3 Episode results for "Millennium Project"

PGCE Research Bites 6 - Oracy in Drama with Lucy Gooding

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

16:24 min | 2 weeks ago

PGCE Research Bites 6 - Oracy in Drama with Lucy Gooding

"Arguing pg see research bites from the team behind. Tom talk teaching. Welcome back to. Pc research bites everyone where we showcase excellent student work and the research they've been doing over the course of rpg see program here at cardiff met. And how the in practice of being integrating working together to help move forward with their classroom practice. I'm delighted to introduce you to one of my personal. Gt's and someone who's on my pc secondly drama program. These gooding welcomed peach research bites. Thank you very much having me very well. Thank you glad to hear it. So we'll get straightened gritty. We're here to talk about assignment. To and i line with team you were asked to select a theme or two teams max that were really important to you. When your developing practice so first question is what did you choose. And why so originally. And i looked at the idea of teacher mbo process drama linden through the experience rather than just focusing on the product and i thought it was bit broad so i wanted to look at the skills that you needed to have be. Successful in process drama so and speaking came to the forefront obviously and i thought back to a on sessions object session. We had for christmas. We i was first introduced the concept of voice and and then i thought about school entering day we had about cross curricular responsibilities without even thinking about it. I put speaking sin at the top of my list. Fort drama and so. I did some maurice it around that and i became more interested because i discovered previously. There's been an assumption that pupils and arrive in education knowing how to talk and how to communicate effectively when in fact that's not necessarily the case especially with pupils from and deprived areas and poor backgrounds. Home life is not which was talk. And which with collaboration and they don't know how to effectively communicate as educators. trash practitioners. I feel like we'd be naive. If we ignore that statistic so i think it's our job to teach. These pupils helped toll a not. Then if like an intentionally neglect the in the aspect because they need the skills to be able to be successful in a way will context. And i think we'd be doing at injustice if we ignore that fucks really useful to hear your journey and also the kind of different aspects of the program that fed into you choosing that theme. You said there was a lecture at university. And i'll t- day so it kind of theory practice. Lots of the different settings. It will help you to arrive at this at this focus. I'm really interested in what you said about these assumptions that we might hold a by tau well pupils can talk and how that how they learn to talk and i wonder if in drama just thinking about it as an authentic context for developing reseda. Is something that we can do well. We could do well but do you think they're any kind of problematic assumptions. That even drama teaches might hold about how we do that in the classroom. And whether it happens by osmosis or whether we actually really do try to teach strategic. Yeah i think going off what you just said dramas -ticipant does lend itself well to oversee authentically and naturally and i think as teachers and classroom practitioners. We have to remain a wit about the type of conversation that pupils have been. Because i was in the assumptions while just because they talk in doesn't mean the quality of talk is actually helping to develop that if you like. And we need to make sure we struck to these conversations and help these pupils to or quick these people's with correct skills to ensure they survive in shade pit bus through a successful way to feel like because through my literature. My visa came across different types of took you might find in a classroom set mutational which is very blunt very argumentative than if you like got cumulative which is more positive. Where people's build upon an elaborate on each other's answers but these new programs. No question is no criticality. so he's very postive unhappy. Then he like and then i came to a explosive talk where pupils question each other. They are sharing their opinions understanding each of this perspectives to arrive shake conclusion and has drama teachers any teacher. We need to make sure that is the talk. That is prominent in our drama classrooms and the linen into be successful task. Really interesting and i can hear ready. How literature was informing your practice and i wonder. Is there anything else that you came across in the literature and kind of particular approaches sources in particular that helped to address those preconceived ideas that you had before you start doing this work. Yes so i really get bug. Actually which was probably the foundation of my assignment by any did not stuff written quite recently and it put into perspective and how it hasn't been and given the recognition that it deserves the book gave you ways in which you can include or sea bass activities in your classroom lessons your practice practice said yet on a us those to maybe see. They w- elsie. How do differently. That's readings thing. And i i know that particular burke of used in my teaching and it's quite useful isn't it because it's got really kind of practical. It's got the theory the practical to purchase that we helpful for informing. You you pedagogy and practice. I knew that you read some other theorists big theorists in this as well did you wanna bring anybody has to the full. Yeah so. I looked at which by and facet neil mesa ends up to james manion and how warsi is an presented and finally given this vaccination in the new curriculum. I also have the voice funny one who are charity who advocate four and pupils on talk and the overseeing invoices which was interesting as well. Because i think i empathize with a passion for it. If that makes sense does really does something that you did. While in your assignments. What was the us. They're kind of oversee framework as well linguistic dimension the cognitive so really interesting but what i really want to know is how that literature then informed your practice. So did you make any changes to what you doing in the classroom. Based on what you read. And yeah. I suppose they did. I used one of and coen stott's practical activities with my team. Glass way they have to place themselves on like an invisible line of agreement lack and Statements on the board and these statements were reluctant to and specific character. They will look in that from one of they plays and my aim was to get instinctive about his character's motivation but also through and the medium. That of talk. If you like. So i was. I was aiming to symbiotically This subject knowledge and the on the ability to talk. And if you look and it's really interesting to see where these people's place themselves physically fit without saying anything. And then. I got them to and i clashed in them. Haden's him about why they thought that and how they opinion to somebody else who was on a different part of the line and that would be interesting to see in practice imperious and after reading through the literature. That was one of my favorite. That's a really good example. And i know from reading your assignment and from the work that we've done in our drama sessions that there's a a nice link between or see learning through talk and learning to talk and drama where we learned through drama and we learn about drummer. So it's interesting that you still have leeward there. That kind of symbiotic relationship between the two. Did you do anything else with your research and inquiry time when you're on school placement and that's part of this assignment part to asks you to show how you developed it in practice. Was there anything else that you did to try and develop this by using your recession query time. Yes so when the sections of my poppy. I labeled title than a school based approach and and i started looking at the things that we we give on our school at training day and and we had its hawk fund the moise champion in my chaco practice to school so after i decided that i was going to focus on. Cnn's important in the curriculum. I decided contacting holds fashion compensations. I wanted to see a the way the school was. The school is approaching noisy and how it was feed through each discipline. But i also wanted to get a professional opinion on see. Anyway that makes sense so he shared with me and a variety of resources that he was aiming staff and a lot of them from your c. Pioneers programs and they were some really good resources which help fomative assessment in orsi. Because i feel like one of the reasons why he hasn't begin his plexus because it's difficult to assess it is heaton is not concrete. It's not hard evidence and then if you like which is why i think attention. His sword shied away from it. Going off what. The champion said as well and through technology through our increase in oslo of us technology. And if you liked it is finally on the can finally get in the place that saves that makes sense. Do you mean because we can capture in a way. That kind of tackles the fact that it is ephemeral here and then it's gone capturing not movement can be difficult is that is that what you mean. Yeah it's hard evidence. I think drama park. Saddam has the same problem is difficult to assess. Because is there an gone if that makes sense. Yeah absolutely fascinating and great that you can tap into the re situated and contextual expertise of somebody who has that responsibility in school to help you understand how school or addressing it and whether that times with literature okay so thinking about the feet to now you are going to be starting first job in september. Eveland a lot from this sinement. I'm just waiting to know how what you've done in assignment to techy the influence what you do in future in your in your new job yet from his point of view is only this shit that i've been introduced the force. John's voice eve physical linguistic cognitive. Social emotional before my pc. I wasn't aware of those. I think i was subconsciously. But i've never been taught them explicitly that if you like. What i'm interested in doing is if we show these four strands to pupils. Teach them about each one will. Our pupils have better and sons. In dorsey we teach them tangibly. These four strums foresee. And so. I want to look at that and also during my time in kindergarten i was able to observe that a lot of english. Asan's especially during the enrichment leaks and your time we on the one which is an individual presentation on. I didn't trust the how two different disciplines edition. Drama approach warsi task. Then feel i can have drama Physical aspects of raising just looks more maybe linguistic what goes into it and how to different disciplines with teach and the same thing if you have a strong focus depending on which subject you looking and i thought that would be interested so fascinating and you know is. It isn't old alliance actually in gresh drama. But you made a really good point. We'll prepping for this interview. That in wales are aol. Liza are different. It makes it makes it really good point about the importance of cross. Aol working doesn't it. But making sure that drama and english working together. This was a fantastic assignment and it was really great to see you. Grappling with fee unpracticed and interrogating one against the other. You've recommended quite law already. But was there anything else that you would recommend anybody else to watch. Listen to read. And so i've already said gordon starts but quit was amazing. Whatever you say. I was highly at manda. That i would have bob in alexander's dilated teaching companion. And i thought that was really interesting. Quite challenging wage. I feel and this larger -nology get your heads about. But they expand quite well on alexandersson lord of emphasis again on the history of voice in the curriculum while you mentioned lots of really great sources there and i know the in your first job. You've got a big sort of alan connection. Re-met haven't you in that post. An i know the in your assignment. You mentioned the significance of people's being vicious additional language. Anything on that for that. You won't listen to know. Yeah definitely like you just said. My kindle fiscal had high-percentage of an english as a language lena's and and eventually evaluated by market and colts have teach out and in the classroom. Complete study guide. I think and what the book pointed out what mitch suggested was how to teach these pupils orsi how to teach these how to talk effectively but without singling in marked and still doing it. I create an inclusive environment. I recommend up to really interesting. Lots of crossover there with you. Know your focus and then other areas of education Incredibly important these given us a wealth of information there and hopefully some ideas about how the stephen teaches could may be influence their own practice with oversea but also how they use research and inquiry to to move themselves boys who thank you very much. Thank you for having me. Pg researched bites comes from the team behind. Tom talk teaching and is presented this week by amazon. It showcases the best student teacher research from the cardiff partnership for initial teacher education. Thanks to lucy cutting. Pg secondary drama. Who joined us today to share her research. Podcast art work is by beth. Blandford and the music is by cameron stewart. We'll be back with a regular episode next week and pg research bites. We'll be back soon.

Fort drama neil mesa james manion warsi gooding coen stott reseda cardiff maurice orsi Tom elsie drama park Eveland Haden burke heaton Cnn us oslo
Wine Makers Creating Wine for Mars Trip

SPACE NEWS POD

08:24 min | 2 years ago

Wine Makers Creating Wine for Mars Trip

"Three two one. We have ignition and liftoff. Hello and welcome back to the space news pod. Your daily source, I space science and tech news. Mars get as the dry dry place while there's some water there. But there are some farmers some grape farmers, some wineries that are interested in being the first to make wine on Mars, and I'm gonna get into that in just a moment. But I have to pay a few bills. Do a pause for the cause. So be right back with some more information about grapes on Mars. Hi, everyone. I would've let you know about inker dot FM. It's where I host podcast in. I find that. It's the easiest place to do that. And it gives you everything that you need in one place for free, which you can start podcasting from your phone or from your computer. You don't need special crazy equipment to start doing it. You can talk into your phone delete editing equipment that costs thousands of dollars to start a podcast. You can do it from anywhere. And when you're done recording your episode anchored at FM will distribute it so it can be hard everywhere on Spotify, apple podcast, Google, podcasts, Stitcher. Every place podcast can be heard in you can make money with your podcast. It's pretty simple. There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast while download the crap or go to anchor FM to get started. Georgia is a place between mountains in the Black Sea. And they're known for being the first nation on earth to make wine. But now they wanna make wine on Mars, and they have a mild climate is perfect for vineyards. And it's developed a thriving wine tourism industry, but now the co founder of the project wants to develop grape varieties that will be able to grow on the red planet Mars. He says Georgians with first winemakers on earth. And now we hope to pioneer viticulture on the planet next door. So NASA has put out its feelers to the public and ask them to contribute ideas for sustaining human presence on Mars. So the group of Georgian researchers and entrepreneurs got together, and they wanna make the country's winemaking inter planetary not just on earth. But on earth. And on Mars in Georgians, the really good at making wine. They've been doing it for about eight thousand years longer than any nation. That's because our geologists they found traces of wine residue in each int- clay vessels. So they made this new project it's called IX millennium. And it's a reference to Georgia's long history of winemaking, and I ex millennium is managed by consortium set up by the Georgia space research agency, Belise business technology university, the national museum in a company called space farms now, the Saul might seem kinda crazy. You know might just seem like somebody's making up an idea for a book or something for a story, but people are actually working on this. They're taking the time out of their day. They're spending their own money. And they're hoping that this actually becomes a thing. Because NASA wants to send a manned mission the Mars in about twenty five years. Spacex who's Elon Musk company has set a goal. For about fifteen years. So let's just say, you know, say twenty five years say if NASA does the manned mission in twenty five years. What do you wanna drink on Mars? Do you want to drink water? Do you wanna drink soda or would you like to sit back sip a little bit of wine? You're hanging out on Mars, you're on the red planet. You're with your buddies who made the trip with you the long arduous journey. Do you wanna drink water or do you want to have a little civil line? Well. I think these Georgian people really want you to drink someone in there working on it. They have some breakthrough results in one of the scientists working on the project Astrobiologist is developing bacteria that can turn Martian soil into fertile soil. And researchers have already achieved a breakthrough in results with some foam Martian soil in their laboratory. So they're actually working on this stuff, and they collected bacteria from regions of Georgia with extreme ecosystems such as hot sulphur springs that may strains capable living in Martian conditions. So they're working on things on earth with bacteria that could be used on the red planet in what the bacteria would do is that they would transform the lifeless surface of Mars into fertile soil where the future Mars colonists would be able to cultivate. Plants now that introduces bacteria onto another planet. Most of the time you're not really supposed to be doing that. But maybe if you're going to survive at another planet. That's another thing, you know, if you want to survive in grow plants while not just wind, but if you wanna go plants that you can survive on then maybe we do need to do this in the future or find another way that doesn't use bacteria, and these scientists are also testing the skins of Georgia's five hundred twenty five grape varieties to see which are most resistant to the highest levels of ultraviolet radiation that hits the Martian surface in their preliminary results showed that a pale skinned variety of grapes, which is the popular variety of produces white wines with crisp green apple flavors is the best in all tra- violent race, so far so the founder of space farms company, which is part of the millennium project said in the. Distant future, Martian, colonists will be able to grow plants directly in Martian soil. But first we need to create a model of completely controlled sustainable Martian greenhouses, and they're not just doing things than a lab the building vertical farming laboratory a new laboratory, which is called the ideal technology for Martian Angra culture in the future in the plants will grow in a specificity located inside a hotel trendy hotel. I guess, and it's laid out in vertically stacked layers with carefully controlled temperature light in humidity. So the next step for these scientists is to grow their grapes in simulated Martian environment in a lab now under construction at the business technology university plants will be subjected to sub-zero celsius temperatures, high levels of radiation and carbon monoxide high-altitude air pressure. And they said they'll be able to. Identify breed food crops resistant to the problems caused by global climate change. So they're actually doing this. They're growing Mars, grapes growing grapes here that they could ship to Mars and make the wine sometime, hopefully, the science that they put together can help us grow plants on Mars as well. Now, I wanna give a special shout out to Rick who just joined us on patriots the newest member of our patriot family. Thank you so much for joining the crew. And they also want to say that if you're interested in joining up, you can go patriot dot com slash space news podcast. It's his little as one dollar per month to help out every little bit counts. So thank you so much for that. In the best way to help out is just to listen to the podcast subscribe to listen every single day. So thank you so much for taking the time to your day to spend it here with me on the space news pod. Your host will. And I will see you see.

Georgia NASA apple Black Sea Spotify co founder Rick Saul Astrobiologist Google Belise founder twenty five years eight thousand years fifteen years one dollar
Cities Empowered by Systematic Futures ThinkingEP. 10

Urban Futures Podcast

36:05 min | 1 year ago

Cities Empowered by Systematic Futures ThinkingEP. 10

"Welcome to another road of the urban futures podcast these Jones into base bestowed. We have the pleasure to speak with Suka. Heynen super is professor of Futures Studies at the University of two and a full member of the club of Rome. She actively promotes fishers. Learning is here to talk about. How a future surrendered. Approach can be used supposedly to influence outcomes in urban planning circa. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much for reminding me here you have worked in several projects ranging from technology for side to the future of CDs in rural areas before we dig deeper into some of you work. Tell us about your personal story in. How do you become interested in working at this junction of Futures Research and the environment? That is indeed an interesting story. Because when I graduated as a Master of arts from Helsinki University it was not self evident that I end up here where I am now. So it turned out so that I had a possibility to apply for a job at bt. Vity is Technica Research Centre of Finland employing more than three thousand researches so I as a master of arts we'll see employed to this hard core technology center. I went exactly to the unit that studied urban planning urban studies communities and besides that The field of Fuser's bodies will entering Finland. At the time circa. You grew up in. Helsinki fins are well known for having strong bond with nature in the more than fifty percents of your country. Area is under forest land. What is that human nature relationship that you have grown to know as a fan? Growing UP IN HELSINKI ACTUALLY. Naser is really important for us. Finns it is something very embedded in our personalities even in our soul so it is sometimes called as our religion so we want to have nature around us whether we are living in city or in the countryside. So we need these Release Naira relation to nature and the natural environment all the time so We are lucky because our cities are always surrounded by a lot of nature so it means a lot. So where does that human nature relationship that you find here? In Finland that is so hard to find elsewhere. I think it is The respect for nature on the time. Let's take an example Muncie area for example and then dairy Sablan that the trees are cut down and new buildings are being built. There is strong resistance from citizens citizens residents. They know that they need this kind of connection to nature solve. They want to conserve and preserve nature as much as possible. Helsinki is growing in developing new public infrastructure particularly in Syrian areas of the city. This is a challenge when we think about the future of the cultural aspects that are linked to people relationship with nature. What are some examples of developments? He Ain't Helsinki in which you have seen. There may be some resistance towards development in order to preserve natural areas. I think this resistance to every act soon to try to remove nature or of further away is the mainstream really In Finland and in Helsinki area we are lucky because the land area is quite large so we can have both built environment and the natural environment in balance together in the same city and in Finland. Of course the climate is rather harsh. Sometimes in the winter we get snow. Even here in Helsinki and then we also have these tragedies of a cross country skiing. So in the core of Helsinki City there is this phenomenon called skiing urbanism. That means that people want to start skiing right after of their door and they enter the nature. That's even possible. You can make it compatible with city structure. How do you in the course of development? How do you see? Helsinki has changed. Because you have lived here for. How long have you lived in Helsinki? Now I was born in Helsinki and I'm now sixty six years old so I've lived all my life here and I've been following the growth of course population. Crows is happening. All the time and physical built environment is changing but not radically. I would say that Helsinki city has managed succeeded. Not Spoiling the landscape. Urban landscape be the high rise skyscrapers et Cetera or trying to a construct buildings. That are alienating people I think it is very liveable city and if you look at the statistics. International Statistics Helsinki has been rated among the most livable cities in the world. And that is exactly because of the scale. Human scale citizens are taking into consideration circa. Do you have worked at the crossroads of futures in city planning applying what is called systematic futures thinking for those listening who don't have the background on futures research. How do you define systematic futures thinking in? Why's that important? It is actually very exciting to know that. Futures Research is a discipline. It is an academic field and at the core of these academic field is systematic feuds thinking so at the University of Georgia we have International Masters Program and even doctoral program in Futures Studies. Systematic feud says thinking is the starting point there are specific broaches specific methods that are being applied in this field and what it means systematic. It means that we really whenever we are studying the future of cities. Let's say we always have systems view. We are not looking only at housing or only transportation. That happens inside city. We are looking at the whole system cities as a system and then another thing that is important criteria is that we have a long term view. He and the long term view doesn't mean only ten or twenty years. It could even mean one hundred years. We should have this. Long-term you systems view looking holistically at the topic that we are studying and using systematically different methods that have been developed for example. So-called Millennium Project has a methods toolbox that consists of thirty different methods and also the Phoenix Society for future. Studies has recently published a book that covers more than twenty different methods. That can be used in future research and talking about these methods. What are some of those tools that you have used the have given the most interesting results like for example? What about weak signals? Yes that's one very interesting. mess Look at the week's signals but before going league signals I would like to emphasize. Is that urban studies and futures studies are very closely related because when we con plan and construct cities they are meant to survive for many centuries even so this kind of long term. Planning long-term horizon is already embedded in urban planning and studies but we can enrich urban studies when we introduce different message from feuds studies. So we sing. Now's is part of the first phase that we do when we start a project. It's called Horizon. Scanning we look at Feuds signals seeing mouse of Jane. The strongest signals are mega trends. We look at Mega trends success. Climate change population grows et Cetera. But then we can also have a look at weeks signals and we sing is a sign of an emerging Isuzu Finoman. It can be very much in the marginal. It's not visible even on unless you look very carefully but it is important and interesting in a sense that if one of these weeks thing nose starts to strengthen itself then if we have early on idea what it can be rea- have sort of competitive so that the reason behind this method of we sing now and tally in one of the research projects we had we started by looking at zing now specifically of course. We have to bear in mind all the time. Those global mega trends. They are not going anywhere. They are there but it is not enough to look at the mega trends. We have to look at medium sized Trans and also this week's mouse. And how can someone train to see her pinpoint those weak signals in an everyday life there are specific means and tools that we can try to strengthen this kind of capacity first of all you have to identify weeks he knows and but those are not easy to identify. Now that's the most challenging part. They can go missed neglected ignored. And that is because if you look at only those mainstream things that are happening if you don't chump out of the box and if you don't use your Berry Berry Farrell reason. It is difficult to identify weeks. Nas using the very feral visa means that you are looking not where you are normally looking but in the marginals it can be something that you notice. When you are walking on the street you'll see your small sign or a small special bootie for some new things or it can be something that you hear from one of your friends or colleagues that they have seen somewhere but it is something that is not yet in the mainstream or something that is known so if you ask people do you know about this phenomenon. It should be something that not everybody knows about it. I can give you one example when we think about cities. And let's take Helsinki City as an example. Let's say fifteen years ago. There was not a single Vegan restaurant in the city. So veganism started to grow when we restaurants were opened and that was of course because there was demand some people changed their lifestyles and they not only vegetarian but Do the extreme form beads veganism. And now when we look at the cityscape we can easily find more than five Vegan restaurants in the city centre so that is a phenomenon that started somewhere at some point. It was not even known what we eat. Some people didn't know and now it has become not yet a trend but almost trained and and this is where you really have to pay attention to see whether this very small signs do have potential to become a dominant trends like in the case of vagueness exactly and if you if you have identified we sing. Now's and if you think that those phenomenon are something that are desirable then developing cities of course then it is wise to find out measures how to how to strengthen that phenomen actually. I could tell another example over week thing now that was actually established in in in housing again. This kind of a bottom up activities citizens like to invent things. They like to do activities fall themselves. Basically this kind of restaurant. Dave start it in Helsinki one day Anybody good open up. A restaurant bake or Kook something and go to the street or from their flat. Open the window sale outside that was something revolutionary and it hadn't happened before and then it was like becoming very popular so that also sign over vehic. Seeing now that actually was strengthened. When you look at Finland how do you compare phenomena and urban issues? What is your view? When you compare Helsinki for example with other model cities Helsinki has some special qualities. Off Course it has a very fortunate low case by the sea seaside so housing is surrounded by sea and greenery. An AIDS are actually everywhere so it is very very good location. Very good media on the other hand. It is quite large. Helsinki hasn't had struggle with the population. Expose soul of course. There is always demand for more space for Buildings Etcetera but in general. I would say that Helsinki has not struggled with this kind of cold. Land so space area is quite large. Ibn also leaving in several other cities for several months spirit at the time is basically like berries. Rome London Tokyo and Nas. Iris and I'm of course. Naturally I compare these cities with Helsinki. We have a small in the city large area and of course I have been paying attention. Also to counselor of facts. Helsinki is an the defense are different from. Let's say Latin American people. We like to have also places for silence for just recreation by ourselves. So it's it's very different from these other hectic metro policies In and perhaps this is a very good. Highlight of what make Helsinki or The cultural aspect of Finland intervene with the with their environment with the built environment work in Finland do better. I know that we talked about this. And I know that there are some things that you see. What are those things that are changing the landscape? Yes I think there are actually two great risks in urban planning especially in the metropolitan area one risk is that we go with some hype developments. I mentioned this highrise skyscraper. I don't have them yet. We are going to have some of them here in Helsinki. I'm not so worried about them as such but I'm worried if there is the tendency to make cities to combat because from the point of view ecological point of view of course if the distances for commuting and transport tastes and if they are long we create emissions if we use fossil fuel based cars and then there is tendency that we should construct CD's very conflict but there is a limit if they are to compact there are negative effects negative impact so we should find a balance making cities both compact but so that These kind of pleasant feeling living in cities not lost and the other risk is that if we want to make cities Gar Frey. We lose this idea that the cut emissions not only making CDs CAR-FREE PUTT turning to electric vehicles. Why Not? Jane's the whole car fleet into electric vehicles then we wouldn't have emissions but we wouldn't have to compromise equality of residence in cities we have to remember that people are aging especially in Finland. Population is aging among the countries. That are like and Finland aging more rapidly than other countries. The Com- thing that the aging population we'll use mass transit or psych go cycling or biking walking. They need cars but they could be electric vehicles. Electric cars no emissions and Of course then you should pay attention to these kind of measures how to cut down emissions and this aspect of compaction and density versus having more distributed type of landscape. I think it's a big issue for cities because on the one hand we need this kind of then city in order to build efficiencies in also to have less impact on those natural resources. Because if everybody wants to live in the countryside then then we have the problem of expanding the infrastructure and impacting. The land So for for Finland. Do you have such a culture of being in contact with nature. How do you see in the future? This is going. How do you make that Needlepoint between compassion and development. I see the solution in this combination living in cities and living in the countryside. Some part of your time In Finland we have half a million summer cottage cheese so people are used to go in the summertime. They go to their cottage cheese and of course Due to technology. You can even tell over there. You can spend long around longer periods in the countryside as well so I think this kind of combination of living in multiple localities during one year. It's a good solution. You can combine spending time in the countryside and then enjoy this kind of silence and Then on the other hand leaving in the city is what you normally do. This kind of optimal combination of city living and countryside living is. I think exceptionally easy here in Finland. Do you think that giving all the problems that we have With climate change and population change This is something that will change in the future. Well I think climate change e soft gauze number one in the list mega trans. We really have to find a huge variety of different measures how to combat climate change and I think we should not only use one tool or won miss or a variety of different measures. And of course these kind of I mentioned electric cars but I would promote electrification of whole society of many many different sectors as one very general goal that you could use in combating climate chains if this electric ace is made on the basis of renewable energy. You get then. This kind of a cuts. In the missus carbon dioxide emissions that are critically need Circa you are among other things a member of the club room. The club wrong is Is Most famous for his report. The limits to growth That was published in Nineteen seventy-two as you know do they. The mission of the club is to promote understanding of the global challenges facing humanity from that perspective. What do you think is the future of urban societies given our current trajectory and in which direction that we hitting I think clubroom has now activated itself in a sense that it emphasizes the urgency of Axon not just Giving out reports and talking about climate chains they are now talking about climate emergency so there is climate emergency plan being made reading. The Club of Rome and Club of Rome gives advised governments to see these to everybody who listens? What are the measures steps needed to combat climate change so climate emergency means that you really pay attention to this challenge and problem and take it seriously? What are those key challenges inside the Climate Emergency Plan that the clubroom has released one key? Challenge is the need for changing the whole energy system. Energy System which has been based on fossil fuels have to be turned into the one that he's based on renewable energies. So I think that these the most urgent challenge and need that he's recommended. The future has become our present. Would you agree? Yes feuds or is present in our thinking in our plans all the time we now have features for Friday and other initiatives. Indeed this podcast. It is being aired on future. Stay here in Helsinki. What are the implications for the field of futures research? Are you optimistic about the future? Future is something that we all should be thinking about very seriously and it doesn't matter what age you have. It is never to leave or never too late. To start feuds US thinking you have to think about what you want from the needs from the future so in futures studies we have three kinds of food says began think about possible futures began think about probable futures and we can think about preferred desirable. Viewed says it is important that we think at all these three futures but very of an in industry in business and in normal life probable feud says are something that people want to know. What is the probable future of the city? What is the future of our business but it is not enough. We really have to open up our thinking and think about different alternatives different possibilities and then among these possibilities we have to think what it is that we want from. Our Future. What is the preferred future? Be Bill when we pick up this season. The preferred feuds then we can start thinking what other steps and measures needed in order to move towards that future yes gaining understanding but at the same time also being able be able to use that understanding Tors improving or changing or getting a new a new future exactly and there are three pins principles in future studies. I is that you cannot predict the future but you can explore the future then the other one is there is not just one huge but there are several alternatives and then the third principle we'd sees according to my mind the most important you can have an impact on the future so if I think about future of cities I am optimistic. That if we set this goal this season of preferred feuds that the won't an equal smart and livable city. Then we can start thinking. What are the steps needed that we can have our cities as Eko smart and on the other hand Labor Ball Place? We begin this conversation. Talking about systematic futures thinking. How is the adoption of this? Futures Thinking mindset useful for improving live in cities and and the way. The cities have planned. It is all about anticipation the have to anticipate also these looming threats and risks. What our existing and try to solve the problems. That's one thing but the other part is this Go apart or the target the recent part we have to have courage enough to set the target. High enough in order to reads Desirable future for our CDs and it doesn't happen only by Thinking and dreaming it happens by. Xm We have to find the right actors. The right strategies the right processes how to proceed to that Preferred few CH-. You mentioned the word anticipation. What is anticipation means in the context of futures research it means futures awareness futures consciousness? That you are all the time aware. All the feuds that is that we are not living in the present but we are already one step ahead in the future and we have to construct the future and we have to do this as co creative collaborative process for urban planning. I have proposed. This kind of new anticipate jury hybrid governance model. It means that we all the time have in mind the present realities also remembering the boss and the dreaded since that we have city but very strongly looking at the medicine of the future of city that we want to have and that we want to construct it in a collaborative co creative process together it citizens with businesses with NGOs city authorities altogether. Do you think that? From the from the city's perspective and and planners and city officials What is the level of imagination But you see or level of futures thinking that you see in them. At least for the cases that you have are for for Finland of caused city authorities have some constraints because there are rules and regulations and codes that of course have to be obeyed and followed but it also a limiting factor if we add to this This situation if we add imaginary thinking and let's say a include even children imagining while this their ideal city we can then enrich this normal regular roses in city planning and that is something that is needed. I very strongly recommend all CDs to exercise these kind of anticipate or processes and it could be even using this kind of feud day campaigning in feud sus Day campaigns you can go to schools and ask pupils and students make drawings or write essays about their safety and what they want to develop in the future. Because you seems like it's an exercise something the more you do the better you get at it but then you have to start and you really have to train yourself to do it and in learn by doing exactly an. It's all about alternatives. You have to open your mind and think about alternatives. You don't have to jump right into some some solution you can test them in your mind. And these kind of you just workshops and clinics and think about what happens costs and consequences then I test the ideas SUNA. We're coming to the end of our program. let's go back to the concept of nature What do you think will be our human nature relationship in the future? It has to be a very balanced relationship because we have been locked in this kind of situation that we are using the needs or by nature would be seen as an equal partner humans and nature in an equal partnership that is the ideal solution. I think what is your favorite spot? In the city in Helsinki city I was born. You Know City area. That's called La. It's very nice area. Old City area there is the bay. And there's Muti eggs restaurants cultural activities oprah musical and a lot of needs so you can go walking around the bay so it's an ideal place but there is another ideal place for me. Then I grew older. I have a family and I moved to the eastern parts of health saint. Elias Allah is now my favorite place because it's almost like countryside. It is a combination of city and the best of countries. I'd living and the air. Quality is the purest in Helsinki there. These unclutter episode CDs empower by Systematic Futures. Thinking thank you for listening. C- UNIX time.

Helsinki Finland Helsinki City Futures Research Systematic Futures Helsinki University professor of Futures Studies club of Rome Technica Research Centre of Fi Jane Suka University of Naser Jones bt Muncie Old City Fuser