35 Burst results for "Million Years"

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 2 d ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 d ago

Palm oil labor abuses linked to world’s top brands, banks

"The two international an Associated latest farms government Olympic Press developing investigation committee figures president cope show has with Thomas an the unusually nineteen found Bach vaccines high delivered an number invisible a pep of say Americans talk workforce pharmaceutical to Japanese are still some companies government of the seeking poorest are officials trying unemployment corners and to local give of organizers aid the Asia public as much toilet about the information in labor the the palm reschedule department as possible oil says industry twenty eight about hundred twenty the testing seventy one many regimes Tokyo of them thousand and during games as drug various people makers in Bach the U. forms talked S. and filed about public of exploitation the reason health for jobless for officials the postponement benefits including last child seek the corona to week boost labor virus confidence pandemic a high that figure rights any he approved slavery that says proves the vaccine vaccines the corona and will should viruses be allegations be safe ready for still the games of squeezing AstraZeneca rape next many summer CEO businesses in there Pascal Malaysia will be hundreds Soriot and including Indonesia I'm of Paul millions restaurants Stoffels these airlines workers of chief doses and hotels scientific tend the heavy officer of reddish the Johnson number being orange and of Johnson people available palm who are oil continuing say already fruit that they recognize to in that the receive makes first the unemployment its half corona way into virus off benefits emergency the for supply chains demands dropped all for increase of to many twelve the transparency iconic point next six food million year from bokeh and that banks total cosmetics few and developers details is steadily companies to but declined ensure said the that IOC over the like public many Unilever has months has faith been in contact in l'oreal the an end indication with the product World Nestle that Health some Organization of the and unemployed Procter they stressed other and experts or however being gamble rehired that there an are limits unnamed Gemma to and the tentacles that pharmaceutical information others the they have rainforest can used release companies up their action jobless because we're sitting they network must aid protect together about says patient in the half industry one confidentiality of the vote jobs has been that built were initially on and the backbone the integrity lost the of human when only the corona of thing trafficking the virus we scientific have to struck do not expect research always have set they'll been talk recovered to roll back sorry buying it says of my modern camp ultimately slavery in in the Washington same the direction public and will it's have surveys been to built trust show on the a back majority regulators buying of Japanese all around of these companies the world companies and the public and being the independent out don't of violate think the experts Olympics human will rights happen that norms next oversee year left or drug should right and trials center happen with I'm no consequence a Donahue there is shockingly London it's virtually impossible to avoid often disguised on labels as an ingredient listed by more than two hundred names I'm sorry shockingly

Bach offers pep session for Tokyo Games and talks up vaccine

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

Bach offers pep session for Tokyo Games and talks up vaccine

"The two international latest farms government Olympic developing committee figures president cope show with Thomas an the unusually nineteen Bach vaccines high delivered number a pep of say Americans talk pharmaceutical to Japanese are still companies government seeking are officials trying unemployment and to local give organizers aid the public as much about the information labor the reschedule department as possible says twenty eight about hundred twenty the testing seventy one regimes Tokyo thousand games as drug people makers in Bach the U. talked S. and filed about public the reason health for jobless for officials the postponement benefits last seek the corona to week boost virus confidence pandemic a high that figure any he approved that says proves the vaccine vaccines the corona will should viruses be be safe ready for still the games squeezing AstraZeneca next many summer CEO businesses there Pascal will be hundreds Soriot including I'm of Paul millions restaurants Stoffels airlines of chief doses and hotels scientific officer of the Johnson number being and of Johnson people available who are continuing say already that they recognize to in the receive first the unemployment half corona virus off benefits emergency for demands dropped all for increase to twelve the transparency point next six million year from bokeh that banks total few and developers details is steadily to but declined ensure said the that IOC over the public many has months has faith been in contact in the an end indication with the product World that Health some Organization of the unemployed they stressed other experts or however being rehired that there an are limits unnamed to and the that pharmaceutical information others they have can used release companies up their jobless because we're sitting they must aid protect together about patient in half one confidentiality of the vote jobs that were initially and the integrity lost the when only the corona of thing the virus we scientific have to struck do not research always have set been recovered to roll sorry it says my camp ultimately in in the Washington same the direction public will have surveys to trust show a majority regulators of Japanese around companies the world and the public and the independent don't think the experts Olympics will happen that next oversee year or drug should trials happen I'm a Donahue there is shockingly London

Thomas Astrazeneca Pascal Stoffels Airlines Officer IOC Donahue London President Trump CEO Paul Johnson Washington
Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

Toure Show

04:25 min | 4 d ago

Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

"I watched the film twice because. It was compelling and I kind of had to like see it a second time after I've seen the twist and all that Sorta good stuff So a lot to talk about why this film now. Well, you know. We'd like to say that it was it was strategic but it but it wasn't about. SIX MONTHS DR moved to La for Miami I had this horrific nightmare that I think. was probably precipitated by the death of my father. Bit, less than a year prior that I was having some problems processing. And in this nightmare. This woman who was eating. was so desperate for help that it felt as though she was screaming across dimensions to reach anybody. And when I when I awoke from the nightmare. It didn't feel like anything that I had experienced before. It was within the the Brandon category of what would you call dream or nightmare, but it definitely felt like something other worldly like an ancestral visitation. And the next day Christian from I talked about it and ended up writing the short story because that's our process. And the natural writing the short story. We wrote the script that is now a antebellum. So you know for us as part of the work that we've done up to this moment, we've always felt like. All of the work that we were presenting or that we're trying to percent. Of that, there was an urgency of now and that that. The world in America has been. Careening. Toward disaster. And so yeah I mean we we never imagined in a million years that anything that we would create would be just for entertainment sake but that it is it is art. To, activate into catalyze a national dialogue around a host of issues. Not least of which is race in America. But without finger-wagging. you guys are co directors right and that's unusual to my experience and the last pair of CO directors. I remember the Hughes Brothers where there was a clear delineation of like I do this sort of stuff. I, this sort of stuff is there a division of labor or you guys kind of like one? Group. We pretty much. You know act as one onset were always together in the same space, which is super important because otherwise you know production designer or Qassams Zainur will come up to one of US nasty question we have to kind of be central in the same place but. What what helps us as a directing duo is that were also writing duo so that we kind of are able to have all of those knock down drag out. Battles on the creative in our own home. As writing the by the time we get onset we really have one vision at were were super. I mean within the duo is there a division? Is there I'm a little bit more this. I'm a little bit more that. I think. We've been together for twelve years and so we speak a telepathic shorthand. I don't know that we could be objective in saying that one is a little bit more this or that I think. I think. An outside observer would have to get you that answer as far as we're concerned we are we are. It's Qismat and we're we're we're certainly would have connected on on levels that feel we normal most writer director. duos were also a couple. So it's like everything is really on. Utilized.

America LA Hughes Brothers Qassams Zainur United States Miami Writer Director.
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

60-Second Science

03:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Some Dinosaurs Probably Nested in Arctic

"Those vicious predatory dinosaurs that tended to be fairly small as six to nine ten feet. Long snout to tail there. Certainly in the Jurassic. Park movies the things that terrorize people Anthony Fiorello a paleontologist at southern Methodist University in Dallas Texas for more than two decades. Now, Fiorello has been digging a dinosaur fossils, hundreds of miles north of the Arctic Circle in Alaska. So one of the fundamental questions about dinosaurs in Alaska. In the ancient Arctic is, did they live there all year round did they migrate? How did they get their a recent discovery sheds light on those questions this fossil that's the subject study is a baby dinosaur, the baby predatory dinosaur, and it is a baby. It's not just juvenile and given the size estimate of this thing. This probably was not far from where the nesting ground was. So this is the first physical proof. Alley some dinosaurs nested in the ancient Arctic some of the first Arctic dinosaur remains ever found were discovered back in the nineteen sixties in Svalbard, an archipelago north of mainland Norway. Since then researchers have theorized, the dinosaurs must have migrated to avoid deeply cold winters but Fiorello says this new discovery disproves that idea for you know the classic stereotype for dinosaurs is that had been. that they were living in sub tropical environments oftentimes, somewhat swampy if you look at various artwork over generations, that was quite often how these dinosaurs were reconstructed. In reality the climate north of Alaska's Brooks range seventy million years ago was similar to what we might see today in Portland, Oregon or Calgary Alberta. Certainly a place where. Things were cooler. Or who were capable of being cool at times but certainly warmer than the the Arctic today, the fossil find is a piece of jawbone with a tooth from Dromaeosaur Fiorello and colleagues unearthed it along the banks of the call. They'll river not too far from the Arctic Ocean. The bone is the first non dental evidence of that species in the far north the researchers report their discovery in the journal plus one. Of course questions remain. How did they do what they did because even with the warmer temperatures at the latitude, the thieves dinosaurs were living, which is at least seventy degrees north if not even farther nor. Do they endure long periods of light and dark, and that's where the research will go next for now Fiorello says the new discovery proves that these giant reptiles were well adapted to the highly seasonal environments of the late Cretaceous that we still experience today in the Arctic.

Dromaeosaur Fiorello Arctic Arctic Ocean Alaska Arctic Circle Jurassic Southern Methodist University Norway Dallas Texas Calgary Oregon Portland Alberta
Teyana Taylor welcomes baby with Iman Shumpert, gives birth in bathroom — again

The Breakfast Club

01:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Teyana Taylor welcomes baby with Iman Shumpert, gives birth in bathroom — again

"Team on Shumpert. Auntie Anna Taylor. They had their baby. Really? Okay, that the baby share like couple days ago. Right? I know so much temperate. Posted at 3:28 A.m. On September 6 2020 Rose decided the baby shower throne for her and mommy was tulip. She didn't make the party, but she managed to make the next day, her birthdate. Now when we buy homes, we always find a bathroom with great energy. But not in a million years. Would you be able to tell me we deliver both of our daughters in the bathroom without the assistance of a hospital, our newest addition into the world in the water and came out looking around and ready to explore a healthy towels. A little sister. Another daughter, Black Love wins again. Welcome, baby girl. We love you, baby clothes bombs was the name dropping clues. Bombs for rules and Shumpert, Deana Martin. I did Eric about do get there to be the Dola. The question I would like to know. Remember, Tina said Erica was gonna do it. I saw the Erica actually posted about it. And I posted about the birth. I'm trying to see if that post said that she was actually there because she was saying it's a perfect little baby. Hold on. Let me pull up her post her right now. She said. Welcome, baby. Rosiana Tiller. They did that. Thank you both for allowing me to assist. So yes. Beautiful. First face. You see our voices, Erica Badu.

Erica Badu Auntie Anna Taylor Shumpert Rosiana Tiller Deana Martin Eric Tina Dola
What Made the Prehistoric 'Hell Ant' So Diabolical?

BrainStuff

02:24 min | 3 weeks ago

What Made the Prehistoric 'Hell Ant' So Diabolical?

"Hey brains of is Christian, Sager here fire ants, carpenter ants, bull ants there. A lot of ant species that can cause a great deal of harm. The worst one alive today about two Guinness World. Records is the bulldog ant. It has killed at least three human some within fifteen minutes. But perhaps, the worst aunt ever was the hell aunt, a prehistoric insect that was recently discovered encased in a chunk of Myanmar amber dating to the late. Cretaceous period evolutionary. Biologist Phillip Barden of the Jersey Institute of Technology and his team wrote about the Hell Aunt discovery in the journal systemic entomology. The hell aunt got its name from its anatomy and behavior instead. Of having a typical mouth, the hell aunt had blades that stuck upward think like tusks plus a horn that was reinforced with metal scientists don't know for sure how the hell used. It's unusual appendages but they have some theories i. it clear that the ants tusks and horn were mainly used for catching prey. So here's one possible mo when it came to finding dinner when a tasty insect passed nearby the hell aunts jaw tusks would flip the insect up an onto its horn impaling it spearing prey does take a toll though which is probably why the Hell Lance Horn was clad with metal and if that isn't gruesome, enough researchers say this prehistoric insect. Some vampire like tendencies two when the ant snagged its prey, it's Tusk like jaws close to form a gutter, which may have been a means of funneling the insects blood right down into the ants. Gullit, the Helen scientifically known as Lingua Mir Mex- vladi was discovered in chunk of amber that was ninety, nine, million years old although it's unusual appendages were likely used to catch its food researchers say they may have occasionally been used defensively. This is not the only insect sporting metal either some present day termite species actually have zinc and manganese in their manuals. However, there are no modern ants similarly equipped.

Lance Horn Lingua Mir Mex- Vladi Sager Phillip Barden Myanmar Jersey Institute Of Technology Gullit Cretaceous
Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

"Our solar system is far from the only way to put together stars and their planets. They feel look at all the stars in our galaxy the Milky Way. More than a half of the stars are forming multiples meaning that there are more than once tar in system astrophysicist. Jay. Han. Bay of the Carnegie Institution for Science he has studied one of those systems with three stars. It's called GW Orion is and it's freshly formed on the a million years old. Yeah. It's really really young. Yeah. It's a baby bay says if you translate that million year lifespan. To that of a human, it's the equivalent of a week old baby and how many week old babies do bump into. If you just walk around your neighborhood, there's really little chance that you me the baby weighs one week old right. So first of all, it's hard to find these systems. They are pretty rare ban. His colleagues got lucky spotting this one using radio telescopes they were able to image the. Star system and they say, it differs from our own solar system in more than just star account in our solar system. For example, all eight planets orbit the sun more or less in a single plane. Think of the Sun as the center of a vinyl record with the planets strung out along the grooves in contrast as team discovered that the stars in this triple star system are ringed by clouds of. Dust in multiple warped and misaligned planes picture three-dimensional gyroscope rather than a two dimensional vinyl record. The observations in the journal Science those rings of dust will presumably go on to form planets as the star system matures and base as astronomers have indeed observed other more mature star systems with planets orbiting in these misaligned planes, and we want each under tenth if that happens at the time those planets worn or. Some evolutionary thing over you know billion years, the findings suggest that weirdly aligned planetary systems are born that way and that stars in their embryonic planets can be all topsy turvy even in their infancy.

Carnegie Institution For Scien JAY
Science briefs from around the world

60-Second Science

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Science briefs from around the world

"Hi, I'm scientific American Assistant News Editor Sarah Frazier, and here's a short piece from the August. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called it. He dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits And it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From Canada a new study models how gigantic morphing Blob of liquid iron in Earth's outer core underneath the Canadian Arctic is losing its grip on the north magnetic pole a second intensifying. Blah below Siberia is pulling the poll away. From Scotland, a geologic dating efforts suggests the fossil of millipedes creature found on the island of Cara formed four hundred, twenty, five, million years ago making it possibly the oldest known fossilized land animal older land animals have been spotted indirectly through preserve tracks. From Tanzania researchers discovered Africa's largest ever collection a fossilized human footprints left in volcanic mud about ten thousand years ago. Many of them came from a group of Seventeen people mostly women all walking in the same direction. From Norway archaeologists excavating a twenty meter. Viking ship buried below farmers field to stop a would eating fungus from destroying it. Ground penetrating radar had found the ship in two thousand eighteen and a new woods sample analysis revealed that could not be preserved underground. From Zambia in Mongolia. Spring satellite tagged Kuku completed an epic twelve thousand kilometer journey from one country to the other. It had originally been tagged in Mongolia in two thousand nineteen and traverse sixteen countries in his round trip migration. From Antarctica, scientists found that King Penguin excrement releases nitrous oxide also known as laughing gas. It forms a soil bacteria eat the droppings nitrogen rich compounds.

Twenty Twenty Mongolia Sarah Frazier Nitrous Oxide News Editor Tanzania Siberia Norway Canada Cara Scotland Africa Antarctica Zambia Kuku
What's the Largest Lake in the World?

BrainStuff

05:09 min | Last month

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

"Siberia's Lake Cal is not your average. Lake. At forty, nine miles wide by three hundred and ninety, five miles long that seventy, nine by six, hundred and thirty, five kilometers. It's the world's largest freshwater lake and with history that dates back twenty, five, million years it's also Earth's oldest. But size and age aren't the only things that make this. Lake. Special. Lake by cow is also home to more than three thousand, seven, hundred different species, many of which are only found in the Baikal region. That's why by cows often considered the Galapagos of Russia. No in case it's bio-diversity doesn't dazzle you here's another but Julia fact. Lake by cow has its own version of the Loch ness monster. Its name translates to water dragon master and it's described as a giant sturgeon with a prominent stout, an armored plating along the back. The monsters history goes back centuries with ancient carvings depicting this terrifying creature. Interest peaked we thought. So here's a starter guide to this ancient beautiful and mysterious late, which is by the way a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lake Baikal is located in southern Russia near the border of Mongolia, its depth of five thousand, three, hundred feet about one thousand, six, hundred meters makes it the world's deepest lake about five hundred feet or two hundred meters it's also famous for its clarity of water and ice. When the lake is frozen, you can see dozens of meters or hundreds of feet down. And as we said at the top, it's also the world's largest lake that size twelve, thousand, two, hundred, square miles, or thirty one, thousand, six, hundred square kilometers makes it comparable in volume to the entire Amazon Basin? A first scale? It reportedly takes about three hundred and thirty years for single water molecule to flow from inlet to inlet. So. How did like by cow get so massive About twenty, five, million ago lake by CAL formed through fractures and shifting within Earth's crust. It wasn't Lake Baikal as we know it. Now, though experts believe it was a series of lakes similar to the Great Lakes in the United States while scientists aren't positive how lake by CAL went for many lakes to the behemoth. It is today they do have theories. It could have been sinking earth erosion earthquakes or increased water from melting glaciers although it's likely a mix of these factors and more. That unifying change took place in the pleasing epoch about five point three to two point five million years ago. But this lake isn't finished growing. It's expanding at a rate of about point seven inches to centimeters every year at the same speed at which Africa in South America are drifting apart. At this speed, some scientists believe lake by Baikal is actually an ocean in the making. The lake boasts twenty-seven islands, the largest of which spans two, hundred, eighty square miles or seven, hundred, twenty, five square kilometers and has its own lake mountains and the population of fifteen hundred residents. The locals connected to power van underwater cable in two, thousand and five, and we're connected to the Internet shortly after. Some Call Lake by Cao, the Galapagos of Russia not only because it has an impressive array of those nearly four thousand species but also because eighty percent of those animals are found nowhere else. One reason for this unique biodiversity is the lakes. Array of hydrothermal vents which are commonly found in oceans but lake by cow is the only freshwater lake known to have them. Cold water from the lake enters cracks in the Earth's crust through these hydrothermal vents. When the water reaches magma, it heats up, then returns resurfacing with minerals and heat. These rich minerals are probably the reason some of the lakes most unusual species were able to develop including several unique fish and the nerpa seal species, which is the only exclusively freshwater seal species in the world and its evolution is mysterious and some scientists believe it arrived by a prehistoric river from the Arctic But beyond seals fish other common animals found in the forests and mountains surrounding Lake Baikal include. Elk. Reindeer links wild-boar, and of course, the lakes frequently reported water dragon master. And this ancient lake has another air of mystery about it. UFO sightings. Many locals have reported strange lights and alien spacecraft throughout the years and several Soviet era documents mention ufo instance in sightings around Earth's largest lake. However for all of its natural wonder, amazing wildlife end stranger sides for lake cows one hundred, thousand permanent residents it's simply home. Made, occupations are forestry agriculture, fisheries, hunting, and tourism though that's currently on hold due to covid nineteen. Here's hoping they opened back up soon.

Call Lake Lake Baikal Lake Cal Russia Galapagos Unesco World Heritage Site Siberia CAL Julia Great Lakes Loch Ness Monster Amazon Basin Mongolia South America United States Africa
Strange, 'Long-Lost' Elephant Shrew Has Been Rediscovered in Africa After 50 Years

Morning Edition

02:16 min | Last month

Strange, 'Long-Lost' Elephant Shrew Has Been Rediscovered in Africa After 50 Years

"For half a century and recently found again. It's called an elephant shrew. Now that name is deceiving, because this isn't an elephant, Nor is it a shrew. The little creature can be described like this. It's a teeny tiny relative oven aren't barking an elephant. That's the size of a mouse. Stephen Heritage, a Duke University researcher who worked on the expedition, says another name for the creature is the Somali Cendy, although it was not found in Somalia, But rather in neighboring Djibouti, the Somali sandy can fit in the palm of your hand. It's got a pointy nose in these large, adorable eyes. In science. We call them charismatic microphone. A which in lay speak translates toe cute little animal. Glad there's a scientific term for that Now. The last time the creature was documented by researchers was 1968, so it's been a minute There's a lot to catch up on. We know now that it is for sure, a rock dwelling sang. It didn't have to be that we know that it has foot drumming behavior as one of its communication behaviors. So we have some basic knowledge Now. People also have that foot foot drumming communication. Don't they Heritages teammate from Djibouti Who's saying Raila hopes this news will bring Mork on conservation efforts to the country? Now the international community will have a nice on our Brian diversity. And this is the importance ofthe this suspicious for acts. Though some information about the Somali, Sandy is relatively new. It has a really long history. This is an endemic lineage of African mammals has a history on the African continent. It goes back at least 45 million years, possibly much longer, And we know that it shares a common ancestor with the elephants in the art barks and golden moles and 10 Rex and these are really the true endemic African mammals with a long lineage. All of these other mammals that end up in Africa with you know, lions and giraffes and zebras. They don't appear until after the Miocene. About 20 million years ago. Somali sang You cannot be taken off the global wildlife conservation list of lost species.

Sandy Somalia Djibouti Africa Duke University Miocene Stephen Heritage Researcher Raila
Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

60-Second Science

01:56 min | Last month

Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

"Of millions of years ago. Reptilian predators called it. Swam the sees their fossils look fearsome but paleobiologist real SUITCA. Motani. Of UC, Davis says, they may have looked more like friendly dolphins maybe in life he feels might have been cute. But at least the smaller ones Martinis team studied one such specimen found in southwest China. It was two hundred and forty million years old fifteen feet long but it seemed to have some extra bones in it, which Montana's team termed to be the remains of a thirteen foot long the ladder sore or see lizard the this or had swallowed and spoiler alert the only reason they were able to see this animal in the belly of the or is that this gigantic meal never got digested the sword died soon after swallowing it. Motamed is careful to say they're not sure exactly why the theus or perished, but the specimen has a broken neck. So he gave a speculative play by play. Perhaps he says the source snapped at the C. Lizard, but the Lizard fought back and the Pike in between the two fierce probably. So the the or fought to subdue its prey damaging its neck in the process then it had dislodged the praised bony head entail from it's juicy midsection. Now, the have to do it through jerking. And twisting like the crocodiles do also bad for the neck and finally the sore had to swallow the animal perhaps using inertia show or gravity to shove the prey down its gullet and the two things are by the kind it was ingested maybe the neck damage was accumulated to certain level and maybe the Knicks could not support the head details of that ancient battle appear in the journal Science. In the reason why this analysis matters is you can only and I so much about who by looking at teeth this fossil offers direct evidence that these ancient beasts sometimes bit off a whole lot more than they could chew.

Davis Knicks China Montana UC Motamed
The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

Environment: NPR

02:23 min | Last month

The Evolutionary History Of Penguins Is Far From Black And White

"The image of a penguin might bring to mind an endless march across windswept ice. The reality of penguins is a bit different says Grant Ballard of point blue conservation science was actually see species of Pangolin. Really, love, it's only two species. Many others live in warmer waters. So we're could conceivably dealing with something like minus seven degrees or even colder than out. Then, show, but lobby goes mainland has encountered temperatures that are up around one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. So how'd it penguins evolve with such different lifestyles and new study and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has some answers we've been able to resolve. Several. Longstanding questions about penguin evolution in particular way penguins originated. Hurry Bowie of UC Berkeley as an author on that study. He says there's been a long debate about where the first penguins evolved was it Antarctica or farther north in New Zealand as others have suggested, well armed with genetic evidence from a species of modern day penguins his team has an answer which turned out to be along the coast of Australia and New Zealand the nearby islands of the South Pacific. They say that happened around twenty two million years ago from there, the penguin served on a circular current at the bottom of the world there is a clockwise current. And so they use this current colonized like. The region Juliana of the Catholic. University. Of Chile is a CO author. She says, eleven million years ago that current revved up and penguins used it to slingshot themselves throughout the Southern Hemisphere. That's right. slingshot. The researchers also observed genetic adaptations. Some penguins picked up along the way like the ability to drink seawater also changes in how some species use oxygen allowing them to dive deep that doesn't mean. Penguins will be quick to adapt to modern day climate change. Here's Valley. Again, this adaptation to being able to occurring freezing cold waters in tropical waters occurred over a period of twenty million years, and this doesn't mean that penguins are going to be able to keep up with oceans warming today. If there is one thing, the paper makes clear. It's that the evolution of penguins for from black and

Penguins National Academy Of Sciences Bowie Grant Ballard Pangolin Chile New Zealand Southern Hemisphere Berkeley South Pacific Australia
Misplaced Science

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:35 min | Last month

Misplaced Science

"Night Welcome to kids Miss Mystery Cyber your host kit chrome today. I'm going to talk about how some Mistakes made it into text books and I'm going to start with the woolly mammoth arose about five point one million years ago in Africa according to the curator of the American Museum of Natural History in New York from Africa the mammoth migrated through Eurasia North America their evolution continued over millions of years eventually producing what we know now as the wooly mammoth beginning roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand years ago. mammoths were extinct about ten thousand years ago. OOPS more like three, thousand, five, hundred years ago scientists now believe an isolated population of mammoth persisted on Wrangel Island off the northeastern coast of Siberia. And deep in Canada's Northwest Territories, World Heritage site in hunt, valley until about three thousand, seven, hundred years ago. Unfortunately, the ten thousand year mark of extinction is in most textbooks. But let's take a closer look at that date the prominent theory that made it into most textbooks. Encyclopedia's remember those was ten thousand years ago because it was believed for decades at the mammoth migrated from the African continent through. Eurasian North America, driven by the last ice age, they were following the food supply. If that's the case, then it makes sense that some moms ended up into Hani because it was never touched by. The last ice age and yes bone. So the mammoth have been found in that region but this isn't the first theory published in Texbook. As fact that there's some founded expend believed and yes, made it into text books that the continent of Antarctica has been covered by ice for millions of years again hoops the Perry reese map drawn in fifteen thirteen shows the northern coast of Arctic as ice-free. The most puzzling aspect of the map isn't how it managed to be. So accurate three hundred years before Antarctica was discovered but that the map shows the real Coche line under the ice geological evidence. has confirmed that the latest date and Artika could have been charted in an ice free ages. Four thousand BC officials sciences been saying all along the ice cap, which covers yet arctic is millions of years old the Perry reese at Arctic map shows, but the northern part of that continent has been mapped before the ice covered it. That could make us think it has been mapped a million years ago but that's impossible since mankind did not exist at that time further and more accurate studies have proven that the last period of ice free condition and already got ended about six thousand years ago. The question is who map Queen Maud land at Arctic six thousand years ago which unknown civilization, how the technology or the need to do that I wanNA touch on just one more scientific nestled in the ancient city of Komo. Polka Bolivia are stone blocks that were used to make up a series of Pyramids Wayne from two hundred to four hundred tons each block nothing unusual there the city dates back to five, thirty, six AD. Yet. The blocks are riddled with carved indentations and in the surrounding grasses were found. Staple shaped clamps that fit in place were used to hold the blocks together. How could the indigenous people? No knowledge of urgency have created these clamps and where did the metal they use come from? This isn't the only case of metal clamps being used to hold giants don't together in Cambodia's anchor watt giant sandstone blocks way nearly two tonnes were brought to the site of the temple from nearby mountain via series of waterways. Close inspection of stones that are scattered around the site have revealed carved indentation receptacles for metal clamps perhaps. How about an eerie coincidence just outside the magnificent ruins of anger what stands an ancient pyramid temple known as backseat clump core now from Cambodia. Travel over eight thousand miles to Guatemala in the ancient Mayan city of Tacoma all among the long forgotten structures at the call is the Temple of the Great Jaguar although the Cambodian pyramid is much smaller than the pyramid in Guatemala the similarities between the specific design features are uncanny both. These pyramids both these ancient structures have an unusually steep slope angle that didn't exist in many other pyramids or temples however, and perhaps most importantly they both feature a stepped formation. There's a massive stairwell going up the middle of both temples and there's a domed area located on the top of both once there you can see there's a small door that goes inside the pyramid on both and there's another internal structure that looks the same. Basically what you have here is an ancient civilization. Cambodia. Another one in Mesoamerica despite the fact that they are separated by more than nine thousand miles, they feature incredible similarities that no one not even science has been able to explain

Cambodia Arctic Antarctica Africa Wrangel Island Guatemala Canada American Museum Of Natural His Polka Bolivia North America New York Perry Reese Hani World Heritage Texbook Pyramids Wayne Mesoamerica Artika BC
Why Is a Brain-Shaped Blob In Canada?

BrainStuff

03:10 min | Last month

Why Is a Brain-Shaped Blob In Canada?

"Stuff. This is Krista. Sager. lagoons are famous for creepy swamp preachers but in Canadian Park in Vancouver British, Columbia scientists have found something possibly just as outlandish a slimy gelatinous brain blob. Well, okay. It's not really a brain and it's not really even an it. It's a collection of tiny creatures collectively called a magnificent bryozoans or also known by its Latin name as Pectin Tele. MAGNIFICO this colony forms a brain shaped mass can grow to be larger than a human head and I think we can all agree that's a really weird now bryozoans sometimes, they're also called Maas animals there an. Ancient Group of filter feeders. The earliest fossil evidence of one of these colonies can be dated back about four hundred, seventy, million years individually each tiny invertebrate called Zo Lloyd Ken just barely be seen with the naked eye it's only about half a millimeter or about point zero, two inches long. But when hundreds of them assemble, they can glue themselves together with a special protein to form all sorts of shapes, sheets, columns, and even branched tree like structures. Now, actually, fossilized bryozoans are among the world's most abundant fossils as well, and you can find them in rocks originating more than four hundred. And fifty million years ago up until the present, their colonies start with a single zoysia which asexually reproduces until it's got an entire army of clones to hang out with most bryozoans, species live in marine habitats but the one found in Vancouver's Stanley Park belongs in freshwater it just doesn't really belong in Vancouver Canada this August the Stanley. Park Ecology Society held its annual bio blitz a community event in which citizens scientists survey the park identifying hundreds of organisms in twenty four hours in the lost lagoon, which is the parks bio filtration pond blitz goers discovered the giant slimy football shaped. Bribes zone thousands of miles from home. Their usual range is decidedly to the south of Canada and east of the Mississippi River and it turns out. This isn't the first time. A magnificent bryozoans has been found in this part of Canada and nobody can tell whether they're staying either. But why they're there is a different question like with most migrating or these days warming global temperatures might have opened the door of the great white north to these probably ecologically harmless blobs they need a water temperature warmer than sixty degrees Fahrenheit or sixteen degrees Celsius in order to make a go of it.

Vancouver Canada Stanley Park Pectin Tele Canadian Park Park Ecology Society Lloyd Ken Columbia Mississippi River Sager. Football
How Harry Styles' ‘Watermelon Sugar’ Became His First No. 1 Single on the Hot 100

Pop Shop

04:59 min | Last month

How Harry Styles' ‘Watermelon Sugar’ Became His First No. 1 Single on the Hot 100

"Harry styles scores his first number one on the hot one, hundred as his single. Server searches from number seven to number one out as the hot one hundred is comprised of airplay sales and streaming data. Let's take a closer look at the songs gains in those respective areas. It climbs three two on the all format radio songs chart with eight percent gain in audience. It flies nine to one on the digital song sales chart with a six hundred and fourteen percent gain to sixty three, thousand copies sold, and it rises twenty nine to eighteen on the streaming songs chart with a one percent gain to fourteen point two million streams there was a bevy of promotion last week that kicked into high gear in support of the single I think fans and probably Harry's label knew that this was their chance probably to get to the song number, one Harry released three physical. Singles and his web store each of them came with a digital download of the song and that counted towards sales for the week his single with sale price for sixty nine cents at all major retailers, and there was even a couple of new videos for the song that were released as well. A one I think was like like a tour visual, which I think people thought would be like the visual that would have been behind him if he were on tour. And there was I, think I wanNA say like a behind the scenes video to there is clearly a whole heck of a lot of promotion around the song last week. Yeah of lot going in because as you said, this was kind of the. Time to strike while the iron is hot. There's so much of the mental behind the song Harry of course, is the second member of one direction till end a number one on the hot one, hundred following Zane with pillow talk back in twenty sixteen. So Keith let's take a minute and talk about how watermelon sugar became his first number one single. Besides besides obviously, the things that we just laid out in terms of the airplay streams in in sales obviously because that was a huge driver last week, but it couldn't have got to number one without sort of hit in the first place is kind of overseeing sorry to. Interrupt. You know it's I. I was looking up this morning when this song actually came out Harry styles debuted watermelon sugar on Saturday night live on November sixteenth. Twenty. Nineteen. To give some perspective of what was going on. It it was released to the same weekend as the Charlie's angels. reboot. that. Feels like a million years ago. You look at this as an airplay hit. First of all, adore you which peaked at number six on hot one hundred still in the top twenty by the way. It seems to me that a door you really kind of opened the door for Harry at pop. Radio. Way And following a door you and success which hit number two on the radio songs chart legacy number six in the high one hundred. Sugar which had been around a while just started surging. As the latest single from fine. Line. Sugar debuted on the radio songs chart in mid June and then has jumped all the way to number two this week. And then as you know, this is the third week in a row that both watermelon sugar and adore you are in the top five at Rio songs. And I you know I think what we're saying is I think what we're saying Jason is that Harry Styles is incredibly popular on the radio this entire year which. Is Not entirely expected, but no a pleasant surprise. It's awesome. These songs have been huge on pop radio and I just anecdotally I hear them all the time and I have for months especially adore you and now more. So watermelon sugar anyway key. Yeah I've been writing a lot about song of the summer. We talked about it a lot. and. I think that's part of the reason why watermelon sugar has done so well, is that the timing really worked out they released the video in May and it's just become this big summer song by the way climbs thirteen to eight on the latest songs in the summer. Chart. It's making a last minute run for the crown. But I I mean two babies Rockstar has been number one for seven weeks. So I that seems unlikely to me seems unlikely. But yeah, it does seem like I mean especially when you pair it with the video, which is you know very bitchy and summary and it's breaking at just the right time to it's just firing on all cylinders seems like. Yeah and then meanwhile you have this artists in the middle of this storm that is you know a has. A total one, hundred percent approval rating just in terms of how adored he is no pun intended. He's obviously like has this hard to define cool factor. You know he's basically been letting the music do the talking, and now this is another huge accomplishment for

Harry Styles Harry Keith Charlie Zane Jason
The Interior World

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:06 min | Last month

The Interior World

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe. McCormick, and today we're going to be taking a look at interior space. Get Era Two thousand twenty brings to mind the old curse. May You live in interesting times and one of the factors here has, of course, been the corona virus cove in nineteen pandemic and in an effort to fight the spread of the illness, save lives and prevent overwhelming are hospitals. We've made a lot of changes to our lives and these range from the simple such as just wearing a mask when you're out in public and you can't so full. Distance from people to the harder choices about employment, and in life choices, we've all been social distancing and stay at home orders teleworking in quarantine have meant that we've all been spending a lot more time at home. Now depending on your home, this could mean a lot of things, but we want to explore what this means from a biological standpoint for the most part here. Now, make no mistake spending more time at home has absolutely been the right move. But just as it's forced you to focus more on, say that weird stain on your ceiling we wanted to focus on the other often unseen aspects of life in home right much the same way that being say on a Spanish galleon out in the middle of the ocean might have made you pay much more attention to the biology and behavior of of ship rats than you ever would have otherwise I. Think being at home more and more is forcing all of us to Turner is and maybe our microscopes and magnifying glasses to the corners and the cornices and the showerheads and the drain traps and all of the wonderful places in our house where life dwells. we're going to really get into the difference really between the natural world outside of our homes in the unnatural world inside and getting into some ideas about how how we could perhaps enable our interior world to be a little more on the natural side of things. But. Before we get into all that, I wanted to take a moment here to discuss the history of houses in general, you know just to get into the concept of what a house is. Our first and most important interior artificial environment. So you can certainly look at a home as an artificial cave to a certain extent indeed, we have lots of early evidence that early hominids sought out shelter in caves in the same way that many other animals do these can shelter one against the elements and against predators and as recently as one hundred, thirty thousand years ago cave-dwellers were already augmenting these natural interior environments with things like rough stone walls using timbers so So you know, even one, hundred, thirty, thousand years ago we were taking naturally occurring interior spaces and. A little less natural. And of course, on top of just the shelter caves can provide. It also seems that caves had a strong sacred meaning too many of these prehistoric peoples those might be important, but ultimately, proximity to water is far more important thus as Kate Spin Brian fagin point out in. In the section of the seventy grade inventions of the ancient world about homes, most early hominids lived out in the open near streams and lakes built temporary structures, and most of this has been lost a time. But some of the earliest evidence of potential structures for homes goes back a one point seven, two point seven, million years ago with Homo Erectus sites in southern Africa, and these were potentially contemporary with the domestication of fire. The have been temporary tents, but they still would have been artificial interior environments. Now, more secure evidence comes from the Ukraine roughly forty four thousand years ago the the mammoth bone structures from mullet ova with recently see us on the show actually yeah we did talknet these that would have been structures in one of the northernmost habitable regions of the earth the time because this was during a time of glacial. Advance where the polar ice caps from the north were coming deep down into Europe and Asia, and and so this would have been far far north way up among the ice and for some reason, humans were building these structures out of the bones of mammoth and we don't know that there are still things. We don't know about those structures like how how consistently they were inhabited and for how long and so forth. Right? Now beyond this, the history of human homes is is largely dictated by local resources and local climate. Long process of trial and error ends up leading to the development of regional and cultural building forums construction methods. Before nine thousand B C e we see evidence of clay houses and Palestine what is today Palestine and before seven thousand BC we see rectangular dwellings in Anatolia. But but a home is far more than just a shelter. As the authors here point out houses became key to social structure as well.

Robert Lamb Palestine Kate Spin Brian Fagin Mccormick Africa Turner Ukraine Anatolia Europe Asia
"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

07:51 min | 8 months ago

"million years" Discussed on Trailblazers with Walter Isaacson

"Meat. I'm Mark Post Post. I am chief scientific officer of Motza meet startup that aims to commercialize cultures mute remembered the prediction that Winston Churchill may back in nineteen thirty one. One that could be grown in a lab. You might say that Mark Post is a man who's taken up that challenge. poche was a professor fester in the medical school at University in the Netherlands in two thousand and sex when he was asked to help out with a study that was being funded by the Dutch government lament the idea was to place muscle cells in a nutrient rich serum and encouraged US cells to grow into muscle so like fibers are many medical applications for this. What but the Dutch researchers looking beyond Madison? They he believed that. If you can turn animals stem cells into muscle fibers. You can actually grow synthetic meet in the lab. It could be the best has to both work real neat. That doesn't require a real animal now. I thought it was a great idea and I was also ready involved in tissue engineering for medical purposes and the more I learned about the problems with meat production in the next thirty five years. The more enthusiastic I became about this entire project not only scientifically but also for its suicidal impact. There were scientific hurdles that still had to be overcome but the main obstacle was money. They would need lots of it to scale up produced cell base meat for commercial mass consumption. It didn't help when in two thousand hasn't nine. The Dutch government withdrew funding for the project and basically the language that the government used. We don't see any commercial interest from companies companies in this kind of triggered me. I said well you know this is such a great idea. We need to be able to get this across the general population. So let's make make a sausage from a pig presented to the press while the pig is honking around on the stage and so that was kind of the image was for me was a very unusual kind I thought because I I just basically was a biomedical scientists but I was so frustrated. Is You know W- we'll show them. We needed quite a bit of money to do that. That wasn't really lying around so we had to wait until we got that money and then kind of out of the blue. That was a year and a half or two years later the office of Sergei Brin approached. Just me and said we want to talk to you about this project that you're doing and when we come over Sergei brand is one of the co founders of Google but while marked post had of course heard of people you've never heard of Sergei Graham so when Brennan's representative came came calling post had no idea who he was dealing with post told his visitor about his idea of creating a so based sausage and holding a press conference or the pig on the stage and the representative of Sergei Brennan said. Oh Yeah we will support that. How much money do you need and body set off a couple plus million would be fine Indian? We got the money that we needed to make. That event happened so suddenly Mark Post I had all the money he needed to make his cell meet prototype and the money came with only one string attached tugay brand. Dan wanted a hamburger on the stage. Not a sausage well that was basically a not a request but the demand from Sergei Britain. If you're going to do this it has to be a hamburger not sausage. It's an American thing and that was actually quite fortunate. I think because environmental impact impact of beef is actually a lot higher than that of pork and so on August fifth twenty thirteen. The first I sell Burger was ready to be unveiled at a press conference in London. The event was carried live around the world and included a taste test by food critic. Who of course very gratifying moment? That you because you you have been living up to this for two three years and to finally make that happen was was the big thing so I was pretty happy throughout. It was also a little bit nerve wracking because we had no idea how to tasters basically would respond onto it if they would spit out. Say Yuck this is nothing like we expected or if they would be at least somewhat positive about it we had no idea so that was nerve wracking thing but all in all the whole event went pretty well and I wasn't even noticeably nervous but somebody told me I was tapping my fingers continuously on a desk so Hawaii. Apparently I was the world's first. Cellular Burger got good reviews from the food critic but most of the press coverage focused on cost cost not taste the price tag on. That Burger was three hundred and thirty thousand dollars so mark mark post needed to find a way to drive down costs significantly or his cell Burger would remain an interesting science experiment with no commercial potential and more importantly no potential to solve the environmental challenges caused by animal based meat production. So one of the things that makes cell culture extremely expensive is factors Proteins that stimulate cells to grow and day cost like a million euro per gram. Unfortunately you need only very very small amounts but still if you start to grow at large scale. This is US prohibitive but I learned pretty quickly that end feed industry in a completely different industry not the biomedical part. But the feed industry people people are making similar proteins with similar technology for five. You're a programmer for Europe Aram. I thought well if we can do that. And I and the price of the cell culture drops tremendously and then we started to look at more components of this feat for cells. And we realized realized that if you source differently and you make it a little bit of a different composition you can actually make these very cheap type of Takashi in two thousand fifteen mark post started his own company called motion meet to continue his quest to develop affordable cellular alert meet at a commercial scale. Today he says the price of a Cell Burger is down to about fifteen eighteen dollars still too expensive song grocery three stores but he hopes to be able to increase meat production to the point. We can offer it in some higher end restaurants but then a couple of years post and Brown a two of the trailblazer. We're trying to address the enormous enormous environmental challenges. We are facing by leading what could be doric transformation in our eating at indeed indeed the biggest dietary revolution since humans for started eating me two point five million years ago. I'm Walter Walter Isaacson and you've been listening to trailblazers original podcast from Dell technologies for more on any of the guests on today's show. You can head to our website at Dell technologies dot com slash trailblazers. Thanks for listening..

Mark Post Sergei Brennan Sergei Brin Dell representative Sergei Britain Walter Walter Isaacson Winston Churchill Dutch government Burger chief scientific officer Sergei US Madison Netherlands Motza Sergei Graham professor Hawaii
"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Post Reports

"For, I think eight charges altogether possession with intent to distribute cocaine possession of a firearm by non violent offender. Just a slew of charges projo, it was hard to think about anything but the prospect of being locked up, and it was a very depressing time to say the least, I remember I slept for at least the first day and a half, and eat anything. I was sick emotionally and physically sick and not from a drug withdrawal. But from realizing the jobs, you really did it this time. And this could potentially be the end for the Dane, twenty fifteen win Joe got out of prison wasn't any better. You know, the day that I got released was just as scary as the day that I got arrested, realizing that it's going to take. Probably the hardest work in your life. If not the absolute hardest work, and your life to make it out here into not go back eighty three percent of former inmates end up back in prison nine years after they're released Joe didn't want to be one of those people. So he did something new read an article about social media about videos, and I said, you know, maybe that could be something that I could do I could actually come home and his possibly focus on creating videos, to, again, showcase what it's like to come home and to really want to do better Josie. Youtube channel is called the after prison show his videos cover all kinds of topics from how to make a prison tattoo to how to readjust to life outside. Hey skipper,.

Joe drug withdrawal cocaine Youtube Josie eighty three percent nine years
"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on Science Friday

"So there's a few hypothesis for it a big one is that there may have been a break-up in an asteroid family. So asteroids live in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and sometimes two of these large asteroids or more collide into one another and they get broken down into smaller pieces, and as they absorb heat from the sun and re emit the heat back. They start to shift them their spot. They start to move around and eventually they exit the orbit and they start moving towards the inner solar system so towards the earth and the moon, you can think of it as a landslide slip starting at the top of the mountain and think of the earth and the moon as a house in the Val. Ali. So we see the footprints of those broken pieces of asteroids as craters on the earth and the moon. So something happened. Hundreds of million years ago. All of a sudden, you had more bombardment. Yes. So an asteroid family broke up in they started to move towards the inner solar system, and that that caused more of a bombardment you'd let some people use your data. I understand to create a piece of music that represents these impacts on the moon using sound gives an explanation of what you did. Yes. So system sounds kind enough to take our lunar data and turn it into a video and also into sound. So they've turned the last one billion years the history of the impact of the moon into sound where every note represents the size of an impact crater, and you can hear the frequency of the bombardment and they've been doing more turning into strana me and space data into music..

Ali Val one billion years million years
"million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And so the suggesting it is going to be the woman who says I find that really offend. I'm suggesting is about probably is never mind, but women are also more sensitive today. Give emotion. So there is some slightly higher probability that that might be the case. But then I think women are also associated at least in men's imaginations with nature, which is part of the chaotic domain say as opposed to culture because they're sexually selective. So you think what is nature we have that as a cognitive category. Right. We think of the natural world, we think of nature versus culture, it's a fundamental opposition. What is nature? Well, nature is trees and landscapes and animals and all of that. But that isn't what nature fundamentally is nature fundamentally is that which selects from a genetic perspective, that's nature. That's the fundamental definition of nature. And it is the case that human females are sexually selective, and it's a major component of human behavior. So the. The evolutionary theory. Roughly speaking is that the reason we diverged from chimpanzees eight million years ago seven million years ago is at least in part because of the differences between sexual selectivity between female, humans and female, chimpanzees female chimpanzees are more likely to have offspring from dominant males, but it's not because of their sexual selectivity. So a female chimpanzee has periods of fertility that are marked by physical by observable physiological changes not the case with human females human female automation is is concealed. So that's a very profound biological difference between human females and chimpanzees and the chimpanzee females will mate with any male, but the dominant males chased the subordinate males away but human females are sexually selective. And so, and it's not trivial fact so you have twice as many, female and. Sisters as male ancestors. You think well how can that be? Well, imagine that on average every single human female has had one child throughout the entire course of history, which is approximately correct, by the way, then imagine that half of the man had zero and the other half had to. Okay. And that's roughly the case so half of males. Historically, speaking have been reproductive disasters. And the reason for that is because of female sexual selectivity. So it is actually the case that female, humans are nature. It's not only that they're that. They're associated with nature symbolically as far as reproduction is concerned. They are the force of nature that does the selection and so their nature in the most fundamental way. And there is a chaotic element of that at least in relationship to men and also in relationship to women because a lot of the female on female competition is competition that's chaotic for the right to be sexually selective. Right. Not only with regards to man, which drives a lot of politicking. But also in relationship to each other because part of what human females do is jockey for position in the female dominance hierarchy for the top position. Which is the woman who gets to be most sexually selective. And so that drove. Female female competition, and it's different dynamic. There's there's similarities between female female competition and male male competition, but there are also differences and their pronounced so men, for example, while men are more likely to compute compete for socioeconomic status, and that's partly because that drives female may choice. So the correlation for men between socioeconomic status and sexual success is about point six and for women. It's zero. Zero. In fact, it's actually slightly negative you so and that's a huge difference between men and women. I know that you knew the anthropologists Sarah Hertie, HR D Y, an and she's like my favorite feminist theorist. Although is she would say, I'm a theorist who happens to be a feminist, but she studied primate behavior, and she watched she looked at the women very care.

Sarah Hertie eight million years seven million years
"million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Five hundred million years ago. There was a major rotation of the earth ninety degrees. And this is this is responsible for all the changes that took place or Eric contributor to the changes that took place on the planet at the time and based on the payload paleo magnetic data. This was a change that took quite some time took many millions of years to occur. But now jumping fast forwarding talk. We're talking about smaller more recent polls shifts, and if you believe Plato as a take it literally as as a source of historical facts. These shifts were were rapid, and and and cataclysmic causing floods volcanic eruptions and so forth. So the hypothesis in Portland is is that these more. Recent polls shifts were were rather rapid and did caused the mayhem and destruction that occurred at the time that is recorded in ancient legend and myth. So what you surmise in your book was that? There was something pretty dramatic in terms of technology before Atlantis if so where might that have been so so the the the the evidence is the these these incredible structures that we find throughout the world. He's stones that are massive hundreds.

Plato Eric Portland Five hundred million years ninety degrees
"million years" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

Sports Radio 610

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

"You know thirty million years or more but i just wanted to tell you about that and i'm i'm thrilled that you took my call and get through ticket well good i just personally it everything has listen to you from here on william i appreciate that i i you know one one listener at a time baby i appreciate that and call anytime don't be a stranger it's you know i don't i don't believe i'm not part of the process of actually taking the phone calls to get on the air but i don't think you're applying to harvard or anything like that you know you sound good you got a point you gotta take our friend jim rome says have take don't suck that kind of thing i think you're good to go like dave in buffalo for example dave calls all the time and he's always got solid takes what's happening dave hey what's up johnny how are you doing man i'm doing fantastic how are you good man good to talk a couple of points i wanna make with the nfl you're bringing up a bills fan i'm really interested to see where you're just gotta go out with shady mccoy obviously the big question with him you know in my mind is going to be you know what the dell and and that you know what he's going to do with it are they gonna put him on the exemption let's or not and then obviously if he hasn't got play this year or you get suspended you know to me i feel like that might mean josh allen might play sooner rather than later because i feel like you only in there it's gotta be it would be a game plan a run first second and our schedules wrote off especially early in the season so i think it's going to be a threat josh allen actually gets out there i that's my big question of the bills fan what if new england do it's kind of the big national story to me is there a lot of infighting y'all the infighting revert about kind of bella jack and radio is that real is if you know that's the question i really wonder about it and one one last thing man my pick for the british open this week rickie fowler he's the people and i'd love to see him get it done so i'll talk to john you have a good night thanks dave appreciate you as always you know the shady mccoy then by the way i'm going to use your rickie fowler pick i'm gonna gulf pool every week so i'll maybe i'll i'll ride you on that rickie fowler pick here's the thing with shady mccoy and this upcoming season as it's not i don't think it's even worth it to bring up the word suspension you know what i mean like i the nfl's probably doing some investigating right now we know that he doesn't need to be arrested by the long arm of the law in order to get a suspension and who knows maybe there is a suspension maybe because shady there have been three calls to that house the house that he's ex girlfriend lives in there have been three domestic violence police visits to that house over the last several months prior to this most recent crime where some anonymous fief broke into the home and just beat the ever loving snot out of leshan mccoy's exgirlfriend but the reason why i feel like suspension isn't even worth bringing up is i feel like he's he's either involved in this or he isn't and if he isn't then and if they find that he isn't then these these calls that have been to the house previously have not been enough to get him suspended so far now maybe nfl doesn't know about them and now they find out about them and now they say well now we have something to really investigate but with respect to this crime the one where this person broke into the house and stole back some very specific jewelry items i should say stole back that would imply that these people are with mccoy we don't know that but either he is part of this and he put this person up to it or he didn't and if he didn't then he shouldn't get suspended at all if he did then he's going to jail like there's no in between like to hire somebody to go lay a beating down on your ex girlfriend to steal back some things that.

thirty million years
"million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fourteen million years a year but even in germany's advance economy the businesses finding it hard to retain skilled staff dita mason is one of the firm's managers possibly have lost a lot of well trained workers i don't know the reason but i see every day consequences more than half of the students who leave school go to university there nobody will became for example in electricians or a prom or worker on site i have no idea how we will do it in ten years what should the german government and the new coalition do in order to attract young people into civil engineer i at uk shen second education third education it starts at school we need more opportunities we need specialists in school to train students we need much more in westlands in education and infrastructure and to the future of our children for now fishing fouls is resorting to employing polish workers one of the german construction workers things as government has its priorities all wrong rian ocial the fact that manual work is partly a comedy needs to be sponsored more and promoted in schools not everybody can go to university and if at some point there's no more water coming out of the pipes then we won't have any universities to study in we have so many longterm university students study for ten or fifteen years they should do a three year apprenticeship instead we would profit more from it despite a short comings germans are proud of the education system but many blamed the previous coalition for under investing in schools and for cational training especially given the huge fiscal surplus the country has run up in recent years now pressures growing on the new government abandoned the hawkish stance of former finance minister shoygu blah and spend some of its richest on classrooms and on both physical and digital infrastructure cross germany's sixteen states that and fish nerds and economists at the german institute for economic research he says germany's tight grip on his public purse has had wide reaching consequences and has led the country's biggest firms to invest abroad rather than their own backyards public investment public infrastructure is too weak and this leads to a comparable weakness of private investment in germany our road system for example is in urgent need of reconstruction of improvement of the system this is a problem which obviously leads to problems for firms as well because if it takes too long for truck to get from a to b because the road system is weak then it's unattractive for firms to invest in germany and they go rather to countries where this is not as important because drivers are cheap or because the road system is petra how could you explain why is germany not investing enough and then these sectors then over the last five to ten years german policymakers had the feeling they have to show to other the european countries what you can achieve if you try not to spend too much that you can still achieve a lot so in that sense they tried to form a positive example to honest i'm not sure it really works out because we now feel the consequences of this lack of spending and it probably diminishes our longterm growth perspectives tough reforms are difficult and a government which largely resembles the one that preceded it with many of the same politicians still in various cabinet positions and even though the cd goes on trial has been replaced by the social democrat of charles the socalled black zero policy which mandates balanced budgets and a sturdy is alive and well but in berlin there's hope for mood i'm here we work berlin an american company that provides shad workspaces.

germany ten years Fourteen million years fifteen years three year
"million years" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"I would never in a million years have thought of this because i like all the colors of the rainbow when it comes to nipples sure but apparently women are now getting nipple tattoos oh this is if they are to light colored oh they're going after a darker colored so you're like a pink nibble put on exactly i'll bet alex natural i thought you were going to say they're getting like a flower on this one and a starburst is say that'd be cool i'll get that to very painful hours and costs about eighteen hundred dollars to have both of them darkened imagine the tattoo artists who's like you're going to have to pay me eighteen hundred dollars for me to stare your boobs for the next two hours they call it areola restoration like and they say it's actually done by dr not not a tattoo artist yeah the doctors one in on this i can't even imagine now i heard about the bleaching where you sit and was shocked by that that seems who sees that so rare i mean so few people you don't need you mean you're buckeye or your nipples i mean you're buckeye your buckeye though you know if you're single and you're out there in the world and you shoot and sex tapes on your phone the place to look as nice as i'm telling you it seems i don't watch i don't watch that much porn but all the white girls i see in porn the whole area looks very very light like they've had the whole on just the but dot i'm talking the whole everything's great about you love your mind i think you're very attractive you dress well love your parents but your buck guides just for me it's a little color its little scary now the thing is is that we i talk about my in fact you see it very prominently in one of the popular positions in fact it's what you're looking at in one of those positions but i've never once looked at one you know i wish that was a couple of shades lighter to break up with her that's just the coloration is just too it's too distracting never thought that of course you like it fully fully wooded as well so i don't know what that means a thicket lady line why take a shower for me clean is how i like it that's all that's all i'm concerned about i've never once ben with anyone that was less than clean so i've been fortunate in that way i never came across anyone was like okay to the bathroom with you is that a reason to dump someone might be more than once you'd be like are you kidding me crack is is it what don't you understand oh jesus four one five says thanks sarah huffington post apple apple stock hit lowest level since two thousand eleven sarah did that it is my fault you still have the stock yeah i've still got it high sell it today it'll skyrockets so why don't you get rid of it i'm not gonna do that i'm never selling it again i sold it what it was like thirty dollars one hundred something shares of it oh god it takes a woman seven and a half months to become comfortable with a guy that long seven and a half months before starts fighting in front of him yes that's on the list were they've burp and break wind in front of you took me a lot less time than that yeah john were been dating for maybe a month and we're together his his little apartment where he went to college and he got up out of bed and he goes in the other room and then he comes back and i go out there and fart and he's like yes just do that in here it's fine and they just because i was so sick a hold holding it soon as he started doing it but i was like the girl who fardon valletta frankenberg hold it in don't that's that's how about common courtesy where together stop it does your girlfriend on any burp and fart yes on a regular no it's not comfortable with them yet yeah she's afraid to listen we're very go around doing that in front of her either in fact just the other day she got up and left the room and i started because i i had one and she came back in and she goes was there a drive by and i'm.

eighteen hundred dollars thirty dollars million years two hours
"million years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on KCRW

"That that means that there's gotta be a technique that's right for every vegetable and i think that a lot of the vegetables that were used to grilling and that would be peppers and eggplants zucchini and potatoes and carrots some root vegetables actually grill better over low heat than over high heat so i think that you know it took me a long time to learn that actually learned it actually quite directly from gary danko who just said it's better to do it this way and he was right some of the things i'm happiest about giving recipes for our for example grilled romain lettuce and grilled ridichio and grilled radishes and grilled turnips and some of the some of the less common vegetables that people don't think of grilling that much that really can be quite fun again when you know when the right technique is used so i remember a million years ago in one of my katina bucks out that's like when the eighties the early nineties doing a recipe for you know grapes stretched in sugar and then put on the grill and people were astounded at this idea that you can grow fruit and now you know grilling for it has become something like a very common way i mean at least here in california to finish off finish off in outdoor grilling session but i must say i have never grilled watermelon and i think that's really smart i mean this is so such a silly thing to say but it starts with the watermelon so to get it right you have to have the right watermelon and you don't always know that when you buy a watermelon so at its worst it's pretty good at its best it's like eating a steak i mean the texture just gets drier and denser but it's kinda sweet and it's chewy and qc well thank you once again for giving us a light of quote food for thought always fun evan sees do now i've been talking to food journalist and cookbook author mark pitman he's the author of more than fifteen bucks including his insanely popular had a cook everything bucks the latest entry is how to grill everything find a link to his grub street article about eating healthy on the good food website coming up the business of beef we're talking all about it with third generation butcher katie flannery stay with us.

gary danko california evan mark pitman katie flannery million years
"million years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on KOMO

"The drive home at the editor's desk is bill o'neil our headlines in the breaking news out of the south end of king county a major bust of many involved in apparently alleged drug use and drug distribution we've had hundreds of police officers involved in many raids the latest on that story coming up in fifteen minutes scientists say may shattered all kinds of heat records in the us the national oceanic and atmospheric administration reports maze average temperature five degrees warmer than normal a major warning for parents who use baby monitors to keep an eye on their kids one mom claiming that hackers use the device to spy on her and her son abc's area reshef has more on the claim in a million years would i have expected something like this to happen first time mom jamie summit said she thought she he noticed something strange about the baby monitor she was given by a friend we were eating and notice that the monitor started moving and panned overcharge bed and pause for a few seconds and then pan back over to our son who is sleeping in his bassinet right next to our bed she says she disconnected the device bright away tried to cancel the app on her phone and called the local police but never filed a report we shut our bedroom door we kind of sat for a second and just i was crying i was really upset and kind of realizing what was happening security experts say most hackers or interested in the camera they're using it as a launching point to get into a network and steal the user's id that's why some it's not the only parent pressing pause on her crib camp and it was screaming at my daughter screaming wake up baby wake up baby back in two thousand fourteen the shrek say a hacker used an internet back door to take control of the camera in their little girls bedroom the camera then turned and looked at me and it started started screaming at me it turned out the shrek camera had a known vulnerability the manufacturer had released an update to solve the problem but the family was unaware that's why experts advise the parents keep checking the manufacturer's website and download.

editor king county abc jamie summit fifteen minutes million years five degrees
"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"I go back when i was eighteen years old in a million years we were different that's a holy dip that's not fair what do you mean you wouldn't have done it dan wouldn't have done it i talked to ross about it he wouldn't have done it i don't know a man out there how about our guests in a million years you're eighteen which you have had your wouldn't want her taker i i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids having part because that's what you were bragging about i i want to ask you go ahead would you want him driving her home if he felt uncomfortable driving in winter weather like no i wouldn't want her take i wouldn't want him taking her out in the first place do they not know it's gonna snow like they've been saying for two days okay but he did so okay i think it's just like if kids had too much to drink and they called and said that's a completely at home you save let's stick to this then you bring it into infinite we're drinking if you let me finish i'll tell you what i mean it's the same thing when it comes to judge judgment he felt uncomfortable driving in the snow what i meant was it's the same thing for judgment when kids are drinking too much or if kids feel tired or if they're not feeling good and if he was having a seizure i'd want her to call to it's got nothing to do with the case at hand though it has to do with judgment i feel would you have ever done it well what difference does that make a no i okay maybe it goes down to okay who see dating an eighteen year old in eighteen year old that takes her out and can't get her home maybe that's the whole route of this that's an issue.

dan ross eighteen year million years two days eighteen years
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"We're to a southern complicated were do workers of your that make fifty million dollars if you get it right but my team is still i'm telling they're still europe do you i you know this beginners come in the boxing gym do they want to learn the fundamentals some those on the northern countries one of west berlin that guy at he has pulp provisional five rally that the start of lima could take him her case this try it come on one thirty seconds or hold on let him go yeah because unity of guys dig dealer near bashes you can have learned the hard way by i i make sure that they sign a waiver because you know every time they want in the news agency you keep it simple people try to it's funny in my in my boxing jim everybody goes straight to the speed bay because it again at the end in the goal is why people like you know really what makes you win a boxing finest conditioning always so do you should job growth for 30 minute but every blade once the fancy thing we caused the marketing bureau at target dole multi it's what i was actually listened to bloomberg not bloomberg business radio and satellite serious last night driving all annuals i they were talking about split testing and just hours going yes split test ended aboard and i knew split testing but everything take i'll put it this way everything it takes you to make a million dollars a year keeper is there's not one thing that's not common sense there is no trick just like the industry fight it's like you just punched the dude in those fast and horror with your right hand give your right hand it your left hand with your left is like on that end dole grabbing every graf you.

lima news agency dole europe berlin boxing bloomberg fifty million dollars one thirty seconds million dollars 30 minute
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Are the easy to go along with the show up a common sense common sense common sense concert so if you're interested in bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and wanna learn how to make money with bitcoin opening up a brand new bitcoin crypto academy for you crypto is starting to fundamentally change everything from currencies to the very structure behind the internet if you don't understand it you will be left behind remember if you had put one hundred dollars in bitcoin in 2010 you would have over a hundred million dollars right now i don't want you miss out on the coming opportunities offered by bitcoin in the cryptocurrency space so i brought in the best experts in the game the people that are teaching me in training me and i'm gonna share that with you because it's not too late to understand bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and the block chain and to make money with it so to sign up for my new bitcoin crypto academy on learn how to invest how to make money in this new exciting safes i'm an open up room for a few of you early access to the new online mentor mastermind so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast to learn more so i'm testing the mastermind so i'm just going to let a few of you in at a low price and it's already filling up quickly so if you want to get in i'll let a few of you in so go to tie lopez dot com slash bitcoin podcast all one word bilo busy dot com slash bitcoin podcast if the course disclosed when you get to the page put in your name in the waiting list you missed out on the first round uh in if you see it welcome to the group glad you didn't procrastinate okay back to the show.

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Elle one key dancing and over no room vis getting killed we're working on trying to get a split test conversion funnel doing better and people come up with esoteric theories of everything i'm like how can i just keep this so simple and so we just went through the seven steps that people are going to be i are products and we're like is this one broken no no no yes and then you start there this one those debts are up but he's not complicated i promise you oh comes razor a thousand over a thousand euro about a thousand euro principle from william will open it just means you you don't know what's wrong in life picked the simplest solution so you're in a street fight you don't know what to do yes you can do a flying arm bar occasionally flight you all the number one thing that wins in a ufc fight the most fights areas or rear naked choke you get behind the person and you attack their neck the next the weakest part of the body even the strongest guy me elite neck and carotid artery if you go like this for about seven seconds you go to sleep so when you're gloves on a street fight on gloves what hurts more but his estry fight upon straight pont right to the knows where the gene puts people to sleep that's it that's why guy you got a big strong right hand or a great ability to get behind who you win a fight same when business you just got on a few things out of thing through things correctly marketing accounting you need to have sown stands that have higher people as important debut mahanta ira maho this personal i've done that before the author hell a little simple system was the simplisafe system to hire people would you if would you date or mary this person is in that in a romantic steadied give the answer is no the you to supply that businesses somebody i want to go for longterm on a loyal honest simple things that you learn in elementary school about people are they sharp are they lazy elese crossing off bullets.

mary ufc seven seconds
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"So agassi there's a few times that i use it but mostly there's a few times of buddy shut them because they try to hold onto you especially in speed five you get up you do on here so the whole so when i now what exactly is all this is legal in business i'm telling you i mean people i higher be will be employed that think they need these complicated things but they really for everything they supposedly moved you four they distract you to steps one step forward to just back you basically need for your workstation one big monitor unless you're hedge fund trader or some complicated than one bad asked iphone eplus this is i don't like mac computers but on light 'cause i i don't care i'm up i'm simple all cure app that apple everything are you the do jimmy that's gotta wear are you are you will height beasts you gotta have brave shirt dan tan bates bay boxer the no you can you can vary and up to apple guy the guy gives shit about learn as corporation the world's apple a i things better than the ten because it's a bigger screen end up it's simpler you don't have the weird thing you know like it's a disease in europe look how big it is almost like a little ipad then you get one bad ask monitor deputies the i've got my seven teenage there one keyboard one mouse that go simple eu go back and forth main thing you don't internet go back and forth.

jimmy apple agassi iphone mac europe
"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

The Tai Lopez Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"million years" Discussed on The Tai Lopez Show

"Yes refi upon straight pont right to the knows or the gin puts people to sleep that's a that's one guy you got a big strong right hand or a great ability to get behind you you win a fight same when business you just got on a few things kind of things through things frankly marketing accounting you need to house owns does that how hire people are so important thing we will know how to ira miles this person would have done that before the yep hell a little simple system we're talking about productivity my team insists that is to monitor set up and this isn't even about two monitors ricki we are talking about the power of simplicity you ever see these karate movies were gonna in these don't do that just know is a professional boxing train at warfare tang's how many places do you really need to know to win a fight how many fights have you been profession add three none on a very slow ratified it 38 how many have you lost one why do lose it that was taken off pusher so you got a fancy adjustment has changed so thirty issue fight you're from the means streets central america right under is and i van ice california how many punched different type of punches did it take you to win thirty seven on science flavor hell's powerful my favorite hacked so you just get a good straight right here in dg jab ever i know he's my my jab always through a right hand because i know that was my the hardest punch so you just aren't at the fight both tested nsa as a body or to the video which featured a face as well who does that mean dane when you where you're out of street fighter that's the main thing you both or if you are smart fighter domi you start using the jab and land follow over the right and so now.

tang street fighter professional boxing america
"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"million years" Discussed on Double Toasted

"I get up on stage in front of evil goal i can think about his birthday laughed at me be you menu her fearless don't care are not going to happen for you not in a million years after that town which we could just make our own moving at great idea from but may have renewed the wheel of a renewed weekly yone help no no dedicated no amendments is me is going to last through this review radio i'm i'm going to tell you i kompyang sacrifice will you guys do it do it i with tool the and a promise you i did not reveal that movie i did not reveal them i did not i didn't i a high toast these review of eu now though we are talking about the movie the disaster artis under the disaster art is manned people in in la they were terrorized by this back rain for about two years the man who has got their vet party lumad over the channelling west rather than i just star wars you bet everybody wanted for two years what is this thing called room the billboard was up they're telling people go see there was even a number of inviting people to go see the movie and at the time there wasn't even a trailer for people see on the internet letting them know what they were getting into a lotta people just with to see it out of curiosity and when they got in their they said it was probably the biggest what the fuck but the big is happy is what the fuck moment a glorious accident if ever there was to be a perfect world.

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