9 Burst results for "Miles Rappaport"

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"Sitting in for can't wait to hear that story also sitting in for her today from any c. n. and current on nbc lx and the south end news and bay. Bay-windows co publisher. Both those things. That is su- o'connell hi. How are you today jury duty. I have. I've i served on a full trial once even take it took actually is one of those like four days. They promised us four days. Even though the south end news had reported on the story that we were covering and i was the publisher I was seated on the trial. I mean we didn't. It was just a report. It wasn't we editorialize so outdated case good to have you here members of the senate as you just heard on the national. Npr news returned from their august recess today and their face with the number of items such as the voting rights measure actually to an ambitious infrastructure spending package in his latest column in the washington. Post the j. dion rights without a hint of hyperbole. This is a make or break moment for democracy. Saying they're failing to enact the democrats social policy plan would be a big problem in that failing to protect democratic rule would be catastrophic. He jones's online to talk through this and other political headlines in addition to being a washington post columnist. Ej senior fellow at the brookings institution. Latest book is code red how progressives and moderates can unite to save our country. Ej wonderful to talk to you as always it is so good to be back and god bless marjorie for doing her civic duty And we'll miss her. I agree i hope. She doesn't get one of those long trials. Great to be with you sue. Could i say one other thing. Sure everybody get out to vote The preliminary election in boston as the news reported earlier in this you guys have covered closely is tomorrow. A number of other cities are voting and for the california listeners of the show tomorrow is also the last data. Vote in the california recall. Maybe we can touch on that before we are over so use your constitutional rights just as marjorie is on jury duty also not collector and she's being required to show up because the federal government and state governments are requiring hurt. Show up. we'll get to that in a minute. Second caution even though. Ej is a full fellow fall river. Right we don't want you to vote like marjorie. 'cause we have learned on certain days she is going to the she has gone to the wrong location on the wrong day. Ej is urging correctly j. Yes although i think it should be made a lot easier for people who go on to the wrong location The problem but the suit gave me an opening my friend. Miles rappaport and i have a book coming out in february on compulsory attendance at the polls. Which you for anybody but you gotta show up or or or vote by send the ballot in by mail. It can be a blank ballot. It works very well in australia. The book is called one hundred percent democracy so shoe. God bless you for letting me plus advanced. It was by accident too. But i also wanna talk implant one talk about your call them which you know i i don't know about you actually know..

Npr news marjorie nbc dion brookings institution senate washington post california jones washington Miles rappaport boston federal government australia
"miles rappaport" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

08:01 min | 11 months ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"Because they don't like to have a deadline they have wanted to endlessly kind of game this thing and string it along and string it along and string it along and You know so i think. Schumer is is rightly Saying look it's it's put-up-or-shut-up ta yeah. Well it is and the thing is This part of the bill. The the the quote bipartisan infrastructure. Bill this is the roads and bridges and the buildings. Hello i'm in florida where one collapsed in a ceiling and a roof caved in and then other buildings have been evacuated. Because they've determined they're not safe. I think all over the country people have been ready for infrastructure. For a very long time i would think it would be politically bad for the republicans to block it. But that's me and they don't listen to what i say but then once they get past this. Isn't there another debt ceiling fight coming up. You know we went through four years and didn't it seems like when the republicans are in office the democrats do the responsible thing and say of course you know the debt ceiling just as we will pay the bills for the money we've already allocated the republicans are the ones who say you know. We'll let those credit cards build up. We're not going to pay our debts while they wanna use those forcing mechanism to get something else and so Yes the debt ceiling was essentially suspended under trump for a couple of years and that suspension. And sometime this summer. I believe next month and it's quite unclear. Because you know that point trick the treasury department can use some what they call emergency measures to try to extend it as much as they can but those only goes so far and Now that it's been suspended for so long at the it's trillions of especially as what's happened in the last year how much spending we've we've incurred It's trillions of dollars so that there aren't that many extraordinary measures name take and so the expectation is could be as soon as next month. We're gonna hit the ceiling and So that. That's another reason that the urgency is here because there was some some expectation or assumption or possibility that The debt ceiling would be folded into this infrastructure. Package that that they would deem it. Pat you know with your right birth for a certain amount of funds So that you know if if the debt ceiling earth a infrastructure. Bill doesn't come together less likely that you'll see that happened and then the question is will. What are we going to do about the debt ceiling. And i think everybody has been studiously ignoring it. Snowing has not been a large part of the conversation. But i always thought in the back of my mind that if there was ever a piece of legislation that would force moderate. Democrats say okay. Let's get rid of the damn filibuster. It would be the debt ceiling language right because this is as you correctly identified. This is literally a situation of paying the bills eight. This is this is just getting the the ability to borrow to fund Things that congress already said that we're going to do it's right On often on a bipartisan basis and so these moderates those cinemas and mansions of the world have to be saying to themselves. Okay we we all agree that we were going to spend this money and Now republicans are not going to allow us to cover it and risk a financial collapse. A a a you know a loss of the full faith and credit of the us government. Okay fine maybe. The filibuster thing isn't all it's cracked up to be. Well then can we get them to move a little faster on it because we even more urgent to and it's hard to say one is more urgent than the other i mean. Infrastructure is urgent paying bills as urgent but voting rights is urgent and again you got you got a mansion and cinema but you also have others who've been conveniently quiet. They're happy to let mansion in cinema. Take the heat. But she got maggie of of New hampshire you got more kelly of arizona you've got you've got Jon tester right. There's a few others who very easily could be on the fence about the filibuster but we have this urgent situation where forty states are in the process of or already have passed legislation to keep people who are more likely to vote democratic from voting. And so we do need the four for the people act and we do need the john lewis voting rights advancement act passed but if the filibuster is in place they won't be so now. There are some floating. The idea of carving out an exception to the rule for constitutional issues. Like the right to vote. is that something that's being talked about. Is you know. Joe biden tough enough. I mean he delivered that great speech last week but he didn't mention the word filibuster and he didn't say how we're going to accomplish it. Am i understanding. Is that a syndrome. already said no to carve out And that that happened over the weekend so it doesn't look like that's going to be a possibility. As far as biden. I mean while rhetorically. That speech was saying all the right things. As you mentioned he did mention the filibuster and to the extent that he did mention a policy at all it was to. You know engage in a mass registration campaign. That will just beat them with our numbers. Even though they're they're not letting certain elements of of the democratic coalition to vote. So i don't i. I don't see a path forward really right now. All i mean you had comma harris earlier than this and and you know all the hard things have been given the comma. Hera biden says Here's something impossible here. You right So harris kind of encourage donors to give money to a mass registration campaign. I'm a this seems to be what they're going with their answer and Yeah i don't think that that's going to really do the job to be frank. I'm more concerned. We ran a piece about this. From miles. rappaport was one of the rights to use the former secretary of state of connecticut. Actually and he said that he was more concerned. He was less concerned with the elements that literally Prevent attempt to prevent voting because those have somewhat of marginal significance but he was much more concerned with the laws. Vat commandeer election administration. Yeah and give them to partisan state legislatures in many cases republican legislature. That i think is the real problem and the bigger problem with that is of course even if you passed. Hr one and the for the and hr four. That's not in there like there's no way to deal with that in there and so That i think is the bigger threat. And i haven't seen a credible way on the democratic side to deal with it is anybody thinking about. I mean is any legislation being written because you would think gatien than legislative legislation this point. I mean you know there have been there has been litigation in..

Schumer treasury department florida Jon tester Pat us government comma harris john lewis Hera biden Bill maggie congress New hampshire Joe biden kelly democratic coalition arizona biden rappaport republican legislature
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"So particularly black folks in my case what our history also teaches us is that, yes, guess what poor whites also benefited from those moments to reconstruction led to the first building public education institutions in the south it led to the enfranchisement. Of Poor black people. But also of poor whites after the civil rights movement who were also by the way disenfranchised by poll taxes for instance. So that is the vision it is to get us out of the. Cancel Culture of focused on individuals frankly but really to the big deep structural transformations and the rewriting of the rules that we think our country needs and that arguably we're starting to see happen right now. What does that mean as a practical matter in terms of public policy debates because I think a lot of the conversations that we're having about structures that create these inequities in the United States a lot of them are not necessarily government structures or policy structures and I'm not sure that all of them are amenable to change through public policy. So what what does it mean to? You know to take policy approach to this broad societal phenomenon you're discussing that includes of non-government actors. Well, there's two things. One is at the policy level. Let's just take voting rights. We are in the midst of now what about a decade and a half of conflict over do we want to expand the franchise to people to vote for people about in this country or not or do we want to suppress the vote? And we're seeing that happened in state after state after state. So what it would mean is actually expanding the franchise we did this we had to amend the constitution to do this several times by the way. I'm not saying we have to go that far, but we could have a system of same day registration. We could have a system of early voting that's unified across the state so that we don't have fifty and unequal state systems voting we could have as. Miles rappaport and EJ Dion, and some others going to release next week a system of universal voting where it's actually your civic duty for everybody to vote. Now, by the way that really scares the right because they understand that the numbers are not on their side, and therefore this has been an explicit strategy suppressed vote because they can't frankly win elections outright. If. You don't have ideas you gotta cheap. So that will be one example in terms of the rose of the democracy, and then there's the rules of our economy. And that there's a whole conversation happening whether it's around monopoly power or concentrated economic power in our economy with big big big employers who are by the way are GonNa get bigger on the other side of this pandemic because lots of small businesses are going to are going to fail and this moments. So, there's a whole revived conversation about anti monopoly antitrust. Those would be some rules we'd WANNA rewrites on the we put on the essay. It's one thing for say Walmart to say black lives matter. It's another thing to say, Hey, we're not going to mandate that our employees and their large employer black Americans in the private sector, they don't have to wear masks, but by the way consumers due. To answer the sort but workers not so much. So that's the hypocrisy we also wanted to point out that gets to what are the corporate policy changes that we might imagine in this period that actually provides in this case safety to people whether you're at Walmart or in a meat packing plant. But also to go back to our earlier conversation actually lifts wages. When we know that Walmart, for instance, can do much better making you're to call this week saying structural racism is a is a real thing and the Conservatives to to. Understand that and engage with it. What does that mean to you from public policy perspective I mean do you buy this reconstruction frame what once the once the government acknowledges this as a real insignificant problem that shapes American society. In that, you know eat actions that are not driven out of any sort of animus toward African Americans still operate within this structure and caused them to be placed at disadvantages for various reasons what what is do about that? I think that's a really hard question and you know Glenn Lowry who's an economist. At Brown says points out that look even if. SYSTEMIC RACISM IS REAL You have this problem of like fixing it. Thomas Seoul has also is an economist both of these are black economists. By the way they'd have made this argument that in fact fixing, it would require tyranny and that's the problem is like things like residential segregation, the one hand residential segregation I. Think I'm pretty convinced drives disproportionately bad outcomes for black Americans and has. Sort of throughout the post. Slavery history. But you fix it. How do you make people not move to a school district a more affluent school district if they can afford it right if you can imagine isn't there a menu of options only some of which are command control their I mean for example, you have a lot of government regulations that encourage that sort of segregation including zoning regulations that you know sent make it illegal to build certain kinds of housing on certain land in that entrenches the the the segregated nature of certain. You couldn't eliminated it entirely, but it seems like there are steps you could take would enhance liberty rather than restricting the would also go towards but I think that's really a policy. That's kind of talking about the problem. We don't have anymore right. What is happening in our cities right now is that in fact the suburbs are getting poorer and darker and the the urban centers are getting richer and whiter now that the pandemic could reverse that right but right. Now. That's actually where the main action on this stuff is, is that these cities are getting much richer, much wider and what does that mean right? It's not that you can't build multifamily and you can't build anything in San Francisco right now. Right but it's not that everyone has a two acre lot and you can't up zone it, and so the sort of mandates that try to override those kinds of very restrictive and I agree they perpetuate a residential segregation. Are Not. Actually going to help you all that much with the urban problem that is really developing where you have more and more affluent people moving back into center cities. And I think just know how do you make a company if you can imagine a regime? That could force a company. To somehow compensate for systemic racism, it starts looking a lot lake. We have strict quotas and quotas get really complicated to, and you've seen this in higher education already right I think higher education is an institution that at least since the seventies eighties has attempted to at least approximate, very roughly the representation especially sort of elite schools that have a lot of resources to go out and recruit people and so forth the representation. So Harvard wants to have A. Percentage of African Americans. that. Roughly Mirrors, they don't get their reach that number, but they want to get close to the the representation in population. But how did they end up doing that they ended up doing that by discriminating against Asians so that the white percentage of white students wouldn't fall too far rate and that gets really complex. Are we GONNA have rigid quotas in every major company to make sure that everything is represented representative I mean I think you can make an argument for that right? Like it's not that you couldn't from some perspective make an argument. I think it is an argument that it'd be very politically hard to advance. I think that in practice those systems in countries that have tried them really don't work well. And they tend to produce a lot of side issues of various sorts. But I think you could make an argument for but if you're not going to go there, then you're just kind of left with exhortation..

Walmart United States Harvard representative Glenn Lowry Miles rappaport Thomas Seoul San Francisco Brown EJ Dion
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Bring an other people it's going to bring an India. It's to bring in lots of Africa South America a lot of Asia is going to be ramping up their production because they want the stuff we have they want washing machines and dishwashers and big-screen televisions and. All the rest of it, and I can't blame them I. Love that stuff to air conditioning is a huge one for hot countries right. So what I think we really need to be focusing on is just hog wild spending on research. What we need is actually something that makes the technology to be low-carbon, more cost effective without subsidies, and this is important because subsidizing it. May help us get across some early development hurdles of getting building out infrastructure. But in the long run, it has to be cost effective on its own basis because those countries are not going to impoverish their citizens, they're not gonNA spend money government money that could be going to health or or human welfare. On doing a more expensive green technology. So we need to be finding is cheaper green technologies so that those people. Those countries when they choose to upscale their lifestyles as I hope they can. They. Need to be doing it responsibly and we need to make it easy for them to do the right thing during i WanNa talk about a new article that you wrote for the nation with Sabeel who is the president of the leftist think tank demos and who's been a panelist on this show from time to time you and Sabil are calling for what you're calling the third reconstruction So I take your thesis to be the US has gone through two major policy movements that aimed at uprooting structural injustices in society and reallocating power reconstruction following. The defeat of the confederacy and then the civil rights movement and its associated great society programs what would it mean in your view to have another reconstructing now? So the basis for this is is really influenced by This new book that is coming out next month from the author Isabel. Wilkerson simply called CAST and the argument is is essentially like that your skin color zip code determines your fate in America period always has that's the dark side of the American dream right and cast means stickiness right? It means stuck in place means nobility. And we have seen challenges to our caste system before and so I point to these two. These two moments reconstruction after the civil war and the civil rights movement and notice in the article this is not a focus on individuals. It's not a focus on attitudes. The hearts of Americans, it's actually about rules institutions because rules institutions enable or constrain opportunity and freedom and justice, and so part of saying we rewritten the rules of democracy and our economy before. And we can do it again and yes. By the way, while those at the bottom of our caste system would benefit. So particularly black folks in my case. History also teaches us is that yes, guess what poor whites also benefited from those moments to reconstruction led to the first building of public education institutions in the south led to the. Enfranchisement. Of Poor black people but also of poor whites after the civil rights movement who were also by the way disenfranchised by poll taxes for instance. So that is the vision it is to get us out of the. Cancer Culture of focused on individuals frankly. But really to the big deep structural transformations and the rewriting of the rules that we think our country needs, and that arguably we're starting to see happen right now. What does that mean as a practical matter in terms of public policy debates because I think a lot of the conversations that we're having about structures that create these inequities in the United States a lot of them are not necessarily government structures or policy structures and I'm not sure that all of them are amenable to change through public policy. So what what does it mean to to take you know a to take a policy approach to this broad societal phenomenon you're discussing includes lots of non-government actors. Well. There's two things. One is at the policy level. Let's take voting rights. We are in the midst of now what about a decade and a half of conflict over do we want to expand the franchise to people to vote for people to vote in this country or not or do we want to suppress the vote? And we're seeing that happen in state after state after state. So what it would mean is actually expanding the franchise we did this we had to amend the constitution to do this several times by the way. I'm not saying we have to go that far, but we could have a system of same day registration. We could have a system of early voting that's unified across the state so that we don't have fifty different unequal state systems voting we could have as. Miles Rappaport E. J. Dion, and some others going to release next week a system of universal voting where it's actually your civic duty for everybody to vote. Now, by the way that really scares the right because they understand at the numbers are not on their side, and therefore this has been an explicit strategy to suppress the vote because they can't frankly win elections outright. If you don't have ideas, you gotta cheat. So that will be one example in terms of the rules of the democracy, and then there's the rules of our economy. And there's a whole conversation happening whether it's around monopoly power or concentrated economic power in our economy with big big big employers who are by the way are gonNA. Get bigger on the other side of this pandemic because lots of small businesses are going to are going to fail and this moment. To, there's a whole revived conversation about anti-monopoly and antitrust. Those would be some rules we'd want to rewrite on. We put on the essay. It's one thing for say Walmart to say black lives matter it's another thing to say, Hey, we're not going to mandate that our employees and their largest employer black Americans in the private sector they don't have to wear a mask, but by the way consumers due. To the sort but workers not so much. So that's the hypocrisy we also wanted to point out, and that gets to what are the corporate policy changes that we might imagine in this period that actually provides in this case safety to people whether you're at Walmart or in a meat packing plant. But also to go back to earlier, conversation actually lifts wages when we know that Walmart for instance, can do much better making your to columnist week saying structural racism is a is a real thing and the conservatives ought to to understand that. And engage with it. What does that mean to you from public policy perspective? I mean, do you buy this reconstruction frame? What you know once the once the government acknowledges this as a real and significant.

Walmart United States America India Africa Asia Sabeel Isabel Rappaport E. J. Dion Wilkerson president Sabil
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It means stuck in place means nobility. And we have seen challenges to our cast them before and so I point to these two would Sabil I point to these two previous moments reconstruction after the civil war and the civil rights movement and notice in the article this is not a focus on individuals. It's out of focus on attitudes of the hearts of Americans. It's actually about rules institutions because rules and institutions enable or constrain opportunity and freedom and justice, and so part of what we're saying is we rewritten the rules of democracy and our economy before. And we can do it again and yes by the way while those at the bottom of our caste system would benefit. So particularly black folks in my case what our history also teaches us is that, yes, guess what poor whites also benefited from those moments to reconstruction led to the first building public education institutions in the south it led to the enfranchisement. Of Poor black people but also of poor whites after the civil rights movement who were also by way disenfranchised by poll taxes, for instance. So that is the vision. It is to get us out of the cancel culture of like focus individuals frankly but really to the big deep structural transformations, the rewriting the rules that we think our country needs, and that arguably we're starting to see happen right now. What does that mean as a practical matter in terms of public policy debates because I think a lot of the conversations that we are having about structures that create these inequities in the United States. A lot of them are not necessarily government structures or policy structures and I'm not sure that all of them are amenable to change through public policy. What does it mean to to take a you know? A to take policy approach to this broad societal phenomenon you're discussing that includes lots of non-government actors Well, there's two things. One is at the policy level. Let's take voting rights. We're in the midst of now what about a decade and a half of conflict over do we want to expand the franchise to people vote for people about in this country or not or do we want to suppress the vote? And we're saying that happened in state after state after state. So what it would mean is actually expanding the franchise we did this we had to amend the constitution. To do this several times by the way I'm not saying we have to go that far, but we could have a system of same day registration. We could have a system of early voting that's unified across the state so that we don't have fifty different and unequal state systems of boating we could have as. Miles rappaport and EJ Dion and some others are gonNA release next week a system of universal voting where it's actually your civic duty for everybody vote. Now, by the way that really scares the right because they understand that the numbers are not on their side, and therefore this has been an explicit strategy to suppress the vote because they can't frankly win elections outright. If, you don't have ideas you gotta cheap. So that would be one example in terms of the rules of the democracy, and then there's the rules of our economy. And there's a whole conversation happening whether it's around a monopoly power or concentrated economic power in our economy with big big big employers who were by the way are going to get bigger on the other side of this pandemic because lots of small businesses are GonNa fail and this moment. There's a whole revived conversation about anti monopoly antitrust. Those would be some rules we'd want to rewrite and we put on the essay. It's one thing for say, Walmart to say black lives matter it's another thing to say, Hey, we're not going to mandate that our employees and their largest employer black Americans in the private sector they don't have to wear masks, but by the way consumers due. To answer the sort but workers not so much. So that's the hypocrisy we also wanted to point out that gets to what are the corporate policy changes that we might imagine in this period that actually provides in this case safety to people whether you're at Walmart or in a meat packing plant. But also to go back to our earlier conversation actually lifts wages when we know that Walmart, for instance, can do much better making your to columnist week saying structural racism is a is a real thing. The Conservatives ought to to understand that engage with it what. Does that mean to you from a public policy perspective I mean, do you buy this reconstruction frame what you know once the once the government acknowledges this as a real and significant problem that shapes American society and that you know actions that are not driven out of any sort of animus toward African Americans, still operate within the structure and caused them to be placed at disadvantages for various reasons. what what is do about that? I think that's a really hard question and you know Glenn Lowry who's an economist at Brown set points out that look even if Systemic racism is real You have this problem of fixing it. Thomas Seoul has also economist both of these are black economists. By the way they have made this argument that in fact fixing, it would require tyranny and that's the problem is like things like residential segregation on the one hand residential segregation and I think I am I'm pretty convinced drives disproportionately bad outcomes for black Americans and has sort of throughout the hit the post. Slavery history. But how do you fix it? How do you make people not move to a school district a more affluent school district if they can afford it right if you can imagine isn't there a menu of options only some of which are commanded controller I mean, for example, you have a lot of government regulations that encourage that sort of segregation including zoning regulations that you know, make it illegal to build certain kinds of housing on certain land in that entrenches the segregated nature of certain suburbs. So maybe you couldn't eliminated entirely but. It seems like there are steps you could take. The would enhance liberty rather than restricting it. That would also gorge go towards think really policy. That's kind of talking about the problem. We don't have anymore rate what is happening in our cities right now is that in fact the suburbs are getting poorer and darker and the the urban centers are getting richer and whiter now that dependent could reverse that rate. But right now, that's actually where the main action on this stuff is is that these cities are getting much richer much whiter. And what does that mean right? It's not that you can't build multifamily. You can't build anything in San Francisco right now. Right but it's not that everyone has a two acre lot and you can't up zone it, and so the the sort of mandates that try to override those kinds of very restrictive and I, agree they perpetuate a residential segregation. Are, not actually going to help you all that much with the urban problem that is really developing where you have more and more affluent people moving back into center cities. And I just you know how do you make a company if if you can.

Walmart United States San Francisco Miles rappaport Glenn Lowry Thomas Seoul EJ Dion Brown
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Sort of the basis for this is is really influenced by This new book that is coming out next month from the author Isabel Wilkerson simply called CAST and the argument is essentially like that. Your Skin Color Zip Code Determined Your fate in America period always has that's the dark side of the American dream, right and cast means stickiness right means stuck in place. It means nobility. And we have seen challenges to our caste system before, and so I point to these two would Sabil I pointed these two previous moments reconstruction after the civil war and the civil rights movement and notice in the article. This is not a focus on individuals. It's out of focus on attitudes and the hearts and minds. Americans, it's actually about rules. Institutions because rules and institutions enable or constrain opportunity and freedom justice, and so part of what we're. We're saying is we rewritten the rules of democracy in our economy before and we can do it again, and yes, by the way while those at the bottom of our caste system would benefit so particularly black folks in my case, what our history also teaches us is that yes, guess what poor whites also benefited from those moments to reconstruction led to the building of public education institutions in the south. It led to the enfranchisement. Of Poor black people, but also of poor whites, after the civil rights movement, who were also by the way disenfranchised by poll taxes, for instance, so that is the vision. It is to get us out of the. Cancel culture of focus on individuals, frankly, but really to the big deep structural transformations, and the rewriting of the rules that we think our country needs and that arguably we're starting to see happen right now. What does that mean as a practical matter in terms of public policy debates, because I think a lot of the conversations that we are having about structures that create these inequities in the United States a lot of them are not necessarily government structures or policy structures, and I'm not sure that all of them are amenable to change through public policy. So what? What does it mean to to take you know? Take policy approach to this broad societal phenomenon. You're discussing that includes lots of non government actors. Well there's two one is at the policy level. Let's take voting rights. We are in the midst of now. What about a decade and a half of conflict over? We want to expand the franchise to people to vote for people about in this country are not or do we want to suppress about. And we're seeing that happened in state after state after state, so what it would mean is actually expanding the franchise we did this. We had to amend the constitution. To do this several times by the way I'm not saying we have to go that far, but we could have a system of same day registration we could have a system of early voting that's unified across the state so that we don't have fifty different and unequal state systems voting. We could have as miles, rappaport and EJ Diane, and some others going to release next week a system of universal voting where it's actually your civic duty for everybody to vote now by the way that really scares the right, because they understand that the numbers on their side, and therefore this has been an explicit strategy to suppress the vote because they can't frankly win elections outright. If. You don't have ideas. You gotta cheap, so that would be one example in terms of the rules of the democracy, and then there's the rules of our economy. And there's a whole conversation happening whether it's around monopoly power concentrated economic power in our economy with big big big employers who are by the way are going to get bigger on the other side of this pandemic, because lots of small businesses are going to fail and this moments. So. There's a whole revived conversation about anti monopoly antitrust. Those would be some rules. We'd want to rewrite the we put on the ESA. It's one thing per say, Walmart to say black lives matter. It's another thing to say hey. We're not going to mandate that our employees and their largest employer black Americans in the private sector. They don't have to wear masks, but by the way consumers due. To answer the sort but workers so much. So that's the hypocrisy. We also wanted to point out, and that gets to what are the corporate policy changes that we might imagine in this period that actually provides in this case safety to people whether you're at Walmart or in a meat packing plant, but also to go back to our earlier conversation actually lifts wages when we know that Walmart for instance can do much better making this week. Saying structural racism is a is a real thing, and the Conservatives ought to to understand that. That and engage with it. What does that mean to you from public policy perspective I mean. Do you buy this reconstruction frame? What you know once the once the government acknowledges this as a real insignificant problem that shapes American Society in that you know actions that are not driven out of any sort of animus toward African Americans, still operate within this structure and caused them to be placed at disadvantages for various reasons What what does one do about that I? Think that's a really hard question and you know Glenn lowry economist. At, Brown says you points out that L-. Look even if. Systemic racism is real. You have this problem of like fixing it. Thomas Seoul has also as an economist, both of these are black economists. By the way they have made this argument that in fact fixing it would require tyranny, and that's the problem is like things like residential segregation on the one hand residential segregation I think I'm pretty convinced drives disproportionately bad outcomes for black Americans and has sort of throughout the hit. The Post Slavery History. But how do you fix it? How do you make people not move to a school district, a more affluent school district if they can afford it right if you can imagine it, isn't there a menu of options, only some of which are controller I mean for example you have a lot of government regulations that encourage that sort of segregation including zoning regulations that you know said make it illegal to build certain kinds of housing on certain land in that entrenches the segregated nature of certain suburbs. Maybe you couldn't eliminate it entirely but it. It seems like there are steps you could take. The would enhance liberty rather than restricting. That would also go towards I. think that's really a policy. That's kind of talking about the problem. We don't have anymore what what's happening in our cities right now is that in fact, the suburbs are getting poorer and darker, and the the urban centers are getting richer and whiter now that the pandemic could reverse that right, but right now that's actually where the main action on this stuff is is that these cities are getting much richer much wider? And what does that mean right? It's not that you can't build multifamily. It I mean you can't build anything San Francisco right now right, but it's not that that everyone has a two acre lot, and you can't zone it, and so the sort of mandates that that try to override those kinds of very restrictive and I agree they perpetuate residential segregation. Are Not actually going to help you all that much with the urban problem that is really developing where you have more and more affluent people moving back into center cities. I think just you know. How do you make a company? If if you can imagine a regime. That could force a company. To, somehow compensate for systemic racism, it starts looking a lot lake. We have strict quotas, and then the quotas get really complicated to, and you've seen this in higher education already right I think higher education is an institution that, at least, since the seventies, eighties has attempted to at least approximate very roughly the representation, especially in sort of elite schools that have a lot of resources to go out and recruit people, and so forth the representation so Harvard wants to have A. Percentage of African Americans that. Pre roughly mirrors. They don't get their. They don't reach that number, but they want to get close to the the representation in the population. But how did they end up doing that? They ended up doing that by discriminating against Asians so that the white percentage of white students wouldn't fall too far rate, and that it gets really complicated. We can have rigid quotas in every major company to make sure that everything is represented representative. I mean I think you can make an argument for that right, I like it's not that you couldn't from some perspective. Make an argument I think it is an argument that would be very politically hard to advance. I think that in practice those systems in countries that have tried them really don't work well. And, they tend to produce a lot of side issues of various sorts. But I think you can make an argument for, but if you're not gonna go there then you're just kind of left with exaltation..

Walmart Isabel Wilkerson America United States representative ESA Glenn lowry Harvard Thomas Seoul rappaport San Francisco Brown American Society EJ Diane
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:30 min | 2 years ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Of Poor, black people, but also of poor whites after the civil rights movement, who were also by the way disenfranchised by poll taxes for instance, so that is the vision. It is to get us out of the. Cancer Culture of like focus on individuals, frankly, but really to the big deep structural transformations, and the rewriting the rules that we think our country needs and that arguably we're starting to see happen right now. What does that mean as a practical matter in terms of public policy debates because I think a lot of the conversations that we are having about structures that create these inequities in the United States, a lot of them are not necessarily government structures or policy structures, and I'm not sure that all of them are amenable to change through public policy. So what? What does it mean to to take a you know to? To take policy approach to this broad societal phenomenon, you're discussing that includes lots of non-government actors well. There's two things one is at the policy level. Let's just take voting rights. We are in the midst of now. What about a decade and a half of conflict over do we want to expand the franchise to people? Vote for people vote in this country or not or do we want to suppress the vote? We're saying that happened in state after state after state, so what it would mean is actually expanding the franchise we did this. We had to amend the constitution. To do this several times by the way I'm not saying we have to go that far, but we could have a system of same day registration. We could have a system of voting. That's unified across the state so that we don't have fifty different and unequal state systems voting. We could have as. Miles Rappaport Andy. Dion and some others are gonNA release next week. A system of universal voting where it's actually your civic duty for everybody the vote now by the way that really scares the right, because they understand the numbers and out on their side, and therefore this has been an explicit strategy to suppress the vote because they can't frankly win. Elections Outright If you don't have ideas, you gotta cheap, so that would be one example in terms of the role of the democracy, and then there's the rules of our economy. There's a whole conversation happening whether it's around monopoly, power or concentrated economic power, our economy with big big big employers who are by the way are gonNA. Get bigger on the other side of this pandemic, because lots of small businesses are going to are going to fail at this moment. So there's a whole revived conversation about anti monopoly antitrust. Those would be some rules. We'd re rights. We put on the essay. It's one thing say Walmart to say black lives matter. It's another thing to say hey. We're not going to mandate that our employees and their largest employer black Americans in the private sector. They don't have to wear masks, but by the way consumers due. To, answer the sort, but workers not so much, so that's the hypocrisy. We also wanted to point out that gets to. What are the corporate policy changes that we might imagine in this period? That actually provides in this case safety to people whether you're at Walmart or and a meat packing plant, but also to go back to our earlier conversation actually lifts wages when we know that Walmart for instance can do much better making you're a week. Saying structural racism is a is a real thing and the Conservatives to to understand that engage with it. What does that mean to you from a public policy perspective? I mean do. Do you buy this reconstruction frame. What once the once? The government acknowledged this as a real and significant problem that shapes American society, and that you know actions that are not driven out of any sort of animus toward African Americans still operate within this structure and caused them to be placed at disadvantages for various reasons, Wha, what is what is do about that? I think that's a really hard question and you know Glenn Lowry. At Brown set points out that look even if Systemic. Racism is real. And you have this problem fixing it. Thomas Seoul has also an economy. Both of these are black economists. By the way they have made this argument that in fact fixing it would require tyranny, and that's the problem is like things like residential segregation on the one hand residential segregation I think I'm pretty convinced drives disproportionately outcomes for Black Americans and has sort of throughout the post slavery history. But. How do you fix it? How do you make people not move to a school district, a more affluent school district? If they can afford it right if you can imagine, isn't there a menu of options? Only some of which are commanded controller I mean for example you have a lot of government regulations that encourage that sort of segregation including zoning regulations that you know say make it illegal to build certain kinds of housing on certain land in that entrenches the the the segregated nature of certain suburbs i. mean maybe you couldn't eliminate it. It entirely, but it seems like there are steps you could take would enhance liberty rather than restricting it. That would also go talk, but I think that's really a policy. That's kind of talking about the problem. We don't have anymore. What is happening in our cities right now is that in fact, the suburbs are getting poorer and darker, and the urban centers are getting richer and whiter now pandemic could reverse that rate, but right now. That's actually where the main action on this stuff is is that these cities are getting much richer much wider? And what does that mean right? It's not that you can't build multifamily it. You can't put anything in San Francisco right now. Right, but it's not that that everyone has a two acre lot, and you can't zone it, and so the mandates that that try to override those kinds of very restrictive I agree they perpetuate a residential segregation. Are Not actually going to help you all that much with the urban problem that is really developing where you have more and more affluent people moving back into center cities. And I. Think just you know how do make a company? If you can imagine a regime. That could force a company. To somehow compensate for systemic racism, it starts looking a lot lake. We have strict quotas and quotas get really complicated to, and you've seen this in higher education already right I think higher education is an institution that, at least, since the seventies, eighties has attempted to at least approximate very roughly the representation, especially in sort of elite schools that have a lot of resources to go out and recruit people, and so forth the representation so Harvard you know wants to have A. Percentage of African Americans that. Roughly Mirrors. They don't get their. They don't reach that number, but they want to get close to the. Station in the population. But how did they end up? Doing not ended up doing that by discriminating against Asians so that the white percentage of white students wouldn't fall too far. And that gets really complex. Are we GONNA have rigid quotas in every major company to make sure that everything is represented representative. I mean I think you can make an argument for that right I like it's not that you couldn't from some perspective. Make an argument. I think it is an argument that would be very politically hard to advance. I think that in practice though systems in countries that have tried them really don't work well. And they tend to produce a lot of side issues of various sorts. But I I think you could make an argument for, but if you're not gonna go there then you're just kind of left with exaltation. I think that's a real challenge for you to reconstruction and the civil rights movement. We're primarily focused on..

Walmart United States government Dion representative Glenn Lowry Thomas Seoul Harvard San Francisco Brown
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Election Ride Home

Election Ride Home

07:42 min | 2 years ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Election Ride Home

"Chris Chris ran through a lot of details. Yesterday about tonight's seventh Democratic National Committee managed candidate debate to recap we will see on stage. Sanders Biden Warren Buddha Judge Club. HR and star. There's a crunch of the top with Sanderson Biden at the apex. But there's still plenty of jockeying before the Iowa caucuses on February third but well within striking taking distance Buddha Judge Bloomberg closer and Yang are a distinctly lower tier but could still break out star is on the stage but doesn't stand out in the national arena the Bloomberg refuses to take individual donations which will keep him off future stages Anyang has fallen short of the required polling though that could change based on the Quinnipiac poll all depending on how the DNC sets its criteria for the eighth debate on February seventh following. The Iowa caucuses Yang could pick up additional support in the following weeks given the number of candidates now out of the running Yang and devil. Patrick remained the only non-white candidates and Patrick is polling. negligibly the moderators tonight will be CNN. Political correspondent founded Abbey Philip and Moines Register political correspondent Riyan often steal. CNN's Wolf Blitzer will also be present as a moderator. If you WANNA watch tonight's debate dates. Chris ran through the options yesterday. So I'll just briefly recap. The debate starts live at eight PM in central time and that is six. PM Pacific Seven PM Mountain and nine pm Eastern it will last two hours go to any CNN website or APP and no log in is required to stream debate live you can also go to des Moines Register DOT COM. I'm the other host of the debate for jeopardy fans like me. You won't miss the real time. But not live airing at eight. PM Pacific as it follows the live debate or at eight PM Eastern which precedes it central and mountain. Sorry you'll need to tape it by the way if you want. The analysis of the three greatest of all time tournament matches so far from this has to time jeopardy champion go to motherboard dot com to read my story about how Brad Rutter the all time cash winner across American game show. History isn't winning. Uh Let's check in the state of the impeachment process because there were a couple couple of big things in the last day house speaker. Nancy Pelosi said the house will vote on Wednesday to send two articles of impeachment passed in December to the the Senate this would include approving the appointment of house managers who will oversee their portion of the trial in the Senate and who had walked the articles to the Senate formally after House approval. All those managers haven't yet been appointed. I've seen the notion floated that former Republican justice. Amish now an independent could be picked as one of them. He left the GOP after going public with his conclusion that trump's behavior warranted impeachment hearings during Bill Clinton's impeachment trial in nineteen ninety eight. Thirteen House. Members were managers that that includes now. Senator Lindsey Graham who's outspoken statements in nineteen ninety eight keep coming back to haunt him except that you can't off someone who has already ghost of their former South on the Senate side of things. Utah Senator Mitt. Romney has said he will vote in favor of hearing from at least one witness during the impeachment trial in the Senate Senate Majority Leader Mitch. McConnell said in advance of the trial that he wouldn't consider whether witnesses would testify at all nor which witnesses would be called. Romney supports calling at least John Bolton who volunteered to testify after where he resisted speaking in front of the House Committee considering articles of impeachment. That's despite an ongoing lawsuit about Bolton's requirement to testify in front of the House. House and trump could still attempt to block Bolton by declaring executive privilege. which could lead to more lawsuits because of the fifty three forty seven split in the Senate between the GOP and Democrats including two independents who caucus with the dam's four senators have to cross the party? Line in a simple majority vote to approve witnesses all several GOP opie senators face minor to robust potential challenges. This fall none has made a statement to date as firm as Romney's previously Maine's Susan Collins and Alaska's Lisa Murkowski Hausky of grumbled about some aspects and Colin said. Last week she was working with a small group of GOP senators to consider allowing new witnesses at the trial however CBS News reported that unnamed White House officials told them they expect at least four Republicans to break ranks to vote in favor of calling witnesses. This is one of the strongest bits of news. We've heard so far that that this could occur edition to Romney Collins and Murkowski. It could include Cory Gardner of Colorado. Who is facing these strong potential loss at home? This fall likely to former governor John John Hickenlooper and Rand Paul of Kentucky who votes his own conscience always a White House. Also apparently thinks Tennessee's Lamar Alexander as Enough of a commitment to the Senate Ah Institution to not tow a gop line along these lines. Senators also ruled out. Trump's requests that the charges simply be dismissed when they reached the Senate a broader and more public swath of comments. Republican senators made it clear. That won't happen including Roy Blunt Missouri and Lamar Alexander Finally I do like to find a little positive election news and it seems to keep coming back to voting and voting integrity at the American prospect a liberal and progressive publication George Pillsbury and miles rappaport rounded up the effect of pushback against GOP attempts to deter voter registration nation purge voters and suppressed access to the ballot box. They lift off a number of improvements for access to the ballot in two thousand nineteen quote Twenty Nineteen Gene saw more states advance more electoral forms than at any time since the progressive era of the early twentieth century pro voter policies ranging from same day registration automatic voter registration Gratien and voting rights restoration to redistricting reform and the national popular vote. Compact saw breakthrough gains and quote. Same Day voter. Registration is now available in twenty one states automatic voter registration during motor vehicle or public agency. Interactions often called motor voter. Registration is now available in nineteen in states up from just one in twenty sixteen. The right to vote at home is now available through mail and drop off balloting and more states including no excuse. Absentee ballots in swing states Michigan and Pennsylvania. Some states and counties are experimenting with ranked choice voting which allows a voter to specify their order preference for candidates that allows pluralities votes to be resolved in subsequent rounds to find a majority based on subsequent picks by each voter. It's used in some elections around the world in there have also been gains gains in voter rights restoration and in fair redistricting laws in some states. The effort to replace the Electoral College without requiring a constitutional amendment is also preceding leading the national popular vote. Compact is legislation being passed in state legislatures that would award electoral votes in states that passed legislation proportionate to the national vote vote however these laws don't kick in until states representing at least two hundred seventy electoral votes have enacted the change in two thousand nineteen. Four more states. It's joined the Compact and the total is now at seventy three percent of the two hundred seventy electoral vote threshold. And and that's the election roundup for today I am your host Glenn Fleishman. I'll be back tomorrow for debate. Postmortem and then Chris Figgins we finishing out the week on Thursday and Friday. We'll also be taking Martin Luther King Junior's birthday off on Monday then I'll returned from then on starting next Tuesday. You can find this podcast on twitter at election podcast just or on facebook at facebook dot com slash election ride home. I am also on twitter at Glen. F that's G. E. Double N. F. Like Frank. Thanks for listening listening and have a pleasant night..

Senate GOP Romney Collins CNN Chris Chris Senate Senate Majority John Bolton trump Lamar Alexander Yang DNC Iowa Sanderson Biden Sanders Biden Warren twitter Patrick des Moines Register
"miles rappaport" Discussed on Democracy Works

Democracy Works

14:18 min | 3 years ago

"miles rappaport" Discussed on Democracy Works

"A dear dear Republican hyung-chol who passed away some years ago. He and I spent thirty five or forty years arguing politics, and it was fun for us. And we could really get heated. You could tell how badly we were divide as a country by how heated he, and I got I swear if he were around today, I'm not sure we could do it. And that showed of pains me because if you can't even argue about politics anymore. We have a problem. So I think the other thing is to model a different kind of arguing with people. I am very fond of Christopher lashes. Great essay, the lost argument where you are in real argument as opposed to just people yelling each other. You have to enter imaginatively into the ideas of your opponent. If only to try to refute them, but in the process, you put your own ideas at risk. We don't have. Arguments for anybody puts anything risk anymore. We're gonna figure out how to do that again. And why do you think that is why do you think it's it's hard for people to have constructive arguments? Well, I think my friend might to Maske writes about this in his his new book, if if we keep it, I think some of it is our allegiances are all aligned together in a package, so people's political commitment People's Party commitments are aligned with the alleged commitments are often align with their religious commitments that includes people who are religious or secular combined with where they live, you know, the the big sort argument, and so so many things combined in one in party has come to stand for a whole series of things, my friend. Mike Gerson wasn't post columnist has a great column today where you know, so teary Allah g which is at a. Wonderfully abstract word about salvation has been replaced on the right with eschaton G. But he argues that you know, politics has become religion for so many people. It does seem like the left and the right are both kind of United around the of bringing back civil society. We've been just been talking about some of that the whole kind of join something mentality. You guys talk about it in when ish after Trump bent asked talks it in his new book. I'm wondering that though a lot of these appeals seemed to be backward-looking if only we could get more people to join the PTA, or whatever whatever the the group is I'm wondering how that squares with like, our technology landscape today, you know, how you kind of make civil society work, given some of the given the the world we live in today. Truth is about that one on civil society. I'm a big fan of it. I think we people need ways in which they can get together face to face. Do things together. Sports teams are part of that. By the way, there is enormous life in civil society when kit where kids sports are concerned, even if sometimes people can be nasty and kids sports, but usually not the on the other hand, the there's a part of civil society argument that I really do worry about what two parts one is someone you point to which is we can't just be nostalgic. I wanna talk about that. But the other is that it acts as if there's something magical, and that well, gee, civil society disappeared and what we do about. How 'bout the collapse of the industrial economy and many towns across the industrial belt has helped bring about the collapse of civil society. What I want to tell my conservative friends, I'm with you. I wanna stronger civil society, but you guys have to acknowledge the cost of inequality, and the cost of economic collapse in many cases because you can't support a ROY. Rotary club without local businesses, and you can't support unions without jobs, and you can't support any of these organizations if the economics of a place are hollowed out. And so I think that's one side of it. And then you pointed to the nest Aljic aspect of it. I had a hope of really during the Obama campaign. And I haven't completely lost that hope that new technology can also lead to face to face contact. You know, so often we see it. And maybe so often it is an alternative to people meeting. Face-to-face? We're talking before this podcast about people don't even have to speak to a human when they order things. But in the Obama campaign when you went back to look at their primitive compared to the era wherein now contacts online, they always ended in a meeting somewhere or they always ended in door knock and so. Maybe we should turn a technology that we see as undercutting civil society to the work of trying to reignite it because if nothing else the online world ought to be very compatible with organizing conducive to organizing so the other as all of this organizing going on. There's also been some talk about policy changes that might help to to make America more small d democratic. There's there's two of those ideas, I want to get your thoughts on quickly here as we start to wrap up. The the first is the the national popular vote interstate compact, which needs a different name. I think are. On some marketing for that. But let the people decide initiative. So it seems like that's that's picking up steam, I know it just just passed in in Colorado on the the governor's desk as we record it in New Mexico and Delaware. So can you give us a three thousand foot overview of of what that is? And and whether you think it's likely to to be an effect by by twenty twenty two quick things we have a problem in our country that's going to keep growing with the electoral college. We have had just since two thousand two elections where the electoral college win against the popular vote in the last election, a popular vote margin of two point nine million, which is a lot of people it wasn't huge margin. But it's still a significant margin for Clinton, and yet Trump won the electoral college, and of course, Bush when the electoral college in two thousand election with all kinds of issues down in Florida. The way in which population is getting concentrated in big states. The overrepresentation of low population states in the electoral college will get even greater those studies show that seventy percent of us will live in fifteen states. Which by the way means seventy percent of the population. We'll have thirty senators. This is also a problem for democracy, and you can't change the Senate very easily under the constitution. The popular vote initiative. The will now rename it let the people decided issue of basically encourages legislatures since the legislature can pledge the electors under the constitution to have legislatures vote to pledge their states votes to the winner of the popular vote. And that this that they would only take effect win a majority of states make that commitment. Now if that ever happened, I'm sure it will go to court, but I think it's create. Getting pressure. And the the reason they're doing it. This way is smaller states probably won't ratify an amendment that will undercut their cloud in the electoral college. This way also is good because the electoral college as it stands encourages candidates to campaign in and most ten states, no in here in Pennsylvania where we're sitting. It's good for Pennsylvania because Pennsylvania's seen as swing state. But there are so many states that are either strongly Republican or strongly democratic and never see a candidate after the primaries. So I think it's I think it's important that we have this discussion I would prefer it with an instant runoff system where people rank choice the candidates to guarantee that Nissan only the winner of the popular vote. But the winner of the preference of a majority of the country. The we could have a whole other show just on that. You probably will. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Let's hope so so the other thing I know that you've done some work in is the idea of universal voting, which was comes from Australia. I've heard you describe it as almost like a a parking ticket or you know, some model for voting. So tell us about that. And what your work is in that area. Australia has what's what you might call compulsory attendance at the polls. It's important put it that way. Because people don't have to cast a vote if they don't want to they can draw Mickey Mouse or anyone else on their ballot. They can throw their about and trash just have to show up and I'm working on an initiative with miles Rappaport up at the ash or at Harvard on this where we're trying to see what would this look like if we did it in the United States now, my friend Bill Allston? I wrote a paper on this chose universal voting partly obviously because Americans don't like the word compulsory. But partly also to say, look, if we can't get to the Australian system, which by the way, works very, well, we would still like to get closer to the point where almost all Americans votes. So this is much about tearing down the barriers to voting as it is to creating this system of requ. Quiring people vote in Australia. It's the cost of the finest somewhere. If I remember correctly around twenty bucks, twenty five bucks. It's very little, but it's not an onerous fine. But it's just a message and most Australians obey the law, and our theory is if you can ask people to serve on juries, if you can ask people for going to say to potentially give their lives in war than asking people to vote is not a an over ask for civic life. But finally, it reverses the role of local officials they can't suppress the vote anymore. Their job is to help make it as easy as possible for all the people in the country to do their civic duty and to obey the law. And so I'm most interested in this because I want to stop any efforts locally to prevent people from voting or making it harder for people about. So this also have. To come in conjunction with with some other reforms, if you think about it just as like, we're going to have a twenty twenty five dollar fine for people who don't vote, it seems like that might impact the people who are disenfranchised or who can't. Exactly, right. In fact, again, every reform that you would want a like election day, registration, automatic registration, ending the ideal laws all the reforms you'd want to put in place to make it easier to vote have to be preconditions of this. And so if we got all of those without the compulsory vote, I would be pretty happy because I'd like to move in that direction. There was a study that just came out within the last couple of days that showed that all of these various changes a lot of states. We've talked a lot about the states who are voter suppression measures passed a lot of states have passed laws to increase access to the ballot. And they've actually worked they've increased turnout they've increased registration. So I see this as a way of moving in that direction. And then we can have a debate over whether we go to the Australian system. And say, you know, citizens have the privilege of owning. But they have the right to vote, and it's also an obligation vote. So Jay, we're going to end as we always do with our four mood of the nation poll questions so thinking specifically about American politics. What makes you angry you I think what makes me angry just we can't talk about economic inequality in ways that encompass African Americans in the inner city, white working class voters in Erie, Pennsylvania, or all or writing or all kinds of blue collar areas. And that they're the result is that injustices continue to sit there against very different kinds of Americans who somehow I think should be find themselves on the same side of a lot of questions. And what makes you proud? I'm proud that. We're still hanging on to our democracy. I you know, I am proud that over our. History. We have unbalanced gotten better rather than worse. Even though we've had moments of setback. Love the all church allied. Everybody quotes Americans always do the right thing after I exhausted all the other possibilities. And I think we move forward as a country in the end makes you worry. The president makes me worry a kind of authoritarian autocratic sense. He sometimes conveys just last week from when we're talking he talked about having the military on his side the police on his side the biker on his side. What does that say about his attitude toward democracy thing about and nine hundred seventy three or Spain in nineteen thirty? This really worries me finally what gives you hope the incredible activism all across the country all across age groups, the new generation gives me a lot of hope not just because I have kids in that generation. Also, I teach students in that generation and. But he activism in every part of our country tells me that not only is democracy, not dead. But people citizens see the ways in which democracy gives them openings to change the country. We will leave it there. J dion. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you.

Australia Obama Pennsylvania People's Party Trump Christopher lashes United nest Aljic Senate Spain Mike Gerson Maske America United States president J dion Nissan