38 Burst results for "Minneapolis"

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 min | 8 min ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"9th I'm Tim McGuire, Florida Republican Congressman Trump Allied Matt Gates, under investigation by the Justice Department and the House Ethics Committee vows he has not yet begun to fight. Jackie Quinn has more I'm built for the battle. And I'm not going anywhere with a federal investigation alleging the sex trafficking of minors and a congressional ethics investigation. Congressman Matt Gates was a keynote speaker at a Save America summit held it. Former President Trump's Doral Resort in Miami Gate says the truth will prevail as heard on WPLG TV may be canceled, man. In some corners. I may even be a wanted man by the deep state. Gates is not charged with any crime. But an associate Joel Greenberg, who is charged with child sex trafficking, is reportedly negotiating a plea deal in which he would cooperate with prosecutors. I'm Jackie Quinn in the murder trial for former Minneapolis police officer Derek Shobin. Hennepin County chief medical Examiner Dr Andrew Baker testifies. About George Floyd's death being a homicide and he didn't find any pills and this system. Did you know anything resembling either a pill or pill fragments in the stomach contents? I did not also from court TV. Baker talked about his conclusion last year that Floyd died from cardiopulmonary arrest. That's really just fancy medical lingo for the heart in the lung stopped. Heart, no pulse, no breathing. Other medical experts have gone further testifying, Floyd died of expect CIA or insufficient oxygen because his breathing was constricted as he lay on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back, his face jammed against the ground show Van's knee on his neck. President Biden releases a $1.5.

Joel Greenberg George Floyd Jackie Quinn Floyd House Ethics Committee Tim Mcguire $1.5 Derek Shobin Gates Andrew Baker CIA Baker Matt Gates Miami Gate Justice Department Last Year Hennepin County Wplg Tv Save America Minneapolis
Prince Philip funeral set for April 17

Donna and Steve

00:11 sec | 1 d ago

Prince Philip funeral set for April 17

"Place one week from today at Windsor Castle. Covert restrictions will be in place. The service closed to the public. The Duke of Edinburgh, died Friday at 99, the Derrick show and murder trial. The Minneapolis chief

Windsor Castle Edinburgh Derrick Minneapolis
Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

00:50 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"Minneapolis legal analysts from this week with George Stephanopoulos discuss how the prosecution is doing. From ABC News. It's this week here now chief anchor George Stephanopolous to continue to apply. Yeah. Level of force. It's not part of our training. It is certainly not part of our ethics or values, healthy person subjected to what Mr Floyd was subjected to would have died. There's no evidence to suggest he would have died that night. Except for the interactions with law enforcement. Their law enforcement's dual restraint on the neck compression was just more than Mr Floyd could take by virtue of that those heart conditions. We to the dark Chauvet murder trial has wrapped 35 witnesses taking the stand for.

George Stephanopoulos George Stephanopolous 35 Witnesses Floyd Abc News This Week Minneapolis Chauvet Murder
Medical Examiner Reveals George Floyd’s Cause of Death

Forum

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Medical Examiner Reveals George Floyd’s Cause of Death

"Who performed George Floyd's autopsy is standing by his finding that Floyd died by homicide. Azmat Sepik of Minnesota public radio reports, Dr Andrew Baker testified Friday in the trial of Derrick Show. Vin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of killing Floyd Baker said the stress of being restrained by police tipped Floyd over the edge. Baker noted that Floyd's enlarged heart and narrow arteries left him short of oxygen. In my opinion, the law enforcement so dual restraint and then that compression was just more than Mr Floyd could take by virtue of that those heart conditions. Children's defense attorney argues that Floyd's poor health and drug use led to his death. However, a pulmonologist testified for the prosecution that even a healthy person would have died. Had they been pinned facedown in the street for more than nine minutes. Is Floyd ones for NPR

Floyd George Floyd Azmat Sepik Dr Andrew Baker Derrick Show Floyd Baker Mr Floyd VIN Minnesota Minneapolis Baker NPR
Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

00:23 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "minneapolis" discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"So much. John. You take care of my pleasure. Thanks for having it. Cheers. When my mom when the world is called seven Monday Talk radio 7 90 ABC News update. I'm Steve Coming. The White House says President Biden will meet with congressional leaders tomorrow to talk about his $2 trillion infrastructure plan. Biden has argued that upgrading the nation's infrastructure should not be a partisan issue. Congressional Republican leaders have called the overall price tag of more than $2 trillion, too high. They are also opposed to the proposal to raise the corporate tax rates. The murder trial for former Minneapolis cop Derrick Sheldon is about to enter its third week. The former officer is accused of killing George Floyd by kneeling on his neck last May. My standard video shows the officers need pinning Floyd to the ground for more than nine minutes. The defense is expected to present the theory that Floyd died of a drug overdose. I'm.

John Derrick Sheldon George Floyd Steve Coming Floyd $2 Trillion Biden Tomorrow Last May More Than $2 Trillion White House Minneapolis Third Week More Than Nine Minutes Abc News President Biden Republican Radio 7 90 Monday Seven
Chief medical examiner takes the stand in George Floyd case

All Things Considered

00:34 sec | 2 d ago

Chief medical examiner takes the stand in George Floyd case

"Thomas to testify that George Floyd's death in Minneapolis was a direct result of the way he was being restrained by former police officer Derrick Show Vin during his arrest last year. Mr Floyd was in a position because of the sub dual restraint and compression where he was unable to get enough oxygen in To maintain his body functions. Video shows show Vince Neon Floyd's neck from where the nine minutes the defense argues Chau van was following his police training. No knock warrants are now partially ban in Kentucky Democratic

George Floyd Derrick Show Vin Mr Floyd Minneapolis Thomas Vince Neon Floyd Chau Van Kentucky
Medical Examiner To Testify About George Floyd's Death

Chris Salcedo

00:36 sec | 2 d ago

Medical Examiner To Testify About George Floyd's Death

"Are testifying today in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show. Vin, who's charged in George Floyd's death after video show Children kneeling on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes during an arrest. Dr Lindsay Thomas, a former Hennepin County medical examiner. Wait in employees cause of death. This is a death were both the hurt and lungs stopped working, and the point is that it's due to law enforcement, subdural restraint and compression. The defense argues that Floyd's drug use may have led to his death. Chauvet is charged with 2nd and 3rd degree murder and manslaughter. Texas business will

Derrick Show George Floyd Dr Lindsay Thomas Floyd VIN Minneapolis Hennepin County Chauvet Texas
Medical witnesses clash with defense over George Floyd's death

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Medical witnesses clash with defense over George Floyd's death

"Resumes today in the trial of the ex Minneapolis police officer charged in the killing of George Floyd. Defense. Lawyers for Derrick Show Vin are arguing that Floyd's use of drugs and his poor health caused his death. Prosecutors questioned lung specialist Dr Martin Tobin on Thursday. He disagreed and says Floyd's death was caused because he could not breathe. He's turned prone on the street. That he has the handcuffs in place combined with the street and then that he has a knee on his neck, and then that he has a knee on his back and on his side, all of Thies four forces Are ultimately going to result in the low title volume, which gives you the shallow breaths. The county medical examiner is expected to testify soon on why he ruled George Floyd's death homicide.

George Floyd Derrick Show Vin Dr Martin Tobin Floyd Minneapolis
Chauvin trial focuses on George Floyd's oxygen deprivation

WSJ What's News

01:10 min | 2 d ago

Chauvin trial focuses on George Floyd's oxygen deprivation

"In. Minneapolis were hearing from medical experts in the murder. Trial of former officer derek. Chauvin doctors testified thursday. That george floyd died of oxygen deprivation as he couldn't breathe while being restrained by police officers. Today we expect to hear from the local medical examiner. Here's the wsj's midwest bureau chief shady race. His name is andrew baker and his testimony is very significant because he is the medical examiner who conducted the autopsy on george floyd and he had several findings that make the case somewhat complex one. He declared the death a homicide which means that there was somebody else involved in the data. So that is something that is good for the prosecution however he also noted that he did not find any signs of his fixation no bruising to the neck or back and that is a little bit more complicated for the prosecution because they are trying to argue that derek chauvin the officer who kneeled on george floyd's neck and the two other officers who helped restrain him that essentially stopped him from being able to breathe and that s fixation caused his data

George Floyd Chauvin Andrew Baker Minneapolis Derek WSJ Midwest Derek Chauvin
Pulmonary expert says George Floyd died from lack of oxygen

Michael Berry

00:48 sec | 3 d ago

Pulmonary expert says George Floyd died from lack of oxygen

"Cause of death. On Day nine of the murder trial of a former Minneapolis police officer was the defense's turn to cross examine the pulmonologist Dr. Martin Tillman, who testified for the state that George Floyd died of a lack of oxygen because of the amount of body pressure that Officer Derek Shelf in had on Floyd with showbiz lawyer Erik Nelson, turning to partially ingested pills containing meth and fentanyl found at the scene. Is it fair to say that you would expect the peak? Fentanyl respiratory depression within about five minutes. If there was any amount of it ingested. Yes, as the defense points to drugs is the cause of Floyd's death. And as the case continues in week two of a trial with medical experts as to what they think the cause of George Floyd's death watch boxes. Jeff and also Florida is suing the federal

George Floyd Dr. Martin Tillman Officer Derek Shelf Erik Nelson Fentanyl Respiratory Depressio Minneapolis Floyd Jeff Florida
Biden to take steps on gun control, including on 'ghost guns'

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

Biden to take steps on gun control, including on 'ghost guns'

"Actions to address gun violence in the U. S. NPR's Scott Tetreault reports. One of the proposals includes a ban on so called ghost guns. One would seek to curb these kids that allow people to assemble what are called ghost guns, guns you make yourself and therefore you don't need to purchase and stores where there are more background checks and regulations and play. The second role will put more regulations on stabilizing braces equipment that you add two pistols to make them act more like rifles. They're more accurate. These Was used in a recent mass shooting. NPR's Scott Tetro reporting the trial of former Minneapolis police

Scott Tetreault NPR Scott Tetro Minneapolis
Expert Says Floyd Died From a Lack of Oxygen

Mark and Melynda

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

Expert Says Floyd Died From a Lack of Oxygen

"Expert says George Floyd died from lack of oxygen. Dr. Martin Tobin points the finger at former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show. Vin, who had him pinned to the ground just employed has his face rammed in To the street because he's using his face here to throw us to try and crank up his chest. He's actually using his for it and his nose and his chin. As a way of trying to help them get air into the right side of his chest. The defense has argued drug use played a role in Floyd's death, and they have questioned whether showman's knee was on Floyd's Necker on his shoulder blade. It's Day nine of Sheldon's murder trial.

George Floyd Dr. Martin Tobin Derrick Show VIN Minneapolis Floyd Showman Necker Sheldon
Pulmonary Expert Testifies Floyd Died From a Low Level Of Oxygen

Chris Salcedo

00:45 sec | 3 d ago

Pulmonary Expert Testifies Floyd Died From a Low Level Of Oxygen

"Hearing testimony today from a pulmonary expert and the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show. Then who's charged in George Floyd's death after video showed Jovan kneeling on Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes during an arrest the prosecution asked Dr Martin Tobin about what he thinks Floyd died up there. Floyd died. From a low level of oxygen, and this caused damage to his brain that we see and it also caused a PE a aerate man that caused his heart to stop and what caused the low level breathing is that issue in the trial, The defense is arguing Floyd's drug use led to his death. Death sparked worldwide protest against police brutality and systemic racism.

Floyd Derrick Show George Floyd Dr Martin Tobin Jovan Minneapolis
Prince’s New Album to Be Released 5 Years After His Death

The KFBK Morning News

00:50 sec | 3 d ago

Prince’s New Album to Be Released 5 Years After His Death

"Years after princes death, they're going to release A new album. Welcome to America and the number two. Oh, wow, It's gonna debut Sunday night on 60 minutes. Wow, That's an odd choice, isn't it? Yeah. Um, yeah, that's a bizarre choice. So they went to his studio in. It's called Paisley Park Studios Ants in Minneapolis. There, they believe there are as many as 8000 songs that Prince did not release. Yeah, and I had heard that that he is like a vault of music and you know it. Kind of. If you're a huge prince fan it gives you may be a little bit of pause. Maybe there was a reason he didn't want those songs released. Yeah, so now they're just going to go ahead and release them curious. You're curious to hear it. Of course, he's a genius. Me too.

Paisley Park Studios Ants America Minneapolis Prince
Argument Emerges Over What George Floyd Said During Arrest

NEWS 88.7 Programming

01:40 min | 3 d ago

Argument Emerges Over What George Floyd Said During Arrest

"Question now before the jury in the Derrick Show Vin Murder trial Is this. What did George Floyd actually say in a video of his arrest? Both the prosecution and the defense heard something different relating to whether Floyd had drugs in his body. When Shoven held his knee on Floyd's neck. Ah, warning. We're going to hear some of the video of George Floyd's arrest in this conversation. NPR's Cheryl Corley is in Minneapolis. Cheryl, first off, Can you just explain this discrepancy about what George Floyd said on the video that recorded his arrest and ultimately, his death? Yeah, well, that is really the big issue, and it depends on what you hear, and just this really tiny bit of audio, and it was quite a moment of defense Attorney Eric Nelson played this clip of video where we see Floyd struggling Derrick Show been over him, and it seemed Floyd may have said something about drugs and Nelson as special agent James right race and when he testified what he could make out Yes, it is with the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and he led the investigation into Floyd's death s O take a listen to the tape. Yeah. Did you hear that? Yes, I did. Did it appear that Mr Floyd said I ate too many drugs. Yes, it didn't. Wow. I mean, that that was hard for me to discern. Yeah, really, in exactly what the prosecutor said. So they pulled a longer version of the video and prosecutor Matthew Frank as various nto take another Listen. Having heard it in context you're able to tell What Mr Floyd is saying there? Yes, I believe Mr Flynn was saying I ain't doing no drugs,

George Floyd Floyd Shoven Cheryl Corley Derrick Show Eric Nelson Minnesota Bureau Of Criminal A NPR Cheryl Mr Floyd Minneapolis Nelson James Matthew Frank Mr Flynn
Los Angeles Expert Says 'Excessive' Force Against Floyd Wasn't The Only Option

AP 24 Hour News

00:59 min | 3 d ago

Los Angeles Expert Says 'Excessive' Force Against Floyd Wasn't The Only Option

"Continued to push their case against former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show but in his trial for murder The death of George Floyd last May. Jackie Quinn has this AH, use of force expert from Los Angeles police Sergeant Jody Steiger says based on a review of the video evidence of Officer Derrick Show. Vin Restraining. George Floyd was his knee on Mr Floyd Neck and also his left knee on Mr Ford's neck and his right knee on Mr Floyd's back, then asked for how long nine minutes and 29 seconds, Steiger testified He found the use of force to be excessive. Defense attorney Eric Nelson countered There appeared to be moments when the knee came off the neck and asked Sergeant Steiger about responding to that type of call You here. Scuffle on the radio. You hear We're taking one out and you get dispatch code three audio, courtesy of court TV. A state forensic scientist also testified. Pills containing methamphetamine and fentanyl were found inside the SUV.

George Floyd Mr Floyd Derrick Show Jackie Quinn Sergeant Jody Steiger Officer Derrick Show Vin Restraining Mr Ford Minneapolis Sergeant Steiger Steiger Eric Nelson Los Angeles
Target to Spend $2 Billion With Black-Owned Businesses

Fresh Air

00:25 sec | 3 d ago

Target to Spend $2 Billion With Black-Owned Businesses

"Box retailer Target says it intends to spend more money and black owned businesses over the next four years without total reaching about $2 billion by the year 2025. Minneapolis retailer says it's part of an effort by the company to advance racial equity target says it intends to add a broad spectrum range of products from more than 500. Black owned companies to its stores also increase such spending another areas like marketing and construction.

Target Minneapolis
Expert: Chauvin never took knee off Floyd's neck

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Expert: Chauvin never took knee off Floyd's neck

"A prosecution witness in the Minneapolis police trial says it looks like the officer never let up from George Floyd's neck for the entire night and a half minutes a use of force expert from Los Angeles police sergeant Jody Steiger says based on a review of the video evidence of officer Derek Chauvin restraining George Floyd with his name on Mr Floyd's connect and also has left me homeless with neck and his right knee on most flights back then asked for how long nine minutes and twenty nine seconds Steiger testified he found the use of force to be excessive defense attorney Eric Nelson countered there appear to be moments when the knee came off the neck a a desk sergeant Steiger about responding to that type of call you hear a scuffle on the radio you hear we're taking one hour and you get dispatch code three audio courtesy of court TV a state forensic scientist also testified pills containing methamphetamine and fentanyl were found inside the SUV I'm Jackie Quinn

George Floyd Jody Steiger Derek Chauvin Mr Floyd Steiger Minneapolis Eric Nelson Los Angeles Jackie Quinn
Los Angeles use-of-force expert testifies at Derek Chauvin trial

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 4 d ago

Los Angeles use-of-force expert testifies at Derek Chauvin trial

"In the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Sheldon. The prosecutors used to force expert from the L. A Police department has been on the stand down for a second day. Sergeant Jody Steiger is a paid witness for the state and tells prosecutors that show Vin did use deadly deadly force when he was kneeling on George Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes because at the time of their strength period Mr Floyd was not resisting. He was in the prone position. Hey, was handcuffed. He was not attempting to Evade. He was not attempting to resist, and the pressure that he was that was being caused by the body weight would to cause position or six year. Which could cause death. You can listen to that. Try

Derek Sheldon L. A Police Department Sergeant Jody Steiger George Floyd Mr Floyd Minneapolis VIN
Los Angeles sergeant weighs in on whether Chauvin's actions were justified

Morning Edition

01:04 min | 4 d ago

Los Angeles sergeant weighs in on whether Chauvin's actions were justified

"Lie from NPR News. I'm Laxmi, saying the state has called an expert in use of force practices to take the stand and former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show van's murder trial. Prosecutor Steve Schleicher questions Sergeant Jody Steiger of the Los Angeles Police Department. But whether he believed George Floyd posed a threat to show Vin and other officers when he was arrested last year and pin face down on the ground while handcuffed I'd like you to focus then on the second factor. That is whether Mr Floyd pose an immediate threat. The safety of the officers or others at the time during the restraint period. No, he did not. And why not? Because he was in the pram position. He was handcuffed, Hey, was not attempting to resist. He was not attempting to assault the officers kick punch or anything of that nature. Video of the deadly encounter showed show impressing his knee and a Floyd's neck from where the nine minutes the defense maintains Shobin acted in accordance with his police

Npr News Derrick Show Van Steve Schleicher Sergeant Jody Steiger George Floyd Laxmi Mr Floyd Los Angeles Police Department Minneapolis VIN Floyd Shobin
Target to Spend More Than $2 Billion at Black-Owned Businesses

Bob Sirott

00:19 sec | 4 d ago

Target to Spend More Than $2 Billion at Black-Owned Businesses

"$2 billion at black owned businesses by 2025 this part of its efforts to advance racial equity part of the program. The Minneapolis based product company says it will add products for more than 500 black owned businesses across all types of merchandizing areas. I'm Dave's one in for

Minneapolis Dave
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:46 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"So that is a constitutional law of the city of minneapolis so to reduce the size and actually to eliminate something called the minneapolis police department and create something that might be labeled the minneapolis. Peace officer corps. Whatever requires a illegal change. So that's the first thing. But the second thing that i see as worthy of note is that if the police department were disbanded and replaced that would enable the dissolution or decertification of the minneapolis. Police department union and. That is the goal that we were talking about. Before of that is widely shared that would enable not only the removal of bob dole but his hand successor hand would give a decent shot at recruiting completely new officers. Maybe changing the culture rather than some attempted a band-aid reform. I think in a lot of parts of the world. There is a sense watching what's happened in the last six weeks. The united states that this time it's going to be different. We've we've been close to this point often before we've seen shocking footage we've seen demonstrations we've seen a separations that things will change and then they've reverted but there is a sense that may be coming at this particular time and seeing such an egregious such a flagrant abuse of power recorded on on film that and seeing the the sort of outpouring of anger. Internationally that this time we are actually going to experience. Genuine change even if it takes time and even if it's not as radical as we might initially be calling for. Do you share that sense or are you more cautious in your prognostications will to be slightly humorous but that kind of optimism may be where we see the difference between younger people who are much more hopeful in somebody as old as i am and as jaded as i am so i'd really like to believe in that tential for change but as i said in the article. There's a constant pattern of small reforms that are watered down and returned to trust in a police department that does not negatively impact a large and powerful portion of the population. So i could easily see. Derek chauvin the officer who had his knee on george floyd for nearly nine minutes being prosecuted and convicted and sentenced that leading to some sense of accomplishment. But that's not large scale reform. That would be the punishment. That's back in the bad apple camp rather than the rotten barrel camp and i don't really see. The police are very widely appreciated. That's not a partisan thing with democrats and republicans certainly republicans appreciate them even more but many democrats appreciate them. In as i've already alluded to earlier many black citizens feel a great need for the police department as well so the likelihood of large change to me is less likely in the other thing that i would say that i think is really crucial in answering. That is the corona virus. Because i really do not believe that. The scope of protests ember continuing protests night after night would have occurred even with the egregious video documentation of this murder. I don't believe that would have occurred..

minneapolis minneapolis police department bob dole Derek chauvin george floyd united states
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"The police and as i said. Some of those have been very obscure organizations. They had do believe in some sort of a minneapolis of the future where there would be no police that is defined extremely vaguely but they do believe that but for the city council members who have pushed the charter in that direction and use the term. Defunding the police. What they mean and the way i know what they mean is because they've said it repeatedly and they've written it. I'm not guessing what's going on. In their head is to create a sort of a superstructure that would be called the department of community safety and violence prevention or public safety and violence prevention. And this would be a agency that would contain staff that would be perhaps uniformed or not but would work for the city for homeless contact with homeless population for would contain social workers. It would contain people in a separate part of it that would be focused on chemical dependency or mental health. And the the ethos of the department of community safety would be to start with prevention of violence rather than respond to violence which is the characterization of the police department responding to. They get a call. They respond there is. Maybe we can heal so if other city council members talk about a public health perspective. The public is ill in. Shouldn't be greeted by tear-gas carrying gun-toting police but should be greeted by others particularly when there's a nine one one call emergency response should have different avenues. May be a social worker would be better than a police officer. Within the umbrella of the department of community safety in violence prevention there would still be a licensed minnesota peace officer division and that would very much like the police department although smaller because some of the jobs that the police currently do would be now done by social workers chemical dependency specialists in homeless outreach people at cetera et cetera so be smaller and the chief of the department of community. Safety would not be a police officer. It would be a someone with public health expertise. I think that's the explanation. That many citizens in minneapolis have not heard clearly enough. I think that the city council members are weathering a storm of criticism. And they're waiting to do a more full explanation until maybe the situation is clearer with whether the charter will change or not. But the elected officials that have spoken. August are basically in agreement that this umbrella structure would include something. The looked a lot like a smaller police department and many other staff. The final thing that. I'll say about this strategy. There's two things. One is the the way it's linked to the charter changes. Unfortunately the charter of the city of minneapolis stipulates there will be a minneapolis police department and it even stipulates the size of the police department. There's some sort of formula based on the size of the population and therefore how many officers have to be there..

department of community safety department of community safety minneapolis police department department of community minnesota
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:16 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"Police union to be left alone but only once in a while publicly in the media reprimanded and the city has paid for to the tune of thirty million dollars over the last two decades at actually. Now with the more with some recent settlements. And i'm not talking about the floyd case because that has not reached a settlement previous ones. That's going to almost double. But the city has paid for the criminal behavior of the police and then left the officers to be undisciplined and continue on the force. Which is a pattern that exists in many many cities across the united states. So that's the reason. Why i mean i think that Mayors are not powerless. And this is one of the differences are one of the reasons why this is. These calls for reform are interesting the calls for defunding and changing the charter that i was alluding to because part of that is an effort by the city council to play a larger role in supervising the police because unlike every single other department in the city of minneapolis the supervisory authority over the police department is vested solely in the police chief and the mayor and in every other department it is in the chief of the department that be welfare services employment parks and recreation whatever it would be the chief of that bureau the mayor and the thirteen city council members so the city council has really been outside of responsibility accountability representation and there may have been reasons to do that in the beginning but that's a reason to really place the focus on the mayor so richard if i were to pause what you've said differently would it would it be a fair statement to say that the powerful position that the police union have managed to negotiate themselves into has been found to be more than acceptable by more than just the police unions and their membership in other words it has served a greater utility for certain vested interests and parts of the community yes and particularly i think one of the things to keep in mind is for officials and others elites who have a city wide perspective revenue a neighborhood by neighborhood perspective and need to seek approval whether it's through election or through their activities with civic organizations. That is citywide. Because when you're at a citywide level you tend to value the perspective of the middle class community white were not but in this case mostly wait they have a larger voice and a louder voice when it comes to things that are citywide. If you wanna run for office says mayor you need a lot of money because it's a city wide position and you need choose that come from organizations like the police union and that q would be that this candidate is not soft on crime and that fray soft on crime is a very profound phrase in the history of the united states certainly since richard nixon particularly democratic party candidates are vulnerable to charges that. They're soft on crime so winning endorsement from the police union is.

city council police department minneapolis united states richard richard nixon democratic party
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:28 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"And in your piece you you use. The word scapegoat in reference to them. And i wanted to get you to talk a little bit about their function because the narrative which has been very prevalent last few weeks is that police unions are the most significant impediment to to reform to progress even to the successful prosecution of officers who have committed acts of violence in the line of an in line of work. Can you can you just tell me to what extent that the none of the immediate problem is to be found in the police unions. You are right. that it does appear. Emmett is accurate. It's not appearance is accurate. That police unions are the major the most major impediment to changes in the behavior of police. Officers they're supposed to protect the officers and their behavior and make sure that the officers are not that discretion is not used against officers who were simply doing the job that they're supposed to do and one thing that is notable is minneapolis in minnesota are locations where union ideology and ideals are still a respected and revered in the united states. There's whole parts of the united states as you and the mongol mattie creators are well aware where unions are negatively seen and but minnesota's not one of those but the police union is quite powerful and has pushed back on and attempts at reform that have gone on from at least the year. Two thousand to the present. Now the reason i use the word scapegoat rather than something that would convey irving blame his because the unions have negotiated those sets of rules that enable officers to do so much under the umbrella of discretion. They've negotiated those with politicians. They do not exist autonomously and that's where. I think that they are a target. Politicians would like to place blame on the unions and and certainly conservatives in the state and there are conservatives throughout the state would like to place blame on the unions. And i do think that media like the wall street journal of course would like to place blame on the unions it's always find any useful to find a culprit that it sort of suggests an easy solution if we could only disband the union that our problems but while i do think that changing the leadership of the union is imperative and changing the rules that the union operates under the enable officers to escape discipline regardless of how many times they've been called up and have their records erased which leads to a lack of information transparency. Wills rules were negotiated by mayors in particular as well as in some cases the state legislature and remember. The state is much more conservative and much less diverse racially than the city of minneapolis. That'd be true. Every place in the united states. so the state legislature has been a a backstop for conservatism. But i wouldn't place all the emphasis on the state legislature there. The mayors and to a much lesser extent. The city council of the city have enabled the police department and the.

minnesota Emmett united states minneapolis irving the wall street journal legislature
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

03:42 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"In my view could be said about chicago and saint louis in philadelphia and baltimore mean few cities. San francisco's a city that to has almost successfully pushed out per partially to oakland harshly do its surrounding suburbs. The poor but that's atypical. Most of the rest of the american cities have neighborhoods or iran. Months that look like they have been untouched decaying for a very long time. So that's the dual reality. The extremes of income inequality and like so much of the united states since the nineteen seventies the middle is decreasing. People are going to the two extremes and the virus which is a short term thing but the viruses dramatically exacerbated those and amplified the visibility of those inequalities because there's whole areas of the city where it looks like very few people are working and other areas that Construction on homes is still going on and restaurants maybe not open for visitors with they're open for an thriving for takeout and to to pursue that theme that you mentioned a moment ago that minneapolis is not an outlier. It's actually typical. The same you would say is true of the way black people. Experience interactions with the police force. Yes just to. Because i'm an academic. I want to be a little bit more precise and say obviously there are differences between city like chicago and minneapolis. In those differences are particularly rooted in the fact that not kogyo black people. Are you know over forty percent of the population in here there about twenty percent. What that means is there's going to be more african american representation on city councils and we're not gonna have you're not gonna have your very first black police chief And chicago will city like philadelphia. Would be even better to compare it to because there. There's been more than one african american mayor as well one other thing. That is a difference. That's note worthy particularly in a competitive situation. Is that in those larger cities that have twice the african american population. There is a sizable black middle class. That has made a significant mark in business and wealth are least income if not wealth and that does not yet exist in minneapolis to that translates to political power. So there's much more and political power. That is different than activists african americans. And i think that minneapolis is more of a activist or were completely disenfranchised in the black community whereas other cities might have a third group that is the middle class upper middle class. Since the killing of george. Floyd there's been a a great deal of media. Attention focused on police unions in the us..

chicago minneapolis saint louis philadelphia oakland baltimore San francisco iran us Floyd george
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:56 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"Don't even like those words pragmatic and realistic because that suggests that defunding in changing is not realistic. That's not what i want to claim it. All i think that there's more to be understood that is misunderstood in those claims but the let's start thinking about strategy. That's the better way to put it. What do we do next. And that is taking the unity that was produced in the aftermath of the murderer and leading to splintering and many more divisions if we were to take a step back. Minneapolis is obviously a familiar name. To people around world is under under specially now. But i guess we outside the. Us don't have a particularly strong sense of his character but if we do associate things with it is probably things like the performing arts center of business and corporate headquarters and if you click. Pdf says it's one of the largest lgbt communities in the united states. There's a lot of a lot of the things which take into shape external perceptions of it running in that particular direction and your article x plane that well those things may be true. But there's very much another side to it. And it depends whether you're white or black and high your perceptions of what it means to live in minneapolis are can you. Can you speak a little bit about about that sort of radical disjunction inexperience again. I'm going to stick with the sub theme in the article which is that. Minneapolis is really not that different. In many ways from so many other american cities and for that matter so many global cities in terms of the degree of income inequality that exists and that is rooted in an educational inequality that perhaps the minneapolis case has done slightly worse than some cities that do have its wealth is the schools in minneapolis extremely unequal therefore the life chances in minneapolis are extremely unequal. And one of the reasons why. Minneapolis is such a great place for the biking community in the lgbt community. And levers of all kinds of nature whether it's hunting and fishing or hiking and birdwatching is because there's quite a bit of advanced infrastructure in minneapolis. Because there's been a healthy tax base. So parks are kept in great condition because unlike many other cities minneapolis has had a constant flow of revenues and more people who are educated and have the opportunity for good jobs. Continue to move here from all over the country people who are educated other parts of the country. Decide that even with the horrible weather that we have here of extreme heat and extreme cold. They're still gonna live here. The arts have flourished and that continues to be a a magnet for people to come and if you came to minneapolis now one of the most distinctive features you would see is a skyline filled with construction cranes building condominiums some apartments but mostly condominiums townhomes for people that are coming in from the suburbs or coming from all over the country who could be called gentrify fires. That's that's a a whole we don't have to get into right now but clearly people with wealth and strong futures of earning. Find this place for attractive. The restaurant scene the music scene. Even the youth music scene which is not characterized by people who are very wealthy yet is extremely vibrant and yet viewers areas of the city that have no interest to developers and that do not have access to our light rail system the reliant on buses the bicycles and scooters that are a sign of urban professionals and youth. Who have lots of time for leisure and luxury those are scattered in neighborhoods that you could clock by zip code and income and they're absent in other neighborhoods in much..

minneapolis Minneapolis Us
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"After the demonstrations and rioting et cetera city council has unanimously passed. A resolution to call on the charter committee in the charter is just a word for the city constitution. We just think of. It is exactly the same thing but the charger commission were in charge of changes in interpretations of that constitution. The city's constitution to make a change that would alter the police department. And this is what. I talk about in the part of the article. That was about defunding. We can go into that. That's an important issue. I don't want to focus in this part of your questioning. Basically because there's so much unknown. There is the possibility that the police department would be reduced and even eliminated in some versions of people's understanding of what this defunding police might mean and that scares a lot of people and that's not solely a class or a racial division. There are sentiments that are quite frequent in the african american community that there would be chaos without the police. Even though those same people have had many years of growing distrust of the police for stoppages in traffic. Like i talk about in the article. But they also know their neighbors or their people who prey on their neighborhoods and then for people who are white and whether they're middle-class or not They also have fewer fears of the police. And the idea of doing away with police. Or even reducing the police. There's always been a strong sentiment that the solution to urban problems is more not fewer police and that actually is not something that just White people or conservatives believe the police chief the current police chief chief redondo who is the first african american police chief in the city of minneapolis called for increase prior to the george floyd murder called for an increase of another four hundred officers. So the short answer to your question or the summary answer would be other. Things have seeped back into the public narrative that had been there before and rather than only feeling a resentment towards the police and the union and politicians for this unjust murder. There is a more pragmatic realistic perspective from some yet..

cetera city council charger commission george floyd redondo minneapolis
"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

04:28 min | 9 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

"July twenty twenty podcast from the mall diplomatic. My name is george. Miller and my guest in this program is richard kaiser who is professor of american studies and political science at carleton college in minnesota. Richard lives in minneapolis. The city that became the center of the world's attention after shocking footage of the police. Killing george floyd was released in late. May as protests sprang up in many other parts of the us and internationally media attention perhaps inevitably moved away from minneapolis demonstrations spread precisely because police discrimination and violence against black. People is far from uniquely minnesotan. But there's value in looking at local circumstances as richard kaiser notes in his article in the latest edition of le monde diplomatique. All but eight percent of minneapolis police department officers live. Outside the city they police many supplemental salaries with private security contracts when the mayor band so-called warrior style. Police training police union president. Bob crawl offered it free paid for out of union funds. Deescalation crawl insisted was not in his offices. Nature and protesters were part of a terrorist. All this forms part of the background to calls to defend the police and if change is going to happen it's in the local context of local politics that it will have to happen so in this podcast. We're going to focus on minneapolis on the ways. It's like other big. Us cities and in the ways in which differs. When i spoke to richard at home on the eighth of july i began by asking him if it was possible to sum up. The current mood of the city like most cities in the united states. Minneapolis highly segregated city so in certain neighborhoods. There's still an intensity and a continuing resentment in that intensity of the police and the issues that led to marching and demonstrations are almost as fresh as they were in the first forty eight hours After the police murder and every day there is a story about one of the four officers who have been charged or about. George floyd's life in his road to from houston to minneapolis which is a narrative of recovery and rebuilding himself in many neighborhoods and those will be neighborhoods that are both neighborhoods People of color and low income and also some of the wealthier neighborhoods that Have certain privileges that enable them to stay focused on the wrongs and injustices that have been the focus of the demonstrations but in many other neighborhoods. There's a pushback that has been developing. That is really about the future. I have not seen any change in the attitude about whether or not george floyd was murdered by the police unjustly. Sometimes you're there are indications as indicated in my article there's character assassination of the victim. And then there's a movement towards well. Maybe he deserved. Maybe he was a troublemaker. May be the police. Probably had just 'cause i have not seen any of that in minneapolis. Thus far but what i have seen is pushback against the proposed changes to the police department. Let's the stage that we're in now. In minneapolis the what's next..

richard kaiser minneapolis george floyd carleton college le monde united states Miller minnesota george Richard Bob Minneapolis richard houston
"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:29 min | 10 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Steve Fletcher is a city councilman in Minneapolis Minnesota. He represents an area that's been pretty protected from the riots and protests in the wake of George Floyd's death. It's near the university filled with coffee shops in students. The mayor lives there. But Steve knew something was changing his ward when he started getting. These phone calls in the last couple of weeks. They were from constituents who were worried, pleading for help and unable to reach the authorities, and there were several nights that I stayed up all night because I people could get through to nine one even and they called you. You sure about what there's. You know too sketchy guys with a vehicle that doesn't have license plates driving up and down my street. Who Do I report it to? How do I get information out? Out. I mean like we had people in our city trying to harm us. A who were drawn the news than by the protests and people were trying to report that I. It was terrifying I. Mean it was it was really scary and I was passing information through to anybody I could get on the phone at the mayor's office at the governor's Office of the National Guard like wherever we could sort of find. Ways to backchannel information if if. The, nine, one one system was overwhelmed, Steve got elected back in two thousand seventeen after a career in nonprofits and the arts. And suddenly his constituents weren't just asking him to craft some legislation or debate the finer details of the city budget. They wanted something much more immediate and to be clear I wasn't even the council member. Who was the most? I mean I I was I was operating from my apartment. My northside colleagues were out organizing neighborhood patrols violation of Curcio because they were pretty convinced that nobody was coming to help in. The city. The whole city felt abandoned. In spite of the fact that they've been eight hundred officer police force I mean people were not getting within for a while, and I think once that fell apart. People are willing to say Oh, was this really system we? I think that that was an experience that changes a lot of people's views of our current public safety infrastructure. And so people were jolted into action. I think and jolted into being willing to consider drastic change to prevent further damage to our city. Steve Fletcher was certainly jolted into action. This week he veto proof. Majority of the City Council pledged to dismantle the Minneapolis. Police Department completely..

Steve Fletcher Minneapolis City Council George Floyd Minnesota Police Department Curcio National Guard officer
"minneapolis" Discussed on Worst Year Ever

Worst Year Ever

08:08 min | 10 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Worst Year Ever

"You're now living essentially in Not An entirely post police, but certainly post Minneapolis police in your definitely definitely post Minneapolis police. You know like I, said today's the first day. I've seen a cop and it wasn't in Minneapolis COP and. And that's two weeks now. Almost were were really were were two weeks and you know that It's so weird because it's just it's normal. There's no out SA-. Okay, and I should say normal in the context of the right wing invasion. That's going on simultaneously on the ground, which isn't being talked about really, but there's that element that's kind of. It really confuses this other situation we're dealing with. Can you elaborate a little bit on that? Wing Right So like in the midst of the. Initial uprising when the precinct was burning when the? When people were kind of commandeering goods from all over to help either protesters or to build a barricade walls there was also this other side that was starting to be of noticed both on social media, and the police were hinting added kind of and and you know it's been hard with them, because they don't save very much, but we also know what we've seen. Which is a huge group? Of kind of unidentified I mean they're saying K.. K. K. The reality is, it seems more like an insurgency force built of a couple different groups. And they're on the ground in it's. It's a very strange thing that's happened here. You know day one after the actual. Of looting and rioting and burning here there was an influx. People noticed kind of. Happening of cars that we notice without license plates. And it sounds really noxious, but it's strange. You notice that in a city like Minneapolis. For some reason, it just started happening, and so you know by the time Friday night that the national. Guard was being kind of called out You know they. Were reporting openly that there were groups of people causing problems the president everyone else's lied through their fucking teeth, and said it was Antiga, but the reality is. We had boogie boys on the ground, so we had the Bugalo boys here for sure for sure. Yes, we have pictures of them I. Watched, them in person. We also have the couple other groups that I am still trying to figure out who they are and I have photos of some of them, but they were all foreign nationals. The two that we confronted directly said they were Duchesne headphones and had out of date. Dutch press passes. a lot of the guys that have been caught here have been caught with either some sort of media, badge or something. That would approximate one. there's a lot of a lot of people don't know about media badges, but most journalists yet just print them. Like you just. Like there's nothing like there's not like a centralized authority that issues your badges. Some city outside of maybe New York, city, or where they have press offices cracked and that's the thing and so. You know when when you confront someone who you see driving a car with no license plates in full of people. and. They stop the car in the middle of the street. Get Out and confront you as to why you're taking photos, you know stuff's going on, and you know I've spent a lot of my. Twenties and early thirties, dodging and reading up on just anything that kind of approximates what that looks like whether it's fascist kind of. Revolutionary stuff to how the spread of propaganda works in how that looks in these guys for the spookiest group of people I've ever encountered in real life and when you have that element. and there are public everyone on your social media. Sphere is kind of saying well, we're finding. Let's say jars of accelerates around town in Bushes or we're finding rags soaked in gas. For example. My neighborhood has one business in it, and it's a LGBTQ owned. Coffee Shop Two nights after the actual fires in the main area stopped, it was lit on fire by someone running down the street. You know like there's stuff that's happening. And I think it's a story that's GONNA. Come out more fully as time passes, but it's one that I think is important and extremely integral to whatever the pushback that we're gonNA. See looks like I. Think you know I think we have to be honest with ourselves that the right. Is Actually GonNa, probably look more and more like an insurgency force like this where it's guys driving trucks shooting randomly lighting things on fire leaving kkk style note I mean truly leaving notes, neighborhoods and say we're watching you, we're gonNA. WE'RE GONNA, burn you alive I. Mean You have a very odd element mixed into this whole other revolutionary. No police thing is word were self policing in the midst of what looks to be an insurgency campaign, so there are these like very odd things going on. And this just happening I mean Minneapolis Yellow, the epicenter of this but yesterday in Seattle somebody tried to drive into a crowd, and then shot into the crowd exact somebody. K. member I believe. There was definitely one that was confirmed. I don't know was from. There have been like twenty different cars that have driven. So at least one confirmed KKK Creek Crow Creek KKK leader like not yet some low level leader so. I think we need to. This is something I've been thinking about for a long time. I think we all have been, but there has to be a conversation about what that is because. That looks a lot more like A. far-right Middle Eastern terrorist campaign than a traditional American Conversation. Interesting that Antigua's the one that they want to designate as a terrorist organization, but that standard operating procedure for misinformation. You know like we're seeing. We're seeing the worst worst when it comes to just outright. Manipulation of reality and I thank you know. A lot of us know what we're looking at. And a lot of people are starting to but I think. This this whole thing that we're witnessing the the uprising the response. Is Cracking. I think the neoliberal shell a little bit it I. Don't think any I know for myself. I never thought I would live to see the day. that. The show shook. Yeah Yeah. His. Remarkable things of the last two weeks. Yeah, it does unbelievable and we kinda seem to be. On the edge of everything, there's so much good and bad news every day like today like the police chief in Portland resigned after a bunch of police brutality. Bennett, the head of the guy in the New York Times editorial board, who let a Senator Tom Cotton right about murdering everybody WHO's protesting The guy had to leave. You Have Minneapolis with veto proof majority of the city council like you know trying to put an end to the. Minneapolis Police Department at the same time. You've got saddle police using tear-gas two nights in a row after the mayor put in a moratorium on the use of tear gas. I was GONNA. Say I believe. They didn't because they said they wouldn't right like. That's how this works now. We didn't do it because we said we didn't don't believe you're fit what you saw. And what the Portland Police is has done is like.

Minneapolis Minneapolis Police Department Portland Police New York New York Times Bugalo Duchesne Senator Tom Cotton K. K. Antiga president Antigua Bushes Seattle Portland Bennett editorial board
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

03:25 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"His mother. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And that's what <Speech_Male> led to the subsequent <Silence> issues. <Speech_Music_Male> So. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> You <Speech_Male> know. <Speech_Male> Yes of course <Speech_Male> the balance that <Speech_Male> you discussed needs <Speech_Male> to be struck, but <Speech_Male> there is no balance. <Speech_Male> In <Speech_Music_Male> murder <SpeakerChange> that started <Music> all this. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> MR, Mary really want to thank <Speech_Music_Male> you. And I WANNA. Wish <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you the best of luck for your <Music> <Advertisement> city. <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Appreciate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your time. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you. Michael <Music> <Advertisement> I, <SpeakerChange> appreciate you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> On, <Speech_Male> Tuesday dozens <Speech_Male> of military <Speech_Female> vehicles <Speech_Male> began patrolling <Speech_Male> and blocking <Speech_Male> the streets <Speech_Male> of Washington. <Speech_Male> As president <Speech_Male> trump appeared <Speech_Male> to make <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> good <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on his threat <Speech_Female> to use the <Speech_Female> military <Speech_Female> to crack down <Speech_Male> on violence <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Music> looting there. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Will be back. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> What will return to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the workplace? Look like <Speech_Male> at we work. <Speech_Male> This question <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is top of mind. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> That's why we're <Speech_Male> adapting our spaces. <Speech_Male> Making sure <Speech_Male> that you and your team <Speech_Male> can continue working <Speech_Male> and a safe healthy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> environment <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> across our buildings <Speech_Male> were stepping up <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sanitation, maximizing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> fresh, clean <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> air, and modifying <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> seating for distancing, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> plus <Speech_Male> we're adding friendly <Speech_Male> safety reminder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> so that you can go <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about your day with more <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> peace of mind to <Speech_Male> learn more about how <Speech_Male> we work as enhancing <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it spaces, Goto. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dot co <SpeakerChange> slash <Silence> <Advertisement> future. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Here's what else <Speech_Music_Male> you need ten. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Curfews <Speech_Music_Female> fell on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dozens of cities across <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the country <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on Tuesday night, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as officials <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> tried to discourage <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the kind <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of nightly violence <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and looting. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That has occurred <Speech_Music_Male> throughout the <Music> <Advertisement> past week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Congressional Democrats <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Republicans <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> condemned the decision <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to violently <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> remove peaceful <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> demonstrators <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from a park <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> across from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the White House on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monday night. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So that the president <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> trump could pose <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for photos <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> in front of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a church there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> after the president's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reality show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ended last night. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> While the nation nervously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> watched the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chaos that engulfs <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> US <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> president trump <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> probably late <Speech_Music_Male> in bed. <Speech_Music_Male> Pleased <Speech_Music_Male> with himself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for descending another <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rung <SpeakerChange> on the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dictatorial ladder. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The Times <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> reported that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the order to clear. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> The park came <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from Attorney General <Speech_Male> Bill. Bar, <Speech_Music_Male> who accompanied <Speech_Music_Male> trump to <Speech_Music_Male> the church? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Finally. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Congressman <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Steve, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> King Oh, I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> own a nine <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> term Republican <Speech_Music_Female> with <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a history of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> racist comments <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Female> inflammatory <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anti immigrant <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rhetoric <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> was defeated <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in a Republican <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> primary <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on Tuesday night. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> In a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> major political <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> upset. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> King <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lost to a state <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> senator <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who had won the support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of National <Speech_Music_Male> Republicans <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who said that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Kim had <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> become an embarrassment <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Music_Male> the party.

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

05:31 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"That may have been wishful thinking on my part. I hoped it was outsiders. Do you think you hoped it was outsiders to. I think that's a fair point I think we all. To use governor walls quote got a little bit out over our skis. Is it the case that there were looters coming from outside of our city to burn buildings down. Yes? Is it also true that some of our own community members were involved yes. It's tragic. This may seem like a kind of unusual question, but at the end of the day. Why does it matter? To you governor walls if the people doing this are outsiders if Americans are angry. Does it matter whether or not there from Minneapolis or Minnesota. It's just so incomprehensible. To? Consider. Burning Down Your own block. I mean you know people generally have an affinity to the city in which they grew up or the city where they live. You know the guy who operates the corner store. You have the local barber shop. To on a monthly basis. To even consider negatively impacting those businesses, those institutions. Those community centers in grocery stores. I can't even begin to understand it. Mr Mayor I'm curious about something in up front. I want to acknowledge that it may not be. In your mind the fairest question. A police killing the death of George Floyd in your city by your employees. Has By. This point led to protests across the United States. These extraordinary expressions of anguish and sadness and violence. I mean stores and businesses have been broken into and ransacked from Minneapolis to Los Angeles to New York. I mean there's quite literally a fire raging across the country in your city was the original spark. Do you feel any responsibility for that. Every single second of every single day. I feel that responsibilities mayor of the city where this occurred. Yeah. This is Ben I mean look. This is not about me. It's not about me. I mean but to say. This has been one of the worst weeks in our cities. History would be a massive understatement and to say. That this has been the worst week of my life. would be accurate. How do you think that this ends? And how do you hope that the sense? There's a moral ending to what's happened to can only end in one way. Which is first. Justice for George Floyd. In the form of a full charge and conviction. But Moreover. It needs to end. In true change. To how. Police departments across the country function. To, how were able to make decisions? Issue discipline in terminations as to how we can create these police departments, the truly protect and serve community. I mean that's one version of how to sentence, but. Given that the president is getting more and more involved given that he's calling on states to crack down for a more militarized response. Are you afraid that there is a version of this that ends with that further division between black communities in the police? And the government. Yes that scares the hell me. We cannot go down that path. What we cannot allow. Is For the vision and mentality of of Donald Trump. To come into our city in the form of a millennial terrific rule. I mean the implications. Are! More scary than I can even possibly imagine. In Minneapolis and speaking only for Minneapolis There's absolutely no need for any further force. So you think it's possible to stop the violence. Stop the looting. Allow the peaceful protests to continue, and not make worse in the process, the very problem that started off this which is excessive policing in Minneapolis. I mean that is the balance that everybody's trying to deal with right now. And if you're saying that, it's an easy balance with simple decisions, it is not. I mean. What you have to though remember is where this all began. Where it began was the murder. Of An unarmed handcuffed black man. George? Void was on the ground. He had his hands behind his back. He was calling out for help. He was calling for.

George Floyd Minneapolis United States Donald Trump Minnesota murder president New York Los Angeles
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

08:04 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily

"Today. As, nationwide protests over the death of George Floyd enter a second week. A conversation with the leader of the city where it all began. Mayor Jacob Fry of Minneapolis. Wednesday June third. Hello. This is Jacob, Prai? Mr Mayor! It's Michael Barbaro. Michael. Thanks for having me. Thank you very much for making time for us because we know. What an urgent time is in your city and we really appreciate it. You got it so just to start mayor fright. I want to go back to the moment when you learned about the death of George Floyd and I wonder if you could describe that moment from your perspective and then. Tell me whether in that moment. You could have imagined that it would lead us to where we are right now. When I first heard about the murder of George Floyd I didn't know all of the facts I received a call from our chief, saying that there was an interaction with a black man, and that black man had then been hospitalized. I didn't know yet whether he had died I didn't know the nature of the interaction, and then subsequently, of course we learn more information. I learned that the officer involved incident resulted in. George Floyd dying. I then saw the video. Which? was, horrid. To, see. Our white police officer. Press his knee into the neck of a black man who was unarmed and handcuffed. For a period of eight minutes straight. I'm there is nothing more disgusting that I have ever seen in my life. It was as clear as day to me that the normal protocols and procedures that are baked into the walls and mortar of of City Hall the tell you not to do something not to speak out not to say. Something was wrong because of legal reasons and all sorts of other issues that you just had to throw those away. And so. Around six thirty in the morning, as soon as the press was up and available, and we had at least collected the preliminary information about what happened, we held a press conference. and. My. Soul, direction was that. Let's just be honest. And since that moment. Our entire city has been reeling. Angry, sad. Every single negative emotion that you can think that's where our city has been and I've been with our city and feeling it. You! Know I asked you whether you could have imagined this response, and here's why I'm asking that. When the protests broke out the head of the Minneapolis and Leslie Redmond said this quote. What you're witnessing in Minnesota is something that's been a long time coming. I can't tell you how many governors I've sat down with how many mayors we've sat down with and we've warned them that. If You keep murdering black people, the city will burn. We have stopped the city from burning numerous times, and we are not responsible for burning now. So is the head of the CPI in your state right I mean. Were you warned and was this inevitable? The head of the N. double ACP could not be more correct. This is not just about the eight minutes of time where our officer had his knee. On George Floyd's neck. This is about the previous. Four hundred years. This is about. Hundred, years worth of intentional segregation and institutionalized racism. This is about repeated instances of officer mistreatment. Over decades. And, the only reason it's coming out more often now is that it's recorded on video. I, and so no, this is not just about the eight minutes of this one instance. This has been a longtime come in in many ways and. It's tragic and all we can hope for now is that it leads to clear change. It sounds like you could imagine. Everything that has happened happening the way you're talking right now, that's that's. But I guess what I'm getting at is. Were you ever told by a black leader in Minneapolis that if circumstances did not change? There will be a crisis. There will be something like what we have just seen I'm asking you if you were given a warning. Of that kind! I'm sure there have been numerous warnings over the past several years in decades, yes. I. Mean if you're asking, has anybody ever said that the answers? That I have heard it. Does that make the burning of the city right? No, it doesn't. Misdemeanor Tuesday's episode of of our show daily was about the history of the Minneapolis Police Department, and why it has been so difficult for mayors for police chiefs to change the culture and reprimand officers who commit acts of misconduct and specifically in your city. We focus on the power of the Police Union to set the terms, and even more specifically. The head of Your Police Union who has resisted change and pretty successfully prevented a lot of it. Has that been your experience? Yes! The elephant in the room with regard to. Police reform? Is the police union. The elephant in the room with regard to making the changes necessary to combat the institutionalized racism in have a full on culture shift is the police union the contract associated with that union and then the arbitration that ultimately is necessary. It sets up a system where. We have difficulty both disciplining end terminating officers who have done wrong and so if you WANNA see a full on culture shift, there's a couple of things it's get new officers in that embody the vision of our very forward, thinking and very procedurally justice oriented chief R., A. Dondo and get officers out who do not embody that vision. Both of those things need to happen. Do you currently have the power to do that to bring a new officers. Who Do this job differently and get rid of cops who are problematic. We have the ability to bring in new officers who do the work differently and fact chief are Dondo. Personally interviews have renew cadet that comes in to make sure they have the right mentality that procedural justice is instilled from the very beginning, and that they have a compassionate approach. We do not. Have the ability to get rid of many of these officers that we know have done wrong in the past due to issues with both the contract and the arbitration associated with the Union. You know I mean let me tell you about who are chief is chief R.. A Dondo grew up on the south side and he's the kind of beat cop like knows every person on the street and knows who their parents are I mean. That is the way the policing ultimately should be done. He even sued our Police Department for Racial Discrimination and one right, and now he is our chief, and he is a person of.

George Floyd officer Minneapolis Your Police Union Mayor Jacob Fry Minneapolis Police Department Union City Hall Police Department for Racial D Mr Mayor Michael Barbaro Dondo Jacob murder Minnesota Prai Leslie Redmond chief R. A. Dondo
"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

07:09 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Electric cars might actually help save you money. Electric cars. They're normal now. Learn more at normal now. Dot Com. John Collins is a reporter for Minnesota public radio. He works on their race class in communities desk a few years back. He did whole podcast about the death of Philander Castille and the prosecution of the police officers involved. I spoke last Friday. Protests in Minneapolis had taken a violent and chaotic turn. I'm sorry I've been up for. Like. Four days straight a police precinct had been set on fire and the National Guard. Just been called in to take over for the Minneapolis police. been unable to control events on the ground I. It's not unusual for Minneapolis police to use some sort of force on protesters It's usually seemingly in a strategic way, and it wasn't clear what exactly they wanted the protesters to do in this case specifically because you know, they weren't going to just disperse, so they just kinda scattered them over this larger area and barricaded themselves into. into the precinct, so it was only surprising in that it didn't seem to have any sort of strategic goal for the police, but John says telling the story of police violence in Minneapolis means you're also telling the story of police reform, activism in Minneapolis, and how that movements evolved he I saw protests like this in two thousand fifteen after the shooting of another young black man. City believes had responded to a nine one one call about a fight. They tried to arrest a twenty four year old named Jomar classic. Reports say Clark resisted arrest. An officer shot him in the head. He died of his injuries at the hospital. Almost, immediately, after the shooting demonstration started up certainly like there've been lots of. African American men who been killed by police or the Minneapolis in typically there was some sort of small protest or something, and then it would go away before too long, but with Mark Clark. What happened is people protested in? They focused on the police. and. That's the fourth precinct. Attend North Minneapolis. It's the one of the traditional African American neighborhoods in Minneapolis. And they protested over and over at the fourth precinct, and they actually occupied the grounds outside the fourth precinct in the middle of winter for more than two weeks, and in the middle of winter by saying that in Minneapolis that means it's like twenty below, and they're pretty much living outside the bottles water freezing protesters shut down. interstates even tried to take over the mall of America. This approach digging in forcing people to pay attention. It became a hallmark of Minneapolis, activism following tactics honed by black lives matter. When Casteel 's death was live streamed on facebook by. The machinery of protests crank to life again slender casteel was. Driving with his girlfriend in girlfriend's daughter, and he got pulled over, he told the copy at a gun, but he also had a permit, and in the officer shot and killed him, but the protests after flounder casteel targeted a disruption little bit more, so they had a tactic of going on the interstates over and over and shutting down traffic, and it did anger a lot of people, but it also got them a lot of attention and. Actually. That could be a lesson that like folks cutler now. What works is disruption? I'm hoping you can remind people exactly what happened to the officers involved in Dhamar Clark's death in Flanders, Steele's death because folks may not remember exactly what took place for those officers punished. So. Minnesota until just. Three years ago now head never had a police officer charged for killing someone while they're on duty never. Never and the first time that an officer was charged it was. Officer Haram Alana's who shot and killed philander casteel in that car. And that was after a lot of pressure from activists and people in the community to file charges and a lot of like worrying by Ramsey county attorney on how exactly to proceed with filing charges. Casteel is African, American and Horon. Montana's was Mexican American, and he was acquitted on all counts, and in the case recently it was July, two, thousand, seventeen, a woman, Australian woman who lived in Minneapolis, with her partner, Justin Russo Jack. Thought she heard noises went onto the alley. She called the police and a police officer named Muhammed Noor shot and killed her in her alley. He was also charged. So that was the second one, and he's smalley American and that was third degree, murder or manslaughter. He was found guilty, and that was the first time that police officer was ever found guilty for killing in Minnesota, and now we have the charges against the newest officer Derek Sheridan. That are the first time actually. A white police officer has been charged for killing anyone in Minnesota even though we have one officer has been acquitted and one officer who is in jail right now. it's interesting listening to you because you're sort of sketching this picture for me of like an acceleration of bringing officers to some kind of justice where with Jim Clark, there were no charges, and then with philander casteel there were charges, but the officer was found not guilty, and then you know with his third shooting of a white woman who I believe had called police because she heard something in her driveway. her the officer. There was found guilty, so you can sort of see how. Reactions are changing in real time as each shooting happens right exactly. I mean if we want to think about it to Hera Norianu as the officer who killed Flanders Casteel. It took about four months for the authorities to arrest him Muhammad Noor took about eight months and all, and then this newest officer Derek Sharpen. It took five days, and it happened in a way that is not typical at all. Especially for a police officer where the State Bureau of criminal apprehension actually took him into custody, wasn't a local police department or Sheriff's office or anything like that. It was the state going around Hennepin county to arrest a police officer..

officer Minneapolis Officer Haram Alana Minnesota Casteel Flanders Casteel Mark Clark Philander Castille John Collins Hennepin county facebook reporter Muhammad Noor Hera Norianu National Guard City Derek Sharpen Muhammed Noor cutler
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:31 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Reaction. It's absolute in total discussed. It is here. We have a situation where we should have. The Justice Department on the ground in Minneapolis working with community leaders activists local officials showing real leadership in less moment and the president should be showing leadership and instead. He's basically calling for the shooting of protesters. I I mean love. Every day is a new low. I can never in my wildest dreams. I had a complete failure of imagination. About how how affected we would be by this president's memento lack of decency and leadership but you know so. Should I be surprised? Maybe I shouldn't but it's terrible and I think that the stuff is really corrosive and is really damaging at a time when people are in such pain and to be blocked in America right now to be blocked Brown in America. Right now is People are really deeply in pain right now and this is his response of Anita. We're going to ask you questions about another issue what you're passionate about which is voting in a minute. But I also wanted to get your reaction to the news that a CNN reporter was arrested by the by the local police. They're that's totally outrageous. I mean again here. We have an block reporter as well. I just WANNA I wanNA name that. But he was doing his job he was on live TV and got arrested that way in. Meanwhile the four officers you were involved in the killing of Mr Floyd are not arrested so again this is. This is why people are rightfully outraged. And we've got a first amendment in this country and that that journalists was doing his job but in many ways this is kind of where we are in America you know we can also Kolenda. The fact that in retaliation for twitter actually complying with its own community standards decided to put up warnings when the president misleads voters about elections voting information when he did this thing this morning basically calling for incentivizing shootings of protesters twitter actually blocked it and in retaliation he issues. This bogus executive order. Meanwhile by the way. Facebook is doing nothing and is allowing these messages to be amplified and it corrodes democracy. It corrodes the leadership in this country. And so there's a lot of different touch points unless this may be the perfect segue to talk about voting but I D- stressed about those I was gonna say I imagine that as you think about how to effect change and these issues of police abuse that the ballot box is one of the most important ways to do that and yet voting is under an enormous amount of duress these days Supreme Court. Decisions a president who traffic's conspiracy theories about voting and a whole host of other issues. So give us your sense of what the stakes are right now in terms of giving Americans. Many of whom have been historically disenfranchised to to voting. And where you think the priorities are in terms of pushing forward on this issue so I think a for Cova nine nineteen. There was a real sense by those of us who work in the voting rights space. That twenty twenty was going to bring a wad of challenges on the voter suppression. We have been a nation saddled by efforts to suppress the vote in kind of our elections have been seated on exclude racial exclusion of black people of women and the like and twenty twenty. There's we knew that the president had come in and been ushered in claiming without any evidence whatsoever that millions of people had voted in two thousand sixteen illegally. And so we understood that this was going to be a major challenge and especially also in time of rampant disinformation an online the ability to kind of suppress. The vote had find all kinds of ways to make people fearful to to have them feel like they should not even bother to participate. Which is a form of voter suppression as well but all of that would be on steroids and that much harder to combat and then covert happens and you see immediately in early. March states like Louisiana and other states needing to postpone their primaries because people were literally afraid of voting amid the pandemic and showing up in person at the polls sites. And so then you have Wisconsin and Wisconsin. You have the incredible partisan at for to maintain the impersonal luncheon. You've got a at every level partisanship in facts. The Wisconsin primary from decisions made at the local level to the United States Supreme Court and images around Wisconsin where voters were forced to choose between their health and their vote were really gutting in jarring and so right now for civil rights community. We are pushing on a number of fronts. One is that we need congress to give a four billion dollars to the states to get voting by mail in place and to be able to expand early voting in voter registration in the lead up to the November election. People are not able to register government agencies. Right now they need to have expanded online voting registration but people also there are a lot of communities that don't vote by mail historically and we need to be able to have those options in place so people can show up at the polls and prevent long lines. If there's much expanded early voting and do social distancing and have CD compliant polling sites the like so. We're pushing in Congress for this for this money but we are also pushing in the states. Every state runs its own. Elections in secretaries of state Republican and Democratic are pushing for these rules changes in order to have smooth elections even while the issue is being completely politicized and conspiracy theories and lies from the president. And so we're helping to support those efforts in the fifty states to get all of these these different ways Vote amid pandemic in place. But there's a third bucket that is really important and is voter. Education and fighting disinformation information. Cove it has made all of these things much more difficult. More people are spending more time online and so when you have the president tweeting and posting on facebook utter falsehoods about vote by mail about an and you have him saying it in such a way and he's not alone. There are other Republican officials. That really essentially are saying that they are afraid of more people voting that more people voting is a threat to their and. I do this work as a nonpartisan civil rights lawyer and it is just I have to. They'll call it out like it is right now. Which is that. There is a party that in many in too many parts of the party are really are threatened by more people voting in this country. And it's wide. There's been this very intentional. Agenda to create all kinds of obstacles to people voting everything from disenfranchising people who've served out their criminal sentences already to purging voters off of the world's unlawfully in more. And this is. We have to fight this. We have to wear engaging the leadership conference with facebook and twitter to to pushing them an interface. Quite honestly to help get them to combat disinformation into help provide voter education but also to work in communities around the country to get information out. That is correct. There's going to need to be a mass of public education effort the summer and the fall to educate voters about how they can vote in. November in to make sure that they are energized and activated to vote. There is so much at stake with this with this election. The president signed executive order yesterday that seeks to do away with the protections that social media firms now have internet firms now have for publishing material Basically the law now exempts them from a defamation suits when people say horrible and defamatory false things about you on twitter. You cannot sue twitter or facebook now. The presidency obviously doing it from the perspective of he thinks twitter is is censoring a conservative voices but it is also allowing a lot of really hateful stuff up on its platforms. Be Your thoughts on the Executive Order? I mean executive order. I think it is very likely unlawful. I think there are really serious issues at stake that we need to contend with reckon with around the regulation of these companies and like the fact that the public law regime that exists around these countries is old and needs to be examined in our new world where social media has become so much more the source of news and and facts and what responsibility these platforms have they are not platforms and when the Patriot..

president twitter Facebook United States Supreme Court executive America congress reporter Wisconsin Justice Department CNN Minneapolis Louisiana twenty twenty Anita
"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

09:00 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on Skullduggery

"Seattle CLEVELAND. If you look at where. Those police departments were L. A. Was So long ago that I think there's been a fair bit of kind of their new problems there. I should say but if you looked at the transformation of some of these major city police departments from the time that the Justice Department came in two or three years after the consent decree was over and these things he's concentric as were not. They often were five years They took time in recognition of kind of a level of change in the amount of political will that was required to actually change. Culture change practices on the lake. But these were very changed places when the Justice Department left and they weren't perfect. I say this publicly all the time. There is no such thing as a perfect police department And the Justice Department's going to be able to wave a wand even after five years to say Oh there won't be any more critical incidents the differences that departments that have seen that kind of intervention and had to engage with at that level of deep reform and investigation. When these things happen they know how to self correct and they have that kind of leadership to do it versus police departments. That aren't studying it. That aren't looking at it. That aren't self correcting that. Don't even know where the problems lie that have just thinking about these things as like a few bad apples versus what's happening systemically. Structurally in the police department. And and looking at. Where's the community? Even like engage with this police department to help push for reform and more of a collaborative way so there are studies and evaluations. That have been done. I think there needs to be more of and you can talk to chiefs an community in some of these departments or any cities to kind of document the change or any of these any of them result. Perfect police departments. Absolutely not. But you know what is so dispiriting and in fact enraging to so many people is that time after time. These police officers you know. They're put on paid leave or unpaid administrative leave. This particular case as you pointed out the police chief acted pretty swiftly to terminate them but in the end they are in so many cases they are not charged or they are not prosecuted or they are not convicted. So what is the problem there? That's a different set of problems and I'm GonNa dig into that actually at some point one to return to this issue around systemic reform. There are a lot of problems with criminal accountability of police officers in this country There's the problem of district attorney's offices that work day in and day out with the same police departments. They are there investigators about this concern about having to close of a relationship between the Police Department and the DA's office such that. There isn't a level of independence and independent assessment on a police officer's actions those concerns are real. It's why it has been part of what is propelled in recent years a series of more civil rights minded district attorney candidates. Running for office and getting elected is in booting out. Da's that were just seen as completely part of the kind of local law enforcement machine and so you've seen district some prosecutor's offices. More progressive offices create these independent commissions. The State of Wisconsin actually created an independent body for the state to investigate police officer involved. violence there are different things that people have jurisdictions of done to address us that this concern about the lack of independence in independent investigation. Israel. Why a lot of these jurisdictions turned to the Justice Department. I will also say and I think it. It is a hard and controversial conversation. But it's one that we need to have. Which is that. The Justice Department's jurisdiction to prosecute officer. Involved is so limited and I think there's a real conversation to be had as I said it is requires the highest criminal intent standard. There is criminal law to be able to to prosecute one of these cases and get a conviction and DA's office at the state level have a lot more options. They can prosecute recklessness they can prosecute negligence the in the Justice Department bar is much higher and so that jurisdiction but of course changing the standard lowering. The Bar would require federal legislation right. And is there any chance that what happened? I mean you're saying star conversation but that's a that's a heavy lift isn't it? Yeah I mean it's a heavy lift but I mean all of this is a heavy left and the answer can't be that we just kind of brush our hands off and sit in place of persistent frustration and violence. I mean this is my response to when people are like all these consent decrees you know. They're still people getting hill. It's like the answer it isn't that the consent decree model is perfect but there have been real gains in police departments that have had long histories of abuse and violence in really confronting some serious systemic deficiencies around. Training Accountability Supervision. In the whole gamut that have seen different outcomes again. But I just don't believe in this in this area or in any Emma civil rights lawyer every problem I tackle from voting rights to to police. Violence these are long entrenched problems that are rooted in the founding of our country. And if my answer is damaged too hard. I'm not I can't push Congress Congress's do nothing or these aren't going to change. Yeah then sit it out. Like don't be a part of the effort for change but I think that there there are strategies interventions. We need to make them better we to push to make the law better. I don't think there's nothing count ability in these cases and I think that there is a culture even among prosecutors that needs to change as well as when we're talking about policing a police departments before about how the kinds of investigations you did Into police abuses has not been a priority in this justice department. And you know you spurred me while I was looking at the Justice Department website To look further at their list of priorities. And there's no reference to the Civil Rights Division or investigations into police abuses in fact on the contrary The Attorney General Bar created this announced this commission on law enforcement that talks about and I'm looking at it now. The troubling continued lack of trust and respect for law enforcement that persists in many communities. The job of COP is tougher than now than ever before. All of which most people can agree with except that the kinds of issues. We're talking about today. Do not seem to be addressed. So tell us what you know about what your former division is doing. It's now headed by guy named Eric. Dream on tell us a little bit about what you know about what he's made priorities. And has he continued any of these sorts of investigations at all. As far as you know. Well I mean Eric driving came in. I think two plus years after the start of the trump administration and I think is terribly empower vis-a-vis the attorney general who seems to be driving and setting the tone for almost everything. The dismantling of the policing work at the Civil Rights Division started on Jeff Sessions. Watch and he was very intent on this when I was the head of the division. He called me in for an oversight. Hearing in you know ream to be for being an aggressive civil rights lawyer on policing as though that was a kind of the biggest insult in the world. So this was part of this. This mission attorney general bar his picked right up and has in some ways made it even worse by giving a series of speeches around the country talking about the disrespect to police officers and not at all even acknowledging communities and has really created this further exacerbated the divide between law enforcement and the communities that they serve and the president did this. He did it in July of two thousand seventeen where he very famously. Talking in New York to a police department talked about how police officers should be roughing up suspects as. They're putting their heads in the police cars. You know this. It may seem small but this stuff really adds up. It isn't just that they've walked away. Abdicated their congressionally mandated responsibility to support police community. Trust building to support police reform. They are literally furthering the polarization and divide in furthering. This like warrior mentality of law enforcement officers and community has them and they are at war with each other. And so you know. I just think it's more than it's more than just the work. It's even the kind of rhetoric that's that's coming out. The president tweeted this morning when the looting starts. The shooting. Starts your.

Police Department Justice Department officer Civil Rights Division Attorney DA Seattle Eric Wisconsin CLEVELAND L. A. Israel Congress Congress
"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

The Daily 202's Big Idea

01:38 min | 11 months ago

"minneapolis" Discussed on The Daily 202's Big Idea

"Interview on CNN and as he described watching the video of his brother plead for his life and the violent unrest. That's followed. He said his family wants peace in the streets but he also called for the death penalty for all four officers. Involved in his brother's death lawyers for those officers could not be reached for comment. Floyd's family will seek an independent autopsy of his body citing its mistrust of Minneapolis city officials. Now Minnesota has been the locale of several high profile killings by police in recent years including the shooting. Death of full llandough casteel also caught on video during a traffic. Stop in two thousand sixteen. The officer involved was charged with manslaughter but acquitted. Besides the killings of Floyd and Casteel a Minneapolis. Police officer shot and killed Jomar Clark. A twenty four year old black man in two thousand fifteen that also spurred extended demonstrations that effectively occupied the area near where the police station that burned down is for weeks getting back in two thousand fifteen years now local and federal officials though eventually declined to bring charges against the officers involved in that case it's important to understand that history and background to see why this week's incident has sparked such violence and that's the daily two. Oh Two for Friday may twenty ninth. Thank you for listening. Our show is produced by Ariel Plotnik more theme. Music is by Ted Muldoon. I'm James Home and stay safe this weekend. I'll talk.

officer Casteel Minneapolis Floyd CNN Ted Muldoon Jomar Clark Ariel Plotnik Minnesota James Home