23 Burst results for "Miller Center"

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Try to defeat the Democrat, and he did. But we knew that Eisenhower wasn't going to run for president again. So my dad just wanted us to see in his mind as a World War II hero, you know, my dad was a World War II vet. So he wanted us to see the World War II hero in the former president. My mother two years before I had taken us to see senator John Kennedy running for president. So I come by this very naturally. But we didn't think that, as I say, that Eisenhower was going to be running again. So the fact that you've this is more like the Grover Cleveland era where you've got a former president who is going to sit out a term and then wants to get a second term non consecutive, it's going to be more like that. We don't know for sure whether Joe Biden will run or we'll get the nomination, but if we would say that the election were the nominations were to hell today, I think you'd say those two men would be at the top of the ticket. So that's why these guys feels like the presidential race. They have to act like they're going to run. Both of them have to project this for different reasons right now, but we've got a presidential debate set for June, Barbara. How long do they actually have before they have to decide publicly? Oh, well, I think certainly that Trump has decided that he will run and he talked about that. And so I think that's a given. I can't see that he will step aside. And for Biden, I think that first of all, as you point out, he has a reason. He doesn't want to be seen as a lame duck. And so I think that he would like to run. I think the only thing that prevents him from running is just illness. You know, if he should have an illness that would overtake him given his age and his medical background, but otherwise I think his is in the ring as well. Boy, at a certain point though, you've got to clear the decks, right? Let people know what's going on here and I'm deeply curious to see how long it will be after the midterms before we get Joe Biden and Donald J Trump on the record here instead of teasing all the time. Barbara, thank you for joining us. It's a great conversation. Barbara Perry director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller center, we thought a great opportunity to look at this race or race is of course all over the country through the eyes of The White House, this administration and the prior one because these are the two newsmakers, if you will, who are driving the conversation for better or worse on the trail. I'm Joe Matthew in Washington, this is sound on the fastest hour in politics will assemble our panel next. They're both here. Our signature panel, Jeannie and Rick

Eisenhower senator John Kennedy Joe Biden Cleveland Barbara Donald J Trump Trump Biden Barbara Perry University of Virginia's Mille Joe Matthew White House Washington Jeannie Rick
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With June grosso from Bloomberg radio. I've been talking to Barbara Perry a presidential and Supreme Court scholar at the University of Virginia's Miller center about why justice Brett Kavanaugh seems to be the Supreme Court's lightning rod. In a recent market university law school poll. Kavanaugh had by far the court's worst net favorability rating of negative 11 percentage points. Of the other conservatives only justice Amy Coney Barrett at negative one had a negative net favorability rating, even though some of the other justices appear more conservative than Kavanaugh. Now before the break Barbara, you were talking about how the justices at their confirmation hearings, though they said roe was precedent, they didn't actually make any promises not to overturn that precedent. If you believe that, then are you going to believe what the chief justice was saying in the oral arguments would sounded like he wanted to uphold the Mississippi statute on the 15 week limitation on abortions and yet voted to overturn roe in effect. And are you going to believe Kavanaugh that he won't go back with the rest of the conservative and look at and overturn the sexual privacy cases the contraceptive cases and the marriage equality cases? I don't think for a moment that those are safe with these 5 to 6 men and one woman on the bench on the right. As you mentioned, clarence Thomas seems to still be holding a grudge for his confirmation 30 years ago. In fact, he told his law clerks two years after his confirmation, according to a 1993 article from The New York Times, that he intended to serve on the highest court of the land to make the lives of liberals miserable. So, but it seems like Kavanaugh is not taking that tact

Kavanaugh Bloomberg radio Barbara Perry University of Virginia's Mille Brett Kavanaugh Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court roe Barbara Mississippi clarence Thomas The New York Times
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:00 min | 2 months ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg law. A divided Supreme Court rejects a religious challenge. Tell us a little about the facts of the case. Either views would prominent attorneys in Bloomberg legal experts. My guest is former federal prosecutor Jimmy Carole joining me as Bloomberg law reporter Jordan Rubin. And analysis of important legal issues, cases and headlines. The Supreme Court takes on state secrets multiple lawsuits were filed against the emergency rule. Is this lawsuit for real? Bloomberg law with June Grasso from Bloomberg radio. Welcome to Bloomberg law, I'm June brasso. A head in this hour, why is Brett Kavanaugh the most hated justice? And the uncharted territory of crypto lender bankruptcies. Justice Brett Kavanaugh is the U.S. Supreme Court's lightning rod, despite the fact that he's at the center of the conservative court, joined the majority more than any other justice. My guest is Barbara Perry, a presidential and Supreme Court scholar at the University of Virginia's Miller center. Barbara from all the protests against Kavanaugh, you'd never know that he was at the center of the court. Well, I suppose we should begin by saying that the center has just so that even keep justice Roberts now seems much more moderate and much more centrist relatively speaking than those like Alito and the three Trump nominees on the far, far right. But it is the case. By whatever measure we're now using, even if the center has shifted, at least Brett Kavanaugh is closer to that than he is to the far right. He's also less confrontational during oral arguments than some of the other justices, like Samuel Alito. Sometimes you think from what he says, he's going to vote with the liberals. Do you think it's deliberate? I think that is probably his personality and

U.S. Supreme Court Jimmy Carole Brett Kavanaugh Jordan Rubin June Grasso Bloomberg radio Bloomberg Justice Brett Kavanaugh center of the conservative cou Barbara Perry University of Virginia's Mille Kavanaugh justice Roberts Barbara Alito Samuel Alito
"miller center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:40 min | 2 months ago

"miller center" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"New poll out today might cause Democrats to do a double take, the Politico morning consult poll shows that Democrats have a four point advantage over Republicans in a generic congressional ballot for the November midterm elections. What? President Biden's job approval numbers are in the low 30s and his aides are reportedly concerned that an aging Biden is leading a rudderless White House into a ditch. It could be the Democrats are benefiting from former president Trump driving his whole party into a ditch as the January 6th hearings are driving home, but for the next few minutes, how are Democrats viewing Biden? Christopher Scott is chief political officer at the progressive group democracy for America. He's based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Chris surprising poll, but do you think it offsets known frustrations with Biden? Well, I think the frustrations have just kept mountain for this administration at this point. I think we have seen administration that has been consistently out of touch with the voters that help put them there in the first place. And so I immediately think of just comments this past week about activists needing to be more in touch with the mainstream Democratic Party. These activists are the mainstream Democratic Party, either to black and brown voters, you need to put that coalition back together if Democrats are going to have any chance of success in these midterms. Well, let's take up that debate within the party because that debate was held recently on CNN in a segment where you had democratic strategist Joe trippi, who was white. Saying it was crazy talk. And he said, dividing the party has never helped them win before, then you had Nina Turner, the strategist who is black. Vehemently disagreeing. I mean, her hair was on fire. And she called the Supreme Court's rulings, including about guns, but also overturning the constitutional right to roe V wade. She said these were about life and death for many Americans, then she kind of exploded. Here's what she said. We should measure based on what is best for big mama and big daddy in hoods where people are misunderstood whether it's the rule hood, the urban hood of the suburban hood. That is how you settle whether or not there will be a primary deliver for the people. Is that what you're talking about? Yes, absolutely. We have consistently ostracized and ignored the people that are closest to the pain, which again, more often than black and brown, they're the working class into some administration has been consistently out of touch. Beyond the issue of abortion in everything being threatened with women's reproductive rights, we've seen administration slow to respond and ensuring voting rights. We have seen an administration not come through with what they said they were going to do when it comes to alleviating student debt. And it's going to cost us big time if we don't get it together. Well, let's take up the overturning of roe V wade by the Supreme Court. President Biden got hammered for saying that the solution to that was to go out and vote. But then others are saying, you know, he's kind of right. There aren't the votes in Congress to codify abortion rights through legislation. He did sign an executive action that safeguards some access to contraception, but what else can he do? People voted for Donald Trump who put in three Supreme Court. Members. So I think part of the issue with the response is just how delayed everything came from. Yes, we know we have to go vote. That is always one of the solutions to everything, but they're always has to be more. When you look at him just doing the executive action, it's great that he did it, but it seemed like the administration was grotesquely just ill prepared to handle that decision coming down, even though they knew it was coming. So I think that's the frustration that you're hearing. How did you not have more in place? Why are you not willing to do more in hold the line and be bolder and be proactive in a moment like this? Well, and I'm citing others, The Economist, and Owen, who said if people are looking for Biden to do something to bring inflation down right away, he doesn't have the tools to do that. People think that presidents have sometimes more tools than they do. Here's another one Barbara Perry, a presidential scholar at the University of Virginia's Miller center, said we think of presidents of being so powerful, but they don't have often the tools we think they have. And then she added, though, and Joe Biden doesn't have the communication skills that let's say a Ronald Reagan had. Is that part of the problem? I mean, let's just be blunt. Do you think he is increasingly looking too old in how he holds himself, how he walks, how he speaks, that somehow that's telegraphing the wrong thing. At this moment, I think it's on fortunate he is looking a little dated when you talk about how he was elected. He talked about being the man for the moment the only person that could beat Donald Trump. The only person that can unify this country. I think one of the biggest felons of this administration is looking at how they did not properly deploy even their own vice president, Kamala Harris, who I think would have been a perfect person to put out there in a more proactive role. I definitely get why people are feeling that because you're just looking at the response and he looks tired. He looks like he's tired of the fighting and that is not what he sold the American people on. It wasn't just about beating Trump. It was about being right for these moments like this. It's Christopher Scott, chief political officer at DFA, the progressive group democracy for America. Chris, thanks so much for weighing in. Thanks so much, Robin. In Australia, the prime minister yesterday promised a new era of climate action, as in lower emissions and more money for renewables. And this could be a big opportunity for Ozzy native Saul Griffith. He is a celebrated engineer, and he happens to be a Macarthur genius award winner. Griffith had been living in this country, but recently he moved back to his native Australia, and there he is launching a campaign for more solar panels on rooftops. John caliche reports. Seoul Griffith recently appeared on

mainstream Democratic Party President Biden Biden progressive group democracy fo Nina Turner Christopher Scott Supreme Court roe V wade Joe trippi Trump White House Cincinnati Donald Trump Barbara Perry Chris CNN University of Virginia's Mille Ohio brown Congress
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:13 min | 6 months ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"288 The ten year is down 1.1% with a yield of 2.55% West Texas intermediate crude oil is currently down a half a percent at one O two 80 for barrel That is a Bloomberg business flash I'm Greg Jarrett Now more balance of power with David Westin right here on Bloomberg radio This is about to power on Bloomberg television or radio I'm David west and well judge kataja Brown Jackson to another step toward the Supreme Court as we passed out of committee and the judiciary Senate Judiciary Committee And we welcome now a real authority on the history of the Supreme Court She's Barbara Perry Professor and director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller center So thank you so much professor for being back with us Put this in historical perspective It is the first black woman as by the way President Biden promised he would do He did So for all those people who say politicians don't keep their promises this is one that he certainly did keep running in the primary in the South Carolina primary for the nomination of his party He said that he would put the first black woman on the Supreme Court and that's just about to happen So good for him and good for her And good for the court I've written a piece for the hill that says the Supreme Court should look like the United States And I believe in that I believe that in order to maintain its legitimacy it doesn't mean that people who are representative and an active way as we think of people in Congress will both the way we want them to vote but at least it looks like it's more than just white males populating the courts She will be the 116th member of the court and its history and most of those have been white males So it's good to see some diversity Barbara how do you put it in historical context Am I going back to for example I think of Sandra Day O'Connor being the first woman to see the Supreme Court And goodness knows thurgood Marshall the first black lawyer to be on the Supreme Court How do you rate this in this How does it change the court Well I rated in a book that I wrote on religion race and gender and appointments to the court And actually president is going all the way back to George Washington wanted to make the court representative in terms of geography and regions of the country But in terms of these personal characteristics religion race gender that actually goes back in terms of religion to the late 1800s when the first Catholic was put on the bench And in terms of actually wanting to put a Catholic on actually roger taney was the first to be put on in the 1830s as chief justice by Andrew Jackson But in terms of a Catholic seat developing as waves of immigrants came to this country Catholics Jewish immigrants So 1916 the first two is justice Louis Brandeis Then as you said thurgood Marshall the first black member Sandra Day O'Connor how well I remember being so proud and honored in 1981 when Ronald Reagan put her on the bench justice Sotomayor the first Hispanic justice So what does it mean It means that again the court will look a little bit more legitimate I think in the eyes of the American people because they will see people who look like them and have their backgrounds on the highest tribunal in the land One of the things that is different than at least in recent history now than ever is how contentious these nomination and confirmation processes are I click for justice bow and the vote was something like 82 to three back in those days and I think his hearing was about an hour and a half long It doesn't work that way anymore What has happened to that process can it ever be retrieved if I can put it that way betraying my prejudice Yes I would I will betray my prejudice as well I'd like it to be retrieved that it would be based on merit and that would be intellectual merit judicial experience judicial temperament the ability to write well and work and play well with others It used to be that way that people on the opposite side of the aisle would vote for justices They didn't necessarily agree with ideologically but they thought that they were meritorious and they were qualified to sit on the bench That has Gone with the Wind and I would say until we can get rid of the severe polarization that we have in this country and I don't look for that to happen anytime soon The court and vacancies on the court and fights over those vacancies are going to reflect the polarization and the severe polarization that we see now One more And I think it's perhaps a tricky one You worked up there at the Supreme Court You know the way it operates at least when it operates well How is the Supreme Court in the way it functions being affected by this hyper partisanship I know that it's supposed to be isolated from politics but it's not that far away from the Senate chamber where these hearings were being had They can't be entirely immune from knowing how political this has become Well they can not be in me from it but I like to think of it as the marble temple that beautiful beautiful building that you worked in up on Capitol Hill It is a beautiful marble construct And it's a bit like a monastery or a convict that is that once they get through the difficulties as one would go through a process to become a priest or a nun and then go into that setting then they're all together and justice Thomas has said for all of the problems he faced in coming into that court He always says people were so welcoming to him there Both his colleagues and those who work at the court So I always use the example that before they go out on the bench for oral argument They shake hands with each other And I think that's a great symbol and we could use more of that collegiality could we and all of our politics Yes I think that's fair to say Barbara it's always such a pleasure to have you on these topics It's really helpful That's Barbara Perry of the University of Virginia Miller center Coming up Elon Musk's stake in Twitter isn't looking so passive today This is bounce a power on Bloomberg television and on radio Why get your Jamie's log progressive The Harrington's backyard day four two 18 a.m. I've been camping outside of the Harrington house for four days now proving that progressive has 24/7 protection Mister Hanks says I don't need to do this since progressive protects 24/7 It's a pretty easy concept to grasp But I'm gonna stay improve my point.

Supreme Court Barbara Perry Greg Jarrett David Westin Bloomberg radio kataja Brown Jackson Senate Judiciary Committee University of Virginia's Mille thurgood Marshall roger taney David west Connor Sandra Day West Texas Bloomberg Biden Louis Brandeis South Carolina
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:09 min | 7 months ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Ukraine has led to hundreds of civilian deaths as the government hands out weapons to residents willing to fight and hundreds of thousands flaying Although the U.S. and its allies have issued strict sanctions the Russian ground assault continues This mother is hiding out in a cave bomb shelter with her children Our family tries to stay strong and receive no matter what And the same goes for all of Ukraine There are signs Russia is becoming more aggressive video circulating on social media show the aftermath of an attack on an administration building in kharkiv It followed bombardment of a residential area Ukrainians accused Russia of using cluster munitions to maximize casualties British prime minister Boris Johnson is in Poland today to meet with NATO chiefs on the invasion of Ukraine Johnson reaffirmed NATO's commitment to aid Ukraine and said Ukrainian resistance would doom Russia's attempt to occupy the country This invasion of a free and sovereign country is not only a tragedy it is a colossal mistake Prime minister Johnson says Russia's Vladimir Putin presented false pretenses to the Russian people and troops for the invasion Ukraine will take the spotlight tonight and President Biden's State of the Union address originally he planned to highlight the improved in coronavirus outlook and rebrand his domestic policy priorities The timing of tonight's speech creates a large opportunity for the president according to Barbara Perry director of presidential studies at the Miller center of public affairs If he sees this moment gives a good solid speech acknowledges people's pain points out what he's done well where his victories have been And I think on the Ukrainian business this could be his HB 9 Berliner moment of John Kennedy that is standing at the Berlin Wall in 1963 I don't know how to say it in Russian but it should be 9 Ukrainian Barbara Perry was a guest on Bloomberg's balance of power Bloomberg will provide live coverage of the address starting at 8 30 p.m. Eastern Time Live from the Bloomberg interactive broke his studios this is global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take powered by more than 2700.

Ukraine NATO Prime minister Johnson Barbara Perry kharkiv President Biden Boris Johnson Miller center of public affair Vladimir Putin Poland U.S. government Johnson John Kennedy Bloomberg Berlin Wall Bloomberg interactive
"miller center" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on WCPT 820

"I think that just proves there is not enough bourbon in the world to deal with these mother Republicans You deal with people that are terrorist insurrectionist lunatics They're trying to kill you Sorry I think he is our longest regular congressman that comes to visit With us Yeah But I wonder how any rational people can deal with these This Republican Party is just a terrorist cult They're not a governing body anymore which is why all these former Republicans are like vote for Democrats down the line in 2022 We're the only sane party out there I understand why he's leaving but we still need strong Democrats in Congress to fight against what's going on on the right Yes pardon me I know You're not paying attention to it Well I'm not Because Jamie is in full Pierpont mode and has decided to tangle my headphone cords in her front paws I just gave you a biscuit What did I just give you And that was your second one Okay this is like negotiating with Republicans on the reconciliation bill She knows she can pull more biscuits out of you This is like a debt ceiling biscuit standoff Okay Now my point is all right so you know what I'm gonna say I'm gonna say once again Stephanie Miller Center of the universe I'm just saying what did we just discuss yesterday About them keeping the same money but reducing the time on the bill right Yeah And.

Republican Party Congress Jamie Stephanie Miller
"miller center" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I mean he was one of the most powerful most influential people in the world before he became president. The president The or the brown argued again. This is the dock. They talked to a doctor. Presidents bearing in rhetoric are like background music to the country. Brown argued and no. They're not. They're these two psychopaths who are doing stuff that everyone else thinks is important. Yeah how many people look. This is just ridiculous to believe that people in america actually care about what the president does with his wife. I mean most people don't even know who the vice president is. When i say like you're everything to me just mean like you're awesome. Yeah i think in this case what they're saying they will get to the actual quote. Maybe they use this everything quote somewhere here in the store can find it But i think what they're saying. Okay here's the here's the longer quote this is from Let's see who is this guy. Perry perry very. It's a long article barbara. Perry the director dot is a long article from politico about biden and his wife. Kissing each other occasional not just them but going back in time and looking at displays of affection by presidents As well as dr barbara parry director of the presidential studies at the university of virginia's miller center she says casual displays of affection weren't always so commonplace for first couples according to dr barbara perry and then after paragraphs paragraphs of this getting back to the current to in that sense the biden's displays of affection appears somewhat four and after the last four years even though they represent yet another return to the norms of past administrations that the new president repeatedly pledged to rehabilitate on the campaign trail. She said it's comforting. It's warm it's genuine. And so if you layer and so if you layer. The covid issue are divided country and the violence in our country..

america Perry dr barbara perry one dr barbara parry two psychopaths biden first couples university of virginia Brown barbara each miller center most powerful most last four years four
"miller center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Weather meteorologist. Danielle Middle WBZ Boston's news radio. Right now it's 39 degrees clear Sky over Boston at 605 as the country braces for Donald Trump Second impeachment trial. A new survey from The Associated Press finds 47% of Americans say the former president should be convicted. All 40% believe he should not. Presidential historian Barbara Perry, director of the University of Virginia's Miller Center for Politics, says regardless of the outcome, she believes it's essential to hold the trial if for no other reason, the trial needs to be held for that accountability to get to the facts, even if there's no conviction in the end. Opening arguments are set to start next week. A 17 year old girl shot and killed late Thursday night at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Boston's downtown Crossing 20 year old Messiah. Leggett of Hyde Park was arraigned yesterday on gun charges and is being held on $100,000 bail. Investigation continues its time for 93 financial I'm Madison Rogers WBZ Boston's news radio. The following is a commercial announcement. It's the money minute. I'm Joni Siani with Paul and Larry Welch. We've been talking this week about consolidating all of these scattered accounts. Once we have them in our inventory, then what do we do? I mean, basically, what we talked about is consolidating all of maybe a retirement accounts into one brokerage IRA. Now you have all of your retirement money and one brokerage. That's really you could say, Well, is that diversified inside that broke a diary? You could be as diversified as you want. I mean, you could buy one stock about 100 Stocks s so the first question is has come up with the Objective of what you are portfolio should be. And then it's matter of whether you want to use individual stocks and bonds, mutual funds in exchange traded funds and having the appropriate allocation for growth or income of both. I see. And there's the money minute. Join us every Saturday night from 6 to 8 right here on WBZ. And if you have a question, you can give us a call at 1 809 089334. The following broadcast is a commercial presentation paid for by the 93 financial group. Welcome and thanks for tuning into family financial focus with the Welsh brothers from 93 Financial Group. 93 Financial Group is an SEC registered investment adviser and licensed insurance agency before buying any of the securities or insurance.

Boston Donald Trump Hyatt Regency Hotel Barbara Perry Financial Group Danielle Middle Madison Rogers Leggett Joni Siani SEC Hyde Park Miller Center for Politics Larry Welch University of Virginia president The Associated Press director Paul
AP-NORC poll: Americans are split on Trump's impeachment

WBZ Afternoon News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

AP-NORC poll: Americans are split on Trump's impeachment

"Country braces for Donald Trump Second impeachment trial. A new survey from The Associated Press finds 47% of Americans say the former president should be convicted while 40% believe he should not. Presidential historian Barbara Perry, director of the University of Virginia's Miller Miller, Center for politics, says She believes regardless of the outcome, it's essential to hold a trial if for no other reason that trial needs to be held for that accountability to get to the facts, even if there's no conviction in the end that trial set to start next week

Barbara Perry Donald Trump Miller Miller Center For Politics The Associated Press University Of Virginia
"miller center" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"I'm Dave Packard Before leaving for Delaware for the weekend, President Biden urging Congress to swiftly passes $1.9 trillion coronavirus really feel ABC is Alex Percy in Washington with the part of the bill, the president says, is not willing to compromise on with Republicans. The House now pushing forward with Biden's plan after Senate approval, and the way the Bills frames, they don't need any GOP votes, But the president, making it clear the payment amount is not negotiable. They're going to be $1400 period. Friday's dismal jobs report on Lee, adding to the urgency Nearly 18 million Americans are now claiming some form of unemployment and more than 50 million people, including one in four Children are going hungry. A third Corona virus vaccine could be approved by the end of the month. An FDA panel needs February 26 to decide whether to OK a jab by Johnson and Johnson. Early results show it less effective and find her and modern is against moderate to severe disease. But Things have changed since those earlier vaccines were tested. The pandemic today is a much more complex pandemic than it was several months ago. So the trials conducted now are really very different Ballgame than trials conducted last fall after Dan Brooke led the design effort for the vaccine alongside of Johnson and Johnson, and says the other two vaccines were studied before the emergence of more contagious variance. With Donald Trump second impeachment trial starting next week. A new survey from The Associated Press Norick Center for Public Affairs Research finds 47% of Americans say the former president should be convicted while 40% believe he should not. Presidential historian Barbara Perry, director University of Virginia's Miller Center for Politics is regardless of the outcome. It's essential to hold the trial, which kicks off every night. If for no other reason, the trial needs to be held for that accountability to get to the facts, even if there's no conviction in the end, and conviction is considered unlikely. You're listening to ABC News. Okay.

President Biden president Johnson Dave Packard ABC Lee ABC News Donald Trump GOP Alex Percy Delaware Senate Congress The Associated Press Norick Ce Barbara Perry Washington Dan Brooke FDA Miller Center for Politics University of Virginia
6 in 10 Americans say Trump has 'little or no respect for democratic traditions or institutions'

WBZ Midday News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

6 in 10 Americans say Trump has 'little or no respect for democratic traditions or institutions'

"Braces for Donald Trump's second MP. It's been trial and you survey from The Associated Press finds of 47% of Americans say the former president should be convicted while 40% believe he should not. The poll also finds that about six out of 10 people think the former president has little to no respect for the country's democratic institutions and traditions. Meanwhile, presidential historian Barbara Perry, the director of the University of Virginia's Miller Center for Politics, says regardless of the outcome, it is critical to hold the trial for no other reason. The trial needs to be held for that accountability to get to the facts, even if there's no conviction. In the end, the impeachment trial is set to begin next week.

Donald Trump Barbara Perry The Associated Press University Of Virginia's Mille
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Policy on China. How different will it be? I ask Elizabeth economy from Stanford and antitrust enforcement gets a new regime under a new president. I talked to the outgoing and a trust chief, Macon del Rahim, for his take on what he accomplished and what is left to be done. But first Joe Biden was sworn in this week as the 46th, president of the United States. In his inaugural address, he delivered a message of unity and co working together to meet the challenges we face as a nation and overcome the challenges in front of us requires the most elusive of all things in a democracy. Unity requires us to come together in common love that defines us as Americans for reaction to the president's address and how it compares to past speeches. Bloomberg contributors. Jeannie Shawn's A. No and Rick Davis draw. Me and talking to Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. I thought that was artfully done. I would say that it won't then threads from Lincoln and FDR and John Kennedy. I'm not sure it will rival their inaugural addresses. They're usually considered the top in among the top five. In terms of the rhetoric that's involved. But what really struck me was the spirituality of it that you have. First of all the the now president, starting his day with a Catholic Mass is only the second Catholic president. And then you have his his priest who talked about and quoted Pope Francis about how we must dream together because if we are isolated, we tend to see mirages. And then I thought that the spirituality theme was picked up by the print now president with his reference to his own soul, where he said, I pledge my whole soul. To meet the challenges that we face and that tied so well into his announcement of his candidacy, in which he said after Charlottesville he knew he had to run in order to restore America's soul. It's such a great point, and even over and above that President Biden Quoted ST Augusta and saying it was a scene from his church. And actually head injury bother heads in a silent prayer for the country. I don't remember the last time the president did that It may have happened other than a prayer breakfast, but I don't remember it. I certainly don't remember one in an inaugural address s O give us a sense over all of these inaugural addresses, Barbara from your perspective, What do they have meant to accomplish or what can be accomplished? How much of this substance? How much of this style? Oh, it's always both. As as all of our politics happened to be, especially in the modern media era, But I would say that they're meant to present that Peaceful transition of power s. Oh, they're meant to show that they're meant to symbolize unity, bringing the country together. If if they can, and they're meant to provide in times of severe challenge, as in 18 61 is an 18 64 on DSA. Certainly in 1933 with FDR. They're meant to provide comfort. An aide to the American people and to say here I am the new president. I'm going to work on these challenges. And together we can overcome them was very, uh, I wanted to ask you about sort of the tone. There was a lot of sort of dark Irish messaging around this with, you know, the discussions of the light and the dark. I felt I was reading an old, You know, Irish novel or something, and How much I mean, I my impression, and you would be a better judge. Business was pretty personal speech that he gave that I didn't feel like the riders missed the person here, and sometimes they do. No, I think that's absolutely right. He didn't tend to become tearful would certainly in mode, and actually, this is more like the bushes. The Bushes were well known both father and son and a whole family forgetting tearful on and after four years of the president who didn't vote at all about anything, either happily or sadly. I found myself becoming Bearcat clamp. Just even seen Joe Biden take the oath of office. So I think that Bill Clinton helped to make his career by dealing people's pain, telling them that he did and genuinely feeling their pain. I think Joe Biden, as he said in this inaugural address. I thought this was very poignant where he said you in effect. You never know what fate is going to deal you. And we all know his story. And we know fate has dealt him really bad hands over the years. So there was this triumph I thought of his overcoming that but being able to say to the people I can empathize with you. I empathize with you families. You 400,000 families who've lost people to the virus. You know my story and I will help the whole country to overcome this professor period wanted to ask you for all the talk of unity, and I thought, you know President Biden. I've got to get used to saying that Was sober about the reality that people may look, you know, suspect at that at this moment, What do you think His next steps are in terms of actually achieving that with the enormous agenda, beginning with immigration in the stimulus bill? Well, it will be hard to be sure, but he I think is following in the footsteps of FDR, who said in his inaugural in addition to We have nothing to fear but fear itself but also said Americans need and want action and action. We will give them And that is what we will see from Joe Biden in this avalanche of executive orders, which has now become the norm in new presidencies, because our legislative system is it's so gridlock. I'm not convinced that hey, can find unity. It won't be easy, and I think if anybody can succeed He can, thanks to Barbara Perry from the University of Virginia's Miller Center, coming up the Biden administration's policy on China. How different will it be? I ask Elizabeth economy from Stanford. That's next. You're.

president President Biden FDR Barbara Perry Joe Biden Biden Elizabeth Biden administration China University of Virginia Miller Center Macon del Rahim Stanford United States Bill Clinton Bloomberg Charlottesville Bushes Jeannie Shawn John Kennedy
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Sometimes whether it was really news on whether or not you know who our responsibility and kind of fueling some of the fury You know what? I think This is a legitimate concern that people really need to examine and it goes back to the 2016 presidential campaign when you had networks that would run Trump's rallies from start to finish, giving him a disproportionate amount of air time, but also at the same time airing a lot of you know the falsehood set. We have all gotten used to now in the series Always. Well, you know it's news. Well, just because it's news or might be newsworthy doesn't mean it needs to be put out there. And and how do you Properly. We're refute the false allegations in that. And how do you do that in real time and then continues all the way to you know whether it's you know his press conferences he did early. In his administration or the cove it daily briefings that he did through last spring and summer where he was just dispensing harmful misinformation. And then obviously what we've seen with Facebook and Twitter. Both suspending him. You know, what is what is the role of social media as well? So you know, we've never had a president who has Push the limits on disinformation as much and you know, the theory had always been. You know what the president says, matters that need to be covered. Maybe that shouldn't be the world going forward. That was former deputy secretary of Labor and senior fellow at the University of Virginia Miller Center. Chris Lu, a member of President elect Joe Biden's transition team, still ahead with our focus on politics this week, so easy at times to forget that we are yes. In the midst of a raging help, endemic, we will Get this under control in a way that lets our lives go on, But it won't be easy. We've got to be vigilant. We've gotta replace complacency with vigilance. Access Health International President Dr William Hazeltine on a health epidemic.

Trump president International President Dr William Hazeltine Chris Lu Joe Biden Facebook deputy secretary University of Virginia Miller Twitter senior fellow
US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

The Takeaway

05:51 min | 1 year ago

US 'Safe Harbor' Day Reinforces Biden’s Electoral Victory

"This week marked the so-called safe harbor deadline when states have certified the results for the us presidential election typically by the harvard deadline lection related challenges at the state level or all wrapped up but president trump is continuing to claim without proof that the results in many of the states that voted for joe biden are fraudulent and should be tossed out a lawsuit filed by the state attorney general of texas and supported by the president as well as seventeen republican. State's attorney general and over one hundred. Republican members of the house is asking the supreme court to overturn the results of the election in four states carried by biden. Pennsylvania georgia wisconsin and michigan. That would bring biden below the two hundred seventy electoral college votes. He would need to be the president-elect elect so how can an election certified and contested helping us to make sense of it. All is our friend. Barbara perry the presidential studies director at the university of virginia's miller center she begins by explaining who the electors are and what the electoral college actually does elect doors. One might need them as delegates to this thing called the electoral college. Actually have a t shirt that says property of the athletic department of the electoral college. Which i love that. The politics department at uva gave all of the graduate students at one point. But it's not really a place it's a is it. Is this group of electors. They are chosen typically by a method that is determined by the state legislatures in each and that concept spelled out in the constitution that the legislatures of the states get to choose the manner in which these electoral college delegates or electors will be chosen and that can be through a primary system much as the presidential. Candidates are selected. It can be through a convention of the party in a state but typically these are people who are party leaders. One might call them. Party regulars party activists the only thing that they cannot be is a federal office holder so for example a senator member's house representatives. A member of the cabinet could not participate as an elector but typically it is determined the methodist election by the state legislatures and then really turning it over to the party organizations in each state to choose. This will call it a slate of electors. So then let's walk through what happens. We have the election. We have as we've seen especially this year the states. Sometimes it takes a little longer than some states. Take a little longer than others to certify the results and then we have something known as safe harbor day which happened this week on tuesday december. Eighth can you explain what that is. Yes i in legal terms particularly as it's used in this context of an election. Is that once. This date is set as this is the safe harbor. And once you state certifies your election results you by that date. Then get to be in the safe harbor where your determination and your certification of that election should not be prone to any more of the storm in the seas and the roiling that could come from those who might be questioning the election and its results and so that's where we are now so help us understand this barbara. Because we've passed the safe harbor day we know that every state has certified its electors and yet the texas attorney general is filing a lawsuit or has filed a lawsuit asking the supreme court to block the electors from four states. How can this be possible given that the safe harbor. Data's already passed. I agree with you on asking that question and my answer to that would be what an irony think. Back to two thousand. Think back to the bush. V gore controversy which was much closer because remember that the florida recount that was being requested by al gore Because he was just a few votes behind probably about three to five hundred votes behind. George bush in that popular vote count in florida and whichever person was going to be certified and deemed. The winner of florida was going to exactly end up with two hundred two hundred seventy votes necessary to win the electoral college. So that's how razor send those margins were so understandably al gore was going to keep pressing. But here's the historical irony that republicans were saying on behalf of george bush. Oh safe harbor day is approaching so we really must wrap up and stop this recount in florida and the. Us supreme court accepted that argument by the bush side and said we cannot violate this concept of the safe harbor. Florida must certify its vote and indeed the recount stop. Florida certified their votes which showed that bush had won by sort of three to five hundred votes. That was it and that was it for gore. so by view is isn't an irony that the republican party. This time round led by at this point that commander in chief himself but the attorney general of texas joined by what sixteen seventeen other attorneys general. Republicans in states are now completely violating that concept of. Let's really pay attention to and follow the safe harbor rule right i think many constitutional scholars would also argue that. It's unlikely the supreme court is even going to take this case nonetheless rule on it but the fact is we do know at this point that every single state has certified. It's election correct. That is correct.

President Trump Electoral College Barbara Perry Miller Center Biden Department Of The Electoral Co Supreme Court Joe Biden Texas University Of Virginia Harvard Wisconsin Pennsylvania Georgia Florida Michigan Al Gore Cabinet George Bush House
"miller center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"miller center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Court to overturn the results of the election in four states carried by Biden, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Wisconsin and Michigan. That would bring Biden Hello. The 270 electoral college votes he would need to be the president elect. So how could an election be both certified and contested? Helping us to make sense of it all, is our friend Barbara Perry, the presidential studies director at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She begins by explaining who the electors are and what the Electoral College actually does. Elect doors. One might view them as delegates to this thing, called the Electoral College actually have a T shirt that says property of the athletic Department of the Electoral College, which I love that the politics department at U V A gave all of the graduate students at one point But it's not really a place it is people. It is this group of electors. They are chosen, typically by a method that is determined by the state legislatures and each state and that Concept is spelled out in the Constitution that the legislatures of the states get to choose the manner in which these electoral college delegates are electors will be chosen. And that can be through a primary system. Much as the presidential candidates are selected. It can be through a convention of the party in a state but typically these are people who are party leaders. One might call them party regulars, party activists. The only thing that they cannot be is a federal office holder. So, for example, a senator member's House representatives, a member of the cabinet. Could not participate as an elector, but typically it is determined the method of selection by the state legislatures and then really turning it over to the party organizations in each state to choose this, we'll call it a slate of electors. So then let's walk through what happens. We have the election we have as we've seen, especially this year. The state's sometimes it takes them a little longer than some states take a little longer than others to certify the results. And then we have something known as Safe Harbor Day. Which happened this week on Tuesday, December 8th. Can you explain what that is? Yes. In legal terms, particularly as it's used in this context of a new election is that once this date is set as this is the safe harbor, and once you I state certifies your election results you by that date, then get to be in the safe harbor, where your determination and your certification of that election Should not be prone to any more of the storms in the season. The roiling that could come from those who might be questioning the election and its results. And so that's where we are now. So help us understand this brother because We've passed the safe harbor day. We know that every state has certified it select yours. And yet the Texas attorney general is filing a lawsuit or has filed a lawsuit asking the Supreme Court To block the electors from four states. How can this be possible, given that the safe harbor date has already passed? I agree with you on asking that question And my answer to that would be what an irony. Think back to 2000. Think back to the Bush v. Gore controversy, which was much closer because remember that the Florida recount that was being requested by Al Gore because he was just a few votes behind. Probably about 3 to 500 votes behind George Bush and that popular vote count in Florida and whichever person was going to be certified and deemed the winner. Ah, Florida was going to exactly end up with 202 170 votes necessary to win the electoral college. So that's how razor thin those margins were so understandably. Al Gore was going to keep pressing. But here's the historical irony that Republicans were saying on behalf of George Bush. Oh, safe Harbor Day is approaching, so we really must wrap up and stop this recount in Florida and the U. S. Supreme Court accepted that argument by the Bush sighed and said, We cannot violate this concept of the Safe Harbor, Florida must certify its vote and indeed the recount stop. Florida certified their votes, which showed that Bush had won by again sort of 3 to 500 votes. That was it, and that was it for Al Gore. So by view is, isn't it? An irony that the Republican Party this time around, led by at this point that commander in chief himself but also the attorney general of Texas, joined by what 16 17 other attorneys general, Republicans in states are now completely violating that concept of Let's really pay attention to and follow the safe harbor rule, right? I think many constitutional scholars would also argue that it's unlikely the Supreme Court is even going to take up this case nonetheless rule on it, but The fact is, we do know at this point that every single state has certified. It's election. Correct. That is correct. Yeah, And so what happens then? On December 14th? I mean, do these electors actually, in normal pre Kobe times do they actually really get together on campus? So to speak for the electoral college like, how does this work? Well, there is not one big campus with an athletic department with multi and cheerleaders. It's not as though you are the University of California, Berkeley at U C. L. A and San Diego. It's not as though there's one big Electoral college with 50 state campuses and by the way, we also include the District of Columbia has three electoral votes in the Electoral college, so we would have 51 campuses. But we do have a system whereby typically on these electors are required to meet on the six days after the safe Harbor day, which this time will be December 14th and there to meet in the state capitals..

Al Gore George Bush Florida U. S. Supreme Court athletic Department Biden Texas Barbara Perry attorney University of Virginia president Pennsylvania Republican Party Miller Center senator director
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 2 years ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
"miller center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"miller center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Changing their vote disenfranchises my vote, But I don't You know, you don't hear about all the dead people voting who voted for them. If anybody go about trying to find them and prosecute it seems to me like speeding. You can get away with it may be under 10 Miles an hour, and then they give you a ticket, But little cheating hurts, too. And I understand it. It doesn't affect maybe the election results, but the more people get away with it. I think the more people will do it. Is there an organization or somewhere that tries to catch this? Absolutely so I You know, I talked to state election directors all the time to talk about what they do to prosecute motor fraud on bit's extensive, so states will exchange you know, data there there are. There's a national program called Eric. Which is a data, you know, printing organization that helps states determine whether they're voting Lister accurate, You know. It uses. Yes, Social Security Administration records and death records and all kinds of records to kind of ensure that states have accurate data about who is eligible to vote. And you know who's moved and all this kind of data that's kind of put together and and and what happens after every election? Is that See it's called their list and they look at who voted against, you know who should have voted. And if there is a problem, for example, if they discovered that somebody has voted in two states or if they discover that someone you know who you know, you know isn't alive. You know it has been dead for many years has apparently casting a vote, and then they go after it on Ben. People are prosecuted, but the number of people who are prosecuted when that kind of investigation unfolds is usually starts out as a Eventually bigger number you know, in the dozens on Ben, you know it's rendered down as as sort of figure out what was really going on from this morning's Washington Journal, Rebecca Green, William and Mary Law School professor of law and now we bring you a discussion about presidential transition. Hosted by the University of Virginia's Miller Center. C SPAN Radio. W C. Is PIA from Washington Come to another Miller center Webinar, this 10 produced and co Organized by the Centers for Presidential Transitions that the partnership for Public Service and Citizens for a strong democracy. I'm billing fullest, and I'm gonna moderate today's conversation, and it's the real pleasure to be with you all and they have these terrific guests. Presidential Transition Act was adopted by Congress in 1963 to provide an important statutory framework for the peaceful transfer of power. It has been updated several times since then. Until we discuss some of the important pressing issues coming out of that in the current transition and transferred Strong astral weeks Since my most major networks designated Joe Biden is president left buying team has been moving forward on a transition they selected in a dance to do. White House chief of staff. Have launched a pandemic task force and soon will be announcing other White House and cabinet level positions. It started conversations and foreign heads of state and with the number of American political leaders. Small But growing number of senior Republican leaders have acknowledged the outcome of the election, including former President Bush, his chief of staff, Andy Card, former secretary of state Condi Rice, counselor call room and a handful of other Republican senators. And yet we still not had a formal concession by President Trump that maybe a personal matter of his continuing to final legal claims in a number of states but by not conceding he's also hold held up a formal extradition that the beginning of the transfer of power should begin. Entertainment. Sorry, that is well. Joe Biden is transitioning from candidate the President President Trump and his administration is not transferring knowledge, know how technology and real estate The incoming team. How big a problem is this? How important is it that this happened now? When does it need to start when should start by law and one of the consequences of the July Those are some of the questions. We're going to address today with a terrific panel. We're joined today by Michael Chertoff, who served as secretary of Homeland security under President George W. Bush from 5 4009 before heading up THS. Mr Shore Account Services, a federal judge on the U. S Court of Appeals for the third circuit. Earlier during more than a decade as a federal prosecutor he invested in prosecuting cases of political corruption, organized crime, corporate fraud, terrorism. Including the investigation of the 9 11 terrorist attacks, is now co founder and executive chairman of the church, off Group and internationally recognized leader in security and Risk management Advisory services. Janet Napolitano is professor of public policy at the Golden School of Public Policy at U. C. Berkeley. She served as the 20th, president of the University of California that agent nation's largest Public Research University, joining the University of California professor Napolitano served as secretary of Homeland Security from 2009 to 2013. She's a former two term governor of Arizona. Former attorney general of Arizona and former U S attorney for Arizona. In 2019, the Polisario published house Safer We Homeland Security since 9 11 that you earned her B s degree of Santa Clara University. And her law degree from the University of Virginia. And finally, Dave Marr check is a retired executive from the Carlyle Group who also had worked in government at the State Department. He's serving in a volunteer role as director for the center of Four presidential transition that the Partnership for Public Service Is also an abject, adjunct professor of the Tuck School of Business of Darkness. Is your counsel at the law firm of Coming to the Berlin He spent 12 years at the Carlyle Group and also where he recently served as managing director. Global head of external affairs and lead Carlisle's regulatory and government affairs, communications and branding and sustainability efforts. So we're really delighted to have this terrific group. Let me start with this stalled GS a determination for the ascertain its, uh What is that? And why does it matter? Let me start with Dave. Since the center for presidential Transitions has played the title role in connecting transitions Now sort of couple cycles. So gave give us a sense of what this ascertainment is. What are they trying to ascertain? And what happens when it happens? This William Angeles University of Virginia's Miller Center thanks so much Bill and thanks for the Miller Center, when we also give my salute to Michael Chertoff, who I've known for the Holocaust Museum Museum and elsewhere for many years and also toe sectary Napolitano. I wish he was still president of University, California because None of the other. You suggest, even more important. My daughter's at Berkeley and I'd like her to check in on how her studies air going. So maybe she still has that influence but said that you struggled with the word ascertainment because it's not supposed to be a word that is commonly known. Because the issue of ascertaining the winner of the election has never been controversial, Never been politicized. There is a provision in the 1963 Presidential Transition Act, which gives the G s a administrator the responsibility of ascertaining the outcome of the election. There are many other government agencies that have similar responsibilities, too. Act when there's a new president elect. The Secret Service on Saturday morning significantly expanded their protection around President Biden because he was going to be president like fighting. And so that was not a politicized decision. The Secret Service just did that. So, unfortunately, even the most noncontroversial ministerial acts in this world In this town are being politicized today and this is this is one of them the subject that the criteria is basically if the outcome is clear, and the outcome is clear, the all the networks have called the election. Aziz, You said in your piece from last Sunday, four states would have to be turned over the likelihood of a recount. Changing the outcome is almost zero. Even President Bush stated in his own statement that the outcome is clear. And so we'll get into this. But the GSC should Make this ascertainment and then the Biden team should be able to get access to all the support which we could talk about similar. Well, let me bring in. Mr Chertoff is Napolitano and into this conversation because I do think the first thing that should be on people's mind in a peaceful transfer is Who's watching the home front is..

president President George W. Bush professor Napolitano Joe Biden Michael Chertoff University of Virginia fraud President Trump Dave Marr Miller Center Public Service and Citizens Arizona Congress Ben Carlyle Group Centers for Presidential Lister
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 2 years ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
"miller center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"miller center" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"You know, in the dozens on Ben, you know it's Wendell down, as as he sort of figure out what was really going on from this morning's Washington Journal, Rebecca Green, William and Mary Law School professor of law, and now we bring you a discussion about presidential transition hosted by the University of Virginia's Miller Center Live. C SPAN radio W. C. S P A from Washington. Welcome to another Miller Center WEBINAR, this 10 produced and co organized by the Center for Presidential Transitions that the Partnership for Public Service And citizens for a strong democracy. I'm Dylan told us and I'm going to moderate today's conversation, and it's a real pleasure to be with you all and they have these terrific guests. The Presidential Transition Act was adopted by Congress in 1963 to provide an important statutory framework for the peaceful transfer of power. It has been updated several times since then. And today we're gonna discuss some of the important pressing issues coming out of that in the current transition and transfer. It's been almost a week since made most major networks designated Joe Biden is President elect Biden team has been moving forward on a transition they've selected and announced the new White House chief of staff. Wants to pandemic task force and soon will be announcing other White House and Cabinet level positions. They've started conversations of foreign heads of state and with the number of American political leaders. Small but growing number of senior Republican leaders have acknowledged the outcome of the election, including former President Bush, his chief of staff, Andy Card, former secretary of state Condi Rice, counselor call Rove and a handful of other Republican senators. And yet we still not have a formal concession by President Trump that maybe a personal matter of his continuing to file legal claims in a number of states, But by not conceding he's also hold held up a formal as flirtation. That's the beginning of the transfer of power should begin. Ascertainment. Sorry, that is well. Joe Biden is transitioning from candidate the President President Trump and his administration is not transferring. Knowledge don't have technology and real estate to the incoming team. How big a problem is this? How important is it that this happened now? When does it need to start when should start by law? And what are the consequences of the delay? Those are some of the questions. We're going to address today with a terrific panel. We're joined today by Michael Chertoff, who served as secretary of Homeland security under President George W. Bush from 5 4009 before heading up THS. Mr Chertoff Services, a federal judge on the U. S Court of Appeals for the third circuit. Earlier during more than a decade as a federal prosecutor he invested in prosecuting cases of political corruption, organized crime, corporate fraud and terrorism. Including the investigation of the 9 11 terrorist attacks, is now co founder and executive chairman of the church, off Group and internationally recognized leader in security and Risk management Advisers Services. Janet Napolitano is professor of public policy at the Golden School of Public Policy at U. C. Berkeley. She served as the 20th, president of the University of California that ancient nation's largest Public Research university hired to joining the University of California Professor Napolitano, sort of a secretary of Homeland Security from 2009 to 2013. She's a former two term governor of Arizona. Former attorney general of Arizona and former U S security for Arizona. In 2019. Napolitano published House Safer We Homeland Security since 9 11. She earned her B s degree of Santa Clara University. And her law degree from the University of Virginia and finally Dave Marr check is the retired executive from the Carlyle Group who also had worked in government at the State Department. He's serving a volunteer role as director for the center of for Presidential Transition that the Partnership for Public Service he's also an abject, adjunct professor of the Dutch School of Business of Dartmouth. As your counsel at the law firm of Covington and Burling. He spent 12 years of the Carlyle Group and also where he recently serves managing director and global head of external affairs. And, uh, like Carlisle's regulatory and government affairs, communications and branding and sustainability efforts, so we're really delighted to have this terrific group. Let me start with this stalled gs. A determination for the s 30 minutes. What is that? And why does it matter? Let me start with Dave. Since Center for Presidential Transitions has played integral role in connecting transitions Now for a couple cycles. So, Dave, give us a sense of what this ascertainment is. What are they trying to Esther Tain? And what happens when it happens? That's William Angeles University of Virginia's Miller Center. Thanks so much Bill and thanks for the Miller Center, let me also give my salute to Michael Chertoff, who I've known for the Holocaust Museum Museum and elsewhere for many years and also toe sexually, Napolitano. I wish you were still president of University, California because I'm on the board at UCSD, But more importantly, my daughter's at Berkeley and I'd like her to check in on how her studies air going, so she's maybe she still has that influence. But So, Bill, you struggled with the word ascertainment because it's not supposed to be a word that is commonly known because the issue of ascertaining the winner of the election has never been controversial, never been politicized. There is a provision in the 1963 Presidential Transition Act, which gives the G s a administrator the responsibility of ascertaining the outcome of the election. There are many other government agencies that have similar responsibilities to act when there's a new president elect the Secret Service on Saturday morning significantly expanded their protection. Around President elect Biden because he was going to be president like fighting. And so that was not a politicized decision. The Secret Service just did that. So, unfortunately, even the most noncontroversial ministerial acts in this world. In this town are being politicized today and this is this is one of them the subject that the criteria is basically if the outcome is clear, and the outcome is clear, the all the networks have called the election. Aziz, You said in your piece from last Sunday, four states would have to be turned over the likely another recount. Changing the outcome is almost zero. Even President Bush stated in his own statement that the outcome is clear. And so we'll get into this, but the GSC should make this ascertainment And then the Biden team should be able to get access to all the support which we could talk about some more. Well, let me bring in..

president President George W. Bush Joe Biden Professor Napolitano President Trump Center for Presidential Transi Miller Center University of Virginia Carlyle Group Dave Marr Arizona Michael Chertoff Secret Service Washington Miller Center Live Congress professor of law managing director Dylan
"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"miller center" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That is a Bloomberg business flash Charlie thanks a lot you are listening to Bloomberg businessweek let's get back to our conversation with Chris Lee senior fellow at the university of Virginia's Miller center also former deputy secretary of labor under president Obama he's also work notably in all three branches of the government so Chris you understand politics you understand the government what do you make of a week like this from the democratic side well it's this is certainly been a challenging week and you know and the other one or the one thing you're thankful for that given the way the news cycle works you know by next week we'll be talking I've talked about three other things at this point now look obviously the big focus now is looking for to New Hampshire and that you know we left hi while a bit muddled for a variety of reasons but even if there had been any technology issues with about reporting you still would have basically had two people that more lax tied at the finish Bernie Sanders and keep the judge and then to people two to three people in that second here and so I don't know that we are great clarity but you know this is why we have primaries yeah I know it's interesting though right because you're exactly right Chris but I do wonder you know we've done a lot of coverage as you would imagine not just talking about some of the unfortunate missed momentum coming out of Iowa that was you know for that for the leader right because at some point you just need the party to kind of come behind when when when individual you know and and unfortunately not withstanding even if even if I what had turned out perfectly I'm not sure we're going to get that because I you know if I'm predicting New Hampshire I think you Hampshire is going to be just as modeled and then we moved to some different states in Nevada in South Carolina that potentially Joe Biden or Elizabeth Warren could do better and you know I I don't think we're going to have much clarity after the first four early states and then obviously that the you know the big elephant in the room after that is is Mike Bloomberg on super Tuesday so I think this could go on for awhile well I we just wanna remind everybody of course Michael Bloomberg is a democratic candidate for the upcoming presidential election of course Mike Bloomberg is the owner of Bloomberg out people in Burke philanthropy and of course Bloomberg radio Bloomberg TV yeah I know and I just I guess Chris just push a little bit further is you know I think there's a lot of discussion to about kind of what's going on at the Democratic Party is they're just not the coordination you know that whole idea with it was Republicans or Democrats right you want to fight the incumbent and who's in the White House and it does feel like there's more about battling one another in a certain amount of that comes that's part of the process but rather than saying okay what's best for the party how do we beat the incumbent you know and and this is always a challenge when you are the party out of power and there is you know there's frankly an ideological rift within the party right now you know when you look at the demographics of the party it's basically one third moderate one third liberal and one third very liberal and you've got a variety of candidates who can sort of each are trying to capture one of those lanes and yet they're not really kind of crossing over to any of the other lanes right now and so you know what this is important conversation in and you know I think back to two thousand eight when I was with Barack Obama a lot of people are saying the same thing when we were in in a really old very extended pitch battle with Hillary Clinton and in the in the party to come together and so this is the messiness of the process and yes I wish we were a United on day one but that's certainly not the way it's going to be at least for the foreseeable future and so what does that mean as we look forward months and months how much do you worry from the democratic side that this is just opening a very wide lane for president trump get we reelected well you know what is interesting and again you know I owe it this is at the selection is really more about Donald Trump and you know not withstanding the fact his approval ratings have come up a little bit he still below water and and given where the unemployment rate is a three part three point six percent he should be doing a lot better so ultimately this comes down to being a referendum on his performance in as long as you've got a nominee who I think can bring the different factions together and apart that will depend on who that person vice presidential pick is and how well they reach out to the other primary pundits I think that can come together and I think you know you had these kind of messy things before a perfect example of twenty sixteen in the Republican Party minute if you go back and look at this at this point you know Ted Cruz had just won Iowa Donald Trump was you know and so the this goes on for a while and even at that convention in twenty sixteen you still at Ted Cruz holding out his support and then you know the party come together and and and so we sort of forget that history and is important understand these primary battles can get a little messy all right Chris flew always good to catch up with you we love talking about such a wide variety of things senior fellow at the university of Virginia Miller center and former deputy secretary of labor under president Obama thank you just what I meant to the headline Intelsat could receive four point eighty five billion dollars under the F. C. C. C. band order I think there was expectations that it might be a little bit more money this has to do with the so called C. band spectrum that is expected to be key for the US is transition to five G. satellite operators who have control of this part of the spectrum they have been expecting pay outs for the FCC to get access to it and so I think there's been a lot of discussion about how much the pay out would be and so it's interesting JP Morgan has come in and saying that the stock is going to have Intel says it does that stocks gonna have little or no fundamental value after all of this pay out especially if it doesn't measure whether rumors of bankruptcy said doc had been off as much as fifteen and half percent now it is some of those gains now down around four percent so we'll see what happens next let's get over to.

senior fellow Miller center Bloomberg Charlie Chris Lee university of Virginia
"miller center" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

09:11 min | 3 years ago

"miller center" Discussed on The Takeaway

"During Times like these it's always a good idea to check in with a historian so I called up Professor Barbara Perry the Presidential Studies director at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. I started off by asking her to talk to me about the differences in how Americans are responding to the prospect of an impeachment today. And how that compares to the past given that we've had three three of these now in my lifetime and yes I am getting her. It doesn't seem like I've been here that long. And we have had three in my lifetime. And and that's in inquiries impeachment inquiries and then if you also think about the fact that we have heard conversations about impeachment even when we haven't haven't gone to an impeachment inquiry so you had people bringing up on the Democratic side possibilities of impeachment of George W Bush or are you obviously had people believing that Barack Obama was an illegitimate president. Maybe people would even go as far as to think about impeachment. I think Bank of if we're talking about the emergency and crisis situation used to be on the wall of school or a hotel or a public building where you'd have those fire alarms and it would say break glass. Ask in case of emergency and you would break the glass only if you were going to pull the fire alarm but that was to keep it protected so people wouldn't just lean up against it and have the fire alarm pulled or it would be hard to do so what I see is this metaphor. Is that particularly if we talk about the incumbent president who talked about breaking breaking the China or we say throwing the chessboard up in the air but the glass is being broken. It seems every day now by someone on one side or the other and I think you also hit the nail on the head to say it is this first of all the polarization that we face today that yes we came through the polarized sixties but we still had the the Cold War consensus that held us together somewhat in the period of Nixon and so that finally when things got so bad and the smoking gun was found on the tapes. That people in his own party said okay. The line has been crossed. So that's one big difference. The other is twenty four seven media which we did not have in those days. That's made eight. A huge difference. Social Media has made a huge difference. the fact that we just know that this is the possibility now that can happen. Relatively speaking every few years means that it doesn't take on the gravity as you say that it did for Nixon when we hadn't had an impeachment inquiry for one hundred years do you then believe as some Republicans are seeing right now that okay. Well guess what. It's just a matter of time. Democrats are going to have a president and we have a Republican House. Get ready for another impeachment. I do worry about that As someone who studies presidential history and in other parts of my scholarly life studied the constitution and the Supreme Court in Congress. I do worry about that because if you go back to the founders and you look at what. They said Eh in their debates in Philadelphia about impeachment Particularly a several who were most important obviously Madison. Because he's known as the father of the constitution because he wrote a good part of it. The fact that Edmund Randolph in Richmond was a key player in the debates for ratification in Virginia before the ratification itself and then George Mason and his well the three of them particularly those Virginians were arguing about what this impeachment clause should be and they themselves said first of all. We don't want a situation where this can just be used as a routine matter where the president is always at the Beck and call of Congress because impeachment is hanging in over his head. STA- didn't want it to be easy. They wanted it to be hard and unusual and they didn't want it to be routine normalized. They did worry about foreign influence. Louis we should say that was one of their main concerns was foreign influence over the president. But they didn't want it to be used simply when Congress disagreed politically or ideologically with the person sitting in the White House. I does feel to me like we're at another time. Sort of tipping point beyond the question of the constitution or we in a constitutional crisis but it seems like we're tipping point two terms of the balance of power between the executive and the legislative. That as long as as Congress is divided Po- politically and as long as the Senate still has a filibuster rule. There's very little that can make it through. The legislative process process in the governing for the foreseeable future is going to come through the executive branch. I'll speak I historically and that is to say that scholars I think David Mayhew political scientists are not that long ago relatively speaking maybe ten or so years ago. Did a tally of all of the major pieces of legislation. That had been passed when there was divided party governance so the good news is at least there has. It's been precedent for that. But we've been discussing increased polarization first of all and that's going to make that harder so even though we have a precedent for that and we shouldn't lose hope that someday perhaps we could go back to it. I think that it's unlikely that in this polarized era however long this last that we will go back to that. And then I think you have to think in these terms if you have republicans who are in charge of at least the Senate or maybe both houses of Congress who who have run on in recent years an anti-government platform an anti-government action platform. It makes it that much harder to you. Have a Democrat in the White House who believes in activist federal government going to Congress that has constituents who don't believe in governmental action. So it's just as easy for them to do nothing in fact it's better for them to do nothing because that appeals to their constituents so I think as long as Republicans and Conservatives hold to that view that government is bad and that government which governs least is the best. There won't be a lot done between between the two branches of government and therefore the way we've been headed in our presidential power structure. Really going back to Woodrow Wilson but obviously really taking off with FDR you will see more and more governance through executive orders rather than through what the founders hope would be that balance between the two branches the government so as we move through this process of impeachment. What do you think the most important factors actors are for us to be paying attention to in other words as important as to what the House and the Senate do or is it about what it says about the presidency? I the focus of course on the ladder as someone who studies the presidency. But obviously I'm paying close attention to what's happening happening in the house and the Senate because that's going to determine the outcome of the process but I do think that as those of us who are members of the public who care about our constitutional structure and care about the presidency as an institution as an office. That what I am concerned about is that we're entering in a new phase of the presidency as as an office and that particularly as it relates to the facts that are being gathered about this current her an inquiry would be as we do here at the Miller Center oral histories. We've got all the way back to the Ford Administration doing oral histories of both presidents and send those who serve them usually the top one hundred senior people in administration and over that this material we have and seen firsthand by the descriptions of all the people who participate careful systems particularly in foreign policy that are meant to work worked to the benefit of America the United States as as a nation and the American people and so. I think that's what I'm paying closest attention to about about the presidency as an institution. I how this president relates to the people via the direct communication of social media which is very much beyond what the founders had intended and second the process or lack of process in making decisions particularly in foreign policy. Because we have found that those presidents who have governed most wisely are those that have good people in place who have have good systems in place and they follow them for the good of the nation. Good of the American people professor Barbara Perry is the presidential studies director at the university. Of Virginia's Miller Taylor Center beechman proceedings are underway in the House of Representatives and articles of impeachment are all but certain to land in the Senate some point the central impeachment is stated in the Constitution. Quote the Senate shall have the sole power to try impeachments.

president Congress Senate executive Barbara Perry White House Virginia Nixon George W Bush director Barack Obama University of Virginia Presidential Studies Miller Center House of Representatives Ford Administration Edmund Randolph
Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

04:10 min | 4 years ago

Trump, NPR and Ted Anthony discussed on Morning Edition

"Local member, station by, name This is NPR news Ahead on, morning edition for Tuesday you'll hear a story about rethinking the practice of solitary confinement for inmates the story. Out of North Dakota more about that on that, story on morning, edition as it continues we'll get the Traffix story two from Ted Anthony and just a. Few minutes right now today's weather pretty much the conditions remain the same that we've seen the, past couple of days sunny skies for the bay area after some morning clouds and patchy fog do watch for the clouds though to hanging hanging around along the coast through, the day highs today the low sixty s along the coast through the seventies around the bay into the low nineties inland and for. The southern Sacramento valley a sunny day today with areas of smoke through the day is between ninety. Two and one hundred they predicted high for the capital, city of Sacramento. Today ninety six degrees I'm Michael state the time it. Is nineteen after four From NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly Afghan officials say a roadside bombing in the west. Of the country today has killed eleven people aboard a passenger bus in the east militants have launched. An assault on Jalalabad Afghan officials say gunmen stormed a, government building and. Took hostages after a suicide. Bomber attack the front gate Iran's, president is expressing skepticism over President Trump's offer, to meet with Iranian leaders as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports Trump says he's willing to do so without preconditions president Hassan. Rohani says a country that breaks its, promises a reference to Trump pulling out of the twenty fifteen nuclear agreement cannot be trusted and further talks Ronnie also says. Tehran will protect its right to export. Oil a vital economic lifeline at a time when Iran's inflation rate is soaring in the currency rapidly, losing value, to history professors. Are resigning from university of Virginia think-tank over the appointment of a former, aide to President Trump has caused Spencer with. Member station w. c. v., e. reports Mark short is also a UVA alum the resigning professors point to Mark Short's, history of working for such conservatives. As former marine Ollie north the coke brothers and, Trump nevertheless short remains on track to begin a one year fellowship on Wednesday UVA's Miller center Short worked as the president's legislative affairs director I'm Dave Mattingly NPR, news in Washington On the next fresh air you want a husband will take a. Bullet for you not one who points to the attic and says they're up there Tony. Shalhoub has been nominated for an EMMY for his performance in the Amazon comedy series the marvelous MRs Mazel shalhoub also starred in the TV series monk. And the film big night join us It's fresh air, one o'clock this afternoon and again this evening, at seven here on kqed public radio I'm Michael state help you. Have a nice safe trip to your place of employment this morning let's see how smooth. It is at this hour here's Ted Anthony Wright in. A good morning to you Michael will head over to Pittsburgh. Westbound four near a railroad just getting word of a, two vehicle accident which may have the right lane block CHP. Already headed out there San. Jose hit and run accident right shoulder McLaughlin avenue on ramp and northbound six. Eighty and we still have this situation in south San Francisco the point boulevard Dubuque. Avenue on ramp to southbound one zero one remains shut down this from a big rig action which happened late last. Night and it produced an oil spill so the cleanup there continues now we're. Hearing maybe. Seven o'clock this morning when you have that. Ramp reopen I'm Ted Anthony for Ted's update brought to you by. FEMA and the Ad Council I'm Marco werman PR is the world brings you a global. Perspective on the news with a worldwide network of correspondents you meet people at the heart.

Donald Trump NPR Ted Anthony Michael State President Trump President Hassan Dave Mattingly Iran North Dakota Washington Ted Anthony Wright Sacramento Valley Mrs Mazel Shalhoub Sacramento Mark Short San Francisco Jalalabad Afghan Assault Marco Werman