16 Burst results for "Millennium Seed Bank"

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:08 min | Last week

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Maybe if you're looking for it. Yep. Something for everyone. Perhaps not a good thing for everyone. But, hey, all right back to her. Yeah, we have the Seed Savers Exchange, which was founded in 1975, and their mission is to because they're still around today conserve and promote America's culturally diverse but endangered food crop heritage for future generations by collecting, growing and sharing heirloom seeds and plants. And nowadays there one of the largest banks in North America, and they managed several state bank locations outside of their headquarters in Iowa. Then the slow food movement very briefly began in the 19 eighties, prescribing neo gastronomy and a slower, more thoughtful approach to food. But in 2003, members of slow Food International created the Slow Food Foundation for biodiversity. The 19 eighties is also when community see banks started popping up. The convention on Biological Diversity took place in 1993 and then the Millennium seed Bank that we mentioned earlier located in Wake Hearst, England. The Millennium Seed Bank partnership was started by the Royal Botanic Gardens in 2000 and has gone on to preserve 10% of wild plants species boasting over one billion thief from 130 countries. They're 2020 goal was to be home to 1/4 of the global bankable plants, and I went on this whole, like Well, did they do it? I was trying to find it everywhere. I forgot. It's still 2020 Still progress. Believe it or not, it is still too near. Oh, gosh. So maybe we'll check back in and then in February, 2008 Svalbard International seed vault, open up its stores for storage, and this is also known. As the doomsday vault. Ah, although the founder pretty much he's known as the founder, Cary Fowler prefers Library of life. Which is also good Also, they're they're both really nice. Yes, Yes. So okay. Get this. This is Steve Bank is located inside a frozen Arctic mountain. In Norway, a location that can survive pretty much whatever is thrown at it from earthquakes to bombings. It's meant to be this kind of global backup system. Seize provided from C banks all over the world are kept their black box protocols are used for these sees the sea packages won't be opened or tested, and no one person knows all the vault codes required for entry. It is a serious place, y'all Onda. Really cool, But literally. Oh, sorry. Um, hi. It's kept it negative 18 degrees Celsius. But yes, is built into this mountain in a permafrost climate zone like 800 Miles that's 1300, kilometers north of the Arctic Circle. So that it hypothetically can keep cool even if it loses power, even for a long period of time. A recent deposit of seeds included samples from the Cherokee Nation seed Bank. They have their own seed bank as well, including their oldest and most sacred corn variety, which like they brought with them. On the trail of tears. It's ah, it's It's a really It's a really fascinating place. You're listening to one of the featured I heart radio podcasts of the week. Find this and more on the free. I heard radio app now with over 250,000 podcast to explore Everybody.

Millennium seed Bank Cherokee Nation seed Bank Seed Savers Exchange slow Food International Slow Food Foundation founder Steve Bank North America Royal Botanic Gardens Arctic Circle Wake Hearst Svalbard International Cary Fowler Norway America Iowa England
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

10:33 min | Last week

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"All plants create seeds or or seeds that are amenable to this type of storage on DH. There are all kinds of other ways to to preserve this stuff. Botanical gardens, collections of tissue samples, collections of DNA, and one of the downsides of seed banks in particular, is that because the expression of genes in a growing Plant depends on the environment that that plant is raised in just preserving old seeds doesn't necessarily mean that will be able to get them to grow in strange new environments. Ah, Ah, um, but In general seed banks. They're just really good at what they dio and so they constitute about 90% of these types of conservation efforts around the world as of today. And that is a good seg way into our number section. Yes, this from 1972 through 2010. 7.4 million seed samples have been preserved in about 1750 seed banks globally. Of their samples about 1.5 to 2 million are thought to be unique. Oh, unique. Ah! According to the Millennium seed Bank, one in five plants he sees faces extinction, which is another Just kind of adding on why this is important. Yeah, and since the 19 hundreds over 90% of fruit and vegetable varieties previously grown Have been lost have gone extinct. Just for example, in 18 hundreds, American apple farmers were growing some 7100 varieties of apples and today Only 300. Of those have survived extinction. Oof! Um, yeah, yeah, And and we are a food show and a lot of seeds preserved at these banks aren't necessarily food, so they're about 250,000 known plant species in the world and about 200 of those air cultivated for Food, but But among those, there are hundreds of thousands of millions of varieties of these different things. And so most of what is preserved in seed banks are food crops. There's others that are ah, animal feed or biofuels or or that are otherwise related. Tio we do like like like wood for timber for Construction and any other number of things, but a great number of them are our food plants. Yes, yes, and a surprisingly long history of this. By most accounts, the oldest recognized the bank in the world is the babble of Institute of Plant industry, and it dates back to 18 94 out of ST Petersburg, Russia, and it was the brainchild of biologist Nikolai Vavilov. So he was a plant breeder. And because of that, probably other things, Hey, understood the importance of crop diversity, and he went on some map. Eight centers of crop diversity, which was really fascinating to read, but not specifically related to this. However, if you want, check it out. Did exist in 1926 Babylon, wrote the Centers of Origin of cultivated plants. However, bevel of came from Wells, and he wasn't exactly a friend of the Communist Party and in 1940, he was arrested and hit with treason and espionage charges. Yeah, really, really tragic story. Amazing thinker within all of this discussion about about diversity of crops, but Yeah, Didn't didn't turn out so great for him No. For 11 months, he was tortured and interrogated when his trial finally arrived. He was found guilty in five minutes and sentenced to death by firing squad That later was changed to 20 years in prison, but Vavilov died of starvation within two years. On just a other side. Note about this place during World War two Your researchers protected deceives the seeds at the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry from Wrath with rods. And did not use them to feed the thousands of starving soldiers. They protected the scene. It's they kept it up. Yeah, yeah. The idea. Seed banks is way older than that, though at least going back to the 16th century. And probably even before that. Some people are you could include gardens. Theirselves in this whole conversation and am back. Yeah, Teo 3000 years ago in ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia so Depending on where you lie on that school of thought, um, during the 16th century Botanical gardens served as areas of academic study specifically for medicinal plants. One of the first was the University of Pisa in 15, 43 and other Italian universities followed suit. Pretty soon after that, with colonization explorers would bring back New cross. We've talked about that all the time. Oh, yeah, for these gardens. Not only were these plants use for study, but they were foundational for growing globalization of trade for products like chocolate and coffee. This is also when researchers and growers started experimenting with breeding crops to produce desirable treats are experimenting, Maurine the like, Scientific way that we think of it, Ray, just Oh, this these two were good. See if we can see if we put him out there. And if something good happens, Yeah, of course. Of course, Farmers have been doing that for literally ever. Yes, yes. In 18 58 Missouri Botanical Garden was established. One of the first botanical gardens in the United States for Khan is coming to the new World. Sea Preservation was a top Priority. Thomas Jefferson once said. The greatest service which can be rendered to any country is toe add a useful plant to its culture, huh? Yeah, that whole dude. Gosh, that whole dude. During the Civil War in 18 62. Congress established the Department of Agriculture for the purpose of gathering quote, knew and valuable seeds and plants and to distribute them among agriculturalists in 18 98. The USDA put into place the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant introduction. On 20 million seed packages were sent out a year to farmers in the 19 forties regional seed banks for established across the US focusing on specific crops like corn or potatoes. A decade later, a sort of national reserve of seeds that was established and for Collins, Colorado, the history of sea banking starts in earnest. In the 19 sixties, when governments, NGOs, private and international organizations started investing heavily and conserving plant diversity with a particular focus on agricultural crops. And this This is what's called the Green Revolution and leading leading up to it. Of course, you had a lot of work in an early, like like genetics that was like, Oh, Jean's Everything cool, but specifically, what's going on here is that by the late 19 fifties Researchers were looking at the growth of the global population along with the distribution of wealth among that population. You know, the continued Stratification of the very wealthy from the very poor, along with the population. Just exploding land was becoming more scarce and therefore more expensive and ah, by the 19 forties and and up through the 19 fifties. Researchers were increasingly aware and and warning that famine was going to kill hundreds of millions of people in developing areas of the world over the next two or three decades alone. It is basically the the world had gotten to a point where Cos. In the nations that could afford to create solutions to famine. Didn't have the monetary or intellectual like like research, science incentive to do so. And so on the whole they weren't It's not to say that none of them were there. There was some early work by like the Rockefeller Foundation, for example, that was that was doing some good out there, but, uh but Based partially on that a few international organizations were founded to help drive the creation of those solutions on DH, Furthermore, to incentivize them among Among the wealthier nations and companies that you know could could stand toe to profit from them. Early research was in those grain staples, corn and wheat and rice onda. A lot of work was put into creating these crops, strains that could produce more food on unless land. It worked, which is a A CZ populations doubled over the next few decades. Serial staple production tripled. Ah, with only an increase in land use of 30%. So huzzah and that meant that that Despite these growing populations, food prices and hunger decreased. But, um, But there's also encouraged ever larger use. I've ever fewer strains of some of these crops right. The National Academy of Sciences compiled a report in 1972 about the vulnerability of US crops, and it found that 70% of the corn crop, for example, came from only six varieties of corn. I heart radio is the number one destination for podcast Discovery? Find this show and more on the free I heart radio ad..

Institute of Plant industry United States Office of Foreign Seed and Pla Nikolai Vavilov Millennium seed Bank University of Pisa National Academy of Sciences Missouri Botanical Garden Centers of Origin Thomas Jefferson Babylon apple Rockefeller Foundation USDA Russia Colorado Wells
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

08:00 min | 2 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

"These biospheres is to use the relationship between humans and their environment in order to preserve resources. So the Seinfeld episode is one of my favorite very favorite. seinfeld upset. It's called the blast. They ass and George Jokes that Elaine was chosen to represent. New York and then the other newest biosphere. Experience, but I also got confused with something called Bio. Jill was that okay. Arizona so bio dome. Was a film. starring. polly shore. WAS NOT. It was not I mean it was the fictional film. I thought when I had this vision right head that it was like a cy five. Oh, no, no, this was like like. He gets like Kinda. Stack in the scientific experiment of a biosphere in like the researchers just have to deal with them. You seen this. I never saw this movie, but but in in looking it up i. have come to realize that that it had a cameo appearances from celebrities such as Kylie Minogue in rose McGowan. And also it was the first time that they that Ad Tenacious D. Appeared onscreen. As such together. Okay. None of this is making any sense to me I. My brain is like faltering to process this what this is! You gave me Louis Yati Dodd Donny Osmond. In Our last episode now I got today's D in Polish shore. The research dome. Yeah, it was, it was a kind of a whole cultural phenomenon that a lot of people were it was making big headlines in the nineteen nineties, because some some science humans, and some like non science humans would would either volunteer or be chosen or whatever to go, hang out like be sealed into these domes for awhile and Kinda of see what happened. Again But With more science on same page, okay? Wow I was not expecting tenacious. D reference to come up here. Neither was I. and I thought for a second. It might have been carrot top, not paulie shore, but oh gosh. Wow all right am I have to look this up? No sounds like the very nineties type of comedy movie. Yeah, from all the trailers I remember seeing. It was very slapstick, very goofy I think that e even like like middle. School High School Lauren felt somehow above this film. HR H. I still gotTa know I've got no. I did on the other side of this I. Think he's a tight nee, which is a movie I loved as a kid. That movie ends with. They find like Earth too, and it's basically a big seat belt. Like it has all those Oh. Yeah, I think there's some movie ends that way where they find like a backup earth and it has a yeah. and I suppose waterworld was also in a small way. Gosh about a very similar theme. Another Phil Cultural Touchstone I missed, but I have heard a lot about it. Oh Wow, oh, I hope that this is on your list of terrible movies. Because! It is truly a terrible movie. Hey and I. Feel like you would enjoy watching of it in. A very. Popcorn and and boxer wine kind of way. Oh! Enough said I am into it. He sold me. People are like watched excellent award-winning film. Watch this very bad movie, but you'll like it okay. There's like a lot of of of what are they called? Are they jetskis the things? Yeah I've seen the live action show at universal, so I got some kind of. Image in my head, they well. They used jet skis. How do I know if they actually do? Oh, yeah, no, they they use. They use a Lotta, jetskis. You know. No agriculture, but lots jetskis. That's what the film is basically about. So, they preserved the important thing the. Wow this. This was a cultural tangent. Iowa's not expecting to see bank episode. You're welcome, everyone. There's some a variety of things to try out there maybe if you're looking for entertainment. Yep. Something for everyone. Perhaps on a good thing, everyone but hey. Back to you. Yep We have the seed Savers Exchange which was founded in nineteen, seventy five, and their mission is to because they're still around today. conserve and promote America's culturally diverse but endangered food crop heritage for future generations by collecting growing and sharing heirloom seeds and plants. And nowadays they are one of the largest banks in north. America and they manage several see bank locations outside of their headquarters in Iowa. Then a the slow food movement, a very briefly began in the nineteen eighties, prescribing neo gastronomy, and at a slower more thoughtful approach to food, but an anti thousand three members of slow food international created the slow food foundation for biodiversity. The nineteen eighties also win community. Seed banks started popping up. The Convention on Biological Diversity took place in nineteen, ninety three, and then the millennium seed bank that we mentioned earlier located in wake hearst England the Millennium Seed Bank partnership was started by the Royal, Botanic Gardens in two thousand, and has gone on to preserve ten percent of wild plants CC's boasting over one billion seeds from one hundred thirty countries. There's twenty twenty goal was to be home to one fourth of the global bankable plants and I went on this whole like well, did they do it and I was trying to find it everywhere. I forgot still twenty twenty still progress. Assist believe it or not, it is still. Oh, Gosh ooh, so maybe we'll check back in. And, then in February, two thousand eight fall barred international seed vault, open up its doors for storage, and this is also known as the Doomsday Vault. Although the founder pretty much, he's known as the founder cary. Fowler Prefers Library of life. Which is also good? Also expert. They're both really nice. Yes, yes. So, okay, get this. This seed bank is located inside a frozen. Arctic Mountain in Norway. A location that can survive pretty much whatever is thrown at.

Iowa founder America polly shore Millennium Seed Bank paulie shore Kylie Minogue New York Jill Tenacious D. Arizona Fowler Prefers Library of life George Jokes Donny Osmond Norway School High School Arctic Mountain Elaine Louis Yati
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

05:54 min | 2 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

"Friendly because growing a bunch of different things together actually helps with soil, quality and pest control. But more directly pertinent to our conversation today. You've honed this plant down to one strain, and if you're a big enough producer, you're growing just this one strain all over the place and edging out your competitors and buying out other farms, and using their land to grow your strain to the point that other strains and that valuable genetic material that they contain can be lost, and this can happen for non capitalism related purposes well sometimes, this one strain is valuable to to too many. Many people just because of the wildly high yield that it produces under a range of conditions, but at any rate it's in the long run bad for all of us because like if one of those new pests or say a global change in climate crops up, it can ruin this crop, and it's bad for humanity like in that. That crop is part of our food supply, and it's important that we're able to keep eating food. It's the thing that we both enjoy and kind of need to do And it can be a really big problem. because to feed our growing population We may need to grow. In the next thirty years fifty percent, more food, animal, feed and biofuel than we currently do in order to support. Humanity on this planet. And we're not even truly supporting ourselves today. over one hundred million people worldwide are severely food insecure to say nothing of the millions and millions more who are food insecure at at less dire levels. And those are some pretty big numbers. Yeah so it's really cool. The seed banks preserve the genetic diversity of plants. In conclusion. Yes, that is still versions. And I should say here. That's not the only way to preserve genetic diversity and not all plants create seeds or or seeds that are amenable to this type of storage and there are all kinds of other ways to to preserve this stuff. Botanical Gardens collections of tissue samples collections of DNA and one of the downsides of see banks in particular is because the expression of genes in a growing plant depends on the environment. That plant is raised in Just preserving old seeds doesn't necessarily mean that we'll be able to get them to grow in strange new environments but. In general seed banks are just really good at what they do, and so they constitute about ninety percent of these types of conservation efforts around the world as of today. And that is a good segue into our number section. Yes, this from Nineteen Seventy two through twenty ten seven point, four million seed samples have been preserved in about one, thousand, seven, hundred and fifty seed banks globally. Of those samples about one point five to two million are thought to be unique. Oh unique. According to the Millennium seed bank one in five plants. He's he's faces extinction, which is another? Just kind of adding on why this is important yeah. And since the nineteen hundreds over ninety percent of fruit and vegetable, varieties, previously grown, have been lost, have gone extinct just for example in eighteen hundreds American apple farmers were growing some seven thousand one hundred varieties of apples and today. Only three hundred. Of those have survived extinction. Hoof. Yeah Yeah and we are a food show, and and a lot of the seeds preserved at these banks aren't necessarily food so there about two hundred and fifty thousand known plant species in the world, and about two hundred of those are cultivated for food but but among those there are hundreds of thousands of millions of varieties of these different things and so most of what is preserved in seed banks are food crops. There's a others that are animal, feed, or for biofuel, or or that are otherwise related to. We do like a look like wood for timber for construction and any other number of things but. A great number of them are are food plants. Yes, yes? And surprisingly long history of the. Yeah, yes, and we will get into that right after we get back from a quick break forward sponsor..

producer Botanical Gardens
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:50 min | 4 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"And eighties so an mostly Simpson folk people bringing. They talk about one guy. I forget his name. Who is who says some Mexican seats to Afghanistan in the in the early seventies and then they they mentioned that I think Chanaka someone talks about bringing them Afghan landrace in the pool in the eighties but I don't talk about. This is the whole seed industry with the online online seat industry. And if you look at the the shipping lists of your average dot show seed company. It would make for horrifying reading. I mean the the the online sort of Internet commerce is just arriving in places like India and Southeast Asia So I I I mean. I'm just like some huge business park to the type of in Hyderabad India. I think so there will get up for on on coming to India so in the next couple of years. God knows what's going to happen. I mean it's it's something you already started people shipping hybrid seats into India and places. But I mean we're we're looking at a time and it's Yeah it's a serious situation so this part of getting people to take it seriously. I think it's quite important parts of it to persuade. Some people like the Millennium Seed Bank. And so and so you've got one one accession of Cannabis. I think it's Yeah they looked at a lot of different factors because she's changed so they they looked at not just morphology not just Chemical profiles but also genetics and when they looked at chemical profiles they focused on tacb ratios because concentration can be influenced by all sorts of factors. So that doesn't really make sense to focus on concentration but THC CBD ratios are more genetically controlled. So they focused on that. They also looked at Turpin Lloyd's which I thought was great And we'll talk more about that in a minute. But they notice patterns around How certain varieties seem to lack key Types of turpin turbines. That gives them their characteristic. Smells that people..

India Millennium Seed Bank Turpin Lloyd Hyderabad India Simpson Southeast Asia Afghanistan Cannabis
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

05:24 min | 4 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"You're listening to Jason. A curious about canvas podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again at today. I'm really really stoked. I am joined with one of my early guests and friends that was able to talk to you. At the earned the early days of the podcast angus from the real seat company. Thanks so much for being willing to come back on. We've got some exciting stuff to talk about It's great to be. Yes exciting paper this so yeah looking forward to yes so what? We're going to be talking about today. Relates to our first conversation that we had Which is all about Why first conversation went in a lot of directions but Talking about cannabis taxonomy. So there's a paper that came out just this year By John mcpartlin and earn a small. Both of whom we talked about in our first conversation and specifically this relates to Landrace varieties of cannabis and Talks about the importance of preserving those genetic so This is really come around full circle. And I'll go ahead and prepare people say that between the actual paper and the supplemental material. There's about one hundred fifty pages worth of material the centrally a book but Angus. What before we get into the nitty gritty details of what was present here and My thoughts in your thoughts and kind of how it meshes with your experience in the field. what were your initial impressions upon reading this paper? Safari taxonomy goes. My instincts is always being to defer to the experts as far as I can see on a small Israeli the taxonomic to defer to. He's some specializes in an all kinds of different places. But he's been publishing about it since the early seventies legislation is based on his work So I was fascinated to see that he has come round to the view that the two main domestic domestic the to the tweet. Sort of Genesis who've sub-species Indika now do merit formal recognition this As varieties in a stricter botanical sense. And you know they. They've done between mcparland more done the work to justify that clearly. They've been looking at Harry collections. All around the world it seems and I think they say about one thousand one hundred different accessions. They've they've looked at and yet clearly satisfied that this is justified. And this is more than just sort of pedantic exercises actually quite important to get people to stop taking conservation of these plant seriously if you look on the genesys database. I think there are about one thousand four hundred accessions of that kind of a sativa. The species in NJ banks around the world but out of those as I forget the exact number but it's a piddling amount this full role. Something accessions of sub-species indicator. I mean it's ridiculous five. I'm sorry five right. Yeah so this is a serious situation. I mean this is an incredibly important plants. And it's it's it's a. I think they actually understate how critically endangered it has mostly what they talk about sort of anecdotal examples of people. Introducing Hyper Non Chino hybrid most of the examples. They gave a from the and eighties so an mostly Simpson folk people bringing. They talk about one guy. I forget his name. Who is who says some Mexican seats to Afghanistan in the in the early seventies and then they they mentioned that I think Chanaka someone talks about bringing them Afghan landrace in the pool in the eighties but I don't talk about. This is the whole seed industry with the online online seat industry. And if you look at the the shipping lists of your average dot show seed company. It would make for horrifying reading. I mean the the the online sort of Internet commerce is just arriving in places like India and Southeast Asia So I I I mean. I'm just like some huge business park to the type of in Hyderabad India. I think so there will get up for on on coming to India so in the next couple of years. God knows what's going to happen. I mean it's it's something you already started people shipping hybrid seats into India and places. But I mean we're we're looking at a time and it's Yeah it's a serious situation so this part of getting people to take it seriously. I think it's quite important parts of it to persuade. Some people like the Millennium Seed Bank. And so and so you've got one one accession of Cannabis. I think it's Yeah

Angus of The Real Seed Co. on The New Taxonomy for Landrace Cultivars

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

05:24 min | 4 months ago

Angus of The Real Seed Co. on The New Taxonomy for Landrace Cultivars

"You're listening to Jason. A curious about canvas podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again at today. I'm really really stoked. I am joined with one of my early guests and friends that was able to talk to you. At the earned the early days of the podcast angus from the real seat company. Thanks so much for being willing to come back on. We've got some exciting stuff to talk about It's great to be. Yes exciting paper this so yeah looking forward to yes so what? We're going to be talking about today. Relates to our first conversation that we had Which is all about Why first conversation went in a lot of directions but Talking about cannabis taxonomy. So there's a paper that came out just this year By John mcpartlin and earn a small. Both of whom we talked about in our first conversation and specifically this relates to Landrace varieties of cannabis and Talks about the importance of preserving those genetic so This is really come around full circle. And I'll go ahead and prepare people say that between the actual paper and the supplemental material. There's about one hundred fifty pages worth of material the centrally a book but Angus. What before we get into the nitty gritty details of what was present here and My thoughts in your thoughts and kind of how it meshes with your experience in the field. what were your initial impressions upon reading this paper? Safari taxonomy goes. My instincts is always being to defer to the experts as far as I can see on a small Israeli the taxonomic to defer to. He's some specializes in an all kinds of different places. But he's been publishing about it since the early seventies legislation is based on his work So I was fascinated to see that he has come round to the view that the two main domestic domestic the to the tweet. Sort of Genesis who've sub-species Indika now do merit formal recognition this As varieties in a stricter botanical sense. And you know they. They've done between mcparland more done the work to justify that clearly. They've been looking at Harry collections. All around the world it seems and I think they say about one thousand one hundred different accessions. They've they've looked at and yet clearly satisfied that this is justified. And this is more than just sort of pedantic exercises actually quite important to get people to stop taking conservation of these plant seriously if you look on the genesys database. I think there are about one thousand four hundred accessions of that kind of a sativa. The species in NJ banks around the world but out of those as I forget the exact number but it's a piddling amount this full role. Something accessions of sub-species indicator. I mean it's ridiculous five. I'm sorry five right. Yeah so this is a serious situation. I mean this is an incredibly important plants. And it's it's it's a. I think they actually understate how critically endangered it has mostly what they talk about sort of anecdotal examples of people. Introducing Hyper Non Chino hybrid most of the examples. They gave a from the and eighties so an mostly Simpson folk people bringing. They talk about one guy. I forget his name. Who is who says some Mexican seats to Afghanistan in the in the early seventies and then they they mentioned that I think Chanaka someone talks about bringing them Afghan landrace in the pool in the eighties but I don't talk about. This is the whole seed industry with the online online seat industry. And if you look at the the shipping lists of your average dot show seed company. It would make for horrifying reading. I mean the the the online sort of Internet commerce is just arriving in places like India and Southeast Asia So I I I mean. I'm just like some huge business park to the type of in Hyderabad India. I think so there will get up for on on coming to India so in the next couple of years. God knows what's going to happen. I mean it's it's something you already started people shipping hybrid seats into India and places. But I mean we're we're looking at a time and it's Yeah it's a serious situation so this part of getting people to take it seriously. I think it's quite important parts of it to persuade. Some people like the Millennium Seed Bank. And so and so you've got one one accession of Cannabis. I think it's Yeah

Cannabis India Angus Millennium Seed Bank Jason NJ Hyderabad India John Mcpartlin Harry Collections Indika Southeast Asia Simpson Afghanistan
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

04:34 min | 4 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"There are many organizations around the world who have taken up the banner of seed preservation thousand. In fact most of us have heard of the seed vault. It's Bart the cool looking tower. Sticking out of Norwegian mountain or the permafrost ensures that the seats are reserved without need for electricity incoming futurama reference behold the swallow bond global seed vault since two thousand eight. The vault is preserved of every known plant species in case of extinction. What Your Business bookie poke in about. Two seed Vault Guardian. Mankind's precious botanical heritage. There we just want to come in rummage out of it so okay. If you don't want to go quite so far north perhaps flight old blighty and visit the Millennium Seed Bank at Q. Gardens in London in two thousand nine they reached the goal of preserving and cataloging seeds from all of the. Uk's native plant species with the exception for things that don't store well they also work with a network of nearly one hundred other seed banks around the world to preserve species institute where they are and provide backup samples in case the specimens at one seed. Bank are compromised alongside the three attractive glass buildings which House the collection a laboratory and the public exhibits face and really is quite fetching. There are raised garden beds. Each an example threatened landscape in Britain. If there was a C- bank that looked like a nice day trip Q. Gardens would be it. It's not the most important seed bank though or the bank that has given its collection the most protection for that we have to go back to World War Two with an abrupt shift in tone. In September. Nineteen forty one. German forces began to push into Leningrad before and since called Saint Petersburg. They laid siege to the city choking off the supply of food and other necessities to the two million residents the siege of Leningrad. Didn't last a month or two or even six. The siege lasted nearly nine hundred days. Among the two million Soviet citizens struggling to survive were a group of scientists ready to make the ultimate sacrifice for the good a fan kind while they did their leader. Nikolai Vavilov a Russian geneticist and plant geographer. Lay dying in a Soviet prison. A thousand miles away. Savelov had traveled the world on what he called a mission for all humanity. He led one hundred and fifteen expeditions in sixty four countries to collect seeds of crop varieties and their wild ancestors based on his notes. Modern biologists following envelopes footsteps are able to document changes in the culture and physical landscape and the crop patterns in those places to study the Global Food Ecosystem. Vavilov conducted experiments in genetics to improve productivity for farmers he was one of the first scientists to really listen to farmers traditional farmers peasant farmers around the world and why they felt seed. Diversity was important in their fields says Gary Poll Novel Ethno Biologist and author of where our food comes from retracing Nikolai Vavilov quest to end famine. All of our notions about biological diversity and needing diversity of foods on our plates to keep us healthy sprung from his work eight years ago. That bluffs hope was that one day science could work with agriculture to increase each farms productivity and create plants could grow in any environment thus bringing an end to world hunger as Russia fought its way through revolutions anarchy and most importantly to Avalon of famine. He went about storing seeds at the Institute of Plant Industry in the Pavlov's experimental station the scientists they're collected thousands of varieties of fruits vegetables grains and tubers unlike swale Barbecue Gardens..

Nikolai Vavilov Savelov Q. Gardens Leningrad Vault Guardian Institute of Plant Industry Bart futurama Norwegian mountain Ethno Biologist Barbecue Gardens species institute Uk London Britain Russia Gary Saint Petersburg
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

14:55 min | 5 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Well yes I guess I was GonNa let me. Let me rephrase that question is I guess so earlier the conversation you mentioned this idea that sometimes you have the fortune of building on what others have done before you. Maybe they've already figured out the protocol for the species but on other times you have to do your homework. You have to know something about the natural history and run experiments just to see what's going on so when you're faced a your day to day week to week SORTA operations there. Would you say it's more often? You're building on the work of others. You know there's a lot of protocols in place or is it more often that you have to do the experiments and figure things out. I guess what this comes down to his. Have we figured out most of the species you work with or other still many unknowns there are still many unknowns but I would say that most of what I'm doing is going to be built off of that scientific research this already been done and again we're just changing small things and just tweaking what's already been done in order to advance the field a little bit farther so I think the most exciting part about my job is going into the unknown Ed? It'll probably be what makes me go gray prematurely but it's really thinking about where we haven't gone before what haven't we solved. I believe we kind of have a little hitlist. Essentially of which species we really want to work with and we really want to nail down their protocol and it's time and time again that other organizations and our organization included have tried to grow and just haven't been successful with and those are really where we're trying to focus our research and our efforts in things because again we have a comfort zone of yes. We can grow this really well. Sometimes you may even say it's easy to grow but we're trying to grow it better and faster and we're trying to make those plants that are out planted last longer because we're not just trying to do it for our own benefit but we're really trying to do it for the benefit of the species and so yes. There's still a lot more unanswered questions about the ecology of orchids and how they fit in within their biomass and things. And so. That's really where we're trying to take our research to that next level and actually really see long term growth and sustainability of those populations run on and I love hearing sort of that excitement about challenge enjoying the process of it all but also knowing that you have the satisfaction of it being virtuous work. I mean there's no other way put it. This is really important for biodiversity for ecosystem health and it so nice to know that you get to play and do something good for the planet at the same time. Yeah there aren't enough jobs like that. Yeah unfortunately but you're lucky lucky to have one that is so in thinking about this. Obviously this comes down to the species level. I mean you're doing this on a species by species basis so in your experience in propagating orchids in doing work with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens. Out of me. Have there been some memorable species. I'm not GonNa ask you for your favorite because I know how difficult equity could be. But what are some species that Kinda stand out throughout this process in why Okay I would say that I could divide the into a few different categories for different reasons. I would say that some stand out because they're easy to groom. I like those those make my life a little easier so I would think of it on the on the genus level essentially. But if we're thinking about the different Genera out there some that are easier for us to grow would be things like pathway pendulums and fragment the different slipper orchids and I would say even things like Stanhope via from our Fuqua Orchid Center. We have a great species collection. There and I would really say a lot of times. It's because of the number of seeds we get so the ones like the pathway pedal homes and some of the failings and even though staint Hopi those are fun and relatively easy because we have a plethora of seed to work with so those are enjoyable. I would say but I would say other ones could be more memorable just because of their conservation value and things like that I will talk about the fragmented Kevorkian. That's when that has a beautiful purple flower. It's one that's very rare in cultivation and so being able to see those little seedlings growing up in their lab and remembering back to when I worked for the Hookah Orchids Center and we actually hand pollinated at a now. Actually seeing those grow up is really fulfilling so kind of being there long enough to see some of those capsules that I set on those organs. Come through the lab and things three and four years later is really gratifying And then other ones as we said would be the ones of conservation concern so the ones like the ghost orchid that I believe I showed you The ghost orchid is one. That's it's both enjoyable because it's relatively simple but then also just for its conservation concern. It's one of those leafless orchids of that's native to Florida and so that was just a nice easy one but also has conservation value. And of course we have quite a few of our potanin throats at manny. I an integral Labia and having area and Calico gone and things are ones that we work with and those just knowing their conservation value or just fun and fulfilling to see grow up. Yeah all good reasons. All great species to lucky now but it is. It is amazing to think about sort of the timeline. That plans work on. They work on a timescale that humans don't readily and especially a lot of the funding agencies. Don't readily kind of given to and so the fact that you've been there and been through different processes of growing plants in propagating them. That is such a unique perspective to get. And how often do people get to see like you said going from a capsule to a tiny seed to a protocol all the way up to plants that are now getting ready to make their way into a greenhouse or even potentially go back outside? I mean it is. It's gotTa bring so much closer to these species than if you were just kind of in there for a couple of years and then moving onto the next thing. Oh yes I I agree. I would like to think that. I'm not emotionally attached to these plants but I believe at some level I am but I think that's going to be true of anybody who goes into plant conservation is you do. Actually have that connection with what you're doing and I would say that that's true of everyone on my team. And everyone at the botanical garden as well who worked directly with these plans just gives you that deep appreciation to be working hands on with these species that are important. Yeah for sure again. Just having the inspiration of others with similar goals but different skill sets. The menu are really kind of in the heat of battle with this but with best possible players in this game. I like to think so. That's fantastic and then you know from the conservation standpoint. All of this gearing up to hopefully getting plants back out in the wild if their habitat still exists. And you know how much of a hand do you have in that process do or do you at least get to see some of the fruits of your labor going back out into the wild to to potentially reinvigorate a species. That might not be doing so hot. I I don't think they let me out of the lineup. No but I do actually get to get out some so other people on our team as you said with other specialties are really at the forefront of that habitat restoration working on that habitat level in order to augment that and this for example we have people on our team who are trained for prescribed. Burns and actually work with our partners for different state agencies in order to actually open up the canopy and cut down trees when needed and things let more sunlight end so there is that habitat restoration. That goes along with it. It's not I work on a more of a species specific level but I would say that our department though is really looking at those imperilled plants and their natural communities as a whole And I would say for for field work when I do get out of allowed. It would be for things like the seed collection trump's which I really enjoy so we for example. Last year we were funded through the Q. Foundation America and Center for Plant Conservation in order to go out and collect to priority species that are considered globally critically imperilled. So that was the TA- Limb Neom Alessia and dice arranger read forty on and we were able to go out into the field and you talked about. They're not working but again it was a seed collection trump which came through me and things because they needed to be banked And so yeah. That was really fun because as we were talking about there wasn't a protocol rarely emplaced for how to collect a win to collect and all of those things and so we use the Center for Plant Conservations Best Practices and we forward with collecting them that way and then getting them back in a timely manner and banking them and things but that was really fun to kind of be out there and strategize how to collect that representative genetic diversity from across its range at each site as well. That's fantastic in against so cool to be involved in all steps of the process from beginning to end really I think again it kind of it. It's really helpful for me to be there from the beginning through the end things just to kind of not so many changes of hand. I would say along the process. Having that consistency for the plants seems to be really awful yet and that is the point that I think doesn't get touched on. Enough is just how much turnover can damage projects like this even with the best intentions. I mean if you've got different people doing different things even if it's like little tweaks to their protocol You know like you said the fewer exchange enhance sometimes the better. It is in the long run for these plants so it is nice to see this sort of start to finish right and then again it. Harkens back to the partners for plant conservation and so really just making sure anyone interested in that habitat or that species and we kind of agree on the same outcome and things so that way it'll affect what steps we take to get there and she of the same goal right right and so looking ahead. I mean obviously you are in the thick of it. There's always more work to be done. But what are you excited about You know moving forward with some of the propagation work ou so I will say. I'm most excited about getting more into the symbiotic germination for orchids and then also those alternatives to micro propagation. So you have to have me back again for a whole interview about seed banking shirt because only lightly touched on it but essentially for me seed banking comes I. It's the most space efficient and usually cost efficient way to bank genetic diversity. And then if you can't do that because the seats don't allow for traditional seed banking. Then they're going to be alternatives to that and so right now even if you look at the Millennium Seed Bank and their website. You will see that only about sixty percent of the work. They've tested are actually Orthodox which means that they can be stored in a conventional seed bank whereas the other ones. You can't store in that way so one thing that I'm really excited about. As actually looking for other alternatives to that conventional seed bank storing it at negative twenty Celsius but instead looking into cryopreservation. So we're really going more into that. In order to preserve the pollen and then some of those non orthodox seeds as well a while. Yeah Okay so thank you for giving me another episode schedule you in for sure. Those are really exciting techniques and I love seeing technology being put to good use. It is often you think about some of these things a sort of leg nature in back to Earth but oftentimes technology can be very important tools in making this process far. More sustainable and far more doable. I guess in the long run right. And I think that's all about is really trying to be at the forefront of applying all of these innovative strategies in order to conserve plants. A little bit better excellent. What else do you have going on? I mean obviously you. You have a varied amount of interests. What else is going on in your life. Yeah so as if that weren't enough outside of the garden Also act in the right and things as well so just like you might actually trying to raise more awareness for plants and just that kind of intrinsic value of them so actually been writing series called platonic plants and it's just a short video format in order to bring more awareness to plants and actually connect people better with plans as you may realize in the midst of the pandemic one of the safe alternatives is getting back out into nature and things like that and so. I really am trying to focus. On writing episodes that people can really use in order to improve their. Id skills just learned. Quick facts about The plants that are around them out there. Oh that's fantastic in Is this something that you're not yet ready to release or is there a place people can go looking for it where we are with it so right now it would be on instagram? So it would be at botany blackout would be handle and there you'll see all the updates westwood. This little pandemic has put a wrench into plants. Still be coming out later. This year tastic while put up links to all the relevant stuff on the show notes for this episode. But Jason. Thank you for giving us a light into this incredible process of protecting plants. An insuring that at least these species will be around for future generations to appreciate enjoy. So thank you for all the work that you're doing. Thank you for talking with us today. Now it's my pleasure my pleasure and if anyone would like to follow up on the work that we're doing you can also follow the Atlanta Conservation and Research Department on Instagram at Atlanta. Bg Conservation as well fantastic. Make sure to link that one too. Sure wonderful we'll jason again. Thank you so much for talking with us. A Real Pleasure. My pleasure thank you. All right cheers.

Atlanta Conservation and Resea Jason Center for Plant Conservation Hookah Orchids Center Millennium Seed Bank Bg Conservation Florida Atlanta Botanical Gardens Fuqua Orchid Center TA- Limb Neom Alessia Stanhope manny representative Atlanta Burns Q. Foundation America
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

FoodStuff

15:57 min | 6 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on FoodStuff

"You sponsor. Yes thank you. So eggplants most likely originated in India China Thailand. Burma are somewhere else in Southeast Asia though its genetic descendants may have come from Africa Yeah that the working theory is that this wild selenium species from Africa end or the Middle East as selenium in canam income that as a Harry Potter. So you know it is funny and can tell them Salona them in kind of their. I cannot argue with your logic contest. Eggplants rain down from the so delicious and Badgley. Who'LL I it would stop me? I would be confused. Oh yeah you can totally jump me that way. Yeah and then I'd probably start picking up the eggplant stockpiling them share right delicious. They can be expensive anyway. Okay yes and Hardwood find. Whatever this thing. Whatever this thing was it was domesticated and ancient India Myanmar and China and became eggplant. An independent domestication may have happened later on in. What's now the Philippines but but yes instead of food most early documentation indicates it was mainly used medicinally arithmetic texts. Dating back to one hundred. Bc describes some of the believed health benefits of eggplant. The first known written direct record of Eggplant and Sanskrit literature took place in third century. See although a possible indirect reference might go back all the way to three hundred BC and as far back to fifty-nine ancient Chinese literature possibly referencing eggplants centuries of domestication documented by the ancient Chinese increased the weight and size of Eggplant and changed other traits. Like flesh and peel color prickliness and flavor documents botanical. Drawings follow the process from the seventh to the nineteenth centuries. See it's like really useful and helpful documented. Air prickliness is really interesting. Because a lot of wild species still do get like a lot of trickles Especially on the planet but sometimes on the fruit itself and so it's something that has been very specifically bred out of most domestic eggplants exactly beginning around the Sixth Century C. E. Merchants transported eggplant for trade along the Silk Road to Africa the Middle East and further west into Europe. But some evidence dating back to the second century see indicates that the eggplant was not unknown outside of Asia. Possibly carried by Alexander Grapes records show. It made it to Japan by the eighth century. Ce MEDIEVAL PERSIAN MEDICAL CAUTIONED. The use of eggplant warning. It could cause huge host of negative outcomes from leprosy to elephant. Titus two pimples insomnia some blood thickening and blackening however will. It wasn't all bad. I know this sounds a little little risky. But it wasn't all bad with proper preparation which I believed involves salting salting eggplant They claimed it that it could be beneficial. Oh so shrug shrug emoji. Eggplant has been a lot of art one piece in particular that caught our eye dates back to the thirteen hundred and depicts the believed Aphrodisiac Properties of the eggplant. It looks I really enjoyed that painting. The eggplant looks quite quite royal. Quite sight to behold during the fifteenth seventeenth centuries. Spanish brought the Eggplant to South America and it was recorded in Brazil by the middle of the eighteenth century in fifteen forty four herbalism. Matthew really wrote of the eggplants potential as an aphrodisiac translating to those that eat love. Apples and plants are receptive to flirting so he basically said if you eat these love apples. Which for eggplant. You're going to be open to possibilities. yeah. I think that most of this was a specifically about women. It was said that if women eat these things then they'll be more right receptive to flirtation right exactly other countries in Europe where the eggplant did not grow so well. Viewed eggplant a lot more suspiciously in fifteen ninety seven English herbalist Gerard wrote in Egypt and barbary. They used to eat the fruit of Malla insana boiled or roasted under ashes with oil vinegar and pepper as people used to eat mushrooms but I rather wish Englishman to content themselves with the meat and sauce of our own country than with the fruit and sauce. Eaten with such peril for doubtless. These apples have a mischievous quality views. Thereof is utterly to be forsaken therefore it is better to esteem this plant and have him in the garden for your pleasure. And the rarest thereof than of any virtue are good qualities yet known some racism there just a little bit is in a phobia. That's I mean yeah fine. Thank thank God. I do like being something being called having a mischievous quality eggplant I can just imagine it like sitting in my fruit bowl. A mischievous like Tortorella gets little moustachioed. Yeah and Malla Insana. Yeah that that translates to like insanity apple or like madness apple right yeah. Some countries in Europe referred to Eggplant as mad apples around this time and they believed that eating them would possibly lead to insanity. And that's actually where we get that botanical name from Mellon Gina Derives from the Italian name for the plant Millan Zane which derives from Mala Insana so cool People were were wary of things that reminded them of a of the poisonous members of the nightshade family. Which I think is a little bit for but also CR tomatoes episode for so much more hilarity regarding all of that. Yes and where if you need another reason to check out? We're wolves if we look at art created post Renaissance in Europe. The art suggests a rise in eggplants popularity as determined by. It's more frequent depictions. I found an entire I think eighteen pages eighteen page paper just on the art with it from this time period. That's so cool. I know I I really enjoyed it. The plant though didn't make its way to the US market until the nineteen hundreds. Currently eggplant is one of the twenty nine key food crops being investigated by the Millennium Seed Bank and the Global Crop Diversity Trust for development of a climate change hardy varieties. They're they're doing this. By checking out the jeans and parent traits of wild relatives of all of the crops in question and seeing whether like crossbreeding or genetics could help create cultivars that will do well in these our changing climate conditions the first and it but it took awhile for eggplant. Really receive this attention because in some cultures. It's associated I. It's it's like A. It's like a poor person's food kind of thing so yeah. The first reference genome eggplant wasn't released until two thousand fourteen but they're they're working on it and now Emoji News. Yeah Yeah Y'all knew or get through episode without talking about the Eggplant Emoji we add to and we're going to be pretty tame and mature as we are known to be eating this but no no really we are. Yes yes so if you have kids around and don't want them to hear about the Eggplant Emoji Shenanigans because there are a lot of them. Here's your heads up heads up. Yeah okay. So for perhaps obvious reasons. We eggplant Emoji became synonymous with a penis and through that sex to the point. That in two thousand fifteen instagram band. Instagram banned the EGGPLANT EMOJI roof. I love this headline from I feast instagram. Banned the EGGPLANT Emoji Hashtag. Because we're all children pretty much and also. Hey I refused. If you're looking for a minor podcast beyond you're not at all minor show hot ones. I am so here and ready to embarrass myself me too. Absolutely twenty twenty thousand percent like Khalas. We will totally embarrassed ourselves regarding hot sauce and probably lots of other things so the straight we can go as a pair like this in the meantime while we're waiting for that email or call Yes instagram shutdown. Hashtag eggplant Friday for. It's not so. Pg thirteen nature and just to be clear. Instagram did not ban other emojis. The cleft peach the syringe the toilets in our guys especially here in the United States eggplants association with the Penis has been so solidified culturally rather than using similarly shaped emojis. Corn or bananas. People are using other takes on Eggplant Emoji like Hashtag Eggplant. Parm children delightful. I'm you know I I guess. Like like dirty minds Find a way like it's indeed have appreciated the many Late night talkshow jokes about it throughout the years. If you're looking if you're curious the history of the Eggplant emoji debuted in the US in two thousand. Ten introduced by the Unicorn Consortium and adopted a year later on iphones and very very quickly. The eggplant became a text. The reason it was adopted over seas is the source of many Thought provoking paper. There is plenty of ink has been spilled on the Internet about this. If you choose to go read it but if you don't if you don't want to go down that particular we've got the T. L. D. R. Some studies around Emoji found that around the world. Americans were definitely leading the way in the usage of the eggplant Emoji. So some think it's because culturally. We don't have that many associations with it. It's not super familiar. Not a super familiar thing here in the United States Yeah especially not a compared with the The the kind of short squat Italian eggplant and I have to be fair even seen Okay so I was in. I was in an A. K. Owens like a Japanese pub right And I ordered a dish of grilled eggplant and it was one of the the the longer dinner eggplants and it was definitely served in the most phallic way that I have ever had a dish served me that I'm not totally positive. That like the waitstaff. Punking US at this point. Because like Oh my goodness like like the like the skin was peeled back at one tip of it and there is definitely like to round objects placed towards the other end while like slices Like like like around like slices and there was a you know you know the little league like Benito Flake that in steam they kind of do the Wavy wavy which is on dishes yeah. Those were dotted around the base and the circular objects. So it's sort of like hair so that's so that's that happened pretty brazen. Yeah Yup. Yeah I haven't I my my my Google Fu Has not come up with any kind of official dish that is traditionally treated this way. But but also I think there's there's a different sense of humor around that kind of thing in in many segments of Japanese culture And a lot more comfort with just being like Oh man. Body parts are hilarious. Like that's that's great so anyway did it tastes good. You.

US Europe Instagram Middle East Myanmar Africa Malla Insana India China Thailand Emoji Badgley Southeast Asia Philippines Asia Emoji News Aphrodisiac Properties South America Bc Harry Potter Google
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:13 min | 6 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Ninety four one FM okay welcome back to coast to coast David Meade with us we'll get your calls as well David let's talk a little bit more about revelation and how this ties into all of this now if you look at revelation it's also end times is that what we're talking about here right yeah precisely end of days and times Hollywood some some some movies on this now that is a very well funded that rabbi in Israel by funded by some very wealthy Jewish but I am just interest rabbi glaziers and he's a he's a world renowned expert of the Torah codes and he recently found evidence of a cataclysmic strike by new group in the Jewish here five seven seven seven of the Gregorian calendar equivalent is October of twenty sixteen through October of twenty seventeen so he also found evidence in a Bible matrix of the end of days that was related to begin in twenty seventeen so it is all related to the impact of facts of of these near earth objects you know these are seven hundred meter object you know is a hundred thousand megatons this this would destroy large states such as Virginia but hit the ocean would produce a one thousand foot high tsunami so all of these in the day's scenarios you know and we've got facilities to track these objects the Catalina sky survey and so forth but they have the sole purpose of monitoring there's no facilities that can cope with an imminent asteroid strike and protection there's either the technology or the time element available and so remember redback lasers and has been pointed twenty seventeen my book agrees and then points a month and I think both scientists and Bible scholars recognized the inevitability of this scenario and you know that it's there's imminent what's ironic to his rabbi glazier said in his Bible codes said that Donald Trump is going to become the next president any said that days before the presidential election when most people were saying it's all Hillary's you're right I think it was it was the definitely the week before and people thought he was wrong but he was a hundred percent right one of those codes are amazing they because they operate with non random equidistant letter sequence extensions in the Hebrew Bible and did you know for for three thousand years there's been a secret code in the Bible and it is it was broken by distinguished mathematician and corroborated by world famous academics and it is forecasted things of it you know on a past tense basis from war to the Gulf War Michael Johnson wrote the Bible code and one thing that got him into that was a phone name ally you rips disclosed in a letter to Yitzhak Rabin the prime minister of Israel he he told them something like well you know a mathematician has discovered a hidden code in the Bible did you know that appears to do this and that and he says the reason I'm telling you about this is that the only time this was to the Israeli prime minister the only time your full name at soccer being isn't code in the Bible the words as fashionable sense macron sure name he Tony on the big board I remember that in the in the any nobody took heed to that goal when a and I think it was and however ninety five about a year after Rabin got the letter he got assassinated by somebody within Israel that's exactly right so dramatic confirmation of the reality of the coat all right to the phones now we go let us go to Thomas and more Hey there you go Thomas hi George thank you for turning my call and David made job wow what an interview and I really appreciate your research David my question you've cited the Bible but there's several versions of the Bible and job there's one Bible that was quite secret for I guess several hundred years and it was the whole Perrin Bible and it was inscribed you know generation after generation by Celtic family is in the British Isles about twenty years ago somebody actually photocopied or whatever and it was released to the public I have never been able to get a copy of this Bible but allegedly allegedly it explicitly refers to plan attacks it like Jesus on the Cole Pearn Bible refers to planet acts as the destroyer and that the destroyer has come in the past and will come again you must prepare that central and there's researchers and planted acts that have cited the coal burn Bible and that's spelled K. as in Kelly old Ellison Leri B. isn't Baker R. as in radio hi N. as in Nancy so I was wondering if you were familiar with well and let me say this to Thomas as well that it talks about a return this is amazing return of a massive space object in the long elliptical orbit around the sun known to the Egyptians and the Hebrews as the destroyer the Celts called it the frightened her what do you think of that David well yeah that's a historical proof that some extra evidence you know you'll want to look for three or four sources on any story if you're a journalist and and that's one of the sources and and the other evidences are circumstantial I mean they you know if if someone's a lawyer taking this before court you have no problem on the basis of circumstantial evidence of proving this beyond a reasonable doubt to a moral certainty I mean you've got everything starting with the the Greenbrier bunker in West Virginia you know a hundred twelve thousand square foot bunker was built back in the sixties to the hundreds that exists nowadays to the six trillion missing from the the the Pentagon budget to the doomsday seed vault at the top of the planet and a remote archipelago of Svalbard management or a way to tutor at all the evidence that we have photographic evidence insider information you know we have circumstantial evidence beyond a reasonable doubt you should be able to find a copy of the book Tom the colbern Bible by going to Marshall masters website as a matter of fact because in it's in two parts but to the you should be able to find it scary stuff though David isn't you know it is and and here's the thing NASA doesn't even have a mandate to develop planetary defenses it never has you know the military is mired in a war on terror and grossly over budget is not war but there's no mandate for space development and there's no money and you know as a deterrence probably is beyond the capability of conventionally chemically powered space craft yeah you have to have a nuclear powered spacecraft that used high efficiency propulsion like plasma engines and then the the Prometheus project is under development but that's ten years old and so you have parent trust requirements similar to the Jupiter icy moons orbiter spacecraft it was the technology is not currently available this may be the reason for the current lack of detection funding can we assume that with the doomsday seed vault and things like that that they really know something they're not telling us right and that's not the only one there's a there's the millennium seed bank in the west Sussex near London England UK its the really the largest C. bank in the world long term it's about a hundred times bigger than the the global seed vault and it provides space for the storage of save billions of seed samples and a nuclear bomb proof multi storey underground vault and if the aim of these places is a store every plant species possible and they hope to be the twenty five percent milestone by twenty twenty and but the the and the at the top of the planet the you've got these rooms of all board you know through say seam seed vault that can hold about two point five billion seeds and numbers about five hundred seeds from each of the close to five million varieties of crops and the them the place is already listed an earthquake Hey it's protected by high walls of of layers of concrete doors was steel plate and the permafrost as an insurance policy against system failures so I would say if you had a world economy collapse will actually have the access you know deep underground bases in one planet X. is eventually visible to the naked eye this is the reason for the establishment of these elaborate facilities one of my consent Lewis now Mike it's your turn thank you thanks George a little master balance with all the predictions he made did he ever have any mention of this but to be honest I'm not a a much of an astronaut all should almost researcher he probably I believe we did the event in the many interviews I've done with John hold very very similar things to so you have a lot of different sources as you've been saying saying the same thing right right right I consider I consider you know the of the apocalypse a a book of supernatural origin and I consider the scientific evidence that we've seen very very important and and people like this that see into other realms and so forth I suppose that's a a third confirmation so you know you have to look at all sources to be on the alert you know I think we're in a war of light against darkness both in politics and then everything and occasionally we get signals and then that's probably one of them when you're talking about John who wrote the book of revelation how did these guys thinks come to him was it an angel or a dream and as you said it was like he was transferred in the time right he was in prison serving a prison sentence under certain Roman Emperor for just simply you know being an apostle to the gentiles and he and when Paul wrote a good deal of the testament and the the apostles but he was apparently was a Sunday you call it the the lord's day and he was I had what's called a vision and open vision and you're right according to his documentation of the book revelation an angel appeared to him and was directed to reveal this information to get all from the sun god himself so this is a this is probably the highest authority we can go on and that we can still look at these other you know collateral sources but because we have both scientific indications astronomical indications we have a multiple weather indications because all of this is coming together you know this is seventy years since Israel you an authorized I think it was November twenty ninth nineteen forty seven forty eight oh well yeah forty eight Israel became a nation Ben but the actually the declaration was signed for that yeah you're right it was may of forty eight so and that's when the clock started running that's the clock absolutely we gonna be able to make it out of this well you know like I say it's an unstoppable train and there's going to be very as I would say we're very fortunate in a way to be in this particular generation and that if you look just look at the the amazing things that have happened you know after the debacle of the of the last eight years you know Americans with with sense of watch with horror the results of that administration and now you've got a new set of policies is going to change all this and I I agree with trump in many many areas but he's going to cause utter chaos Mexico will be up in arms about the cost of the wall now supported one thousand percent but look at China it is time to get tough with them but the trade deals are going to be dismantled China will react emotionally and not logically trump is president is going to shake the system he is a mover and shaker he is totally fearless and I if I you look at historical records it seems like in the Bible the Old Testament particularly god uses very strange and unusual people you look at the the is realized foreign slave for seventy years by someone called the book a Nasser and Sawiris allow the construction of a Jewish temple you had pharaoh who played agent each of her four hundred years and then in seventy A. D. Israel has Jerusalem burned to the ground by Titus and you know in recent history you know you had Hitler who is demonically energized but the result of World War two was the safe housing of the Jewish people in the new state of Israel so seems like some mysterious ways create these are kick off these these new time frames that we have to deal with jets in Culver city California Jeffrey taken away yeah you doing your them with me great yeah the book the book of revelation is my favorite book of all the traps with the from holy Christian Bible and what I find fascinating intriguing is that Jesus manifestation aboriginal appearance the gentleman that mold and what you do you know what he was able to tell John and even show him glimpses of the horrible future ahead this was to me the last chapter of the revelation pulse of unbelievable horror destruction devastation and misery how is this possible contrast what those who believe Jesus no little everyone will save all eight billion people on the planet can't have it both ways so everybody can be saved so lucid come amid well it was very very good point it's it's a book of judgment but in the end and god really in book of revelation is primarily dealing with Israel whether three major wars that occur in the book of revelation they all center around Israel but you've got there are some very up I'll put it this way Queen Elizabeth the second told Paul Burrel who's a former servant of the British royal council some years ago she said there are dark forces in this country this morning when she was referring to of which but what we know not of so you you have in the world today very strange system you've got masonic powers in a cold.

David Meade Hollywood
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

14:01 min | 6 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on KTRH

"Okay welcome back to coast to coast David Meade with us we'll get your calls as well David let's talk a little bit more about revelation and how this ties into all of this now if you look at revelation it's also end times is that what we're talking about here right precisely end of days and times Holly was done some some movies on this now that is a very well funded rabbi in Israel by funded by some very wealthy Jewish but I just interest Robert Glaser's and he's a he's a world renowned expert of the Torah codes and he recently found evidence of a cataclysmic strike by new group in the Jewish here five seven seven seven of the Gregorian calendar equivalent is October of twenty sixteen through October of twenty seventeen so he also found evidence in a Bible matrix of the end of days that was related to begin and twenty seventeen so it is all related to the impact of facts of of these near earth objects you know these are seven hundred meter object you know is a hundred thousand megatons this this would destroy large states such as Virginia but hit the ocean would produce one thousand foot high tsunami so all of these entities scenarios you know we've got facilities to track these objects the Catalina sky survey so forth but they have the sole purpose of monitoring there's no facilities that can cope with an imminent asteroid strike after detection there's either the technology or the time element available and so remember redback lasers and has been pointed twenty seventeen my book agrees and then points a month and I think both scientists and Bible scholars recognized the inevitability of this scenario and you know that it's there's imminent once I run into is rabbi glazier said in his Bible codes said that Donald Trump is going to become the next president any said that days before the presidential election when most people were saying it's all Hillary's you're right I think it was it was the definitely the week before and people thought he was blown but he was a hundred percent right one of those codes are amazing they because they operate with non random equidistant letter sequence extensions in the Hebrew Bible and did you know for for three thousand years there's been a secret code in the Bible and it is it was broken by distinguished mathematician and corroborated by world famous academics and it is forecasted things of it you know on a past tense faces from all over to the Gulf War Michael draws and wrote the Bible code and one thing that got him into that was phoneme ally you rips disclosed in a letter to Yitzhak Rabin the prime minister of Israel he he told them something like well you know a mathematician has discovered a hidden code in the Bible that you know that appears to do this and that and he says the reason I'm telling you about this is that the only time this was to the Israeli prime minister the only time your full name at soccer being isn't code in the Bible the words as fashionable sense may cross your name you don't remember that should not be ignored I remember that in the in the inning nobody took heed to that don't wanna and I think it was and however ninety five about a year after Rabin got the letter he got assassinated by somebody within Israel that's exactly right so dramatic confirmation of the reality of the codes all right to the phones now we go let us go to Thomas in Lahore yeah Hey there you go Thomas hi George thank you for serving my call and David made job wow what an interview and I really appreciate your research David my question you've cited the Bible but there are several versions of the Bible and job there's one Bible that was quite secret for I guess several hundred years and it was the whole different Bible and it was transcribed you know generation after generation by Celtic family is in the British Isles about twenty years ago somebody actually photocopied or whatever and it was released to the public I have never been able to get a copy of this Bible but allegedly allegedly had explicitly refers to plan attacks it like Jesus on the Cole Pearn Bible refers to plan attacks as the destroyer and that the destroyer has come in the past and will come again you must prepare that central and there's researchers and planted excellent upside and the coal burn Bible and that's spelled K. as in Kelly old Ellison Leri B. isn't Baker R. as in radio hi N. as in Nancy so I was wondering if you were familiar with well and let me say this to Thomas's while that it talks about a return this is amazing return of a massive space object in the long elliptical orbit around the sun known to the Egyptians and the Hebrews as the destroyer the Celts called it the frightened her what do you think of that David well yeah that's a historical proof that some extra evidence you know you'll want to look for three or four sources on any story if you're a journalist and and that's one of the sources and and the other evidences are circumstantial I mean they you know if if someone's a lawyer taking this before court you have no problem on the basis of circumstantial evidence of proving this beyond a reasonable doubt to a moral certainty I mean you've got everything starting with the the Greenbrier bunker in West Virginia you know a hundred twelve thousand square foot bunker was built back in the sixties to the hundreds of exist now days to the six trillion missing from the with the Pentagon budget to the doomsday seed vault at the top of the planet in a remote archipelago of Svalbard management or a way to tutor at all the evidence that we have photographic evidence insider information you know we have circumstantial evidence beyond a reasonable doubt you should be able to find a copy of the book Tom the colbern Bible by going to Marshall masters website as a matter of fact because in it's in two parts but to the you should be able to find it scary stuff though David isn't you know it is and and here's the thing NASA doesn't even have a mandate to develop planetary defenses it never has you know the military is mired in a war on terror and grossly over budget my war but there's no mandate for space development and there's no money and you know as a deterrence probably is beyond the capability of conventionally chemically powered space craft yeah you have to have a nuclear powered spacecraft that used high efficiency propulsion like plasma engines and and the the Prometheus project is under development but that's ten years off and so you have parents trust requirements similar to the Jupiter icy moons orbiter spacecraft over the technology is not currently available this may be the reason for the current lack of detection funding which can we assume that with the doomsday seed vault and things like that that they really know something they're not telling us right and that's not the only one there is there's the millennium seed bank in the west Sussex near London England UK its the really the largest C. bank in the world long term it's about a hundred times bigger than the the global seed vault and it provides space for the storage of say billions of seed samples and a nuclear bomb proof multi storey underground vault and if the aim of these places is a store every plant species possible and they hope to be the twenty five percent milestone by twenty twenty and but the the and if the top of the planet the you've got these routes of all of our you know doomsday seem seed vault that can hold about two point five billion seeds and numbers about five hundred seeds from each of the close to five million varieties of crops and is it is that the place is already listed an earthquake Hey it's protected by high walls of of layers of concrete doors with steel plates and the permafrost as an insurance policy against system failures so I would say if you had a world economy collapse and people actually have the access you know deep underground bases in one planet X. is eventually visible to the naked eye this is the reason for the establishment of these elaborate facilities one of my consent Lewis now Mike it's your turn thank you thanks George a little mastered honest with all the predictions he made did he ever have any mention of this so to be honest I'm not a a much of an astronaut all Saddam's job researcher he probably levy did David in the many interviews I've done with John hold very very similar things to sell you have a lot of different sources as you've been saying saying the same thing right right right I consider it I consider you know the of the apocalypse a a book of supernatural origin and I consider the scientific evidence that we've seen very very important and and people like this that see into other realms and so forth I suppose that's a a third confirmation so you know you have to look at all sources to be on the alert you know I think we're in a war of light against darkness both in politics and then everything and occasionally we get signals and then that's probably one of them when you're talking about John who wrote the book of revelation how did these guys thinks come to him was it an angel or a dream and as you said it was like he was transferred in the time right he was in prison serving a prison sentence under certain Roman Emperor for just simply you know being an apostle to the gentiles and he and when Paul wrote a good deal through testament and the the apostles but he was apparently was a Sunday he called it the lord's day and he was I had what's called a vision and open vision and you're right according to his documentation of the book revelation an angel appeared to him and was directed to reveal this information to get all from the son of god himself so this is a this is probably the highest authority we can go on and that we can still look at these other you know collateral sources but because we have both scientific indications astronomical indications we have multiple weather indications because all of this is coming together you know this is seventy years since Israel you an authorized I think it was November twenty ninth nineteen forty seven forty eight oh well yeah forty eight Israel became a nation Ben but the actually the declaration was signed for that yeah you're right it was may of forty eight so and that's when the clock started running that's the clock absolutely are we gonna be able to make it out of this well you know like I say it's an unstoppable train and there's going to be very as I would say we're very fortunate in a way to be in this particular generation in the end if you look just look at the the amazing things that have happened you know after the debacle of the of the last eight years you know Americans with with sense of watch with horror the results of that administration and now you've got a new set of policies is going to change all this and I agree with trump in many many areas but he's going to cause utter chaos Mexico will be up in arms about the cost of the wall now supported one thousand percent but look at China it is time to get tough with them but the trade deals are going to be dismantled China will react emotionally and not logically trump is president is going to shake the system he is a mover and shaker he is totally fearless and if I you look at historical records seems like in the Bible the Old Testament particularly gun uses very strange and unusual people you look at the the Israelites were enslaved for seventy years by someone called the book a Nasser and Sawiris allow the construction of a Jewish temple you had feral who's played ages each of her four hundred years and then in seventy A. D. Israel has Jerusalem burned to the ground by Titus and you know in recent history you know you've had Hitler who is demonically energized but the result of World War two was the safe housing of the Jewish people in the new state of Israel so seems like some mysterious ways create these kick off these these new time frames that we have to deal with jets in Culver city California Jeffrey taken away yeah you doing your them with me great yeah the book the book of revelation is my favorite book of all the chaplain would become holy Christian Bible and what I find fascinating intriguing is that Jesus manifestation aboriginal appearance the journal looked at malls and what you do you know what he was able to tell John even show him glimpses.

David Meade Holly
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

13:21 min | 8 months ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"Jonathan Bennett. And every week I sit down for a forty minute conversation the brilliant expert to learn all about something that means curious. Today's episode joined by Botanist and Research Leader at the Royal Botanic Gardens. Cue Doctor Alex. It's been Rome where I ask him how you plan to get there. Hey curious this is Jonathan Vanessa. We are with Dr Alex Munro who is a botanist at the Royal Botanic Gardens so oh pitcher were kind of were inland and right. Yeah on the edge of London on the edge of London and we're Q.. Gardens which is is the world's the biggest time for gardens on research institute so it combines natural park like landscape with amazing collections of living plants and then a giant collection contrite a barren plants which for example going to study on. I think I just saw a tree that was from seventeen seventy five. Yeah Yeah. Yeah that's like. That was like the Boston Tea Party in the battle of Bunker Hill not to bring up a sore subject in the United Kingdom. You know but I think that was the same year. Yeah Yeah property like wow. That's old Q- Gardens has really been like a living breathing. Newseum for plants were where people can income view that you can see these big beautiful glass houses. They have like palm trees and I also saw this one glasshouse place it looks like mimics high-altitude. You Know Yeah Yeah. The pump. The Alpine House. How do you know why? Why does it MCI altitude? Yeah because they have to generate colder in the summer. Because it's too hot in the summer for it to Alpine and in the spring likes to come and get some of the early won't for they can kind of plants Flowering Sa- really nice greenhouse because they bring plants Johnson when they come into flower is always full of flowering. Things interest. Love that so when now and then there's also the sea bake thank which that is like so this is like a three hundred Acre like big rolling hilly Lakey like a Space within the seed bank is like not like that now. The State Bank is a volt for storing seat. And it's one of the probably only place in the world where we have A. I think it's ten twenty percent of the world's diversity of plants just a moment. Did you ever see panic room with jody foster. You're in the early two thousands and an christened earn Kristen Stewart. Kristen Stewart it's a classic. It reminds me of panic room but for are Basically so what's the importance of AC- bank like what are the. She's like. A vault with Tennessee. Yeah it gives so much in. The season sees the potential plants. When it's plotted out you can you can then so? That seat is protected and saved in conserved and habitats may be being destroyed by logging Farming or whatever and then in the future Tom. If you want to restore rescue species. They've become incredibly red. which low them? All you could tighten that seed germinates emanates it an implant it back where it came from or any seeds the sea bank or the plans extinct or any of them. Yeah really yeah you should go. That's incredible. Yeah so let now extinct in the wild or buying but yeah. That's that's really incredible. I do you know. We'll have not like plot question 'cause they know that's not your thing but do we know bill the State Bank. Yeah like how long has it been there and two thousand and says the Millennium Seed Bank. It was built to celebrate the MELANIA. Now Millennium is all in context and the title of the Millennium seed. Bank got it. And that's part or of gardens. Okay everything's coming into focus so now you Dr Monroe so like would yours minding your own business in the United Kingdom when you're a little and you realize you wanted to be a scientist on never really wanted to be a scientist. sloughing already wanted to explore ongoing forests locked being forest. None of is obsessed with wildlife on nature insects particular. Actually love windows. Three is the Ganz garden with a plastic bag on my hands and catch bumblebees and keep them in jam jars. which I think is probably rule but we actually did an episode on getting curious called to? How can we be less rude to be so up? I was very routes based okay. You're curious in our. You're getting curious when you were really at all. So how did your life lead you to being because you're at title because we love title and you got got several. You're a doctor. You're a botanist. Also daren't you like another EST- like isn't there like a like Tax are a taxonomic. Yes yeah aren't the two that questioning looking. You're getting credentials remote because you can't say no just say you'll the things end in ace bigamist or whatever. Oh No no in your when your doctor feel usually kind of fierce biologist or later so at the taxonomic taxonomy taxonomy Classify things so we kind of we say what they always identified them but we also describing identify new things. So if you think you've got a new species with with ones who say we think this is new. Then we describe it might friend really likes to name plants a lot will because they're a landmark fat Zia Japonica or something. Yeah what city. That's like something from Japan. Yeah yes japonica. Means Japan lie the some relationship shipped to Japan. Yeah so here is it juniper from Japan juniper sounds a little bit joining juniper is gone I why am I so basic. It sounds of Santa Phantom. We tend to have the to pasta. The name is of binomial genus and species. Suspicious changes like the group of things which we sable relates is to each other until the other things so that's the genus. Wait why is it more related to it. Another thing because free volition. Obviously everything is so. We'll write to each other and losing autism so rates each other obviously way more to each other than we are to grow so cute and funded. Think about that. We're all kind of related we. Oh yeah yeah condemnatory about that but volition as the major assumption behind evolution. which is the thing species so you have one species and then it splits into two species? The process got it. Yeah so taxonomic you had to learn all about all about like the the titles things evident yours is more about like discovering new things breath. Yeah that's my buddy because really WanNa know how you became one. Yeah okay yes under become one. Actually I wanted to be malicious kit to study insects and then when I went to university yeah I thought it's really bad idea to study your favorite subject so I fly allergy because I was an idiot. Am I just being clever but it was very sad now. If you humid you want to study in fact have moments when I think want is I do. It's never too late. You can go back. And it's not a literal well behaved he thinks if you felt like you could very old baby. I think it'd be really if you like. All of a sudden like through all of academia it's heels and we're like like no Dr Munro's GonNa go back and becoming etymologists now but anyway I did and I had this love for forest so that was kind of drive me ratings onto degree in biology college in three that. I did an expedition to Bolivia Amazon which was amazing. We spent two months champion the Amazon Cemented the fact that I wanted to work in tropical forests what was going on in the Bolivian Amazon forest. That so we would collecting trees were doing. It was already remotes unexplored area and it was very rich. In primates. I think is still the richest place in the world for primates with like twelve thirteen species of monkey forest worth Bolivia in relationship to Brazil. Aw next. Brazil hates North Northwest So then South America but it's like on the upper part of that yet Brasilia. Yes Amazon extends across into Bolivia Peru Ecuador Colombia interesting. Love that so you're that for two years like in your early twenties would not two months. We account for Afghans nineteen. Twenty Shit was totally not what was like. Were you aware of like. Did you have to like take any precautions. Like when y'all went there are like how to be careful of like yes we should have for. We relied students excited that collecting climbing up trees. You know kind of sixty foot trees but that nine yeah it was just a really it just the southern the amazing place so i. Your Undergrad was biology. Yeah so Fritz expedition. I kind of go segue into looking at forest Tropical Ecology assaulted world spiced in Manaus for a couple of years whereas the capsule of the of Brazilian state of Amazonas. And then I got really sick and then I had to drop out of that and then I came back to the UK. I spent quality time sick and then I got a job at the natural history. Museum is a Boston based And and then they just went on from that. Wow so then when you started guarded. I saw the coupons about five years ago. That's it give you like a full of yes. I spend coming from the Twentieth Museum as opposed to next and then I came here twenty years. I've been here for five years. That tells you that I'm the baby. Because the botanist is I know would would you look amazing so but so a botanist is somebody who studies plans. So you said he planted in the also studied like to to the classification of them. Yes I've asked the tax detects on posses like I think everything that studying plants in the way study migrate taxonomy say we studied the classification description plants. We exploration adventure supplants as well so. Isn't traveling still a big part of your job. Yeah Yeah so tell me about that. Yeah well sorry for every Five or six months away and a guy exploring saw some of the last five years. I've been doing that for twenty five years. So even when you're at the newseum you're probably from the Natural History Museum to the six hundred dollars. Fine Yeah so you always been like a scientist who's based in London and didn't have a perfect contradiction love for so love the wilderness. Bob Is born in London and grew up in London and we're probably died in London and I'm also London. I love that is unusual because it's not it's not obvious but it seems like a coup gardens. There's a very large scientific community. That's aw very much like you know. Dedicated to like all things. Plants totally so is about three hundred scientists of across the two sites and everyone is totally dedicated fascinated obsessed with will move only do how does how does that community interface with like a daily interaction action or like a outlook aren like sustainability climate. Change like how does you gardens. or how does anyone in any tips on. How like an how scientists are trying to be like like like? What do you do so we can all do well? I'm not sure we're better than anyone else. But we sunny really aware of. It is something that we talk about a locks in in two socially but also something we turn. We've into our work so what we're doing helping address climate change so we do a lot of conservation assessments. We look species in the current distributions. And how it'll be affected by changing climates for example coffee. It's been with the load. Welcome not will be in the will the white populations guy will they be wants out. Habitat can move into is because we're wiping out like parts of forest to grow coffee beans there. No no sorry. We looking to his coffee grows in mountainous areas in Ethiopia and as the climate changes the slots would they grow become too dry and was to move up because he gets warmer. And so what can can I move to the top of a mountain. Say they go nowhere to go and probably close harmony and so that's kind of really practical example but But we kind of look at that for many different plants which may be. Maybe they don't have any known uses but still we were important parts of our global ecosystem breath so when you would go out explain early when you currently got exploring like wha like have you been to like all the continent early fix when I've been to. I've been to Latin America by of been to Australia Africa. I've been African David. That doesn't Count Antioch. Yeah but then the work in China for example in southwest China in the Limestone Plateau. You have yeah what would you do with the plant over. There is amazing so they have this incredible ancien in cost landscape which is limestone been weathered by tropical rains kind of fifty six hundred million years. Incredible like shapes rocks and ready spiky. It's quite difficult for plants to survive on its retry and then really wet and re hall and then cold and so. I've been working on the.

London United Kingdom scientist Dr Alex Munro Royal Botanic Gardens Japan Q- Gardens Kristen Stewart Millennium Seed Bank Doctor Alex Jonathan Bennett Amazon Jonathan Vanessa Bolivia MCI jody foster Research Leader Boston Tea Party China
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The blunt to grow and add to survive dry dryseason what we have as it is also fire yeah one you can however some for dance on grass species for for the communities and of the three season did little seedling can grow independently we will to any or their system so he has is quite challenging bad does some sign that is not irreversible provided that you'd get do ride material and their plan them at the right time to to benefit the did limited the rainfall that come to the region but in caning up the planting for any restoration project like this the biggest challenge when dealing with these wide species is the availability of quality seeds and for many varieties scientists apply catch up with their german nation and handling requirements my name is did center so wake him to the meetings see bang held there i am a tonic i thank you the millennium seed bank in the uk is the largest angsi chew plums conservation programming the world's its aim is to bank a quarter of are endemic an economically valuable plant species by 2020 pretty thick door japan the brand dry air and constant low temperatures ensured the collection remains intact experiments are also conducted on its working collection and it here in the lambs that botanist t ten at we end and her team a hoping to identify and propagate welladapted native species that meet the needs of dissent held communities warily following the process from the collecting the west the end to the professional and planting underground where we have to monitor dance in this way we have like a full big chas somehow the life cycle of the species that allows us to be successful for future research on projects one of the species currently under analysis is the african branch but told the cds tree native two savannah it's much in demand but as pound physiologist stiff finally explains its viable seeds are to premium it is an important economic and cultural values because the leaves and the boc i use traditionally for dying the curtain so it's requested by the communities and were greenwood project although it's planting is limited because he has a larger munition rates as her germination a researching the distribution of been and going at you and and we've managed to to separate highly valuable seeds from large quantities of seeds to.

uk boc
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"One of you think about three got three hundred ninety thousand plant species that unknown known currently you think well six thousand dollars on that many but you only need one really aggression invasive to wipeout huge areas of of by diverse landscape um so that's that's a problem and then of course when you're thinking about how you deal with those invasive the most common search going on right now the most common method is is chemical control but of course that brings with it his own suite of problems and so while they're trying to deal with one issue you create another so it's always a tradeoff in in this scientific were to try and look at what is the best for biodiversity i'm probably being a bit romantic here but most people when they think about botanists they think a you guys worked really like one hundred years ago no ordering the victorian era going off into the wilds his helmets exactly but you know this is going on right now and it's not just the finding this stuff you then kind of safeguarding it in the millennium seed bank tell me what a little bit about what modern botanists what it's like so martin broughton accu alone i mean people tend to think of q gardens as a as a very nice guns in west london but we have a three hundred plant scientists there as well going from the identification and naming right the way through to understanding the molecular and chemical compounds of plants and how they could be used in medicines in in fuel in cosmetics cetera right and then we have the conservation section so where do we conserve where the highest concentrations of.

chemical compounds martin broughton west london six thousand dollars one hundred years
"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

The Economist: Babbage

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"millennium seed bank" Discussed on The Economist: Babbage

"Climate change in the uncertainty it throws up was one of the main drivers behind the need to establish the millennium seed bank this is a collection of the world's seeds held in cold storage accused base and wake hurst place column club is the head of conservation science khan what makes scientists believe all the seeds that way cursed need storing at a very cold temperature blessed that's a great question because of course seed research and see biology is its own discipline within biology that there's lots of work it's been going on looking at the seat and functions of the siege and what we certainly know is that we can't stole all seats we thought there was a dichotomy two different groups of seeds one that a cold orthodox seat and these awan's it turns out we can stole in a cold temperatures and a a relatively easy to to dry out under controlled conditions and then stole voters another group which called recalcitrant then seeds that aren't able to be dry down in these can control conditions without the the membranes being disruptive they they tend to be seeds that are quite fleshy either quite a lot of material associated with and so the drying process is challenging and they tend to be associated with very moist humid conditions so of tropical forest trees and plants would have these sorts of recalcitant seats and so one branch seed biology is really trying to look at recalcitant seeds and work out how we can store does and there that's where we move into things like nick come you extract the embryo install that in liquid nitrogen cryopreservation or all the other ways we can stole that to try and get over this problem of not being able to to dry them down sufficiently.

Climate change head of conservation nick