35 Burst results for "Million Years"

The Science of Zoom Body Language

TechNation Radio Podcast

01:49 min | 3 weeks ago

The Science of Zoom Body Language

"There's a lot of debate as to how we ended up in the universe. That can encode information Some people use the anthropic principle. That wasn't the case we wouldn't be here. Wouldn't be talking about it but that allowed. Evolution and evolution has evolved more and more complex creatures that eventually evolved nervous system and those never systems automatically evolved a neo cortex which is capable of thinking in hierarchies to reflect the natural hierarchy of the world as i emerging mammals was the size of a postage stamp and as opposed to stamp and little rodents Not very noticeable but allow these animals to actually learn new skills that were complicated and hierarchical Without having to go through thousands of years of biological evolution to change their behavior but then sixty five million years ago there was this cataclysmic event called the cretaceous extinction event and we can see archaeological evidence of that everywhere in the world. Something happen very dramatic to change the environment very quickly and Animals non mammalian species. It did not have a new cortex died out. Many of them did And that's when mammals took over there the ecological niche and to anthropomorphized biological evolution said. Hey this neo. Cortex is pretty useful and it's talk growing it As mammals got more complex than by primates it was no longer flat. It was very convoluted if you know. The brain of primate looks like it has many bridges and combinations to increase its surface area. It's still a very thin structure to stretch out. A human neo cortex be about the size of size of a table napkin injustice. Then but because of its all of these curvatures and convolution. It's about eighty percent of the brain. And that's why we do of thinking and thinking in hierarchies

The Civilian Climate Corps Is a Big-Government Plan

Short Wave

02:17 min | Last month

The Civilian Climate Corps Is a Big-Government Plan

"Nearly one hundred years since the creation of the civilian conservation corps. Much of its legacy is still being put to use of everything needed here. This tunnels the most impressive piece of work tom. Ford would is assistant manager of lewis and clark caverns state park in west central montana. Thirty feet long lasting from the outside in the tunnel is big. You could walk down at comfortable until the passage opens into a massive dark cave where the air is heavy with a chilly humidity. This came forward. Says was discovered by a member of the conservation corps who decided to do a little non-sanctioned exploring like i said slid through all that and came out into just this hits the lights so it's by far the largest room we know of in the cave system it has the biggest formations hole cave that we know of as well ribbed columns of rock stretch from ceiling to floor looking like glistening coral reefs perfect. Somebody's formations are still a million years old at they're going in every year. Seventy to eighty thousand people get to enjoy them. That's not to mention the millions more who used trails campgrounds and bridges the dams and other work. That was done by the civilian conservation corps. That's one of the things. I hear the most bizarre. They talk about the history. All they lament the loss of that type of an organization the here in washington it makes sense. President biden is so drawn to the idea of re-booting one of the most popular enduring programs from the new deal biden has draped himself in fdr symbolism and like roosevelt. He's made big government spending and programs a key part of his agenda once in a generation investment in america yourself. This is the largest jobs plan since world war. Two in fact biden has positioned himself as the first president in generations to like fdr unapologetically pitched the federal government and government spending as the solution to big problems. These are investments. We made together as one country investments that the government was in a position to make time and again propel us into the

Lewis And Clark Caverns State Civilian Conservation Corps West Central Conservation Corps Montana President Biden Ford TOM Biden Roosevelt Washington FDR America Federal Government Government
Never Forgive, Never Forget

Mind Body No Soul

02:09 min | Last month

Never Forgive, Never Forget

"Suzanne somers once said forgiveness his gift you give yourself. Does it come with a gift receipt. Susie oh pro winfrey once said true forgiveness. His win you can say. Thank you for that experience oprah. I love you but if someone murdered my family at least the ones i enjoy i would. Under no circumstances ever in a million years forgive them and if forced to do so to adhere to fundamentalist ideals. I would. Intern hate myself for being a fraud. And betraying my truth here at mind body. No saw we never forgive and we never forget we also so don't dwell but we don't wish them well. There is a myriad of intrinsic quandries attached to the notion of forgiveness to start both the definition and connotation of forgiveness is all about other person the motherfucker that did you dirty and setting them free. Absolving them letting them off the hook ceasing to feel anger or whatever. The new demonized emotion is towards that person. Place or thing.

Suzanne Somers Winfrey Susie Oprah
Leaf Margins, Paleoclimates, and Continental Movements

In Defense of Plants Podcast

01:47 min | Last month

Leaf Margins, Paleoclimates, and Continental Movements

"All right. Dr ian miller. Thank you so much. For coming on the podcast. I'm really excited to talk to you about your research today but before we get there. Let's tell everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is you do. Oh thanks. I'm super excited to be here as well. And so my name is ian miller has said i'm a paleobotanist. I worked at the denver museum of nature and science. Where i'm a curator and i'm also the chair of the earth and space sciences there at the museum run a team of paleontologists and geologists as well as do my own research implants. Uh so that's that's sort of what i do now. I got to this point sort of chasing fossil plants in the american west. Were you always interested in fossil plants. Though i mean that that's an really interesting interest for like a child to get into you. Don't hear that a lot. I mean i was a dinosaur kid. I know a lot of other dinosaur kids out there but fossil plants. I mean it took me a little bit to get to the point where those were interesting but now i would argue. Sometimes they're more interesting than dinosaurs. But that's harris. The i think in a lot of circles is and i. I started all the time constantly. Battling the data serve posts. Make sure that the plants get the same sort of airtime So i was a mineral kit up at eastern washington state. So i was always after you know courts pistols. Pyrite things like that mine tailings. That were there around. The ranch grew up on. So i kind of discovered fossils a little late-game did have this interesting. Formative experience was really little. i was born in seattle. And there's lots of miocene rock around seattle right there on. I five knows eight. Ninety right outside of his supply of my grandfather took me to a road cut. Still remember pulling these fifteen million year old clams out of the hillside in their big like softball-size clams

Dr Ian Miller Ian Miller Denver Museum Of Nature And Sc American West Harris Seattle Washington Softball
Casper Sleep (CSPR) Reports Q1 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

MarketFoolery

01:35 min | Last month

Casper Sleep (CSPR) Reports Q1 Loss, Tops Revenue Estimates

"Year after their first quarter loss was smaller than expected revenue in. The first quarter was higher than expected and this was looking like it was going to be a really good day for shareholders and it has not turned out to be a really good day for shareholders a pre market. The stock was up close to ten percent it reversed course. It's basically flat right now. A start wherever you want. But i'm curious what you see when you look at casper sleep so generally positive things chris. I haven't listened in on the call. So i don't know what management might have said to kill the enthusiasm. They created with this earnings report. This is a tough industry. I am a big fan of a company called sleep number which is a competitor of casper. Sleep casper sleep is starting to impress me a little bit though. Well let's work through these numbers and then we'll talk about the stories behind them. So as you mentioned revenue increased. It was up twenty percent to one hundred seventy eight million year over year. They're direct to consumer revenue so this includes their retail stores and their online sales that increase eleven percent but north america retail partnership revenue. This increased fifty four percent. So what is this. This is casper. Sleep selling through partners. Like nordstroms ashley. Store sam's club. It is gradually getting into really great venues to sell their price point of mattress. Which isn't super expensive. I thought that number was great. The other thing Which is

Casper Chris Sam's Club North America Ashley
Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:42 min | Last month

Determining the Age of Earths Continental Crust

"And you study claims its continental crust. First emerged some three point. Seven billion years ago. The findings presented at the european geological. Union's general assembly showed that the planet's light continental crust formed within the first nine hundred million years of the earth's existence. The continental crust is the layer of grew natick sedimentary amid them offic rocks which forms the continents in the areas of shallow seabed close to their shores is the continental shelves. It's list dance. The janik crust material and therefore floats on top of it unlike previous research which is based on strontium isotopes and marine cabinets which are usually either scarce or altered in rock more than three billion years old new study by scientists from the university of bergen looked at the mineral barrett which forms from sulfates emotion water mixing with barium from hydrothermal vents and thus holds an unchanging record aversion chemistry. Going back through time. The authors calculated the ratio of strontium isotopes in six different deposits of barrack from three different continents range in age from three pointed three point. Five billion years this allowed them to determine win with continental rock populated into the ocean and was incorporated into barrett the authors determined that the weathering started about three point seven billion years ago. That's around five hundred million years earlier than previously thought. The findings provide a new understanding of early ocean chemistry. As well as the onset of plate tectonics and even hope understanding the evolution of the biosphere because once process is like plate tectonics hope established the continents processes like erosion can begin to where the crucial minerals and nutrients into the ocean.

General Assembly University Of Bergen Barrett
The Anthropocene Radical: The Scientist Who Saved the World

Science Friction

01:38 min | Last month

The Anthropocene Radical: The Scientist Who Saved the World

"Reaching this week. With a dummy speed was year two thousand a month was february and a bunch of top. Scientists are meeting in mexico there with the international geos fee biosphere program which investigates global change australia. Climate scientists will stephanie's. He's eats executive director at the time and a presentation is underway talking about recent changes and get referring to the hall of fame now. The whole scene is the last approximately twelve thousand us a birth history epoch geologic on skill a stable warm period and it's the one that's allowed humanity to agriculture villages cities as we know today before the holocene was the pleistocene the ice age and that lasted over two and a half million years. Geological time is epic until that meeting in mexico though the hall of fame was definitely considered the geological age. We are in but someone important in that room. And i could see paul. Getting agitate was about to lose his tampa. It would sort of build up to something and you could. You could see visibly that he was getting agitated with what was being said. We'll stephens talking here about dutch scientist. Paul crutzen the pioneering cast and nobel laureate and finally he just burst out and interrupted new. Stop saying the policy or not in the whole scene anymore. And then he said we're in the and then he stopped because he had actually worked out what he was going to say they were in and then he just blurted out and throw cosc-

Mexico Stephanie Australia Paul Crutzen Hall Of Fame Tampa Stephens Paul
Extracting Fossils From Their Rocky Tombs

The Science Show

02:02 min | Last month

Extracting Fossils From Their Rocky Tombs

"Like many kids of the eighties. When i first saw drastic park. I wanted to become a paleontologist gently brushing sand and stones away to expose a perfectly preserved skeleton in reality. They want you to at the active getting fossilized bangs out of brook. That's encapsulated them. For tens of millions of years as less brushing brushing and more buzzy and really and well bloody noisy. This start is really fun every now and again. That is paleontologist. Ben francis shelley. And we'll get back to those tools. Sick pre pandemic into the basement of the melvin museum. To show me just how. Hey and his colleagues removed fossils embedded in rock the barnes hayes working on lunchtime souls instead there remains of ancient wiles and dolphins and when they died millions of a guy they body sank to the sea floor and covered in soft mud and sediment over time that sediment hardened into limestone which these days form. The cliffs along victoria coast ben in others gone regular expeditions to say what fresh fossils have been exposed by the wind and waves. When you get a specimen in an it's mostly embedded in rock. It's been there for twenty. Five million years held healthy. Get it out the first step that you have to do before anything else. As you have to. Cut the exposed boeing. That's at the surface with a lot of different clues that can cure the action specimen hot as well. We tend to use something known as paranoid seventy two. It's polymer resin and when we add it with acetone the base of about three percent. What it does is. It hardens the surrounding bone. So we can take back and then we can be certain. That bone is probably going to be a lot stronger than when we actually left it in the field

Ben Francis Shelley Melvin Museum Barnes Hayes Dolphins Victoria Boeing
New Species of Prehistoric Turtle Discovered in Madagascar

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | Last month

New Species of Prehistoric Turtle Discovered in Madagascar

"Which roamed Earth. Some 66 million to 100 million years ago, has been discovered in Madagascar. Archaeologists unearth the near complete fossil of the quick mouths frog turtle and 2015 the freshwater turtle out of frog like appearance with the flat skull. Researchers say it was likely a suction feeder, which eight small living prey. Like insect larva and tadpoles. This is

Madagascar
‘Godzilla’ Shark Discovered in New Mexico Gets Formal Name

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

‘Godzilla’ Shark Discovered in New Mexico Gets Formal Name

"Species found in New Mexico has gotten a formal name. They were 300 million year old shark's teeth but less spear like and shorter than others. The teeth found east of Albuquerque, and 2013 indicated that this species at almost seven ft, long grasped and crushed prey rather than piercing it. The formal name is Drake. Oh, Priestess, Hoffman NorAm, but some might like the name. It was first given Godzilla shark because of its dragon like jaw line and more than two FT. Long fin spines.

New Mexico Hoffman Noram Albuquerque Drake
2.5 Billion Tyrannosaurus Rex Roamed Earth

America's First News

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

2.5 Billion Tyrannosaurus Rex Roamed Earth

"That 2.5 billion Tyrannosaurus rex, Proud North America and now, the study released Thursday, so they didn't all do it at the same time, that's over a couple million years or so and at any one moment, maybe 20,000 or so we're alive. The study figures out of the T rex population based on its size, how much it had to eat, and it's a sexual maturity. It's the first of its kind estimate, though it comes with a huge margin of error. Scientists say. If there were much fewer T racks week they have never known they existed on Lee about 100 or so T rex fossils have been found.

Tyrannosaurus Rex North America LEE
Nature Makes GMO Fish

Science Facts & Fallacies

02:11 min | 2 months ago

Nature Makes GMO Fish

"Skeptical of aqua bounties fast-growing salmon while nature makes genetically modified fish to next up. Why the effort to find a quote biological basis for being transgender is misguided and harmful and finally cure for sickle cell diseases inches closer with the launch of a major gene. Therapy trial very exciting stuff. But first up kevin. Let's talk about Natural gm fish apparently. Yeah this is really cool and this is a report that came out in. Cbc news which is canadian broadcasting company usually not writing very favorable things about genetic engineering because this isn't genetic engineering unless it's genetic engineering that nature did so the story goes back to a couple of researchers at queens university. A lorry graham and peter davies found this evidence a while ago now that there was this antifreeze gene that helped the rainbow smelt live through freezing temperatures so super cooling fish and some other organisms can endure temperatures below freezing because of a mechanisms that keep their cells from forming ice crystals. What interesting stuff going on there and if you think about it. These are cold-blooded so when it gets below freezing you have the risk of freezing so years ago. Probably a decade and a half. I guess they found this evidence that there was A this gene that that didn't seem to make a whole lot of sense that that it that it looked like a in so we go over now to herring and smelt How was this hearing. Gene ending up and smelt the last time that they were related was by extremely distant ancestor. They said by the article article here. Two hundred and fifty million years ago so that was like the carbon difference period so these two individual lineages of fish split off pretty early a back before dinosaurs or you know and so this really cool so well same time as early dinosaurs.

Sickle Cell Diseases Cbc News Peter Davies Queens University GM Kevin Graham
Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

"Says carbon dioxide and methane emissions went up in 2020. Despite coronavirus lockdowns, Ryan Shook explains. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explained the global surface average for CEO to went up by 2.6 parts per million last year. It represented the fifth highest rate of increase in Noah's 63 year record. The agency also noted CEO to levels are now higher than at any time in the past 3.6 million years. As for methane, it saw its largest annual increase recorded since systematic measurements began nearly four decades ago.

Ryan Shook National Oceanic And Atmospher Noah
Carbon Dioxide Levels Highest They've Been In Over 3 Million Years

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Carbon Dioxide Levels Highest They've Been In Over 3 Million Years

"Say the level of carbon dioxide in the earth's atmosphere is now higher than it's been in at least 3.5 million years. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says levels of carbon dioxide and methane continued their unrelenting rise in 2020 despite the economic slowdown. Well, if you like treasure hunts this stories for you, a pair of Maine residents have hidden

National Oceanic And Atmospher Maine
North Carolina Tar Heels basketball coach Roy Williams retires

ESPN Radio

02:55 min | 2 months ago

North Carolina Tar Heels basketball coach Roy Williams retires

"North Carolina coach Roy Williams announced his retirement after 18 seasons coaching the Tar Heels. I feel very fortunate that we've had him for so long, it's such a high level. One of the great coaches in the game of basketball more reaction to the retirement of UNC legend Roy Williams with over 900 wins and three national championships to his name. When asked about why he chose to retire now, Williams said, quote every time somebody asked me how long I was going to go. I'd always say as long as my health allows me to do it, But deep down inside, I knew the only thing that would speed that up. Was if I did not feel that I was any longer the right man for the job. I no longer feel that I'm the right man for the job. Williams went unbeaten in March Madness first round matchups. 29 You know until this year, the first round loss to Wisconsin breaking the streak. Sixers Garden national champion with UNC Danny Greene talked on Keyshawn J. Will and Zubin about his former coach, and what made him so legendary. He's been doing a strong as I've been alive and he's been a legend since then, since before probably I was born and he's a legendary stuff before me and during my time there and after He's one. You know a number of championships, and that's not even that doesn't speak on his success to me what he's done off the court and what he's pledged that school in other schools, eyes helped out in the community there, North Carolina and you know not just there, but many places in the world. So to me, that just speaks legendary. You know, outside the court just many ways you could be, um You know, a legend is many ways. You can be a hero. As many ways you could be a champion and world wins is the definition of all those. Those things even said the in before I was born. ESPN College basketball analyst Jay Billa spoke on Spain and Fitz about who could be a successor to Williams at UNC. I think it'll have to be somebody within the Carolina family. So the first thing you think of his Hubert Davis, who played there for Dean Smith, that has been a system under Roy Williams, the last 89 years. Some like that, and Um, you know, the only the only thing that people would bring up with Hubert is he has not yet been a head coach, but he's played a million years. The MBA there, you know, Roy Williams had never been a head coach when he took over Kansas, so I'm not all hung up on this head Coach thing. I think it's great. I'd rather I'd rather have Ah, someone with head coaching experience that not, But when you got somebody's got his Hubert, I wouldn't hesitate to make that higher. But also that the other one that I think Will be right in the mix of those West Miller, the head coach of UNC Greensboro, He played for Roy Williams on the 05 National championship team as backup guard and he's been an outstanding music, really young head coach. UNC Greensboro, and he's done really well there, but for the last couple of tournaments that were held, and he had a really good team this year with Isaiah Miller is his best player, making the double A. So he's He's another really good option

Roy Williams UNC Sixers Garden Williams Danny Greene Keyshawn J. Will Zubin North Carolina Basketball Jay Billa Hubert Davis Wisconsin Hubert Dean Smith Fitz Espn Spain West Miller Unc Greensboro Carolina
English Is Plain Weird

Lexicon Valley

01:59 min | 2 months ago

English Is Plain Weird

"English is not normal the more you hang around and linguistics to more languages you mess around with the more language histories you learn the more you realize that this language that i'm speaking right now. Although it has many advantages for muendane and often unfair reasons this language is not normal and by that. I don't mean that it's extraordinary. I mean that english is weird as languages go and i actually find this one of the funnest things that i know about language and yet it's very hard to perceive it because it's the language that we speak and it's the language spoken by so very many other people in the world. English can feel so normal. But it's actually a highly abnormal thing. And i want to share with you. How it's abnormal and what i mean specifically is that when we think about language we have to think about the history of homo sapiens and the history of homo sapiens. As far as is known now goes back about three hundred thousand years and we might suppose that language emerged then. It's the way. I tend to think of it now. It's also possible. That homo erectus had language in which case language goes back about one point eight million years that is daniel ever another linguist view and i am pretty convinced of it but let's be conservative for now. Let's say that it's three hundred thousand years. The thing is for most of that time. Humanity was different from what most of humanity is now. The neolithic revolution that large scale architecture and the development of what we call civilizations. That's only ten thousand years ago or so and so what that means is that i say two hundred ninety thousand years what humanity was relatively small groups living on the land language developed there. So anything that happens to language after that is a departure from what language normally was what this evolved to be

Daniel
All About Lemurs

The Children's Hour

01:54 min | 2 months ago

All About Lemurs

"What is a lemur. That's a really awesome question to start with as a educator at the lemurs center i actually meet a lot of people who don't really know the answer that question because we murs are kind of in the middle of a couple of different families so to simplify that. Lemurs as you guys probably know are part of the primate but they are the very earliest primates that ever showed up on earth so when you look at them they don't really look like the monkeys and apes that we think of when we think of primates they have a wet knows they have a small body and they look a little bit more like some of those earlier mammals cats and raccoons in marsupials. So a lot of people at the lemur center think that lemurs armor soup bills or related to raccoons or something like that but lemurs are primates. And like i said there the earliest primates that ever showed up in the world so they are like the original primates on her. That's amazing so in a way. Is it true that we could trace our evolutionary history. Back to lemurs we could. We'd have to go about sixty five million years. Back but primate started with levers so our whole family tree starts with them all the way up to humans so cute my goodness i can hardly stand cute they are they just seem like a super snugly. Almost cat like monkey. Like if i worked at the duke lemur center. I'd wanna hug them all the time do you do you have them. Leaders are definitely very social with other lemurs but as wild animals. They are totally uninterested in hanging out and hugging humans and they look super cuddly. But the more you hang out with levers the more he gets to know that they don't really care about us. they just want to hang out with earlier buddies.

Lemurs Center Lemur Center Duke Lemur Center
Talking Roses With Peter Kukielski

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

01:46 min | 3 months ago

Talking Roses With Peter Kukielski

"Kutowski is former curator of new york botanical gardens. Peggy rockfeller rose garden. We're in two thousand two thousand fourteen. He implemented a new mission to plant and trial roses for disease resistance and less chemical usage. He's the author of an earlier book roses without chemicals and the designer of a recent garden at the royal botanical gardens in ontario canada a chemical free province and these days peter gardens in maine. How are you up there. Great appear thank you. Are you okay. So thirty five million years on the planet That's a long time so this new book. It's quite different from the earlier one. It's sort of more culture than horticulture. And as i said in the intro tells about the cultural connections we have with the roses throughout history. And i wonder if you know having completed at. Did you sort of finish and say oh. Those are my two favorite stories or you know a couple of highlights. That really stuck with you. Were surprised you yeah. I think What you betcha the introduction about the thirty five years. it's very interesting when whenever i gave tours or lectures about the rose garden. People seem to be more interested in the stories about whereas if something where about dates and things so it's always fun to say. Are you aware. Roses existed thirty five million years ago and the kind of people kind of stop in their taxes. Had no i had no idea and so the idea that it's such an ancient plant and survived. You know the millions of years It's just an amazing factory and give me joy about working with these plans to understand Their strength their resilience.

Kutowski New York Botanical Gardens Peggy Rockfeller Rose Garden Disease Resistance Peter Gardens Royal Botanical Gardens Ontario Maine Canada
"million years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

01:45 min | 4 months ago

"million years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"We know they of these specimens one. Is that our paleontology colleagues have been using geological methods to date the sample we knew beforehand. Approximately all samples. Were but then when we got the genetic date though. We also could use the molecular clock so the assumption that mutations happened at a relatively constant great to perform a molecular dating that was independent of the geological dating. And when we do that we find that the two younger specimens we get more or less exactly the same age plus minus a few hundred thousand years but in the grand scheme of things we basically get the same age for the oldest specimen are denied they actually says studies a bit older at one point six million years and so we don't know why that is but still very comforting that these two different independent methods basically give us the same as salt in the sense of two of these specimens of more than a million years old and to be honest. It's not that important for our analysis where they'll just one is one point to a one point six million years old. It's it's really old. I mean presumably. You didn't do this just to get the record right. You actually wanted to get some data on the mammoth family tree now. I often familiar with woolly mammoths. I guess that's what we learn about at school but there may be some of the more recent species of mammoth and what you've done you able to really get a sense of of how the different species that go all the way back to a million years ago fit into the tree i mean. What's the story here. So roughly between one and two many years ago in siberia we have type of. Mammoth that has been called steph. Mammoth and the classic model of mammoth evolutionist. A-this step mavs. Were the ancestors of the woolly. Mammoth and the columbian. Mammoth of north america..

six million years north america two younger specimens one point six million years old more than a million years old a million years ago two different independent meth two of these specimens a few hundred thousand years one siberia two many years ago columbian
"million years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:10 min | 8 months ago

"million years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Shows at DC P. official dot com on apple spotify Google Pandora or wherever you get your shows. Be..

"million years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:23 min | 8 months ago

"million years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"This episode is Space Times brought to you by last pass simplifying your online life. If you're anything like me, one of the biggest frustrations and time consuming parts of going online anyway is trying to remember and then use all those log in details and passwords that you up over the years, and again, like me, you probably already have hundreds of them. Of course, only other hand. You could just be like a lot of other people out there and simply use one password for everything, and that's not particularly secure idea. I guess it could be worse. You could be one of those people that use one, two, three, four, five, or ABCD E. A. West of all. You could use password as your password and with intimate getting more and more dangerous. Now really is the time to do something about that, and the good news is there's a great solution out there. It's called last pass password manager and with it suddenly all those security hassles the gone. And believe me the relief really is unbelievable not to mention the time it saves you and it's convenient having everything stored in the one manageable dashboard. If you sign up for last pass, you'll be joining twenty five point six, million users around the world and more than seventy thousand businesses. Now, you've got admit that's a lot of trust were one of the most important aspects of online live and the good news is all this piece. Of. Mind is really affordable. If you want, you can simply sign up for the free service and leave it at that offer. Even more features get the premium package, which is four dollars fifty a month they're a family and enterprise plans available as well, plus last pass works across all devices and even suggests super secure passwords for you to use. So why not put your passwords into autopilot and reduce the stress you can check out. Last pass at space. Time with Stewart Gary Dot com forward slash last pass that way you'll be helping support our show so sign up and use it for free at Space Time with Stewart Gary Dot com forward slash last pass and simplify your life and always you'll find the link details in the show notes am on our website that space time with Stewart Gary Dot com forward slash last pass, and now it's back to the show This is time with student Gerry. New highly classified satellite ground station for the wideband global satellite. Communication system has now become operational near Geraldton in Western Australia The new facility known as satellite ground station West is located in the existing code arenas said like ground stage in complex thirty kilometers east of Geraldton it'll provide Australian American and Canadian military with greater access to the wide global satellite communication. System and ultra high capacity defense satellite communications network. It's designed to provide real time or video and data communication services linking military command and control centers with the land forces anywhere in the world. The constellation currently includes ten satellites with operations running out of the Fourth Space Operations Squadron at the air, force base and the Fifty Third Signal Battalion at Fort Carson. Colorado it's understood that a single wideband global satellite communication systems spacecraft as much bandwidth as the entire existing Louis, defense satellite. Communication System Satellite Ground Station West. We'll link with satellites position over the Indian Ocean may well work on Amirah Facility Satellite Ground Station East is currently underway in the New South Wales Riverina operated by the Australian Defence Force the codge. Arenas. Satellite. Ground Station is a major Australian defence singles in facility and includes dishes associated with the echelon signals intelligence system, which monitors global communications networks satellite dishes associated with several other military communications networks including the mobile user objective system. The next generation said like communication system and the ultra high frequency satellite communications project are also located at the complex.

Ground Station Amirah Facility Satellite Grou Stewart Gary Dot Geraldton Fourth Space Operations Squadr Australian Defence Force Fifty Third Signal Battalion Indian Ocean Colorado Australia Fort Carson Gerry South Wales Louis
"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Meat. I'm Mark Post Post. I am chief scientific officer of Motza meet startup that aims to commercialize cultures mute remembered the prediction that Winston Churchill may back in nineteen thirty one. One that could be grown in a lab. You might say that Mark Post is a man who's taken up that challenge. poche was a professor fester in the medical school at University in the Netherlands in two thousand and sex when he was asked to help out with a study that was being funded by the Dutch government lament the idea was to place muscle cells in a nutrient rich serum and encouraged US cells to grow into muscle so like fibers are many medical applications for this. What but the Dutch researchers looking beyond Madison? They he believed that. If you can turn animals stem cells into muscle fibers. You can actually grow synthetic meet in the lab. It could be the best has to both work real neat. That doesn't require a real animal now. I thought it was a great idea and I was also ready involved in tissue engineering for medical purposes and the more I learned about the problems with meat production in the next thirty five years. The more enthusiastic I became about this entire project not only scientifically but also for its suicidal impact. There were scientific hurdles that still had to be overcome but the main obstacle was money. They would need lots of it to scale up produced cell base meat for commercial mass consumption. It didn't help when in two thousand hasn't nine. The Dutch government withdrew funding for the project and basically the language that the government used. We don't see any commercial interest from companies companies in this kind of triggered me. I said well you know this is such a great idea. We need to be able to get this across the general population. So let's make make a sausage from a pig presented to the press while the pig is honking around on the stage and so that was kind of the image was for me was a very unusual kind I thought because I I just basically was a biomedical scientists but I was so frustrated. Is You know W- we'll show them. We needed quite a bit of money to do that. That wasn't really lying around so we had to wait until we got that money and then kind of out of the blue. That was a year and a half or two years later the office of Sergei Brin approached. Just me and said we want to talk to you about this project that you're doing and when we come over Sergei brand is one of the co founders of Google but while marked post had of course heard of people you've never heard of Sergei Graham so when Brennan's representative came came calling post had no idea who he was dealing with post told his visitor about his idea of creating a so based sausage and holding a press conference or the pig on the stage and the representative of Sergei Brennan said. Oh Yeah we will support that. How much money do you need and body set off a couple plus million would be fine Indian? We got the money that we needed to make. That event happened so suddenly Mark Post I had all the money he needed to make his cell meet prototype and the money came with only one string attached tugay brand. Dan wanted a hamburger on the stage. Not a sausage well that was basically a not a request but the demand from Sergei Britain. If you're going to do this it has to be a hamburger not sausage. It's an American thing and that was actually quite fortunate. I think because environmental impact impact of beef is actually a lot higher than that of pork and so on August fifth twenty thirteen. The first I sell Burger was ready to be unveiled at a press conference in London. The event was carried live around the world and included a taste test by food critic. Who of course very gratifying moment? That you because you you have been living up to this for two three years and to finally make that happen was was the big thing so I was pretty happy throughout. It was also a little bit nerve wracking because we had no idea how to tasters basically would respond onto it if they would spit out. Say Yuck this is nothing like we expected or if they would be at least somewhat positive about it we had no idea so that was nerve wracking thing but all in all the whole event went pretty well and I wasn't even noticeably nervous but somebody told me I was tapping my fingers continuously on a desk so Hawaii. Apparently I was the world's first. Cellular Burger got good reviews from the food critic but most of the press coverage focused on cost cost not taste the price tag on. That Burger was three hundred and thirty thousand dollars so mark mark post needed to find a way to drive down costs significantly or his cell Burger would remain an interesting science experiment with no commercial potential and more importantly no potential to solve the environmental challenges caused by animal based meat production. So one of the things that makes cell culture extremely expensive is factors Proteins that stimulate cells to grow and day cost like a million euro per gram. Unfortunately you need only very very small amounts but still if you start to grow at large scale. This is US prohibitive but I learned pretty quickly that end feed industry in a completely different industry not the biomedical part. But the feed industry people people are making similar proteins with similar technology for five. You're a programmer for Europe Aram. I thought well if we can do that. And I and the price of the cell culture drops tremendously and then we started to look at more components of this feat for cells. And we realized realized that if you source differently and you make it a little bit of a different composition you can actually make these very cheap type of Takashi in two thousand fifteen mark post started his own company called motion meet to continue his quest to develop affordable cellular alert meet at a commercial scale. Today he says the price of a Cell Burger is down to about fifteen eighteen dollars still too expensive song grocery three stores but he hopes to be able to increase meat production to the point. We can offer it in some higher end restaurants but then a couple of years post and Brown a two of the trailblazer. We're trying to address the enormous enormous environmental challenges. We are facing by leading what could be doric transformation in our eating at indeed indeed the biggest dietary revolution since humans for started eating me two point five million years ago. I'm Walter Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Mark Post Sergei Brennan Sergei Brin Dell representative Sergei Britain Walter Walter Isaacson Winston Churchill Dutch government Burger chief scientific officer Sergei US Madison Netherlands Motza Sergei Graham professor Hawaii
"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Abundant protein rich meat native third that we are like basically tender grandkids. AM flavorful meat. Contributes to the wellbeing and strength of people in our country is good and pure Alaska. Paul says links. Thanks take back by the insurance uncle. Sam himself two and a half million years. That's how long it's been since humans. I have been eating meat from animals and wild today. Scientists are warning that we have to stop eating meat. In order to lessen the impact impact of climate change historians tell us was a different period of climate change. That drove us to eat meat. In the first place. Martin's Rosca is the author of Meat hawked the history and science of our two point five million Europe session with meat. So what happens. Two and a half million years ago is that the climate has changed the Savannah where our ancestors lift at the time became aimed drier and hotter and many plant foods that our ancestors were relying on became much less available especially from January to April which was does the particularly dry season so they couldn't basically find the foods and the leaves that they were eating habitually on the other hand would became became more available more abundant was meat because they were suddenly many more grazing animals so with more grazing species there are also more that animal flying around basically so there was meet lying around and our ancestors tried and discovered. It's you know it's good. It's highly caloric full of fat. And they started eating ants. Humans are not actually well suited biologically the meat jaws and teeth. Don't have the strength to bite raw meat of an animal caucus so these earliest meters use primitive tools to cut the meat plus the bones of get it would take hundreds of thousands of years more before we went from being scavengers eating whatever meat we found lying on the ground becoming hunters the most sophisticated tools and then many more thousands of youth before me with Cook over an open fire and all all the while the bodies and minds of those early humans evolved into the modern form. Something that many researchers bleep. You never would've happened. They hadn't been consuming meat and the reason for that is that meat for our ancestors was a very high quality polity food loaded of color because of fat but also full of minerals and vitamins. And because it was such a high quality food could power our brains human brains are very energy inefficient so they only weighed about two percent of our body weight our brains but they they take up to twenty five percent of our resting energy and power such a brain you need a lot of energy and before our ancestors started eating meat they had very big guts because you know digest. Low quality food with lots of fiber for example leaves or grass. You really the really big got. What about when we started eating meat? The food was much denser in calories so the gut could shrink. This freed energetic resources that way used for the growing brain this why some scientists say that's meet made us human by the Middle Ages meet had become a very popular food food but it was a luxury enjoyed mostly by the rich and powerful. Think about the story of Robinhood robinhood. What crime was he being accused of? He allegedly kill the deer and the kings farce presumably so he could share the bounty Johny. What's a common folk? Their Diet was still largely made up plant protein because they were denied access to land where they might be able to hunt game but all that changed when the common folk again to make their way to the new world. Roger Horowitz is the the author of putting meat on the American table taste technology and transformation the early British colonists the ordinary ordinary people came over the speculators. There are people down there look. They're looking for a new start for various reasons. Life in England had not worked out for them and they're looking to do better so they are aspiring people and they come over here and the forest are full of wild game and the cane doesn't own them is there's all sorts of opportunities to eat meat and they love it and the opportunity to forage if the forest opportunity to kill wild animals. Eat them amazing. Amazing to have this opportunity in America meat may not have been a primary driver of settlement in the colonial period nor later on when large numbers of European immigrants came aimed will have chores but it was part of the attraction in the nineteenth century when you have immigrants coming over like the Irish the Germans early nineteenth century. The availability of meat gets commented on the letters that they write home. The Irish especially the idea they can come to New York City in the eighteen forties eighteen fifties after after starving in Ireland and they can eat beef three times a day is astounding. There they write back and people don't believe them. This can't be true. Not It's true we can do that so this is with an immigrant population a laboring population coming at a later. Point that you see this being referenced but it becomes part of the immigrant an experience that they are able to have access to meet by the beginning of the nineteenth century residents of New York City. They were eating about one hundred and fifty pounds of meat per person each year in the nineteen thirties and forties meat consumption except not for lack of one but for lack of access. I because of the Great Depression and then during World War Two when it became came the subject of government rationing but when the good times returned after the war ended so too did Americans appetite. For me Roger Horowitz. They're not able to get meat because they can't there are the money or it's being scarce it all that they haven't done it because they've decided or because you know they've learned or taught something different they just can't get it. It's a frustrated desire. And so so.

Meat Roger Horowitz New York City Robinhood robinhood Alaska Sam Paul England Martin America Cook Europe Ireland
"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Nineteen thirty one was not not a good year in the remarkable career Winston Churchill. His Conservative Party have been defeated two years earlier and he had lost most of his American investments. The stock market crashed so the future British prime minister we cast himself as a right wrote. A couple of hefty historical tone accepted assignments from popular magazine. One of these commissions came from Strand magazine which asked him to write a speculative asset for the December nineteen seventy-one edition on what the world might look like in fifty fifty years judge made dozens of predictions about robots and the triumph man over nature. But perhaps his boldest boldest prognostication was that by nineteen eighty-one people would be eating. Synthetic meet run entirely away. We shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to just eat the breast or the manx he wrote. He predicted elected. These parts could be grown from animal cells. There would no longer be any need to slaughter animals to get meat and those new foods would be practically practically indistinguishable from the real thing. Winston Churchill's prediction seemed like science fiction in nineteen. Thirty one. It but not anymore. It took thirty years longer than he thought but lab me is now here. We're on the cusp of a meatless. Meet.

Winston Churchill Conservative Party Strand magazine prime minister
"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:39 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

"For, I think eight charges altogether possession with intent to distribute cocaine possession of a firearm by non violent offender. Just a slew of charges projo, it was hard to think about anything but the prospect of being locked up, and it was a very depressing time to say the least, I remember I slept for at least the first day and a half, and eat anything. I was sick emotionally and physically sick and not from a drug withdrawal. But from realizing the jobs, you really did it this time. And this could potentially be the end for the Dane, twenty fifteen win Joe got out of prison wasn't any better. You know, the day that I got released was just as scary as the day that I got arrested, realizing that it's going to take. Probably the hardest work in your life. If not the absolute hardest work, and your life to make it out here into not go back eighty three percent of former inmates end up back in prison nine years after they're released Joe didn't want to be one of those people. So he did something new read an article about social media about videos, and I said, you know, maybe that could be something that I could do I could actually come home and his possibly focus on creating videos, to, again, showcase what it's like to come home and to really want to do better Josie. Youtube channel is called the after prison show his videos cover all kinds of topics from how to make a prison tattoo to how to readjust to life outside. Hey skipper,.

Joe drug withdrawal cocaine Youtube Josie eighty three percent nine years
"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So there's a few hypothesis for it a big one is that there may have been a break-up in an asteroid family. So asteroids live in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and sometimes two of these large asteroids or more collide into one another and they get broken down into smaller pieces, and as they absorb heat from the sun and re emit the heat back. They start to shift them their spot. They start to move around and eventually they exit the orbit and they start moving towards the inner solar system so towards the earth and the moon, you can think of it as a landslide slip starting at the top of the mountain and think of the earth and the moon as a house in the Val. Ali. So we see the footprints of those broken pieces of asteroids as craters on the earth and the moon. So something happened. Hundreds of million years ago. All of a sudden, you had more bombardment. Yes. So an asteroid family broke up in they started to move towards the inner solar system, and that that caused more of a bombardment you'd let some people use your data. I understand to create a piece of music that represents these impacts on the moon using sound gives an explanation of what you did. Yes. So system sounds kind enough to take our lunar data and turn it into a video and also into sound. So they've turned the last one billion years the history of the impact of the moon into sound where every note represents the size of an impact crater, and you can hear the frequency of the bombardment and they've been doing more turning into strana me and space data into music..

Ali Val one billion years million years
"million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Five hundred million years ago. There was a major rotation of the earth ninety degrees. And this is this is responsible for all the changes that took place or Eric contributor to the changes that took place on the planet at the time and based on the payload paleo magnetic data. This was a change that took quite some time took many millions of years to occur. But now jumping fast forwarding talk. We're talking about smaller more recent polls shifts, and if you believe Plato as a take it literally as as a source of historical facts. These shifts were were rapid, and and and cataclysmic causing floods volcanic eruptions and so forth. So the hypothesis in Portland is is that these more. Recent polls shifts were were rather rapid and did caused the mayhem and destruction that occurred at the time that is recorded in ancient legend and myth. So what you surmise in your book was that? There was something pretty dramatic in terms of technology before Atlantis if so where might that have been so so the the the the evidence is the these these incredible structures that we find throughout the world. He's stones that are massive hundreds.

Plato Eric Portland Five hundred million years ninety degrees
"million years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on KCRW

"That that means that there's gotta be a technique that's right for every vegetable and i think that a lot of the vegetables that were used to grilling and that would be peppers and eggplants zucchini and potatoes and carrots some root vegetables actually grill better over low heat than over high heat so i think that you know it took me a long time to learn that actually learned it actually quite directly from gary danko who just said it's better to do it this way and he was right some of the things i'm happiest about giving recipes for our for example grilled romain lettuce and grilled ridichio and grilled radishes and grilled turnips and some of the some of the less common vegetables that people don't think of grilling that much that really can be quite fun again when you know when the right technique is used so i remember a million years ago in one of my katina bucks out that's like when the eighties the early nineties doing a recipe for you know grapes stretched in sugar and then put on the grill and people were astounded at this idea that you can grow fruit and now you know grilling for it has become something like a very common way i mean at least here in california to finish off finish off in outdoor grilling session but i must say i have never grilled watermelon and i think that's really smart i mean this is so such a silly thing to say but it starts with the watermelon so to get it right you have to have the right watermelon and you don't always know that when you buy a watermelon so at its worst it's pretty good at its best it's like eating a steak i mean the texture just gets drier and denser but it's kinda sweet and it's chewy and qc well thank you once again for giving us a light of quote food for thought always fun evan sees do now i've been talking to food journalist and cookbook author mark pitman he's the author of more than fifteen bucks including his insanely popular had a cook everything bucks the latest entry is how to grill everything find a link to his grub street article about eating healthy on the good food website coming up the business of beef we're talking all about it with third generation butcher katie flannery stay with us.

gary danko california evan mark pitman katie flannery million years
"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"I go back when i was eighteen years old in a million years we were different that's a holy dip that's not fair what do you mean you wouldn't have done it dan wouldn't have done it i talked to ross about it he wouldn't have done it i don't know a man out there how about our guests in a million years you're eighteen which you have had your wouldn't want her taker i i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids having part because that's what you were bragging about i i want to ask you go ahead would you want him driving her home if he felt uncomfortable driving in winter weather like no i wouldn't want her take i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids had too much to drink and they called and said that's a completely at home you save let's stick to this then you bring it into infinite we're drinking if you let me finish i'll tell you what i mean it's the same thing when it comes to judge judgment he felt uncomfortable driving in the snow what i meant was it's the same thing for judgment when kids are drinking too much or if kids feel tired or if they're not feeling good and if he was having a seizure i'd want her to call to it's got nothing to do with the case at hand though it has to do with judgment i feel would you have ever done it well what difference does that make a no i okay maybe it goes down to okay who see dating an eighteen year old in eighteen year old that takes her out and can't get her home maybe that's the whole route of this that's an issue.

dan ross eighteen year million years two days eighteen years
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"We're to a southern complicated were do workers of your that make fifty million dollars if you get it right but my team is still i'm telling they're still europe do you i you know this beginners come in the boxing gym do they want to learn the fundamentals some those on the northern countries one of west berlin that guy at he has pulp provisional five rally that the start of lima could take him her case this try it come on one thirty seconds or hold on let him go yeah because unity of guys dig dealer near bashes you can have learned the hard way by i i make sure that they sign a waiver because you know every time they want in the news agency you keep it simple people try to it's funny in my in my boxing jim everybody goes straight to the speed bay because it again at the end in the goal is why people like you know really what makes you win a boxing finest conditioning always so do you should job growth for 30 minute but every blade once the fancy thing we caused the marketing bureau at target dole multi it's what i was actually listened to bloomberg not bloomberg business radio and satellite serious last night driving all annuals i they were talking about split testing and just hours going yes split test ended aboard and i knew split testing but everything take i'll put it this way everything it takes you to make a million dollars a year keeper is there's not one thing that's not common sense there is no trick just like the industry fight it's like you just punched the dude in those fast and horror with your right hand give your right hand it your left hand with your left is like on that end dole grabbing every graf you.

lima news agency dole europe berlin boxing bloomberg fifty million dollars one thirty seconds million dollars 30 minute
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Are the easy to go along with the show up a common sense common sense common sense concert so if you're interested in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and wanna learn how to make money with bitcoin opening up a brand new bitcoin crypto academy for you crypto is starting to fundamentally change everything from currencies to the very structure behind the internet if you don't understand it you will be left behind remember if you had put one hundred dollars in bitcoin in 2010 you would have over a hundred million dollars right now i don't want you miss out on the coming opportunities offered by bitcoin in the cryptocurrency space so i brought in the best experts in the game the people that are teaching me in training me and i'm gonna share that with you because it's not too late to understand bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and the block chain and to make money with it so to sign up for my new bitcoin crypto academy on learn how to invest how to make money in this new exciting safes i'm an open up room for a few of you early access to the new online mentor mastermind so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast to learn more so i'm testing the mastermind so i'm just going to let a few of you in at a low price and it's already filling up quickly so if you want to get in i'll let a few of you in so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast all one word bilo busy dot com slash bitcoin podcast if the course disclosed when you get to the page put in your name in the waiting list you missed out on the first round uh in if you see it welcome to the group glad you didn't procrastinate okay back to the show.

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Elle one key dancing and over no room vis getting killed we're working on trying to get a split test conversion funnel doing better and people come up with esoteric theories of everything i'm like how can i just keep this so simple and so we just went through the seven steps that people are going to be i are products and we're like is this one broken no no no yes and then you start there this one those debts are up but he's not complicated i promise you oh comes razor a thousand over a thousand euro about a thousand euro principle from william will open it just means you you don't know what's wrong in life picked the simplest solution so you're in a street fight you don't know what to do yes you can do a flying arm bar occasionally flight you all the number one thing that wins in a ufc fight the most fights areas or rear naked choke you get behind the person and you attack their neck the next the weakest part of the body even the strongest guy me elite neck and carotid artery if you go like this for about seven seconds you go to sleep so when you're gloves on a street fight on gloves what hurts more but his estry fight upon straight pont right to the knows where the gene puts people to sleep that's it that's why guy you got a big strong right hand or a great ability to get behind who you win a fight same when business you just got on a few things out of thing through things correctly marketing accounting you need to have sown stands that have higher people as important debut mahanta ira maho this personal i've done that before the author hell a little simple system was the simplisafe system to hire people would you if would you date or mary this person is in that in a romantic steadied give the answer is no the you to supply that businesses somebody i want to go for longterm on a loyal honest simple things that you learn in elementary school about people are they sharp are they lazy elese crossing off bullets.

mary ufc seven seconds
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"So agassi there's a few times that i use it but mostly there's a few times of buddy shut them because they try to hold onto you especially in speed five you get up you do on here so the whole so when i now what exactly is all this is legal in business i'm telling you i mean people i higher be will be employed that think they need these complicated things but they really for everything they supposedly moved you four they distract you to steps one step forward to just back you basically need for your workstation one big monitor unless you're hedge fund trader or some complicated than one bad asked iphone eplus this is i don't like mac computers but on light 'cause i i don't care i'm up i'm simple all cure app that apple everything are you the do jimmy that's gotta wear are you are you will height beasts you gotta have brave shirt dan tan bates bay boxer the no you can you can vary and up to apple guy the guy gives shit about learn as corporation the world's apple a i things better than the ten because it's a bigger screen end up it's simpler you don't have the weird thing you know like it's a disease in europe look how big it is almost like a little ipad then you get one bad ask monitor deputies the i've got my seven teenage there one keyboard one mouse that go simple eu go back and forth main thing you don't internet go back and forth.

jimmy apple agassi iphone mac europe
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Yes refi upon straight pont right to the knows or the gin puts people to sleep that's a that's one guy you got a big strong right hand or a great ability to get behind you you win a fight same when business you just got on a few things kind of things through things frankly marketing accounting you need to house owns does that how hire people are so important thing we will know how to ira miles this person would have done that before the yep hell a little simple system we're talking about productivity my team insists that is to monitor set up and this isn't even about two monitors ricki we are talking about the power of simplicity you ever see these karate movies were gonna in these don't do that just know is a professional boxing train at warfare tang's how many places do you really need to know to win a fight how many fights have you been profession add three none on a very slow ratified it 38 how many have you lost one why do lose it that was taken off pusher so you got a fancy adjustment has changed so thirty issue fight you're from the means streets central america right under is and i van ice california how many punched different type of punches did it take you to win thirty seven on science flavor hell's powerful my favorite hacked so you just get a good straight right here in dg jab ever i know he's my my jab always through a right hand because i know that was my the hardest punch so you just aren't at the fight both tested nsa as a body or to the video which featured a face as well who does that mean dane when you where you're out of street fighter that's the main thing you both or if you are smart fighter domi you start using the jab and land follow over the right and so now.

tang street fighter professional boxing america
"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

"I get up on stage in front of evil goal i can think about his birthday laughed at me be you menu her fearless don't care are not going to happen for you not in a million years after that town which we could just make our own moving at great idea from but may have renewed the wheel of a renewed weekly yone help no no dedicated no amendments is me is going to last through this review radio i'm i'm going to tell you i kompyang sacrifice will you guys do it do it i with tool the and a promise you i did not reveal that movie i did not reveal them i did not i didn't i a high toast these review of eu now though we are talking about the movie the disaster artis under the disaster art is manned people in in la they were terrorized by this back rain for about two years the man who has got their vet party lumad over the channelling west rather than i just star wars you bet everybody wanted for two years what is this thing called room the billboard was up they're telling people go see there was even a number of inviting people to go see the movie and at the time there wasn't even a trailer for people see on the internet letting them know what they were getting into a lotta people just with to see it out of curiosity and when they got in their they said it was probably the biggest what the fuck but the big is happy is what the fuck moment a glorious accident if ever there was to be a perfect world.

eu la two years million years