelled critics to view those donations as efforts to foment anarchy and back government corruption emily. Tamken. saw these critiques and conspiracy theories already building steam and two thousand sixteen which inspired her to research and write the influence. Of Soros, her latest Book Emily Welcome. Thank you so much for having me on the show so far listeners. Let's take a step back and start with WHO is George Soros not who the conspiracy theorists say he is but who is he really and what causes does he support and why? George. Is a Hungarian born American billionaire he is very influential in three realms the realm of finance, the rubber philanthropy, and the realm of politics in finance. He was a very famous and successful hedge fund manager. He's maybe the most famous and successful currency speculator in the history of finance, and then you know in the nineteen seventies after making a lot of money, he decides to start giving away some of that money to the cause of what he calls open society. The title comes the Name Open Society comes. From this book by Karl. Popper who was Soros's tutor at the London School of Economics and basically the premise of open society and its enemies is that this gross over simplification but basically, the premise is that you know neither you nor I can really know the truth. So what we're supposed to do is all of us together in a society come together and we discuss and debate, and we try to reach this perfect understanding and practice that's meant giving students scholarships. It's meant setting up a university in. It's meant you know after the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc in Suva Union paying for Internet for various government ministries and trying to connect people to information. He's also a big an influential figure in politics beginning in two thousand four. In the United States, he decided that he really wanted George W Bush out of office and became a major political donor. So I think you know I WANNA be careful to make clear that the political spending is separate from thirty but because he's this major philanthropic and also major political donor and because the political donations or not exclusively, but do tend to be four Democrats in liberal causes. I think that that colors the perception of some not just on the right but particularly, some people on the right in the United States. So source is a Hungarian. Jewish emigrant right tell us more about his upbringing and how it informed his philanthropy and political activism nineteen thirty Hungary is the Inter war period between World War One and World War Two prior to World War One Jews in the Hungarian part of the austro-hungarian Empire were more assimilated than many other Jews in Europe. They really saw themselves. Many of them saw themselves as Hungarian were part of the Hungarian national project report of this Lake Glittering Budapest life world we're one happens Hungary is on the losing side they lose a lot of their territory in the tree of and all, which is like the austro-hungarian version of the treaty of Versailles. And for a variety of reasons, the Jews are scapegoated for this. So you have these he's born into this world where you start having a Jewish quotas laws meant to persecute Jews, and this is. Even, before World War Two, his father has them changed their name from shorts to Soros to seem less obviously Jewish in this increasingly hostile environment his father had previously like escaped. Prison camp in Siberia during World War, one and made his way back to Hungary during the Russian civil war. So he knew something about survival. World to comes and there's there's not the occupation and there's the Arrow Cross which is like the Hungarian variant. He sees his father as this great protective figure who helped other people the father. was procured bull forged embargo documents of the Soros family and friends in front of friends could hide out is Christians during during the time, but he also he's persecuted for being Jewish he then after world, War Two is living under a certainly not the same kind of persecution but under a repressive oppressive socialist regime and I think that this is two things one, it makes this concept of society where we can all debate and discuss very attractive and I also think that for him because he was persecuted on the basis of his ethnicity religion. That inspired in him. The understanding that it was important to try to help whatever group was caught under the wheel at a given moment with this history and background in mind. IS IT ANTI Semitic to criticize Mr Soros and the causes he supports I'm not saying the criticizing Soros is. Anti Semitic I think he's done things that you can criticise part of the reason that I wrote this book is that it should be what he is actually done and the money that he's actually spent not money that he has never spent and thinks he has never going to do that to me is when it trips over into in antisemitic conspiratorial.

George Soros Soros Family George W Bush George Hungary United States Donald Trump Suva Union Murder Fund Manager Floyd London School Of Economics Minneapolis Tamken. Karl Lake Glittering Budapest Europe
Mayor Frey closes all indoor bar areas in Minneapolis due to COVID-19 pandemic

Minnesota's Drive Time News

00:49 sec | Last week

Mayor Frey closes all indoor bar areas in Minneapolis due to COVID-19 pandemic

"Restrict indoor bar areas after a spike in Corona virus cases. It's an emergency measure ordered by Mayor Jacob Fried today to try to curb the spread of Cove in 19 a night out at the bar is too often leading two nights in the hospital for family for friends and for neighbors. By focusing on bar areas, which are proven to be hotbeds for congregation and community spread. We could help keep both Minneapolis and Minnesotans safe. Come August 1st alcohol will only be served two people seated at tables with appropriate spacing. There will be no sitting or congregating at the actual bars and moving around with alcoholic drinks will not be allowed, Minneapolis health officials say. As of Monday, 367 covert cases were tied to Minneapolis bars. We'll go in depth on

Minneapolis Jacob Fried
Minneapolis police identify "Umbrella Man" as white supremacist

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | Last week

Minneapolis police identify "Umbrella Man" as white supremacist

"The so called umbrella man who they believe helped to incite riots following the death of George Floyd, according to a search warrant filed earlier this week, which is obtained by CNN affiliate W. C. C o The man is associate ID. With the Aryan Cowboys that is a street gang that the Anti Defamation League says is known for white supremacist views. Video of the guy went viral after he was was confronted confronted by by peaceful peaceful protesters protesters on on May May 27th. 27th. When When he he smashed smashed in in several several windows windows of of an an AutoZone AutoZone store. store. Police Police have have yet yet to to release release his his name name and and say say only only that that this this remains an active investigation. 83 degrees. Now

Autozone Police Police George Floyd CNN W. C. C
10 Ways to Defund the Police Today

The Breakdown with Shaun King

05:23 min | Last week

10 Ways to Defund the Police Today

"If you haven't yet listened to yesterday's episode of the breakdown, this is really a two part series, and so I would encourage you to go back and listen to yesterday's episode where I break down the pushback that the movement to defend police is getting from some people. It's really rooted and misunderstanding. And introduce the work of the scholar Alex Towel in his book the end of policing. A brilliant must have book one of the most important books for this moment. And then I share Alex broke down ten ways that we could de-fund police, but increased public safety and yesterday I share the first five and today I wanna get to the final five. Step, number six is that we need to fund school wellness centers. Now, unsurprisingly, putting more people and more police rather in schools has only fueled the school to prison pipeline and what else did we really think they were going to do if they weren't going to be an arrest kids, police are doing in America schools exactly what we thought they do. Police officers don't have specialized training in adolescent or childhood development. They're not mental health experts. They're not social workers or psychologists. They're not school counselors are educators. They are literally law enforcement officers, normally whose primary training is in how to use a gun. Okay. And you put them in schools and what they do is they be arrest people. It is better safer and cheaper. If you fund school wellness centers in cities, like Minneapolis have started to experiment with replacing armed police officers with something called students, safety coaches who specialize in mental health and restorative justice in de Escalation and building positive relationships with students in one school arrest decreased by eighty percent arrest decreased by eight percent after implementing this program. We need in in defunding police and removing them out of schools and many school districts around the country, including Seattle, and Denver, and Minneapolis. If said, you know what we're moving the police out of our schools. And we need. When we remove those police, we need to fund school wellness centers, which takes me to step number seven. We need to dispatch dispute resolution experts to handle neighborhood and domestic conflicts listen to this. Domestic and. Neighborhood. Disputes. Are. Among. The single most common calls for law enforcement accounting for up to fifty percent of all calls in most areas. Now, the vast majority of those calls are not violent in most end without an arrest. But in some jurisdictions police listen to me, police are required to make an arrest in some of these calls. There's no evidence that these arrests generally reduced domestic violence and in fact, many domestic violence victims. Actually, don't call law enforcement at all because they are afraid of the legal repercussions. There is a better smarter response. What we need to do is to dispatch non law enforcement, first responders to respond to calls, involving disputes and domestic disturbances, social workers, and teams that are experts in working to escalate these disputes are less costly and more effective, actually resolving the conflicts. These crisis response teams would-be, specially trained and credentialed in the neighborhoods that they work in bats key. This already works in other countries all around the world. This is the primary method of intervention in France where trained mediators respond to the vast majority of calls involving interpersonal conflicts. In America though they send an officer or two officers or for or five or ten officers with guns, ready to shoot you or tasers you or spray you an arrest you in jail you. Other countries are already doing this better, which takes me to step number eight. We need to provide support not police for people who are experiencing homelessness. This is so simple and so important. Police spend an absurd amount of time in resources dealing with people experiencing homelessness, who has a result often become victims of unnecessary arrest in violence that only further disrupts their lives by creating specialized trained homelessness outreach units. We can reduce these harmful and pointless police confrontations and replace them with positive interactions that build community trust and help people find true stability.

Alex Towel America Minneapolis Seattle Officer France Denver
Very different, symbolic hajj in Saudi Arabia amid virus

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last week

Very different, symbolic hajj in Saudi Arabia amid virus

"The after president an in Muslim there's head a alleged big of been months the U. an trump's pilgrims S. agreement shift assault of park reelection protests police between from against in the campaign the and Portland more top donning the comedian measured the studio U. face Oregon S. is Attorney denying masks will approach and not General a a allegations leading source he's and be tells movie taken moving prosecuted are the denying toward theater in Associated small the it corona allegations chain funneled groups Press on virus how by the trump one to house recently release hundred began Democrats administration prosecutors seventy arriving movies president that in million New has the at trump action started Orleans Islam's dollars is at talks say Lafayette back they will holiest to to not to square find defending it's an be advisor's a sites following on a sign way June the in to malaria first of draw Mecca up changing companies on down a case drug times was the presence for a as 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escalation nothing alleging insiders me about to that series wipe her federal Attorney including clean the over General agents president the next the Parsons William in wife Portland three moments Barr of years trump's testifying are before and attacking son deepen abruptly in I'm a journalists Eric different their Oscar faith house wells ending and Gabriel and hearing other the the girlfriend a Saudi observers news says conference government the decision of with is Donald right to covering clear protesters Sager control junior all the munitions expenses mag was campaign ani independent of despite travel Washington legal of a center federal trump's accommodation court photo says op it ordering leaves that's meals voters that them and last in had the healthcare dark nothing week to to about do stop with entities that I'm Barr Charles said working the de plan for Ledesma to the trump move protesters campaign I'm Jennifer from Lafayette what king they square do was solidified and how much during an they're afternoon paid meeting with multiple Jackie agencies Quinn Washington Jennifer king Washington

President Trump
Umbrella Man: Minneapolis suspect linked to white supremacists

Pacifica Evening News

01:11 min | Last week

Umbrella Man: Minneapolis suspect linked to white supremacists

"Captured on surveillance video breaking windows that a South Minneapolis auto parts store in the days just after George Floyd's death. Is a hell's a Joel's member who was bent on stirring up social unrest. The man was dubbed umbrella Man for his all black Get up. His action soon Fed soon led to an arson fire that police say was the first of several that transformed peaceful protests into chaos. They start Tribune newspaper reports of Minneapolis police arson investigator Wrote in the search warrant affidavit that police identified the 32 year old suspect through an emailed tip last week. The fire's spread and caused an estimated half a $1,000,000,000 in damage in Minneapolis police spokesperson tells The Associated Press. The investigation is open and active and investigation found that the man was also an associate of the Aryan Cowboy Brotherhood, a white supremacist prison and street gang. Based mainly in Minnesota and Kentucky. It's

Minneapolis Arson Aryan Cowboy Brotherhood George Floyd Joel FED Tribune Investigator Minnesota Kentucky The Associated Press
"minneapolis" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

12:57 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"NPR politics. PODCAST must call it. I'm covering the Presidential Campaign and I'm Carrie Johnson. I cover the Justice Department. We have spent a lot of this week talking about police reform at the federal level, but in Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by local police officers. The city council has already begun making changes. It has pledged to dismantle the city's police department entirely. Adrian Florida has been in Minneapolis covering this story for NPR and he's joining us on the pod now to talk about exactly what that means Hadrian. Hey, so Adrian were hearing a lot about ideas at the federal level. You know some of them conflicting about how to ensure that police don't use a disproportionate amount of force, especially with black and Brown people and Congress is pledging to reform policing activists have been talking about defunding police departments, but talk to us about what's happened there in Minneapolis where the city council has said that they want to dismantle police. What does that mean? On Sunday. nine members of the city council showed up at a park at a rally that black activists had organized, and basically announced that they wanted to begin the process of dismantling and defunding and spending the police, and said that they were going to start doing that. In the coming weeks and months through a series of policy decisions. You know what it means is still unclear because they don't yet have a plan for what would come next. If The police department were just to be completely disbanded but what they said is that there have been. Many, many years of failed reforms within the Minneapolis Police Department efforts reforms that just haven't amounted to much, and so they said at the time was now to do something much bolder, much more radical, which was to begin the process of defunding, ultimately disbanding the police department entirely. Know is this decision really entirely in their hands, or could the mayor other people step in and have a say so importantly the nine members of the city council who voiced support for this idea, represent a veto proof majority. Of the thirteen member at City Council so they could take very significant decisions on the council toward this goal of of of defunding dismantling the police department. It's more complicated than that. Though because you know. Minneapolis City Charter requires that the city fund a minimum police force, and so in order to completely end the police department, the City Council would have to amend the city charter. That's not something that you can do even with a super majority of the council. You need an unanimous vote of the city council to do that. another option. If you don't have unanimous vote of the council is to put an amendment to the city charter. To voters while there are a lot of steps there, Adrian. It seems like whatever happens next. It's GonNa. Take a lot more action by city, officials and police unions so people in the streets now may not be getting action as quickly as they expect. and carry. How does what we are seeing now in Minneapolis compared to reform efforts that we've seen from cities in the past. It feels different you know. After after Ferguson Missouri after Michael Brown's death and Ferguson. We heard a lot of pushes for body cameras, more training of police on excessive force and implicit bias, and even calls to try to end programs in which the military military provides equipment to local police forces, but this call to disband or dismantle. Dismantle the police force entirely. It's not unprecedented, but it's a really big step one that even some civil rights advocates say they're surprised. We got to so quickly. Adrien this is not the first time that Minneapolis has tried to reform its police department. Anything people who were hearing the story of dismantling the police are wondering. Why does the music reforms not work or did they work? But maybe just like not sufficiently in the mind of some folks. There just wasn't enough. Yeah. There's a long history here. In Minneapolis of attempts to reform the police department, because there's been criticism for a long time of racial disparities in use of force in two thousand fifteen report found that only twenty one percent of conduct complaints lodged against the police department, where even investigated about a half of those were were dismissed outright the re-. The rest of resulted night undisciplined, but in in coaching. Basically you know police officers given a little refresher course on on department policy. there's also been a lot of attempts to establish civilian review boards here in Minneapolis. and those have have mostly failed largely because critics have said that these review boards just ignore the vast majority of complaints that come in against police departments, and so there's just sort of this long list of reforms have been attempted over years and really decades that almost everyone agrees have failed, which is why people who say that more reform is what's needed. Aren't well received by by activists who say the time is now to do something different people who've been really hungry for reform for ten years, and and longer in the civil rights community say that these are problems with systems and systems and cultures are very difficult to change because people have a lot invested in them. Their livelihoods, police unions mayors and elected officials I had. Had A conversation earlier this week with Alec haircuts on us who is a civil rights lawyer and works on fines and fees and and cash bail? issues around the country, and he says almost none of what police do everyday is dedicated to violent crime as we would see it, and almost all of their activity disproportionately targets black and Brown people and he thinks that. From what he seen on Capitol? Hill and some of the conversation Nationally a lot of the proposals here for change reflect a failure of leadership and imagination. He thinks talking about things like defunding in disbanding is where the culture needs to go in is where real change will take place. There's a city councilman here in in Minneapolis. Who has said you know? Know I I know that. You know we could fire every single. One of the one thousand police officers in the Minneapolis Police Department and Rehire a thousand people to replace them I would not be interested in that because it's about the people, it's about the systems and what they represent and the culture that is ingrained in just the very idea of of policing. And he said I'm not interested in that. We need to come up with something different. All Right? We'll have lots more to talk about this..

Minneapolis Police Department Minneapolis city council Minneapolis City Charter Justice Department Adrian Florida NPR Carrie Johnson George Floyd Congress Ferguson Adrien Alec Missouri Minneapolis. Hill Michael Brown
"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Steve Fletcher is a city councilman in Minneapolis Minnesota. He represents an area that's been pretty protected from the riots and protests in the wake of George Floyd's death. It's near the university filled with coffee shops in students. The mayor lives there. But Steve knew something was changing his ward when he started getting. These phone calls in the last couple of weeks. They were from constituents who were worried, pleading for help and unable to reach the authorities, and there were several nights that I stayed up all night because I people could get through to nine one even and they called you. You sure about what there's. You know too sketchy guys with a vehicle that doesn't have license plates driving up and down my street. Who Do I report it to? How do I get information out? Out. I mean like we had people in our city trying to harm us. A who were drawn the news than by the protests and people were trying to report that I. It was terrifying I. Mean it was it was really scary and I was passing information through to anybody I could get on the phone at the mayor's office at the governor's Office of the National Guard like wherever we could sort of find. Ways to backchannel information if if. The, nine, one one system was overwhelmed, Steve got elected back in two thousand seventeen after a career in nonprofits and the arts. And suddenly his constituents weren't just asking him to craft some legislation or debate the finer details of the city budget. They wanted something much more immediate and to be clear I wasn't even the council member. Who was the most? I mean I I was I was operating from my apartment. My northside colleagues were out organizing neighborhood patrols violation of Curcio because they were pretty convinced that nobody was coming to help in. The city. The whole city felt abandoned. In spite of the fact that they've been eight hundred officer police force I mean people were not getting within for a while, and I think once that fell apart. People are willing to say Oh, was this really system we? I think that that was an experience that changes a lot of people's views of our current public safety infrastructure. And so people were jolted into action. I think and jolted into being willing to consider drastic change to prevent further damage to our city. Steve Fletcher was certainly jolted into action. This week he veto proof. Majority of the City Council pledged to dismantle the Minneapolis. Police Department completely..

Steve Fletcher Minneapolis City Council George Floyd Minnesota Police Department Curcio National Guard officer
"minneapolis" Discussed on Worst Year Ever

Worst Year Ever

08:08 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Worst Year Ever

"You're now living essentially in Not An entirely post police, but certainly post Minneapolis police in your definitely definitely post Minneapolis police. You know like I, said today's the first day. I've seen a cop and it wasn't in Minneapolis COP and. And that's two weeks now. Almost were were really were were two weeks and you know that It's so weird because it's just it's normal. There's no out SA-. Okay, and I should say normal in the context of the right wing invasion. That's going on simultaneously on the ground, which isn't being talked about really, but there's that element that's kind of. It really confuses this other situation we're dealing with. Can you elaborate a little bit on that? Wing Right So like in the midst of the. Initial uprising when the precinct was burning when the? When people were kind of commandeering goods from all over to help either protesters or to build a barricade walls there was also this other side that was starting to be of noticed both on social media, and the police were hinting added kind of and and you know it's been hard with them, because they don't save very much, but we also know what we've seen. Which is a huge group? Of kind of unidentified I mean they're saying K.. K. K. The reality is, it seems more like an insurgency force built of a couple different groups. And they're on the ground in it's. It's a very strange thing that's happened here. You know day one after the actual. Of looting and rioting and burning here there was an influx. People noticed kind of. Happening of cars that we notice without license plates. And it sounds really noxious, but it's strange. You notice that in a city like Minneapolis. For some reason, it just started happening, and so you know by the time Friday night that the national. Guard was being kind of called out You know they. Were reporting openly that there were groups of people causing problems the president everyone else's lied through their fucking teeth, and said it was Antiga, but the reality is. We had boogie boys on the ground, so we had the Bugalo boys here for sure for sure. Yes, we have pictures of them I. Watched, them in person. We also have the couple other groups that I am still trying to figure out who they are and I have photos of some of them, but they were all foreign nationals. The two that we confronted directly said they were Duchesne headphones and had out of date. Dutch press passes. a lot of the guys that have been caught here have been caught with either some sort of media, badge or something. That would approximate one. there's a lot of a lot of people don't know about media badges, but most journalists yet just print them. Like you just. Like there's nothing like there's not like a centralized authority that issues your badges. Some city outside of maybe New York, city, or where they have press offices cracked and that's the thing and so. You know when when you confront someone who you see driving a car with no license plates in full of people. and. They stop the car in the middle of the street. Get Out and confront you as to why you're taking photos, you know stuff's going on, and you know I've spent a lot of my. Twenties and early thirties, dodging and reading up on just anything that kind of approximates what that looks like whether it's fascist kind of. Revolutionary stuff to how the spread of propaganda works in how that looks in these guys for the spookiest group of people I've ever encountered in real life and when you have that element. and there are public everyone on your social media. Sphere is kind of saying well, we're finding. Let's say jars of accelerates around town in Bushes or we're finding rags soaked in gas. For example. My neighborhood has one business in it, and it's a LGBTQ owned. Coffee Shop Two nights after the actual fires in the main area stopped, it was lit on fire by someone running down the street. You know like there's stuff that's happening. And I think it's a story that's GONNA. Come out more fully as time passes, but it's one that I think is important and extremely integral to whatever the pushback that we're gonNA. See looks like I. Think you know I think we have to be honest with ourselves that the right. Is Actually GonNa, probably look more and more like an insurgency force like this where it's guys driving trucks shooting randomly lighting things on fire leaving kkk style note I mean truly leaving notes, neighborhoods and say we're watching you, we're gonNA. WE'RE GONNA, burn you alive I. Mean You have a very odd element mixed into this whole other revolutionary. No police thing is word were self policing in the midst of what looks to be an insurgency campaign, so there are these like very odd things going on. And this just happening I mean Minneapolis Yellow, the epicenter of this but yesterday in Seattle somebody tried to drive into a crowd, and then shot into the crowd exact somebody. K. member I believe. There was definitely one that was confirmed. I don't know was from. There have been like twenty different cars that have driven. So at least one confirmed KKK Creek Crow Creek KKK leader like not yet some low level leader so. I think we need to. This is something I've been thinking about for a long time. I think we all have been, but there has to be a conversation about what that is because. That looks a lot more like A. far-right Middle Eastern terrorist campaign than a traditional American Conversation. Interesting that Antigua's the one that they want to designate as a terrorist organization, but that standard operating procedure for misinformation. You know like we're seeing. We're seeing the worst worst when it comes to just outright. Manipulation of reality and I thank you know. A lot of us know what we're looking at. And a lot of people are starting to but I think. This this whole thing that we're witnessing the the uprising the response. Is Cracking. I think the neoliberal shell a little bit it I. Don't think any I know for myself. I never thought I would live to see the day. that. The show shook. Yeah Yeah. His. Remarkable things of the last two weeks. Yeah, it does unbelievable and we kinda seem to be. On the edge of everything, there's so much good and bad news every day like today like the police chief in Portland resigned after a bunch of police brutality. Bennett, the head of the guy in the New York Times editorial board, who let a Senator Tom Cotton right about murdering everybody WHO's protesting The guy had to leave. You Have Minneapolis with veto proof majority of the city council like you know trying to put an end to the. Minneapolis Police Department at the same time. You've got saddle police using tear-gas two nights in a row after the mayor put in a moratorium on the use of tear gas. I was GONNA. Say I believe. They didn't because they said they wouldn't right like. That's how this works now. We didn't do it because we said we didn't don't believe you're fit what you saw. And what the Portland Police is has done is like.

Minneapolis Minneapolis Police Department Portland Police New York New York Times Bugalo Duchesne Senator Tom Cotton K. K. Antiga president Antigua Bushes Seattle Portland Bennett editorial board
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

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Michael <Music> <Advertisement> I, <SpeakerChange> appreciate you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> On, <Speech_Male> Tuesday dozens <Speech_Male> of military <Speech_Female> vehicles <Speech_Male> began patrolling <Speech_Male> and blocking <Speech_Male> the streets <Speech_Male> of Washington. <Speech_Male> As president <Speech_Male> trump appeared <Speech_Male> to make <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> good <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on his threat <Speech_Female> to use the <Speech_Female> military <Speech_Female> to crack down <Speech_Male> on violence <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Music> looting there. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Will be back. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> What will return to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the workplace? Look like <Speech_Male> at we work. <Speech_Male> This question <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is top of mind. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> That's why we're <Speech_Male> adapting our spaces. <Speech_Male> Making sure <Speech_Male> that you and your team <Speech_Male> can continue working <Speech_Male> and a safe healthy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> environment <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> across our buildings <Speech_Male> were stepping up <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sanitation, maximizing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fresh, clean <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> air, and modifying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> seating for distancing, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> plus <Speech_Male> we're adding friendly <Speech_Male> safety reminder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so that you can go <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about your day with more <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> peace of mind to <Speech_Male> learn more about how <Speech_Male> we work as enhancing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it spaces, Goto. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot co <SpeakerChange> slash <Silence> <Advertisement> future. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Here's what else <Speech_Music_Male> you need ten. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Curfews <Speech_Music_Female> fell on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dozens of cities across <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the country <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on Tuesday night, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as officials <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tried to discourage <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the kind <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of nightly violence <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and looting. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That has occurred <Speech_Music_Male> throughout the <Music> <Advertisement> past week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Congressional Democrats <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Republicans <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> condemned the decision <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to violently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> remove peaceful <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> demonstrators <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from a park <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> across from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the White House on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monday night. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So that the president <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trump could pose <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for photos <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> in front of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a church there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> after the president's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reality show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ended last night. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> While the nation nervously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> watched the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chaos that engulfs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> US <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> president trump <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> probably late <Speech_Music_Male> in bed. <Speech_Music_Male> Pleased <Speech_Music_Male> with himself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for descending another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rung <SpeakerChange> on the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dictatorial ladder. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The Times <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> reported that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the order to clear. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The park came <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from Attorney General <Speech_Male> Bill. Bar, <Speech_Music_Male> who accompanied <Speech_Music_Male> trump to <Speech_Music_Male> the church? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Finally. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Congressman <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Steve, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> King Oh, I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> own a nine <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> term Republican <Speech_Music_Female> with <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a history of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> racist comments <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> inflammatory <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anti immigrant <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rhetoric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was defeated <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in a Republican <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> primary <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on Tuesday night. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> In a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> major political <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> upset. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> King <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lost to a state <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> senator <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who had won the support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of National <Speech_Music_Male> Republicans <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who said that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kim had <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> become an embarrassment <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Music_Male> the party.

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"That may have been wishful thinking on my part. I hoped it was outsiders. Do you think you hoped it was outsiders to. I think that's a fair point I think we all. To use governor walls quote got a little bit out over our skis. Is it the case that there were looters coming from outside of our city to burn buildings down. Yes? Is it also true that some of our own community members were involved yes. It's tragic. This may seem like a kind of unusual question, but at the end of the day. Why does it matter? To you governor walls if the people doing this are outsiders if Americans are angry. Does it matter whether or not there from Minneapolis or Minnesota. It's just so incomprehensible. To? Consider. Burning Down Your own block. I mean you know people generally have an affinity to the city in which they grew up or the city where they live. You know the guy who operates the corner store. You have the local barber shop. To on a monthly basis. To even consider negatively impacting those businesses, those institutions. Those community centers in grocery stores. I can't even begin to understand it. Mr Mayor I'm curious about something in up front. I want to acknowledge that it may not be. In your mind the fairest question. A police killing the death of George Floyd in your city by your employees. Has By. This point led to protests across the United States. These extraordinary expressions of anguish and sadness and violence. I mean stores and businesses have been broken into and ransacked from Minneapolis to Los Angeles to New York. I mean there's quite literally a fire raging across the country in your city was the original spark. Do you feel any responsibility for that. Every single second of every single day. I feel that responsibilities mayor of the city where this occurred. Yeah. This is Ben I mean look. This is not about me. It's not about me. I mean but to say. This has been one of the worst weeks in our cities. History would be a massive understatement and to say. That this has been the worst week of my life. would be accurate. How do you think that this ends? And how do you hope that the sense? There's a moral ending to what's happened to can only end in one way. Which is first. Justice for George Floyd. In the form of a full charge and conviction. But Moreover. It needs to end. In true change. To how. Police departments across the country function. To, how were able to make decisions? Issue discipline in terminations as to how we can create these police departments, the truly protect and serve community. I mean that's one version of how to sentence, but. Given that the president is getting more and more involved given that he's calling on states to crack down for a more militarized response. Are you afraid that there is a version of this that ends with that further division between black communities in the police? And the government. Yes that scares the hell me. We cannot go down that path. What we cannot allow. Is For the vision and mentality of of Donald Trump. To come into our city in the form of a millennial terrific rule. I mean the implications. Are! More scary than I can even possibly imagine. In Minneapolis and speaking only for Minneapolis There's absolutely no need for any further force. So you think it's possible to stop the violence. Stop the looting. Allow the peaceful protests to continue, and not make worse in the process, the very problem that started off this which is excessive policing in Minneapolis. I mean that is the balance that everybody's trying to deal with right now. And if you're saying that, it's an easy balance with simple decisions, it is not. I mean. What you have to though remember is where this all began. Where it began was the murder. Of An unarmed handcuffed black man. George? Void was on the ground. He had his hands behind his back. He was calling out for help. He was calling for.

George Floyd Minneapolis United States Donald Trump Minnesota murder president New York Los Angeles
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

07:52 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"Expressing a lot of understanding for the protests and for the protesters and as you said. You've been doing that pretty much. From the moment with video of George Floyd was released. But how did you feel as you verbalised sympathy with these protesters? And then some of them turned violent. We'll let me be clear. There is a difference between protesting and looting. I am for the peaceful protest, I. Am four and expression of First Amendment Rights, but those expression of First Amendment Rights Stop when you talk about endangering our city and burning down. What for generations people had built up? The burning of A black business, which has for decades been pillars of of community does not help to create the change. We need to see in our police department in any way, shape or form. The Ransacking of a Latino restaurant doesn't somehow create the change in the police department or push back on structural racism in any way, shape or form. Voicing your first. Amendment rights in peacefully protesting. Yes, absolutely, but when it shifted to Violence A. That's a shift that I. don't believe any of us should tolerate and do you feel that you are responsible in any way for that shift I mean. Was there a decision? was there a set of decisions you made that you now feel were the wrong ones that may have allowed. Some of these peaceful protests turn into looting burning. Every single day I feel the weight of responsibility on my chest. Im the mayor. In at the end of the day. Yes, I'm a responsible party. I'm sure in the weeks and months from now. All of us will analyze the occurrences that happen in the decisions were made again and again and again, and I'm certain that there are things that I will look back on. That I should have done differently. Right now. Is Our city is still reeling. From the murder. And The subsequent looting. I can't tell you with certainty. But I think clearly we'll be a lot of analysis that will that will come in the weeks and months ahead. I'm mindful that you face I. Think. I? I think I think I think when I came out right at the beginning, and said this was wrong. It was unacceptable. It was a heinous murder that was the right decision when chief and I decided to immediately terminate the four officers that were involved. That was the right decision when I asked for the charging of officers show van. That was the right decision. And when we saw looting throughout our city, and we spoke out very clearly to say this is wrong, and it needs to stop immediately. That was the right decision to you know, but like you know. I wouldn't wish on anyone to be in the rooms. That I've been in over the last week to make the decisions that I've had to make in many instances where there's no chance of a positive outcome, no matter what you choose. You are choosing between two negative outcomes, no matter what. You know that's tough. What are what are those outcomes just to be clear? Well. For instance on Wednesday I got a call. From our chief of police that said he said the target is being looted. Our police officers are not going to have the numbers or the resources to. Combat what is likely to come? It wasn't a matter of planning or strategy, but simple math. And having to choose between allocating officers to protect precinct. Or escort firefighters that needed to put out fires or prevent businesses from getting looted. When you have to choose between. that. That is a fail fail failed decision, no matter what you choose. There are at least a couple of negative outcomes. And then the problem is even more compounded by the fact that the body of the Minneapolis Police Department that we were counting on to keep people safe through the looting was the entity. That originally caused this problem. And that makes the issue, even more difficult. Misnomer at a certain point. Your governor Tim Walls called in the state's National Guard, but he declined to accept help from the US military when it was offered. Do you think that was a mistake given how violent the protests became! No I think our governor made the right decision there why? This was a guard, sized crisis and demanded a guard size response. As became very clear. There was no possible way that our police department was going to be able to handle this on their own. And until we saw the full mobilization of the National Guard, we were having issues. After that full mobilization took place, we were able to quell the looting. We were able to stop the violence and the burning. And so no I think it was the right decision to mobilize the full force of the national. Guard and I also wanted to make sure that that leadership in mobilization came from the state, not the president Is there something about the idea of? The federal government getting involved. The you object to. Well just look at the rhetoric. That's coming from the president. I mean he's talking about shooting people. mean. The whole purpose of the National Guard. Coming in is to create peace, not diminish it. The whole point of creating a sense of order is to stop the looting of businesses, not having communities overridden with militia. There is a dramatically different philosophy that the president has then hours here in Minnesota. You've talked about the difference between the looters and the peaceful protesters. I want to talk for a moment about who is actually in the streets of your city. Yes, this is a quote from you on Saturday. When you spoke about the violence, and and some of these buildings that were burning, you said. We've seen long-term. Businesses overridden. We've seen community institutions set on fire and I want to be very very clear. The people that are doing this are not Minneapolis residents. Is that still your understanding? I think that people who are doing the looting in many cases were not from the state, and not from the city, and sadly as it turns out, others were. I mean. Governor Walls He. Said something quite similar. And his language was. This is outsiders. This is not MINNESOTANS. And then later on. He went back and said.

National Guard president murder Minneapolis Police Department George Floyd Minneapolis federal government US Tim Walls Minnesota
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:39 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"The utmost integrity and I've seen him. Make very quick and decisive decisions to terminate or discipline officers who have had wrongful conduct, but I've also seen so many instances where we are Hamstrung. Were Hamstrung by the architecture of this system that prevents change and protects officers from being held accountable, and if we really want to see the massive of culture shift that is essential we need to have that ability and right now in many instances, the truth is we. Don't I think it may surprise listeners to hear that the mayor of a city? The executive of Minneapolis can't get rid of a cop who has been credibly accused of misconduct. May Be a surprise, but it's oftentimes the truth. I mean you're talking about the need for pretty profound structural change here and you're the mayor. Electing Democratic leadership committed to progressive policies into reform is not enough to affect structural change than what else. would. You expect people to do. Take to the streets. To represent themselves in another way right because the vote the election of you. Didn't do it. I'm not the first elected mayor that has been four structural reform in the police department. I would say the previous three mayors from Sharon Sills Belton to Artie Rybeck to betsy hodges all wanted see reform within the police department, but they like I have encountered this one. Nearly impenetrable barrier, which is the union contract in the way it's set up. There are other forms of change that can occur outside the context of the Police Union contract. And they need to be made, but to tackle the full ball of wax. We can't just ignore that elephant in the room. So. Would you hope that that is an outcome of all of this? Major changes to that union contract. I would. All of the anger. You've seen over the last week. Has Shown how much urgency there is. I mean when when we talk about getting to a point of peace. We're not asking for patients. This is something that needs to happen. And yes, it has been a long time coming in, so if nothing else, let's channel this anger to get to a result that leads to a shift in policing..

Police Union Sharon Sills Belton betsy hodges Minneapolis executive Artie Rybeck
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

08:04 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"Today. As, nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd enter a second week. A conversation with the leader of the city where it all began. Mayor Jacob Fry of Minneapolis. Wednesday June third. Hello. This is Jacob, Prai? Mr Mayor! It's Michael Barbaro. Michael. Thanks for having me. Thank you very much for making time for us because we know. What an urgent time is in your city and we really appreciate it. You got it so just to start mayor fright. I want to go back to the moment when you learned about the death of George Floyd and I wonder if you could describe that moment from your perspective and then. Tell me whether in that moment. You could have imagined that it would lead us to where we are right now. When I first heard about the murder of George Floyd I didn't know all of the facts I received a call from our chief, saying that there was an interaction with a black man, and that black man had then been hospitalized. I didn't know yet whether he had died I didn't know the nature of the interaction, and then subsequently, of course we learn more information. I learned that the officer involved incident resulted in. George Floyd dying. I then saw the video. Which? was, horrid. To, see. Our white police officer. Press his knee into the neck of a black man who was unarmed and handcuffed. For a period of eight minutes straight. I'm there is nothing more disgusting that I have ever seen in my life. It was as clear as day to me that the normal protocols and procedures that are baked into the walls and mortar of of City Hall the tell you not to do something not to speak out not to say. Something was wrong because of legal reasons and all sorts of other issues that you just had to throw those away. And so. Around six thirty in the morning, as soon as the press was up and available, and we had at least collected the preliminary information about what happened, we held a press conference. and. My. Soul, direction was that. Let's just be honest. And since that moment. Our entire city has been reeling. Angry, sad. Every single negative emotion that you can think that's where our city has been and I've been with our city and feeling it. You! Know I asked you whether you could have imagined this response, and here's why I'm asking that. When the protests broke out the head of the Minneapolis and Leslie Redmond said this quote. What you're witnessing in Minnesota is something that's been a long time coming. I can't tell you how many governors I've sat down with how many mayors we've sat down with and we've warned them that. If You keep murdering black people, the city will burn. We have stopped the city from burning numerous times, and we are not responsible for burning now. So is the head of the CPI in your state right I mean. Were you warned and was this inevitable? The head of the N. double ACP could not be more correct. This is not just about the eight minutes of time where our officer had his knee. On George Floyd's neck. This is about the previous. Four hundred years. This is about. Hundred, years worth of intentional segregation and institutionalized racism. This is about repeated instances of officer mistreatment. Over decades. And, the only reason it's coming out more often now is that it's recorded on video. I, and so no, this is not just about the eight minutes of this one instance. This has been a longtime come in in many ways and. It's tragic and all we can hope for now is that it leads to clear change. It sounds like you could imagine. Everything that has happened happening the way you're talking right now, that's that's. But I guess what I'm getting at is. Were you ever told by a black leader in Minneapolis that if circumstances did not change? There will be a crisis. There will be something like what we have just seen I'm asking you if you were given a warning. Of that kind! I'm sure there have been numerous warnings over the past several years in decades, yes. I. Mean if you're asking, has anybody ever said that the answers? That I have heard it. Does that make the burning of the city right? No, it doesn't. Misdemeanor Tuesday's episode of of our show daily was about the history of the Minneapolis Police Department, and why it has been so difficult for mayors for police chiefs to change the culture and reprimand officers who commit acts of misconduct and specifically in your city. We focus on the power of the Police Union to set the terms, and even more specifically. The head of Your Police Union who has resisted change and pretty successfully prevented a lot of it. Has that been your experience? Yes! The elephant in the room with regard to. Police reform? Is the police union. The elephant in the room with regard to making the changes necessary to combat the institutionalized racism in have a full on culture shift is the police union the contract associated with that union and then the arbitration that ultimately is necessary. It sets up a system where. We have difficulty both disciplining end terminating officers who have done wrong and so if you WANNA see a full on culture shift, there's a couple of things it's get new officers in that embody the vision of our very forward, thinking and very procedurally justice oriented chief R., A. Dondo and get officers out who do not embody that vision. Both of those things need to happen. Do you currently have the power to do that to bring a new officers. Who Do this job differently and get rid of cops who are problematic. We have the ability to bring in new officers who do the work differently and fact chief are Dondo. Personally interviews have renew cadet that comes in to make sure they have the right mentality that procedural justice is instilled from the very beginning, and that they have a compassionate approach. We do not. Have the ability to get rid of many of these officers that we know have done wrong in the past due to issues with both the contract and the arbitration associated with the Union. You know I mean let me tell you about who are chief is chief R.. A Dondo grew up on the south side and he's the kind of beat cop like knows every person on the street and knows who their parents are I mean. That is the way the policing ultimately should be done. He even sued our Police Department for Racial Discrimination and one right, and now he is our chief, and he is a person of.

George Floyd officer Minneapolis Your Police Union Mayor Jacob Fry Minneapolis Police Department Union City Hall Police Department for Racial D Mr Mayor Michael Barbaro Dondo Jacob murder Minnesota Prai Leslie Redmond chief R. A. Dondo
"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Electric cars might actually help save you money. Electric cars. They're normal now. Learn more at normal now. Dot Com. John Collins is a reporter for Minnesota public radio. He works on their race class in communities desk a few years back. He did whole podcast about the death of Philander Castille and the prosecution of the police officers involved. I spoke last Friday. Protests in Minneapolis had taken a violent and chaotic turn. I'm sorry I've been up for. Like. Four days straight a police precinct had been set on fire and the National Guard. Just been called in to take over for the Minneapolis police. been unable to control events on the ground I. It's not unusual for Minneapolis police to use some sort of force on protesters It's usually seemingly in a strategic way, and it wasn't clear what exactly they wanted the protesters to do in this case specifically because you know, they weren't going to just disperse, so they just kinda scattered them over this larger area and barricaded themselves into. into the precinct, so it was only surprising in that it didn't seem to have any sort of strategic goal for the police, but John says telling the story of police violence in Minneapolis means you're also telling the story of police reform, activism in Minneapolis, and how that movements evolved he I saw protests like this in two thousand fifteen after the shooting of another young black man. City believes had responded to a nine one one call about a fight. They tried to arrest a twenty four year old named Jomar classic. Reports say Clark resisted arrest. An officer shot him in the head. He died of his injuries at the hospital. Almost, immediately, after the shooting demonstration started up certainly like there've been lots of. African American men who been killed by police or the Minneapolis in typically there was some sort of small protest or something, and then it would go away before too long, but with Mark Clark. What happened is people protested in? They focused on the police. and. That's the fourth precinct. Attend North Minneapolis. It's the one of the traditional African American neighborhoods in Minneapolis. And they protested over and over at the fourth precinct, and they actually occupied the grounds outside the fourth precinct in the middle of winter for more than two weeks, and in the middle of winter by saying that in Minneapolis that means it's like twenty below, and they're pretty much living outside the bottles water freezing protesters shut down. interstates even tried to take over the mall of America. This approach digging in forcing people to pay attention. It became a hallmark of Minneapolis, activism following tactics honed by black lives matter. When Casteel 's death was live streamed on facebook by. The machinery of protests crank to life again slender casteel was. Driving with his girlfriend in girlfriend's daughter, and he got pulled over, he told the copy at a gun, but he also had a permit, and in the officer shot and killed him, but the protests after flounder casteel targeted a disruption little bit more, so they had a tactic of going on the interstates over and over and shutting down traffic, and it did anger a lot of people, but it also got them a lot of attention and. Actually. That could be a lesson that like folks cutler now. What works is disruption? I'm hoping you can remind people exactly what happened to the officers involved in Dhamar Clark's death in Flanders, Steele's death because folks may not remember exactly what took place for those officers punished. So. Minnesota until just. Three years ago now head never had a police officer charged for killing someone while they're on duty never. Never and the first time that an officer was charged it was. Officer Haram Alana's who shot and killed philander casteel in that car. And that was after a lot of pressure from activists and people in the community to file charges and a lot of like worrying by Ramsey county attorney on how exactly to proceed with filing charges. Casteel is African, American and Horon. Montana's was Mexican American, and he was acquitted on all counts, and in the case recently it was July, two, thousand, seventeen, a woman, Australian woman who lived in Minneapolis, with her partner, Justin Russo Jack. Thought she heard noises went onto the alley. She called the police and a police officer named Muhammed Noor shot and killed her in her alley. He was also charged. So that was the second one, and he's smalley American and that was third degree, murder or manslaughter. He was found guilty, and that was the first time that police officer was ever found guilty for killing in Minnesota, and now we have the charges against the newest officer Derek Sheridan. That are the first time actually. A white police officer has been charged for killing anyone in Minnesota even though we have one officer has been acquitted and one officer who is in jail right now. it's interesting listening to you because you're sort of sketching this picture for me of like an acceleration of bringing officers to some kind of justice where with Jim Clark, there were no charges, and then with philander casteel there were charges, but the officer was found not guilty, and then you know with his third shooting of a white woman who I believe had called police because she heard something in her driveway. her the officer. There was found guilty, so you can sort of see how. Reactions are changing in real time as each shooting happens right exactly. I mean if we want to think about it to Hera Norianu as the officer who killed Flanders Casteel. It took about four months for the authorities to arrest him Muhammad Noor took about eight months and all, and then this newest officer Derek Sharpen. It took five days, and it happened in a way that is not typical at all. Especially for a police officer where the State Bureau of criminal apprehension actually took him into custody, wasn't a local police department or Sheriff's office or anything like that. It was the state going around Hennepin county to arrest a police officer..

officer Minneapolis Officer Haram Alana Minnesota Casteel Flanders Casteel Mark Clark Philander Castille John Collins Hennepin county facebook reporter Muhammad Noor Hera Norianu National Guard City Derek Sharpen Muhammed Noor cutler
"minneapolis" Discussed on In The Dark

In The Dark

01:34 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on In The Dark

"Hi It's Madeleine. I'm coming to my apartment in Minneapolis. Just a few blocks from some of the protests that are happening right now. The protests of the death of George Floyd a black man who died after a white officer put his me on his neck more than eight minutes outside a grocery store in South. Minneapolis for my apartment. I can actually hear the sirens the helicopters. Even the sound of glass shattering. Right now. What's important is getting this information about what's happening here in. Minneapolis to the public so effective immediately our entire in the dark team. It's going to be helping out the Minnesota public radio newsroom to cover. This urgent story will be joining the newsroom. Crew temporarily to help them out to be clear. We're not doing a podcast on this. You'll be able to find our work and the work of the Minnesota public radio news journalists at NPR news dot org also that means that our final episode of the Krona Virus and the Delta series. It's going to be delayed by about a week. In the meantime please follow Minnesota public radio for the latest news on. What's happening? What it means where we go from here and one last thing. We're living in some really hard times. All of us. Journalists were really being pushed to our limits and the financial reality of that is also really tough. I know that a lot of you are struggling right now but if you are in a position to help us with this work to make a donation we need your help now more than ever and when you donate now the American Public Media Board of directors will match your gift dollar for dollar so please give generously as you can today at in the dark. Podcast DOT ORG or you can text the word dark two four seven four seven four seven and thank you..

Minneapolis Minnesota American Public Media Board George Floyd NPR officer Delta
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:31 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Reaction. It's absolute in total discussed. It is here. We have a situation where we should have. The Justice Department on the ground in Minneapolis working with community leaders activists local officials showing real leadership in less moment and the president should be showing leadership and instead. He's basically calling for the shooting of protesters. I I mean love. Every day is a new low. I can never in my wildest dreams. I had a complete failure of imagination. About how how affected we would be by this president's memento lack of decency and leadership but you know so. Should I be surprised? Maybe I shouldn't but it's terrible and I think that the stuff is really corrosive and is really damaging at a time when people are in such pain and to be blocked in America right now to be blocked Brown in America. Right now is People are really deeply in pain right now and this is his response of Anita. We're going to ask you questions about another issue what you're passionate about which is voting in a minute. But I also wanted to get your reaction to the news that a CNN reporter was arrested by the by the local police. They're that's totally outrageous. I mean again here. We have an block reporter as well. I just WANNA I wanNA name that. But he was doing his job he was on live TV and got arrested that way in. Meanwhile the four officers you were involved in the killing of Mr Floyd are not arrested so again this is. This is why people are rightfully outraged. And we've got a first amendment in this country and that that journalists was doing his job but in many ways this is kind of where we are in America you know we can also Kolenda. The fact that in retaliation for twitter actually complying with its own community standards decided to put up warnings when the president misleads voters about elections voting information when he did this thing this morning basically calling for incentivizing shootings of protesters twitter actually blocked it and in retaliation he issues. This bogus executive order. Meanwhile by the way. Facebook is doing nothing and is allowing these messages to be amplified and it corrodes democracy. It corrodes the leadership in this country. And so there's a lot of different touch points unless this may be the perfect segue to talk about voting but I D- stressed about those I was gonna say I imagine that as you think about how to effect change and these issues of police abuse that the ballot box is one of the most important ways to do that and yet voting is under an enormous amount of duress these days Supreme Court. Decisions a president who traffic's conspiracy theories about voting and a whole host of other issues. So give us your sense of what the stakes are right now in terms of giving Americans. Many of whom have been historically disenfranchised to to voting. And where you think the priorities are in terms of pushing forward on this issue so I think a for Cova nine nineteen. There was a real sense by those of us who work in the voting rights space. That twenty twenty was going to bring a wad of challenges on the voter suppression. We have been a nation saddled by efforts to suppress the vote in kind of our elections have been seated on exclude racial exclusion of black people of women and the like and twenty twenty. There's we knew that the president had come in and been ushered in claiming without any evidence whatsoever that millions of people had voted in two thousand sixteen illegally. And so we understood that this was going to be a major challenge and especially also in time of rampant disinformation an online the ability to kind of suppress. The vote had find all kinds of ways to make people fearful to to have them feel like they should not even bother to participate. Which is a form of voter suppression as well but all of that would be on steroids and that much harder to combat and then covert happens and you see immediately in early. March states like Louisiana and other states needing to postpone their primaries because people were literally afraid of voting amid the pandemic and showing up in person at the polls sites. And so then you have Wisconsin and Wisconsin. You have the incredible partisan at for to maintain the impersonal luncheon. You've got a at every level partisanship in facts. The Wisconsin primary from decisions made at the local level to the United States Supreme Court and images around Wisconsin where voters were forced to choose between their health and their vote were really gutting in jarring and so right now for civil rights community. We are pushing on a number of fronts. One is that we need congress to give a four billion dollars to the states to get voting by mail in place and to be able to expand early voting in voter registration in the lead up to the November election. People are not able to register government agencies. Right now they need to have expanded online voting registration but people also there are a lot of communities that don't vote by mail historically and we need to be able to have those options in place so people can show up at the polls and prevent long lines. If there's much expanded early voting and do social distancing and have CD compliant polling sites the like so. We're pushing in Congress for this for this money but we are also pushing in the states. Every state runs its own. Elections in secretaries of state Republican and Democratic are pushing for these rules changes in order to have smooth elections even while the issue is being completely politicized and conspiracy theories and lies from the president. And so we're helping to support those efforts in the fifty states to get all of these these different ways Vote amid pandemic in place. But there's a third bucket that is really important and is voter. Education and fighting disinformation information. Cove it has made all of these things much more difficult. More people are spending more time online and so when you have the president tweeting and posting on facebook utter falsehoods about vote by mail about an and you have him saying it in such a way and he's not alone. There are other Republican officials. That really essentially are saying that they are afraid of more people voting that more people voting is a threat to their and. I do this work as a nonpartisan civil rights lawyer and it is just I have to. They'll call it out like it is right now. Which is that. There is a party that in many in too many parts of the party are really are threatened by more people voting in this country. And it's wide. There's been this very intentional. Agenda to create all kinds of obstacles to people voting everything from disenfranchising people who've served out their criminal sentences already to purging voters off of the world's unlawfully in more. And this is. We have to fight this. We have to wear engaging the leadership conference with facebook and twitter to to pushing them an interface. Quite honestly to help get them to combat disinformation into help provide voter education but also to work in communities around the country to get information out. That is correct. There's going to need to be a mass of public education effort the summer and the fall to educate voters about how they can vote in. November in to make sure that they are energized and activated to vote. There is so much at stake with this with this election. The president signed executive order yesterday that seeks to do away with the protections that social media firms now have internet firms now have for publishing material Basically the law now exempts them from a defamation suits when people say horrible and defamatory false things about you on twitter. You cannot sue twitter or facebook now. The presidency obviously doing it from the perspective of he thinks twitter is is censoring a conservative voices but it is also allowing a lot of really hateful stuff up on its platforms. Be Your thoughts on the Executive Order? I mean executive order. I think it is very likely unlawful. I think there are really serious issues at stake that we need to contend with reckon with around the regulation of these companies and like the fact that the public law regime that exists around these countries is old and needs to be examined in our new world where social media has become so much more the source of news and and facts and what responsibility these platforms have they are not platforms and when the Patriot..

president twitter Facebook United States Supreme Court executive America congress reporter Wisconsin Justice Department CNN Minneapolis Louisiana twenty twenty Anita
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:00 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Seattle CLEVELAND. If you look at where. Those police departments were L. A. Was So long ago that I think there's been a fair bit of kind of their new problems there. I should say but if you looked at the transformation of some of these major city police departments from the time that the Justice Department came in two or three years after the consent decree was over and these things he's concentric as were not. They often were five years They took time in recognition of kind of a level of change in the amount of political will that was required to actually change. Culture change practices on the lake. But these were very changed places when the Justice Department left and they weren't perfect. I say this publicly all the time. There is no such thing as a perfect police department And the Justice Department's going to be able to wave a wand even after five years to say Oh there won't be any more critical incidents the differences that departments that have seen that kind of intervention and had to engage with at that level of deep reform and investigation. When these things happen they know how to self correct and they have that kind of leadership to do it versus police departments. That aren't studying it. That aren't looking at it. That aren't self correcting that. Don't even know where the problems lie that have just thinking about these things as like a few bad apples versus what's happening systemically. Structurally in the police department. And and looking at. Where's the community? Even like engage with this police department to help push for reform and more of a collaborative way so there are studies and evaluations. That have been done. I think there needs to be more of and you can talk to chiefs an community in some of these departments or any cities to kind of document the change or any of these any of them result. Perfect police departments. Absolutely not. But you know what is so dispiriting and in fact enraging to so many people is that time after time. These police officers you know. They're put on paid leave or unpaid administrative leave. This particular case as you pointed out the police chief acted pretty swiftly to terminate them but in the end they are in so many cases they are not charged or they are not prosecuted or they are not convicted. So what is the problem there? That's a different set of problems and I'm GonNa dig into that actually at some point one to return to this issue around systemic reform. There are a lot of problems with criminal accountability of police officers in this country There's the problem of district attorney's offices that work day in and day out with the same police departments. They are there investigators about this concern about having to close of a relationship between the Police Department and the DA's office such that. There isn't a level of independence and independent assessment on a police officer's actions those concerns are real. It's why it has been part of what is propelled in recent years a series of more civil rights minded district attorney candidates. Running for office and getting elected is in booting out. Da's that were just seen as completely part of the kind of local law enforcement machine and so you've seen district some prosecutor's offices. More progressive offices create these independent commissions. The State of Wisconsin actually created an independent body for the state to investigate police officer involved. violence there are different things that people have jurisdictions of done to address us that this concern about the lack of independence in independent investigation. Israel. Why a lot of these jurisdictions turned to the Justice Department. I will also say and I think it. It is a hard and controversial conversation. But it's one that we need to have. Which is that. The Justice Department's jurisdiction to prosecute officer. Involved is so limited and I think there's a real conversation to be had as I said it is requires the highest criminal intent standard. There is criminal law to be able to to prosecute one of these cases and get a conviction and DA's office at the state level have a lot more options. They can prosecute recklessness they can prosecute negligence the in the Justice Department bar is much higher and so that jurisdiction but of course changing the standard lowering. The Bar would require federal legislation right. And is there any chance that what happened? I mean you're saying star conversation but that's a that's a heavy lift isn't it? Yeah I mean it's a heavy lift but I mean all of this is a heavy left and the answer can't be that we just kind of brush our hands off and sit in place of persistent frustration and violence. I mean this is my response to when people are like all these consent decrees you know. They're still people getting hill. It's like the answer it isn't that the consent decree model is perfect but there have been real gains in police departments that have had long histories of abuse and violence in really confronting some serious systemic deficiencies around. Training Accountability Supervision. In the whole gamut that have seen different outcomes again. But I just don't believe in this in this area or in any Emma civil rights lawyer every problem I tackle from voting rights to to police. Violence these are long entrenched problems that are rooted in the founding of our country. And if my answer is damaged too hard. I'm not I can't push Congress Congress's do nothing or these aren't going to change. Yeah then sit it out. Like don't be a part of the effort for change but I think that there there are strategies interventions. We need to make them better we to push to make the law better. I don't think there's nothing count ability in these cases and I think that there is a culture even among prosecutors that needs to change as well as when we're talking about policing a police departments before about how the kinds of investigations you did Into police abuses has not been a priority in this justice department. And you know you spurred me while I was looking at the Justice Department website To look further at their list of priorities. And there's no reference to the Civil Rights Division or investigations into police abuses in fact on the contrary The Attorney General Bar created this announced this commission on law enforcement that talks about and I'm looking at it now. The troubling continued lack of trust and respect for law enforcement that persists in many communities. The job of COP is tougher than now than ever before. All of which most people can agree with except that the kinds of issues. We're talking about today. Do not seem to be addressed. So tell us what you know about what your former division is doing. It's now headed by guy named Eric. Dream on tell us a little bit about what you know about what he's made priorities. And has he continued any of these sorts of investigations at all. As far as you know. Well I mean Eric driving came in. I think two plus years after the start of the trump administration and I think is terribly empower vis-a-vis the attorney general who seems to be driving and setting the tone for almost everything. The dismantling of the policing work at the Civil Rights Division started on Jeff Sessions. Watch and he was very intent on this when I was the head of the division. He called me in for an oversight. Hearing in you know ream to be for being an aggressive civil rights lawyer on policing as though that was a kind of the biggest insult in the world. So this was part of this. This mission attorney general bar his picked right up and has in some ways made it even worse by giving a series of speeches around the country talking about the disrespect to police officers and not at all even acknowledging communities and has really created this further exacerbated the divide between law enforcement and the communities that they serve and the president did this. He did it in July of two thousand seventeen where he very famously. Talking in New York to a police department talked about how police officers should be roughing up suspects as. They're putting their heads in the police cars. You know this. It may seem small but this stuff really adds up. It isn't just that they've walked away. Abdicated their congressionally mandated responsibility to support police community. Trust building to support police reform. They are literally furthering the polarization and divide in furthering. This like warrior mentality of law enforcement officers and community has them and they are at war with each other. And so you know. I just think it's more than it's more than just the work. It's even the kind of rhetoric that's that's coming out. The president tweeted this morning when the looting starts. The shooting. Starts your.

Police Department Justice Department officer Civil Rights Division Attorney DA Seattle Eric Wisconsin CLEVELAND L. A. Israel Congress Congress
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:28 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"I mean that's why you're seeing the kind of level of frustration pouring out into the streets every night right now and we would have strongly considered opening at the Civil Rights Division pattern and practice investigation. This is an investigation that you know would look at everything in the Minneapolis. Police Department from use of force problems to training accountability supervision the kinds of systemic issues that infect a culture of policing yesterday. I tweeted this out. But the the local union chief in. Minneapolis has had a long history of antagonist onto the community. And I'm saying that very lightly there have been much stronger accusations about his own affiliations. But you know when the mayor a year ago tried to abolish a kind of training a warrior type training out in Minneapolis. The union chief went ahead in defiance and hired and spent money to re engage trainers to kind of promote this warrior. Thinking and that kind of thing that infects that's about the culture sort of follow up on this concept of were your training because I actually saw your tweet and it was something that I had not heard about it. I gather that is a kind of fear based training that is supposed to prioritize police safety over the community safety and I know it's been abolished but I mean if these police officers have been getting these this kind of training and it's seeped into the culture there you know it's going to take a long time it would seem to me to change a culture and also to what extent is this kind. Worrier training prevalent around the country. Is this something. That's unique there or is it something that we're seeing all around the country so it is not unique to Minneapolis. When President Obama launched the Task Force on twenty first century policing in the aftermath of Ferguson? There was an explicit engagement on this issue of whether law enforcement should be warriors versus guardians and a task force came out with a set of findings around the need for law enforcement to be guardians in their communities and to end this warrior. Type mentality and there was a lot of exposure of warrior trainings. Police departments that were recruiting on a very warrior mentality and so it isn't unique to Minneapolis. It was thought of having kind of seeped into law enforcement leadership culture that this was something to absolutely move away from but we still see remnants of it and there are a lot of concerns too. About how you know Officers that have been repeat offenders on use of force just kind of reading recycled and police department. Police Department can avoid sharing out this warrior mentality around without any accountability. The officer Shova new had his neon. Mr Floyd's neck had a number of disciplinary reports against him for use of force and was supported by a union that clearly had adopted and was seeking to continue to promote this mentality. So I've always said you know policing and police departments are an institution am changing. Institutional Culture doesn't happen overnight but you can't be afraid of not having the silver bullet to to address the problem and just not do anything like there is a role that the Justice Department has played in some departments in helping to turn it takes. It takes a long time. And it's it takes a lot of commitment to do it but this is work that this Justice Department and this administration have completely walked away from and it lacks have supported aggressive aggressive treatment of people during Arrests Veneto. You mentioned that. Minneapolis has long painful history of abuses in its police department was. Minneapolis on your radar screen when you were Chief of the Civil Rights Division. Did you have complaints about? Police practices in Minneapolis. And did you ever begin any sort of investigation to look at these complaints? We were definitely aware of Minneapolis. It was on our radar tenure. At the Justice Department Jim Clark was killed to end provoked a series and also Landau Castio. Who wasn't killed by the Minneapolis? Police Department was in a neighboring county. But both of these things really highlighted. Just how fraught it? They were awful awful incident and highlighted. Just how fraught with tensions were locally and so it was on our radar. The community oriented Policing Services Department in the Justice Department had been engaging in technical assistance with the Minneapolis Police Department and had investigated also the treatment of protesters after the remark heart killing and had done a report about this and so it was certainly on our radar as you now or as you may know my goal there were a lot of police departments on our radar and we were ultimately. Despite the fact of how profile this work was. We were actually we were very judicious about where we would go. It's a small team at the Justice Department of career investigators and lawyers that. Do this work there. Seventeen thousand police departments in this country. And we were we had consent decrees in fifteen. We had investigations and twenty five really significant because the consent decrees became models and base for best practices and for other police departments. Would look at these at what we were doing these jurisdictions. But it wasn't we couldn't we weren't gonNA be everywhere but it's why the Justice Department had a lot of different points of entry in support for producing reform and engaging police departments and community leaders on this and by and large those interventions have been downgraded or actually stops almost altogether and the Justice Department. You don't care. From the Attorney General this attorney general can show up in Minneapolis and have any credibility with the activists there. So there's a lot of different things going on right now where? The Justice Department's Yasser during the criminal investigation. But they're largely absent from abroad. Conversation have actually made things just to pick up on that. I'm looking at the Justice Department website right now and they have nothing on the events in. Minneapolis at all up there. No press release about the criminal investigation. No words All for the community but just on the Minneapolis matter. You say was on your radar screen deejay. You consider opening a pattern and practice. Investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department. How close were you to doing something along those lines? And if you didn't wind up well so the cops office was in Minneapolis. And we were. We were waiting to kind of understand. What the outcomes there would be and we. It was on our radar we were. I don't think that we were like on the verge of opening up in Minneapolis. We were at you may not recall but Chicago. The largest police department police department in the country we hit opened up that investigation about seven months prior to the close of the administration. And we needed to get that investigation on. Chicago was a police department with a very long history at and of abuse. We needed to get the Baltimore. Consent decree negotiated. I frankly think that this this area of the Civil Rights Division in a in a pro civil rights administration needs to be expanded. It needs to have more funding. It needs to be given more Kind of room to maneuver to be able to meet the kinds of needs that existed in places like Minneapolis and around the country. Because we weren't able to go to into police departments that were clamoring for the kind of intervention. It was the most aggressive intervention that the Justice Department had. There were these other ways that the Justice Department showed up to support community police trust and reform. So that's kind of where we were with. Minneapolis as we had hands completely tied in these other jurisdictions rushing to meet the critical needs in those communities but there is no question at any point long even before I got there that the civil rights division could have been in more jurisdictions to help support in really promote the longer term. Change that needed to happen in some of these local departments. So let me ask you Vanita because under your leadership there were a number of pattern and practice investigations were consent decrees which means that. The Justice Department was Basically Forcing Police Department to institute reforms. There is a kind of fatalism about this issue which you can understand because these incidents keep on happening so help us understand so two questions. One is in the work that the civil rights division was doing. What did you see? That was actually working. And what have been the major impediments to actually getting these reforms to take root and to make a difference. Yeah I mean there were in consent decrees in places like Los Angeles after Rodney King. That was the original genesis of the Justice Department having jurisdiction to investigate police departments the sway. Lapd NPD IN DC..

Police Department Minneapolis Justice Department Minneapolis Police Department Civil Rights Division Justice Department of career community oriented Policing Se Lapd Los Angeles President Obama Arrests Veneto Mr Floyd Rodney King officer Ferguson Shova Chicago Landau Castio
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

10:44 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Michael ISIKOFF. Keep investigative correspondent for Yahoo News. And I'm Dan Kleinman editor and chief of Yahoo News so you know our old friend Jack. Shafer over at Politico tweeted this morning. Things are starting to get in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight feel to them. And I hadn't thought about it in that way but when you look at the riots going on right now in. Minneapolis and elsewhere around the country. The deranged tweets from our president and the threats to free press the First Amendment so much else one begins to see how the nineteen sixty eight seems like something. We will all be reliving this year. Well people have pointed out that when the President says make America great again. He's really harkening back to a time when America maybe was not so great in this particular instance. It's it's the nineteen sixties in that quote when the looting stars the shooting starts. Whatever it was hearkens back to the Miami Police Chief Walter. Hedley nineteen sixty seven who among other things talked about crackdowns on slum hoodlums and that? We don't mind being accused of police. Brutality let's not forget Chicago in the Democratic convention in the police riot in Chicago. But right but you know this is. This is not just crazy. Rhetoric deranged rhetoric from the president. It is very close to the line of incitement to violence and back in nineteen sixty seven when Walter Headley. Did this a lot of people say that? That is part of what sparked rioting in Miami so words have consequences and we have talked on this podcast. A lot about how we become inured to the kind of bonkers things at the president tweets. And don't shine a spotlight enough on like how dangerous some of them are. And I think this is a good example of that by the way the the Associated Press Obituary of Hedley said that he called him the architect of crime. Crackdown that sent police. Dogs and shotgun toting patrolman into Miami slums in force and that was the guy that trump specifically it was quoting about. The shooting starts so What a great role model for law enforcement somebody like that but look we also talk the other day in our great chat with Cara Swisher about twitter and whether twitter was finally going to start policing trump's incendiary and false tweets they have not taken down the tweets about the former Joe Scarborough staffer which is what triggered swishes column. But they have started to post these labels on trump tweets. They did identify. The looting starts. Shooting starts tweet as something that violates its policies they didn't take it down well and violates its policies because it glorifies who's what very specifically said and. I have to say I'm a little surprised that twitter was actually willing to kind of escalate. This fight with trump because they seems a little tepid about it at first and certainly does take it to another level and we'll see how trump responded came right after trump signed that executive order that seemed to contemplate some sort of federal crackdown on twitter and other social media firms. For what they put up on their content of course. His only concern is bias against conservatives. Not what a lot of a see as far more threat from social media firms in that is the blatantly false disinformation conspiracy theories that linger up on these social media sites unpoliced and I mean contradicted but what makes no sense about his attack on twitter is he keeps calling for the repeal of section two thirty of the Communications Decency Act. That's not going to help you. A lot of his followers who are pretty active on twitter. Because that's GONNA get banned from twitter right and that's the vision of the law that immunizes these platforms and makes it hard for them. So it's just as usual. There's no logic to it. It's just lashing out no forethought and yet it's destructive right now just coming back to Minneapolis. Because you know the events there are so disturbing first of all clearly there is rioting going on and that's bad and it needs to be stopped and some use of force is probably going to be required for that even as some of these protests and violence starts to not start to has already spread to other cities. But what we've all watched that video George Floyd and you know the events that led to his death. I am baffled by the comments of the district attorney in which he gave a press conference yesterday suggesting that there was other evidence out there. That's preventing him from arresting these officers. I would sure like to know what he's referring to E. issued The his office issued this kind of bland clarification that did not clarify very much at all suggesting that all evidence needed to be looked at on. Its face George. Floyd was arrested. We know because he was a presume suspect in a forgery case forgery not exactly a capital crime. Hard to imagine. There's anything that in any way justify what we saw on that video. Yeah absolutely and we don't know but as you say very hard to imagine what that could be that would any in any way exonerate especially police officer. Who had his his neon. George Floyd's neck. I do want to pick up on one thing you said before which is saying that you know with the rioting there may be a need for law enforcement to step in and. I'm sure that's true but I have to say and this is kind of echoing. The theme that we began with. Which is that. This is a kind of a throwback to the sixties. I mean what I'm seeing and I think are generational divides here that because there is so much frustration that there has been so little accountability in these cases and they just keep happening over and over again and this kind of fatalism settled in. I am beginning to get a sense of like a more of kind of tolerance for these kinds of protests that lead to rioting and that can lead to violence and that there sort of a perversion of how law enforcement is dealing with all of this that the emphasis becomes on dealing with the hoodlums. The word that was used back in the sixties or the thugs as as trump refers to them and not dealing with the underlying crime that sparked the protests. And I have to say I even see it in the conversation with my daughter and her friends they are talking about how police departments these institutions are in some ways not redeemable and there is a movement in this country to raise them to the ground and rebuild them from scratch because they have become corrupt because the cultural and systemic issues of bias and excessive use of force are so ingrained that you're going to have to do something quite radical to actually get back to where we should be. I don't accept that but that is something that you hear more and more people talk about and the more you hear those arguments being made. You're going to hear the counter arguments. We're going to be in a culture war over these issues. That is going to be a real problem for this country going forward. And what do you need in situations like this? We'll talk to Vanita Gupta about it but you need leadership right couple of other Thoughts or at least one other to be narrowly political here. But I think These events are going to be a real problem if they have not already doomed Amy Klobuchar Shire's bid to be Biden's vice president. Amy Closure was the county attorney for years including during a period that this officer Cohen was. There were complaints about him. He was investigated he was never charged. Now it is true that the grand jury after closure became us. Senator left her. Previous office voted not to charge guy but the totality of the events in. Minneapolis the clear longstanding problems. That police department has a think's GonNa make it very hard for Biden to choose her as his vice presidential pick and conversely it probably Boost the chances for say Kamala Harris to be the pick the need to have an African American on the ticket. I think only increases as a result of all this. I think that's right. It is important to point out. That club are actually and this is clarified really in the last couple of days the DA. They're made a public statement about this global had no role in reviewing the cove incase or any of the allegations against him but she does have a controversial record in Minnesota. Yeah there are cases not non-prosecution police abuse cases which scrutiny during the primary campaign. And I've talked to people who are close to Biden and they say that it's just a nonstarter but she did she did. Have I think a pretty good chance at a certain point because Joe Biden's his kind of top standards for who is going to pick as vice-president there's someone who he feels simpatico with and we were told that he felt very simpatico with Amy Klobuchar? I agree with you. I think definitely raises the prospects of Kamala Harris getting the nod even though Kamala Harris whose prosecutor was a prosecutor. For many years she's got her own issues but it has her own issues but many this specific issue. Minneapolis is going to be a metaphor in the same way. That Chicago was a metaphor in one thousand. Nine hundred sixty eight and I think that makes it almost impossible for Biden to pick the former Hennepin county district attorney as his vice presidential running mate. But look there's a lot of substantive issues nonpolitical but important we want to discuss about all with Vanita Gupta. So let's.

twitter Joe Biden Minneapolis president George Floyd trump Kamala Harris Chicago Vanita Gupta Miami Police Hedley Yahoo Michael ISIKOFF Miami Politico America officer
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

The Daily 202's Big Idea

01:38 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

"Interview on CNN and as he described watching the video of his brother plead for his life and the violent unrest. That's followed. He said his family wants peace in the streets but he also called for the death penalty for all four officers. Involved in his brother's death lawyers for those officers could not be reached for comment. Floyd's family will seek an independent autopsy of his body citing its mistrust of Minneapolis city officials. Now Minnesota has been the locale of several high profile killings by police in recent years including the shooting. Death of full llandough casteel also caught on video during a traffic. Stop in two thousand sixteen. The officer involved was charged with manslaughter but acquitted. Besides the killings of Floyd and Casteel a Minneapolis. Police officer shot and killed Jomar Clark. A twenty four year old black man in two thousand fifteen that also spurred extended demonstrations that effectively occupied the area near where the police station that burned down is for weeks getting back in two thousand fifteen years now local and federal officials though eventually declined to bring charges against the officers involved in that case it's important to understand that history and background to see why this week's incident has sparked such violence and that's the daily two. Oh Two for Friday may twenty ninth. Thank you for listening. Our show is produced by Ariel Plotnik more theme. Music is by Ted Muldoon. I'm James Home and stay safe this weekend. I'll talk.

officer Casteel Minneapolis Floyd CNN Ted Muldoon Jomar Clark Ariel Plotnik Minnesota James Home
"minneapolis" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:40 min | 2 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

"Iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Last hour, you know we talked about the FBI. They're now investigating the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer in another painful reminder of the hatred and the racism that is so prevalent in America. A COP in Minneapolis was responding to a forgery call check of course when he arrested George Floyd The officer put his knee on Floyd's neck while he was on his stomach and in handcuffs and being detained, floyd repeatedly told the officers. I can't breathe and tragically floyd died at the hospital. I mean again we have to ask. When will it stop? Again I. Don't get this. You know we talked about this last hour. Saying how win when Misa Floyd was saying I can't breathe. How this reminded us of Eric Garner? In Staten Island. In New York and this was was that I think it was in two thousand fourteen, and we've actually surely we've met Eric Garner's mom. Yeah, all of us have met her the mothers of Justice. Yeah exactly yeah, and civil rights attorney, muddling strong women yes. Yes, it's representing attorney Benjamin crump. We talked about last hour. He's representing the family and the four officers. There were four officers. Day off fire. Surely does not the end right I mean we're not. GonNa, be arrested for this nothing on the FBI. Getting yeah, the FBI has an ongoing investigation, and that is definitely a step in the right direction. Because a lot of times they don't get fired. They may get relegated to a desk job, or more. With pay this time they got fired. So that's a step in the right direction if you can call it that. City well CD Rick has showed that prosecutors rarely prosecute police off the lease. Day Work Together so clearly I think on what happened. What's going to happen? Is it GonNa? Take them in back in what I call. Whisper Talk. You guys go home. Lay Low. You're going to get your money and we're gonNA. Take it with. Those people should be in jail. They should be shelled. Murder. See that happening I mean. But you know we always talk about on this show that when we look at a video is is is clear to us that this is completely wrong and how another ethnicity can look at it and think that it's you know it's. It's understood why it was done this way I. Don't i. don't see these people keeping their job I. Don't see anybody looking at this and thinking this is justifiable i. just don't well. The Mayor Minneapolis did not see that he he was very all the chief of police I love being black over. That's what it is. Of Racism, man all right, guys. We'll talk more about this lot protesting last night in Minneapolis. This is a another tragic story that we hate to bring to you, but it is what's happening. We'll come back at thirty four minutes after the hour and talk more right after this. You're listening. To morning show. All right a lot of protesting now. going on in Minneapolis because of the police killing yet another black man this time. It was George Floyd I mean you know? Come on of. and. We say this all the time. How much how many more times are we going to have to say this in our lifetime? Before it stops is like no one cares. That were dying in the streets, but us is like no one cares they do it. We go back to normal. They do another one. We pro zest were up in arms than happens again. You know it's like a a recurring cycle. Cycle it's like a bad dream that happens over and over and over again the immediate action that was taken yesterday the officers were fired. You know like we said last hour. You know they were fired. Immediately in the investigation will continue, but the citizens of Minneapolis. You know. We saw someone protesting last night. Everybody is just we're tired of this, and it seems like it's open season on on us. where? One, else is desensitized to it all. Go ahead as a black man. I'm just asking for your suggestion. What are we supposed to at this point? One thing we need to do is we need to really get involved. Politically I cannot say that we're politically, but let it so that we know who we're putting in office. In terms of appointing people for the police chief southern has some sensitivity about us when they get in there. If we don't vote and we don't really have a control on what happens in and I just think it's very important you know when. There's so many white people. Hate to keep saying. Over policing black people is isn't it happens all over the country and the majority is being afraid a lot of. Involved in the justice system you know which just not and it needs to change. But We're not involved because we're afraid. To get, involved. Stuff like this happens. You know it's a vicious cycle. It really is, but we can't let that stop US J. from being a part of a community, and and you know wanting things to change we don't. Question John. Get Your Question I. I WanNa. Know what do I do? Were we supposed if I run into a problem? But not what do I do on on on? What do we need to do as a people as? We would need to know back I'm talking about timing is everything we wake up this this could be when we wake up in the morning I'm Aubrey got killed because he was black. Just being blogging in jogging so that you know. How do you answer that question really loves though these three black men on this show right now. All three of us have had run INS with the laws. And man the belittling of you is what hurt. Because the way we was treating. You took my backseat out my car and don't ask me what a drug that I'm a college student. I don't even know a backseat could come out. Owner was looking tour. Go from. My way were. They took my car because they said they had to take it to the station to to search it now on my way to work, you know in, so we've all had, and it doesn't matter how every move is the wrong move every. Redo. Black, yeah just being black, you can have a certain kind of car. They'll start you. You can be walking across the street a certain way it. You know so, that's A. Quest-. There's no answer for that Dome know what to do and. I. Don't know what to do. I don't even know what to tell my kids to do. And, that's the hardest thing in the world because I'm not with them every day I. don't know what to tell them to do, but you gotta tell them what every black.

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