26 Burst results for "Mild Infection"

"mild infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

07:59 min | 3 weeks ago

"mild infection" Discussed on KCBS All News

"We're going to have a conversation about the conversation. The corona virus vaccines have been shown to be excellent at preventing people from becoming very sick with Cove in 19. And yet, as we're told to get vaccinated, we're also told that getting the shot does not mean things go back to normal, and some experts are arguing that is not exactly the most helpful message to send. Dr Monica Gandhi is one of them. She is professor of medicine and associate division chief at the division of HIV Infectious Diseases and Global missing at UCSF San Francisco General Hospital and she joins us now today. After Gandhi. Thank you very much for joining us. Hi. Thank you. So Dr Gandhi do the vaccines have a PR problem when it comes to highlighting just how effective they really are? Yes, they do. Because these vaccines are amazing. And someone went to ask me how we just saved this vaccine so much when they are so incredible. So the point of vaccination Herd. Immunity is tow absolute get back to normal life. There's no one can argue with that on. Do these vaccines are amazing. So what I mean by that is like you said the Madonna and Fizer vaccine prevented severe outcomes. And that was either hospitalizations, death or even just like having an oxygen that was low by Not 95% 100% 100%. So the 95% was all categories of disease, including mild infection, and then we now have four other vaccines that are not yet authorized in this country. Johnson and Johnson Novavax, a Sputnik five and the AstraZeneca University of Oxford, the prevention of severe disease, having to go to the hospital, Everything else is managed a home. Was 100% across all six trials. Majority. Fizer, those four. I just said so we should just be applauding hope and optimism. These are amazing vaccines. I'm so excited. What about the talk of how new variants will affect how well the vaccines will work? So a lot of this is a theoretical conversation that people seem to be having with themselves about the variants, So let's look at the one so let's look at the UK variant. Let's let's call them UK, Brazil, South Africa in California, even though we should be eventually not using these maids, where they're from UK variant, no evidence of any reduced efficacy for the visor and Madonna in the test tube or in the reality when they were tested. The Johnson and those were the only two that are approved in this country. The Johnson and Johnson vaccine was really interesting. It was performed. That trial was it's one does and the trial was performed in South Africa, Latin America and the U. S 100% efficacy even in South Africa, where the South Africa variant accounted for about 90% of cases, Um 100% efficacy against hospitalizations and deaths, 85% efficacy against severe outcomes and by severe it means someone at home never had to go to the hospital. It didn't feel well at home on Dat included that subset of hospitalizations and deaths. And then when you got to mild disease, that's when we saw variability where it was 72% effective in the United States and 57% effective in South Africa, But a mild infection from Corona virus is actually all four of your colt. Like corn of arses. What? Why you're disturbed about of stars Kobe to and what we should be disturbed about is its ability to cause severe disease. It's what has landed us into the situation of masked, distancing ventilation lockdowns. It's because it was severe, so taking away the severe outcome, and that happened in South Africa with the Johnson and Johnson vaccine. Um, has been it's been defamed. Even with the variance now we don't know for sure whether or not the vaccine will prevent transmission and people who have had the shots. So what do you think we can do? That is different after being vaccinated, so Transmission question is interesting. We actually don't have that data. But there's very suggestive data from Adana. Now, if Isa Real World trial and the after Senate, the vaccine that it does reduce asymptomatic infection, which is what would lead to transmission and it makes sense of what all these antibodies get the nose until we get that data, the recommendation and I agree with this is to if you're vaccinated. When you're around someone who is unvaccinated to mask and distance. Now, if you're around someone who's vaccinated, you could be as close as you want to be on DSA. So, for example, my mother is going to be back soon. And my mother and father on by the time they get through the vaccination Serious will be beginning of March on D I am vaccinated because I'm a health care professional. We can just Sit and run around its closest We want to be right because we're both vaccinated. But when she comes to see me she will need to mask on the plane, which is absolutely appropriate on DCI will distance from others for because of that small chance If they're unvaccinated that she could have it in her notes, and we don't seem to be highlighting that message that Hey, if you're vaccinated, and your parents were also vaccinated, as long as it's too, just to you in the room you can get together Is that something we should be highlighting Maura and what's the danger or the risk of sending the more cautious message, So we should be highlighting that more? And that's what they're doing throughout Europe. All you see in Europe is ads on a on a billboard that shows someone getting a vaccine who's older and saying I do this so I can hug my grandchild. I do this so I can go togather. I do this because I want to go. Back to normal life. We don't see these billboard messages in United States, which is interesting. I think we should take from our European neighbors. Better about messaging. What is the danger of messaging? Persistent caution Restrictions mass distancing. The danger is that people will Get really confused when they just heard how great these vaccines were. And all they heard about was people jumping up and down on November night when we got the first data from Fizer and then suddenly we're like, but nothing's gonna change that is very confusing. And when public health messaging is not consistent with fax, it will absolutely lead to distrust. And so it matters to convey what these vaccines do. It matters to convey it factually. There's going to be just Ranger period where some of us have actually in with some of us are unvaccinated to tell the vaccinated that they cannot see their family was vaccinated is not a tenable situation. You can argue. Well, everyone should just say we all stay locked down until we return immunity. That is Thies effects of mental illness, loneliness, the older people staying away from their grandchildren. Those air also real, those air also important effects of this pandemic, so we should be able to message what they could do when you've been vaccinated and we can't It's not everything is about covert. It is an interplay of covert and all the social effects of Corbett and we have to bring mental health back into our discussions. Dr. Gandhi thanks very much for sharing that hopeful perspective with us today. Thank you. That was Dr Monica Gandhi, professor of medicine and associate division chief of the division of HIV Infections, Diseases and Global Medicine at UCSF San Francisco General Hospital and I'm Kathy Novak, Thanks for tuning in tow as prescribe, prescribed every Thursday at 1 30 right here on the Bay Area's news station, All news one of 69 and Am 7 40, KCBS. Streaming on radio dot com proceeding was sponsored by UCSF on We're getting right out to the rose Now to see what's shaking with traffic. Here's George Rask, starting coffee and Hayward.

Dr Monica Gandhi Johnson Novavax South Africa UCSF San Francisco General Hos Fizer HIV United States professor of medicine Diseases and Global Medicine division chief UK UCSF Cove Adana Europe Senate DCI Thies California
When might we see more cases in WA's outbreak?

Coronacast

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

When might we see more cases in WA's outbreak?

"Hello welcome to khurana. Cost a daily podcast. All about the coronavirus. I'm health reported taken tyler physician and journalist alter norman swan. It's tuesday the second february. That's right and the second day of perth and surrounds his five die lockdown which they've gone into because arto quarantine worker has tested positive for. What's now being confirmed to be the strain of coronavirus. That's being called the uk strain and so norman. Seeing a five looked down. We know that it takes longer than five days for the virus to incubate in. Someone's body so i can. We talk about what you do when you're trying to control of virus in its very early stages where you'd have to say first of all five days. He's actually at the lower end of the of the incubation period. So it's almost one incubation period. Not quite so. The there are key elements of control. I is social. Distancing and lockdown is an extreme form of social distancing where you don't know where the viruses remember. This farce is not spread evenly. Eighty percent of people don't spread the virus twenty percent do and they do through clusters so this man has been all over paris. he's been may lands. Which is where he lives. He's been joondalup far north. He's been in the city and so at any one of the so he might not be a superspreader himself but he might have spread to other people who then pass it on a super spreading environment like we saw in sydney. So that's that's the problem is that you get these clusters. And the classics stay underground for a while before they burst out and reveal themselves. And that's the prospect so what they're doing here is the right thing is that they're clamping down on social distancing so the virus cannot spread any further than it already has or you minimize that so. That's one element. The second element is testing and testing has got to be in really large numbers of west australian tens of thousands. So that just in case you there's a case out there that you're not finding you just want to be sure that you're really massively testing in chance that something is out there in a random way and people have caught it where we're at surprise not just in the contact areas where you might have been in coz in mayland or or wherever so. He's talking about testing nine omen but we have seen a lot of testing and they haven't been any more cases least as of yesterday. And i think that this man might have been infected around the twenty-fifth so we're may be getting into a timeframe where we could be saying positives. Yes but the testing rates are just gathering in numbers so the weren't that many tests yesterday for a city of six million people so it got really multiply to maybe ten times that number of tests. I think there were three thousand or tests reported overnight. So that's that was only in half a day so the numbers of just got to ramp up. Then the next thing is that which is about contact tracing so the already got onto the contact tracing identified sixty or seventy people so far context. Those people have got to be quarantined regardless of their status. Because they're the most likely people who are going to become positive and in the northern beaches of sydney a very significant. I can't coach the numbers. But a very significant percentage of people who became positive in that in the clusters that remarriage from the northern beaches positive in quarantine. They were already isolated for fourteen days. So you don't want people becoming positive and about you wanted to become positive when they're home in quarantine or hotel quarantine so those are the elements of control and if it goes size the strategy or queensland then there won't be any more cases they'll have identified them under control and it may not be necessary to go the full five days but it just allows you to get things under control contact tracers to get on top of it and five days is much better than a grumbling. Thing which you really paralyzes the city for for days and days and days if not weeks which is what happened in was the under control done a great job but it lasted a long time and right through christmas so it is looked down. When are we gonna have good indication of whether we're good or whether it's more of an outbreak large testing numbers. Not finding anybody. So let's take some questions from our audience This person saying they've heard that a vaccinated senator in the us has been infected with covid after getting shot. And we know that there's a proportion of people who become infected that have ongoing health issues. Do we know whether someone who's had the coronavirus vaccine is more or less or the same amount likely to get long term health problems from covid. We don't know that yet. there is an right. There is a relationship between severity infection in vancouver but people who get mild infection do get it as well so we don't know the answer to that question. We'll only know as the months go by often when people get infected is after the first does the second does. And that's been the situation in israel as well so you do get partial protection but not for protection so that we don't we just don't know the answer to that question

Khurana Tyler Physician Norman Swan Perth Sydney Norman Paris UK Queensland United States Vancouver Israel
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 3 months ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
"mild infection" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:50 min | 5 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"President Trump says he's starting to feel better tweeting a new video from the hospital where he's being treated for Corona virus. Think we're going to have a very good result again over the next few days? We're gonna probably know for sure, he adds. He's looking forward to finishing up the campaign. The president's physician, Dr Sean Conley, is receiving all of the standard of care and beyond her routine international covert protocols. Um, so we're monitoring for all that, But at the moment, there's no cause for concern. But Dr Neeta Ogden, an internal medicine specialist, says doctors aren't telling the whole story is obvious that this is knowledge is a mild infection. He's at the hospital. Now he's receiving too experimental therapies as well. I feel like he was probably moving in the direction of somebody who's looking set. This has been your CBS News Special report. I'm Lisa Matteo. Now. We also learned from the White House doctor that the president in fact, started showing clinical indications of covert 19 on Thursday afternoon earlier than we had first known, Dr Sean Conley later clarified and said. The president was indeed diagnosed on Thursday evening and also immediately after the doctors gave that update this afternoon. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, telling White House reporters that the president was administered that supplemental oxygen at the White House hours after the initial diagnosis. He also said some of Trump's vital signs over the past 24 hours were very concerning. That the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care, and that the president is still not on a clear path to a full recovery and that coming from White House chief of staff Mark Meadows. Meanwhile, the president has been tweeting. Saying in part doctors, nurses and all of the Great Walter Reed Medical Center and others from likewise incredible institutions have joined them are amazing. And as he said in the video, he is doing well. Other person who has been close to the president recently, is now covert positive. Former New Jersey governor Chris Christie was one of several people helping Trump with debate prep this past week. He has now tested positive for Corona virus. He checked himself into Morristown Medical Centre this afternoon. And says he's feeling good with only mild symptoms. But due to his history of asthma, he says he decided it was an important precautionary measure. Christie says that after five or six people in the room Helping. We're helping the president among those five or six. No one was wearing masks. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani was also there, but we know that President Trump was in New Jersey on Thursday night at a fundraiser at his Bedminster Golf Club. Double D CBS reporter Christie collision now telling us about the task ahead. For contact tracers exposure may have been widespread throughout New Jersey and other states. We've also gotta acknowledge that there'll be other communities..

President Trump president Dr Sean Conley White House New Jersey Chris Christie CBS Dr Neeta Ogden Corona Mark Meadows New York City Great Walter Reed Medical Cent Lisa Matteo asthma chief of staff Rudy Giuliani Bedminster Golf Club Morristown Medical Centre reporter
Trump gets experimental drug cocktail for COVID-19

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Trump gets experimental drug cocktail for COVID-19

"Trump says he's starting to feel better tweeting a new video from the hospital where he's being treated for Corona virus. Think we're going to have a very good result again over the next few days? We're gonna probably know for sure, he adds. He's looking forward to finishing up the campaign. The president's physician, Dr Sean Conley, is receiving all of the A standard of care and beyond her routine, international covered protocols, so we're monitoring for all of that. But at the moment, there's no cause for concern. But Dr Neeta Ogden, an internal medicine specialist, says doctors aren't telling the whole story is obvious that this is not just a mild infection. He's at the hospital. Now he's receiving too experimental therapies as well. I feel like he was probably moving in the direction. Somebody who's looking set.

Dr Sean Conley Donald Trump Dr Neeta Ogden Corona President Trump
"mild infection" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

01:48 min | 5 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"CBS News on the hour your home for original reporting. I'm Lisa Matteo. CBS News has confirmed that President Trump did receive oxygen at the White House Friday before heading to Walter Reed Medical Center. This is standard protocol for treatment of Corona virus and does not mean he had breathing issues. The president's physician, Dr Sean Conley, says there are few conditions at place Mr Trump into Ah, higher health risk, He 74. He's male, and he's slightly overweight, that he's very healthy. He adds, didn't have a fever Thursday into Friday, and since Friday morning, he's had nothing but now conflicting reports arise about the president's progress between doctors and sources close to Mr Trump's condition. I'm Stephen Portnoy. The contrast was stark. First, the president's physician's painted a sunny picture Thursday he had a mild cough on some nasal congestion. Fatigue. All of which are now resolving improving. But just after Dr Sean Conley briefed reporters right in front of Walter Reed Hospital, a source familiar with the president's condition told the same group of correspondents quote. President's vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning, the source added. We're still not on a clear path to full recovery, and the next 48 hours will be critical. Stephen Portnoy CBS News Dr Neeta Ogden is an internal medicine specialist and immunologist obvious that this is not just a mild infection. He's at the hospital. Now he's receiving too experimental therapies as well. I feel like he was probably moving in the direction of A buddy who's looking, said Dr Matthew Hines. Ah hospital physician who also worked in the Obama administration says he doesn't think the president's doctors are telling us everything. At one point. I remember the doctor saying that he doesn't anticipate the president will ever need oxygen, and that's a stunning.

president Dr Sean Conley President Trump Walter Reed Medical Center CBS News Stephen Portnoy Mr Trump Dr Matthew Hines Lisa Matteo Dr Neeta Ogden mild cough Obama administration nasal congestion White House fever
"mild infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:40 min | 5 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I mean, there's a lot ofthe restaurant like small West run. They're not going to be able to survive. Charlie Nicholas, who manages the Hotel Mercure and Capital Restaurant in Marseille and Dr Margaret Harris is a spokesperson for the W. H O, which warned on Friday of two million deaths from Corona virus. Before a vaccine is found. She's live on the line from Geneva and Dr Harris Europe does appear to be struggling to contain the current Kareena farts at the moment. Pleasing Julian. Yes, it's correct with thing. Upticks in many, many countries on this is probably the sound of a relax ation during the summer. They seem to be this widespread belief that somehow it had gone for the summer and it was their people talked about second wave. But they didn't really understand that there was continuing transmission in every country at a lower level than the peaks in March, But because that transmission had not really being suppressed, it built up and built up. And if you look at the Evidence kept genealogical Kurt for many countries. The rise began in July and has continued, and that's what we're looking at now. So what's your advice to national governments? Is it the reimposition ofthe national lockdowns? Or what's happening in a lot of countries, thes local lockdowns thes local restrictions. Our advice is really target the virus. So use your tracking. Your tracing your testing systems Understand way of transmission is, um and really find every contact and find ways to isolate the people who've been in contact to break that transmission. Now, sometimes that may be a local locked up, but we really want to see every country finding a way to live as normally as possible, but safely as possible. That's why we keep on using this term. New normal, Not easy. And the problem is, people confuse that with the old normal, which was when there was no Corona virus were now living in the time of Corona virus, and we have to live safely. So we're not saying good. Just keep one going back to lockdowns. Find a way to be safe, really break those transmission change. You saw there in Spain the problem that they have their regional autonomy, local governments being reluctant to introduce measures that national governments feel should be introduced in the case off Madrid. Your advice. Well, I wouldn't if I wouldn't get in the middle ofthe sort of discussions between local and national, but certainly we say, and we know that you need to tailor it to what's working in the community. You need to partner with the community. You need to help the community and to understand what's going on and not to see this as an imposition off something. But something they do to stop the transmission of this forest and to understand there are reasons for doing it because it is a threat, not just the The lives of every person but to the ongoing health of every coast, and we don't even know whether the people who've had a mild infection may become have ongoing problems. Later later in with what Call Long Cove ID, So it's it's in the interest of every person to stop the transmission. But you can understand how the citizens of Europe is becoming increasingly confused with a wide variety of measures because the root of six here in the UK on the other hand, 30 people could meet up to shoot. Grounds. It just sort of seems all over the place and people are getting very confused and they're getting very frustrated. And this is a very important thing you raise. With any outbreak. It's got two individuals have to feel that it is that they are a part of it, and they've got to understand what they can do to stop it. So indeed, ah, the first step is ensuring they have the information they can to protect themselves. And even when I say simple things like wash your hands Cover your mouth and nose, physically distance. It's not that easy it that people has to be given the means of doing that, Doctor. I'm I'm really sorry, but I'm afraid I'm gonna have to break off that we've run out of time. Doctor, Margaret Harris Suspects, man..

Dr Margaret Harris Charlie Nicholas lockdowns Dr Harris Europe West run Corona Geneva Kurt Kareena W. H O Hotel Mercure Marseille Europe Spain Capital Restaurant Madrid partner UK
"mild infection" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"We think it's Tuesday. We'll go with that. For now, we're close if it might be Wednesday, but we think it's Tuesday. Paul and Jordana. Thank you for tuning in Dave Josephs and D J keeping us from going through the guard rails over the cliff. Most of the time and look. One of the most important things we can do is be a trusted source for information regarding a covert 19 Corona virus. And so every day we're going to be updating you on some of the latest Updates and headlines and breakthroughs and George There is some good news. The scientists who are studying immune responses to Corona virus, say there are encouraging signs. Of lasting immunity after exposure, even for peoples who on Lee have a mild symptom of covert 19. Ah, these antibodies appear to stick around for months after infections have clear it up. But again how long you have immunity remains to be seen. The other thing that I saw that made me do a triple take. You might wanna wear your mask the next time you visit a public restroom. Researchers say there is increasing evidence that flushing toilets and even urinals can release inhalable Corona virus particles into the air. I know You didn't want to hear that. But, yeah, better safe than sorry. Where the mask when you go into the public restroom. Just to be extra safe. Well, no thanks for sharing. On that? Well, yeah, you know, you mentioned the the antibodies, a girlfriend of mine in New York. She was part of that big group that had it. You know, in the very beginning of the outbreak, she had her in a body says she says she had it back in March. She got tested like in July, and she said she didn't She no longer had antibodies so It might. Maybe it is three months, which would be great. But after that, it may decrease. But the reason that we're seeing now New York doing so well, they have a much lower The infection rate right now is probably because of that, because people were infected early. A lot of people died. It was tragic. Her her own father was hospitalized and on his deathbed. He he did make a recovery. Thank God. But it's because of that. It's because there is a little bit of herd immunity, at least for the first few months, so hopefully we will not see a resurgence after these people become non immune. Again on DH. Speaking of Cove, it boy the whole back to school Cove it you know, it's just been a goat rodeo here locally. I'm getting email after email call after call from a kid's school, they are starting distance, my kids. They are teenagers, their junior high and high school. But they're hoping that maybe after four weeks or even two weeks of school, they might be able to do some kind of hybrid in person. I have no idea what's gonna happen. But UNC saying goodbye to you in person classes after just one week, at least 130 students have tested positive for covert 19. They were allowed on campus. And now they're saying no longer the university saying only zoom classes at UNC and I worry about this. I just ran into a girlfriend find this morning. Who's driving her son to Maryland? She said. They're going You know, they're they're some classes. They're doing a hybrid. He's going to be in the dorms and she's taken him and I get that because I'm also a fan of in person. I think you've got to try but We also shouldn't be too disappointed or two frightened. If these outbreaks do happen with kids we know it affects them. Less less is dangerously as the elderly of the immuno compromised Most kids. But this is going to happen and and it's not even because of on campus activities. They said. They said at U N C. It was because of off off campus parties. And you know what? These kids are in college. Of course, they're gonna party sometimes for some of them. It was their first time away from their parents. You cannot stop a college coed from partying. I just don't think that's even physically possible. I remember in college, a lot of women asked me to physically distance Yeah, but that that was That was a long time ago before the virus. Look, Laurie, my wife's Ah, Sister. Has a daughter at UNC, and so we just got the news and, you know, everybody's distraught. I mean, nobody wants the online learning. You do so the kid coming home. Yeah, He's a kid. Yeah, she's coming. So There was some promising news. I found it Interesting. George. There's a new saliva base test company called Saliva Direct, which, again? I didn't ever think I would see that in a sentence, Saliva direct. Which was funded by the N B. A to give rapid tests for the players, NBA players So you may be able to find out within a few minutes. Not have something stuck up your nose. But just a simple saliva test. It apparently cost four or $5 the cost to us, maybe closer to 15 to 20 bucks. It again make it the promise of almost real time testing. Affordable real time. Testing is closer with this new saliva based test, and I I was Distraught to find out a new survey from NBC News. Surveymonkey shows that on Lee 44% of Americans say they would get a vaccine 40 really for Percent 22% No 32% of Americans, one in three, saying they're still unsure..

UNC Lee New York Saliva Direct George Dave Josephs school Cove NBA Maryland Paul NBC News Jordana Surveymonkey Laurie
Scientists See Signs of Lasting Coronavirus Immunity, Even After Mild Infections

Paul and Jordana

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Scientists See Signs of Lasting Coronavirus Immunity, Even After Mild Infections

"Are studying immune responses to Corona virus, say there are encouraging signs. Of lasting immunity after exposure, even for peoples who on Lee have a mild symptom of covert 19. Ah, these antibodies appear to stick around for months after infections have clear it up. But again how

LEE
Scientists See Signs of Lasting Immunity to Covid-19, Even After Mild Infections

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Scientists See Signs of Lasting Immunity to Covid-19, Even After Mild Infections

"Important news about the Corona virus, and it's good news. Several new studies say if you get Corona virus and you recover Your body will protect you against future infections. That's what they think. Right now. Scientists say they see signs of lasting immunity to covered 19 Even if you get a mild infection, researchers at the University of Arizona say disease fighting antibodies appear to persist months after infections have resolved themselves. Doctors say the body's most studio cells are doing their job. A University of Washington scientist says This is exactly what you would hope for more studies of being done. All

Scientist University Of Arizona University Of Washington
"mild infection" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

04:49 min | 8 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on Here We Are

"People who are either thrown in one of those two categories where they don't know that they have an infection or there have mild infections. Already evidence that they have longer term issues so at least within a couple of months have longer term issues for example within a couple of months. Yeah, so within the months that we've had to look at this. There's already people who show up were posse symptomatic, lowly symptomatic. And when x rays are taking their chance, they have those same. Same evidence of of viral pneumonia, so they're not expressing symptoms the way that you'd expect, but they have viral pneumonia. and. They test positive for Covid nineteen. So the an X ray. Image. It's called a ground glass opacity. It's got a very very specific kind of. Image. So. That has implications for what happens in the years out. We know There's recent reports.

pneumonia Covid
COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

Healthcare Triage Podcast

08:10 min | 9 months ago

COVID-19 and Immune Symptoms in Kids

"So why don't you start by telling us a little bit about yourself? How did you get to be what you are? What do you do? Yeah, so I got interested in pediatric infectious disease, probably when I was a medical student, but Never really knew path. I was going to go down as I went through residency. I found all the cool cases happen to be kids that had infections at least to me, so I had two mentors in residency, and then decided to pursue a fellowship in infectious disease. I went to Vanderbilt University in had. Really good experience. There was some great mentors and just got really interested in both clinical aspects of it as well as the research. Aspects of infectious disease so when you talk about the research aspects. What specifically are you interested in? Yeah, so My interest is in kids that have invasive bacterial infections. That's kind of fancy words for kids that come in with bad kind of common infections of their bones and joints, pneumonia things like that caused by bacteria that often are treated. As. Outpatients in clinics, but sometimes get bad enough where they have to come into the hospital in us. Can you give us a little more information about that? Can you talk about like when you talk about research in that area? What specifically do you want to study that others have not before? Yeah, so things that I'm interested in our standing. Why certain kids get really severe disease, and why other kids don't get much of a have a pretty mild course of disease, and so one of the things that's really interesting to me is is figuring out. kind of markers and kind of clinical signs of which kids are at risk for really bad disease, and then using those markers and signs as doctors and clinicians to help target therapies and improve. Improve the way that kids are treated so one of the reasons we wanted to talk to you. Today was because everyone in the world is focused on the current pandemic and with a Vid, and although this doesn't seem to be affecting kids as much it's still is affecting kids, but before even get into that. Let's just start with in your experience. has this been a disease that seems to be infecting kids? Kids because you turn on the news and some people are panicked. Some people are not what's really going on. I think that you're right the level of panic in the level of kind of anxiety around this is super high and I think what we're seeing is that in general kids from the infection of covid in corona virus are really mildly affected in general, there most kids don't seem to be. Be Getting it in big numbers, and if they do most of them, handle it pretty well. Either have no symptoms at all. Our mild infection that said we have seen you know a handful of kids that have come into the hospital in Ben. Pretty Sick and certainly we've. We've had to take care of those kids as well, but overall kind of big picture. Kids seem to be less affected than adults do. So when they come in they, they seem to be very sick. What are they meeting with Cova? They're they're needing. Respiratory support so that they're needing oxygen. They're needing help breathing. The majority of kids are coming in just having a lot of issues with with respiratory things, especially chest pain in trouble breathing. Are these otherwise healthy kids are the kids who seem to have other come. kind of seeing a little bit of both for the most part. They're healthy kids. The ones that we've seen in particular are pretty healthy teenagers. In general, a Kinda you know anywhere from ten to a eighteen nineteen years of age but really we kind of a mixed bag of kids are pretty healthy, otherwise as well as some that have a little bit more health issues. Do you have any sense of whether? It's that kids are not being infected as much as adults are. Is it just that they're most of them? Don't even notice or just her handling. It well yeah. I. Think that that is a really good question in a bit of a hot topic right now. I think that we don't really know exactly. Why some kids are getting? Getting severe not an end, and why kids as opposed to adult I mean certainly when we know what other respiratory infections young young kids, a kind of the extremes of ages usually are most affected. That doesn't seem to be the case with this. It seems like in general. Kids don't tend to build quite as much of this big inflammatory response that we're seeing an adults. So I think that's interesting. I'm not sure and correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm not sure that everybody understands that it's not just getting the virus that is dangerous. It's in many ways. The body's response can sometimes be so severe and trying to combat the virus that the immune response can actually become dangerous. Yeah, that's definitely true, and that's something not necessarily. NECESSARILY UNIQUE TO CORONA VIRUS although We're really seeing quite a bit in this. where the actual infection itself can be, it can be severe, but more than anything. oftentimes, it's that it's that revved up immune system and inflammation that the body makes that really affects the rest of the body in a particular with this disease. It seems to really affect the lungs in. People that are severely affected.

Vanderbilt University Cova BEN
"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

"And so just you know like the example of driving in the and automobiles in death the consequences of shutting down cities countries and Globes and yes economies. No one thought about it. And the risk was not mitigated at all in worse we collectively went now. We trust the scientists because we've been taught to trust the scientists and now if you look at the UK is pushing harder. Well they're media is assisting more at least it's Channel Four's not the BBC yet. They had this Sage Ge that was there over the recommendation board that recommended what to take and they were listened to is very important to Neil Ferguson. Of course was also a key member of sage with his two million people dead in America. Model Built on Thirteen-year-old documented code and so now people are questioning well I she wanted to go for here immunity and then you want to close it down. Did you make we make the right decision in hindsight and So this has been going around the UK twitter's where is channel four newsroom and his grilling one of these sage members. And he's not doing well. Did you change your mind on her immunity and not what is your goodwill you mean by that ahead of meaning just saying held immunity. He'll population immunity is is what You know it for parent it in March. The government appeared to be pursuing a strategy of mitigating the spread of the virus allowing Cheltenham Racist for example. The Go ahead three marched the tension March thirteenth Larry to spread naturally to allow the development of some herd immunity. Was that a mistake. I don't know I'm not quite sure whether that was essentially I think. Can I think at the time it was difficult to imagine? We weren't shoal. By what. Levels of compliance with various social distance measures were possible. Was that one. He didn't model for lockdown until the middle of March. I think it was very hot. Think anybody looked at it. It wasn't just myself think anybody We will look at a range of different meshes. Some of which were very stringent But it was know it's difficult to say but it was difficult to imagine. Just how in some sense who's difficult? Imagine just how easy to look down. What's the main? Oh Yeah we see what you mean. They were all judy John. Oh look how easy going crap. Stay home you may be actually testing us. Yeah now we can't finish this up without talking about Sweden. I've have received extensive written boots on the ground reports over Sweden. And let's just make sure we understand a few things to say. Sweden did not shutdown is ally bullcrap. Bullshit lie not true. We saw the Apple Mobility Data. Their transit number had dropped to minus forty percent. They were staying home. They were expected to stay home. Restaurants were not open it was curbside and pick up only many companies already were prepared for at home work and please also note that the typical Swedish home only has two people. So you don't have grandma and the kids and the kids bringing home stuff and infecting Big Mama and pop pop and getting them sick very different situation but they most certainly did social distance. They did all of that. In fact they followed the W. H. O. Guidelines to the T. There so and they love it. The people who have written to me say we actually feel a little bit superior to the rest of. Y'All that's look at Greta. We are superior we know how to do it. That's why they're being very quiet about their strategy because it turns out they're gonNA have just about the same amount of deaths and that's because only that no lockdown was necessary. That's what we're starting to see. Let's talk to. Let's listen to sweeter scientists Jon Secada. Who Explains here to Sky Australia really. How the lockdown were inefficient. And he has a few questions about where to go from here not inefficient ineffective should say who painted yourself into a corner. I'm watching with interest. How you in one hundred other countries we climb out for the little because I don't think any government that I know gave a minutes talked about how they would get out of the different towns. That are still gets closer. Greg sample close the schools when you're going to open them but I don't think anyone thought about that. When the Josiah was was decided at I think the chance to stop it by any measure weekday mostly would become infected by this and most people want the note this we have Dayton open. Sweden that shows that between ninety eight and ninety nine percent of the cases have had a very mild infection or didn't even realize they were picked this spread of this mind deceased around the globe on most of it is happening what we don't see if it's among people that don't get very sick. Spread it to someone else doesn't get very sick and what we're looking at. The same layer. At the Tokyo people do develop disease an even seemingly or people are going intensive Karen even in day people who die but the real outbreak is happening. Why we don't see but I'm you making succeed than New Zealand made votes sixty but as New Zealand or has stamped out every case in the country. What do you do for the next thirty years? We chose your borders completely quarantine one. Who's going to Australia or New Zealand? Because the disease would be out there. I don't know how you gonNA handle that that you'll problem screw you New Zealand. That's your problem so It appears that everything was done exactly wrong in balls and this was the advice of the scientists who should have known better the majority. That's over fifty. But I think it's closer to over sixty. In general across the world of people who died were over sixty five an elderly and many care facilities were in their nineties a lot. We're dying anyway. Meant many were already in hospice because they didn't want to die in the hospital. You know I do have Governor Cuomo's rebuttal towards the accusation that he killed five thousand people by forcing sick people to be kept at the nursing homes..

Sweden New Zealand UK Sage Ge BBC America Neil Ferguson Jon Secada twitter Governor Cuomo judy John Apple Sky Australia Greg Dayton Tokyo Karen Australia
"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

"And so just you know like the example of driving in the and automobiles in death the consequences of shutting down cities countries and Globes and yes economies. No one thought about it and the risk was not mitigated at all. In worse we collectively went now. We trust the scientists because we've been taught to trust the scientists and now if you look at the UK the UK is is pushing harder. Well they're media is assisting more at least it's Channel Four's not the BBC yet. They had this Sage Sag that was there over the recommendation board. That recommended what actions to take and they were listened to is very important to Neil Ferguson. Of course was also a key member of sage with his two million people dead in America. Model built on Thirteen-year-old documented code and so now people are questioning well I she wanted to go for here immunity and then you want to close it down. Did you make we make the right decision in hindsight and So this has been going around the UK twitter's where is Channel Four newsroom? His grilling one of these sage members. And he's not doing well. Did you change your mind on her immunity and not what is your goodwill you mean by that ahead of meaning just saying held immunity. He'll population immunity is is what You know it for parent it in March. The government appeared to be pursuing a strategy of mitigating the spread of the virus allowing Cheltenham Racist for example. The Go ahead three marched the tension March thirteenth Larry to spread naturally to allow the development of some herd immunity. Was that a mistake. I don't know I'm not quite sure whether that was essentially I think. Can I think at the time it was difficult to imagine? We weren't shoal. By what. Levels of compliance with various social distance measures were possible. Was that one. He didn't model for lockdown until the middle of March. I think it was very hot. Anybody looked at it. It wasn't just myself think anybody We will look at a range of different meshes. Some of which were very stringent But it was know it's difficult to say but it was difficult to imagine. Just how in some sense who's difficult? Imagine just how easy to look down. What's the main? Oh Yeah we see what you mean. They were all judy John. Oh look how easy going crap. Stay home you may be actually testing us. Yeah now we can't finish this up without talking about Sweden. I've have received extensive written boots on the ground reports over Sweden. And let's just make sure we understand a few things to say. Sweden did not shutdown is ally bullcrap. Bullshit lie not true. We saw the Apple Mobility Data. Their transit number had dropped to minus forty percent. They were staying home. They were expected to stay home. Restaurants were not open it was curbside and pick up only many companies already were prepared for at home work and please also note that the typical Swedish home only has two people. So you don't have grandma and the kids and the kids bringing home stuff and infecting a big Mama and pop pop and getting them sick very different situation but they most certainly did social distance. They did all of that. In fact they followed the W. H. O. Guidelines to the T. There so and they love it. The people who have written to me say we actually feel a little bit superior to the rest of. Y'All that's look at Greta. We are superior we know how to do it. That's why they're being very quiet about their strategy because it turns out they're gonNA have just about the same amount of deaths and that's because only that no lockdown was necessary. That's what we're starting to see. Let's talk to. Let's listen to sweeter scientists Jon Secada. Who Explains here to Sky Australia really. How the lockdown were inefficient. And he has a few questions about where to go from here not inefficient ineffective should say painted yourself into a corner. I'm watching interest. How you in one hundred other countries we climb out for the little because I don't think any government that I know gave a minutes talked about how they would get out of the different towns that are still gets closer. Greg sample to close the schools when you're going to open them but I don't think anyone thought about that when the Josiah was was decided at I think the chance to stop it by any measure weekday mostly would become infected by this and most people want the note. This we have Dayton Open Sweden that shows that between ninety eight and ninety nine percent of the cases have had a very mild infection or didn't even realize they were picked this spread of this mind deceased around the globe on most of it is happening what we don't see if it's among people that don't get very sick spread it to someone else doesn't get very sick and what we're looking at. The same layer. At the Tokyo people do develop disease an even or people are going intensive Karen even in day people who die but the real outbreak is happening. Why we don't see but I'm you making succeed than New Zealand made votes sixty but as New Zealand or has stamped out every case in the country. What do you do for the next thirty years? We chose your borders completely quarantine one. Who's going to Australia or New Zealand? Because the disease would be out there. I don't know how you gonNA handle that that you'll problem screw you New Zealand. That's your problem so It appears that everything was done exactly wrong in balls and this was the advice of the scientists who should have known better the majority. That's over fifty. But I think it's closer to over sixty. In general across the world of people who died were over sixty five an elderly and many care facilities were in their nineties a lot. We're dying anyway. Meant many were already in hospice because they didn't want to die in the hospital. You know I do have Governor Cuomo's rebuttal towards the accusation that he killed five thousand people by forcing sick people to be kept at the nursing homes..

New Zealand UK Sweden BBC Neil Ferguson America Jon Secada twitter Governor Cuomo judy John Tokyo Apple Sky Australia Greg Dayton Karen Australia
"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

"And so just you know like the example of driving in the and automobiles in death the consequences of shutting down cities countries and Globes and yes economies. No one thought about it. And the risk was not mitigated at all in worse we collectively went now. We trust the scientists because we've been taught to trust the scientists and now if you look at the UK the UK is is pushing harder. Well they're media is assisting more at least it's Channel Four's not the BBC yet. They had this Sage Sag that was there over the recommendation board. That recommended what actions to take and they were listened to is very important to Neil Ferguson. Of course was also a key member of sage with his two million people dead in America. Model built on Thirteen-year-old documented code and so now people are questioning well I she wanted to go for here immunity and then you want to close it down. Did you make we make the right decision in hindsight and So this has been going around the UK twitter's where is channel four newsroom in his grilling one of these sage members? And he's not doing well. Did you change your mind on her immunity and not what is your goodwill you mean by that ahead of meaning just saying held immunity. He'll population immunity is is what You know it for parent it in March. The government appeared to be pursuing a strategy of mitigating the spread of the virus allowing Cheltenham Racist for example. The Go ahead three marched the tension March thirteenth Larry to spread naturally to allow the development of some herd immunity. Was that a mistake. I don't know I'm not quite sure whether that was essentially I think. Can I think at the time it was difficult to imagine? We weren't shoal. By what. Levels of compliance with various social distance measures were possible. Was that one. He didn't model for lockdown until the middle of March. I think it was very hot. Think anybody looked at it. It wasn't just myself think anybody We will look at a range of different meshes. Some of which were very stringent But it was know it's difficult to say but it was difficult to imagine. Just how in some sense who's difficult? Imagine just how easy to look down. What's the main? Oh Yeah we see what you mean. They were all judy John. Oh look how easy going crap. Stay home you may be actually testing us. Yeah now we can't finish this up without talking about Sweden. I've have received extensive written boots on the ground reports over Sweden. And let's just make sure we understand a few things to say. Sweden did not shutdown is ally bullcrap. Bullshit lie not true. We saw the Apple Mobility Data. Their transit number had dropped to minus forty percent. They were staying home. They were expected to stay home. Restaurants were not open it was curbside and pick up only many companies already were prepared for at home work and please also note that the typical Swedish home only has two people. So you don't have grandma and the kids and the kids bringing home stuff and infecting a big Mama and pop pop and getting them sick very different situation but they most certainly did social distance. They did all of that. In fact they followed the W. H. O. Guidelines to the T. There so and they love it. The people who have written to me say we actually feel a little bit superior to the rest of. Y'All that's look at Greta. We are superior we know how to do it. That's why they're being very quiet about their strategy because it turns out they're gonNA have just about the same amount of deaths and that's because ultimately that no lockdown was necessary. That's what we're starting to see. Let's talk to. Let's listen to sweeter scientists Jon Secada. Who Explains here to Sky Australia really. How the lockdown were inefficient. And he has a few questions about where to go from here not inefficient ineffective should say coup painted yourself into a corner. I'm watching with interest. How you in one hundred other countries we climb out for the though because I don't think any government that I know gave a minutes talked about how they would get out of the different towns that are still gets closer. Greg sample to close the schools when you're going to open them but I don't think anyone thought about that when the Josiah was was decided at I think the chance to stop it by any measure weekday mostly would become infected by this and most people want the note. This we have Dayton Open Sweden that shows that between ninety eight and ninety nine percent of the cases have had a very mild infection or didn't even realize they were picked this spread of this mind deceased around the globe on most of it is happening what we don't see if it's among people that don't get very sick spread it to someone else doesn't get very sick and what we're looking at. The same layer. At the Tokyo people do develop disease an even or people are going intensive Karen even in day people who die but the real outbreak is happening. Why we don't see but I'm you making succeed than New Zealand made votes sixty but as New Zealand has stamped out every case in the country. What do you do for the next thirty years? We chose your borders completely quarantine one. Who's going to Australia or New Zealand? Because the deceased would be out there. I don't know how you gonNA handle that that you'll problem screw you New Zealand. That's your problem so It appears that everything was done exactly wrong in balls and this was the advice of the scientists who should have known better the majority. That's over fifty. But I think it's closer to over sixty. In general across the world of people who died were over sixty five an elderly and many care facilities were in their nineties a lot. We're dying anyway. Meant many were already in hospice because they didn't want to die in the hospital. You know I do have Governor Cuomo's rebuttal towards the accusation that he killed five thousand people by forcing sick people to be kept at the nursing homes..

Sweden New Zealand UK BBC Neil Ferguson America Jon Secada twitter Governor Cuomo judy John Tokyo Apple Sky Australia Greg Dayton Karen Australia
"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on No Agenda

"And so just you know like the example of driving in the and automobiles in death the consequences of shutting down cities countries and Globes and yes economies. No one thought about it. And the risk was not mitigated at all in worse we collectively went now. We trust the scientists because we've been taught to trust the scientists and now if you look at the UK the UK is is pushing harder. Well they're media is assisting more at least it's Channel Four's not the BBC yet. They had this Sage Ge that was there over the recommendation board that recommended what actions to take and they were listened to is very important to Neil Ferguson. Of course was also a key member of sage with his two million people dead in America. Model built on Thirteen-year-old documented code and so now people are questioning well I she wanted to go for here immunity and then you want to close it down. Did you make we make the right decision in hindsight and So this has been going around the UK twitter's where is channel four newsroom and his grilling one of these sage members. And he's not doing well. Did you change your mind on her immunity and not what is your goodwill you mean by that ahead of meaning just saying held immunity. He'll population immunity is is what You know it for parent it in March. The government appeared to be pursuing a strategy of mitigating the spread of the virus allowing Cheltenham Racist for example to go ahead three marched the tension March thirteenth Larry to spread naturally to allow the development of some herd immunity. Was that a mistake. I don't know I'm not quite sure whether that was essentially I think can I think at the time it was difficult to imagine? We weren't shoul- what levels of compliance with various social distance measures were possible. Was that one. He didn't model for lockdown until the middle of March. I think it was very hot. Think anybody looked at it. It wasn't just myself think anybody We will look at a range of different meshes. Some of which were very stringent But it was know it's difficult to say but it was difficult to imagine. Just how in some sense who's difficult? Imagine just how easy to look down. What's the main? Oh Yeah we see what you mean. They were all judy John. Oh look how easy going crap. Stay home you may be actually testing us. Yeah now we can't finish this up without talking about Sweden. I've have received extensive written boots on the ground reports over Sweden. And let's just make sure we understand a few things to say. Sweden did not shutdown is ally bullcrap. Bullshit Line not true. We saw the Apple Mobility Data. Their transit number had dropped to minus forty percent. They were staying home. They were expected to stay home. Restaurants were not open it was curbside and pick up only many companies already were prepared for at home work and please also note that the typical Swedish home only has two people. So you don't have grandma and the kids and the kids bringing home stuff and infecting a big Mama and pop pop and getting them sick very different situation but they most certainly did social distance. They did all of that. In fact they followed the W. H. O. Guidelines to the T. There so and they love it. The people who have written to me say we actually feel a little bit superior to the rest of. Y'All that's look at Greta. We are superior we know how to do it. That's why they're being very quiet about their strategy because it turns out they're gonNA have just about the same amount of deaths and that's because ultimately that no lockdown was necessary. That's what we're starting to see. Let's talk to. Let's listen to sweeter scientists Jon Secada. Who Explains here to Sky Australia really. How the lockdown were inefficient. And he has a few questions about where to go from here. Not Inefficient ineffective should say who painted yourself into a corner watching interest. How you in one hundred other countries we climb up though. Because I don't think any government that I know gave a minutes talked about how they would get out of the different towns. That are still gets closer. Greg sample to close the schools when you're going to open them but I don't think anyone thought about that. When the Josiah was was decided at I think the chance to stop it by any measure weekday mostly would become infected by this and most people want the note this we have Dayton open. Sweden that shows that between ninety eight and ninety nine percent of the cases have had a very mild infection or didn't even realize they were picked this spread of this mind deceased around the globe on most of it is happening what we don't see if it's among people that don't get very sick. Spread it to someone else doesn't get very sick and what we're looking at. The same layer. At the Tokyo people do develop disease an even or people are going intensive Karen even in day people who die but the real outbreak is happening. Why we don't see but I'm you making succeed than New Zealand made votes and sixty but as New Zealand or Has stamped out every case in the country. What do you do for the next thirty years? We chose your borders completely quarantine one. Who's going to Australia or New Zealand? Because the deceased would be out there. I don't know how you gonNA handle that that you'll problem screw you New Zealand. That's your problem so It appears that everything was done exactly wrong in balls and this was the advice of the scientists who should have known better the majority. That's over fifty. But I think it's closer to over sixty. In general across the world of people who died were over sixty five an elderly and many care facilities were in their nineties a lot. We're dying anyway. Meant many were already in hospice because they didn't want to die in the hospital. You know I do have Governor Cuomo's rebuttal towards the accusation that he killed five thousand people by forcing sick people to be kept at the nursing homes..

Sweden New Zealand UK Sage Ge BBC America Neil Ferguson Jon Secada twitter Governor Cuomo judy John Tokyo Apple Sky Australia Greg Dayton Karen Australia
"mild infection" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:05 min | 11 months ago

"mild infection" Discussed on KOMO

"Trump administration health advisors projecting U. S. pandemic deaths could range from one hundred thousand to two hundred forty thousand infectious disease specialist Dr Todd Halloran says there is still much we do not know we don't know how many people have mild infection we don't know how many people are a symptomatic that's really important to understand this virus in what the true mortality as U. S. desktop four thousand more than one thousand in New York

Washington China A. B. C.
White House estimates up to 250,000 may die from coronavirus

News, Traffic and Weather

00:27 sec | 11 months ago

White House estimates up to 250,000 may die from coronavirus

"Trump administration health advisors projecting U. S. pandemic deaths could range from one hundred thousand to two hundred forty thousand infectious disease specialist Dr Todd Halloran says there is still much we do not know we don't know how many people have mild infection we don't know how many people are a symptomatic that's really important to understand this virus in what the true mortality as U. S. desktop four thousand more than one thousand in New York

Dr Todd Halloran New York
Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

Coronacast

09:50 min | 1 year ago

Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

"I'm health reporting tyler. Journalists Daughter Norman Swan so norman. There's been a lot of talk recently about people not taking the pandemic seriously and people that interested to talk about how to talk about it with the people in their life. Who are still wondering around too much. Do you have any tips on how to convince that person who just doesn't want to seem to get the message yet road depends through the are probably more often than not but this preaches coming here being a younger person who feels that they're invincible and they'll just go out and get it and they'll be over it and after all they'll say isn't it just like the flu and so here's the argument one is that yes. It's true that younger people are not as likely as older people to die from it but there are plenty of younger people who die for from it. So if you think you're steel belted. You're actually not thirty to forty percent of intensive care. Unit beds are taken up with people who are relatively young and some of them die and there are no known risk. Factors for why those people died because it's not like elderly people with heart disease and diabetes and so on the no other particular risk factors so you are actually playing. Russian roulette by going out and doing it and the second reason you need to actually be serious about this is do you have family so parents and grandparents you're contributing to the spread to the community and actually could kill them and then the third thing is is when you were at school. Did you have friends that we're on to do nursing? Did you have friends who went on to mid soon or work in healthcare physios and so on because if this gets out of control they will actually die because twenty percent of people of healthcare professionals will get this. They'll get a big doors and many will get it severely and there are doctors and nurses dying of this. Is that what you want? If that isn't enough to convince people I think there's something wrong with them so I do it for yourself but also do it for the people around you people that you love. That's right because it's not guarantee you're going to get a mild dose of it so David's asking if we can clarify what the differences between nineteen and size cough to SARS. Cov too confusing SARS. Cov Two is the virus that causes covered so covered. Nine thousand nine. Is the disease so flu? Like symptoms runny nose fatigue loss of taste loss of smell sometimes diarrhea. That combination of symptoms is the disease and the disease can go for a week. And then you get better or can go for a week. And then after a week you fall off the cliff and you get really seriously ill. That's covered nineteen SARS Cov. Two is the virus that causes it and it's called SARS Cov too because this conversion over related virus to SARS which affected people about fifteen or more years ago in various countries of the world. So it's kind of a second version of the SARS virus not really. The SARS virus was the second version. People say it's the corona virus really what they should be saying. It SARS Cov Tube and the reason why you separate the two is that some people are infected with SARS Cov two and either have very very mild symptoms so mild. They don't know they've got it or totally is symptomatic and sixty percent of infections of SARS COV which leads to covered nineteen are from people who are asymmetrical very minor symptoms and therefore the don't know they're spreading around so speaking of spreading it. We're also getting a lot of questions about testing and testing kits and people are asking. Why can't we being Stra? Just manufacturer testing kits. If there's a shortage there are labs that can produce the reagents and which is the chemicals you need to analyze the genes on the virus. So we do have those reagents around and we can manufacture but we don't have many facilities left in Australia which actually can do that so over the years. We've lost industries in Australia. Which have the tooling which allows you to produce these kits at mass-scale so we can produce the kids but not in the quantities. That's required us as why we're having to import them but we do have some machines around which can actually do this. Sort of testing on mass. They're taken up with other work but we do have those machines to so we would have to create a manufacturing facility with over controls there that we just don't have at the moment so that's some questions from grownups but we're also getting heaps of questions from kids and we've covered a few over the last few episodes but let's keep doing that. Clara has sent this in from isolation at home she and her family have called symptoms. And they don't WanNa make other people seek Clara an league in Adelaide. Five two more. Why IS CORONA VIRUS? Started a really good question Clara and the reason. It's so bad. Is that first of all? It's very contagious. And by contagious. We mean how many people would spread to so if I've got the infection or let's say you had Clara. How many people could you infect around you and on average you in fact two or three people one for the time that you've got the virus that's actually quite a lot so if you've got the flu it's under twos maybe one and a half people but if it was a pretty mild infection then you wouldn't worry too much and eighty percent of people eight hundred ten people? It is actually fairly mild but in twenty percent of the people it gets severe. And that's because it locks into receptor in your long. That's a lock and key mechanism in your lung and can create a really bad lung disease. So it's not a smash a lung infection as your whole long reacts and almost go solid and you lose the ability to take air from the atmosphere breathe it in and get oxygen going into your bloodstream. And that's why people die of this. We have you feel better soon Clara. We've also got a question for six year old. Ezra get virus when you already have a different virus while we'll happen mix or something else. That's a really good question as a really clever question really no but if you were to get influenza if you were to get the flu at the same time as covered nineteen that's the disease caused by the virus. Sars virus then the likelihood is that they will add or multiply together and damage your lungs and damage your body much more than each individually and maybe much more than each so. It's not multiplying by to the effects could be multiplying by four or six. Because they work with each other to actually make your body worse. That's if you get the influenza or say the common cold it could make everything much worse with other things like say for example if you've got cancer diabetes and so on usually means that your immune system your ability to fight this office weaken so you're more likely to get an infection and more likely to be able to resist it very well and so your body if you like is distracted because it's taken up by fighting the cancer or fighting the diabetes then your body's distracted and you're more vulnerable more open to the infection. Hope that explains in language that Communicates Clearly Ezra but really good question. Sorry research groups all over the world looking for different ways to treat and KUA card. Nineteen and the W. H. O. The World Organization has just launched a mega trial of four of the most promising corona virus treatments. Norman what are they testing? So they're testing a variety of drugs testing this anti-malarial co Corcoran related drug called Haiku. Hydroxy chloroquine which may be a bit stronger. They're looking at HIV drugs which are anti viral anti retroviral drugs. Ones Le Vian routine over the has been some disappointing results. I think from those two. But they're going to have a look at them as well and maybe add an immune stimulant called Interferon Beta which helps to which helps to attack viruses. So in other words you might get three drugs working together which might affect the immune system and love noon system to attack. The virus in interferometer has got some nasty side effects which would probably have to monitor it. And then there's this other drug called Rim desert here which is a recent drought produced by a drug company called Gilead for another purpose for another virus and go to try that because they think they might get an effect with the SARS Cov too. So what they're going to do. It's it's not a randomized controlled trial they're gonNA allocate people to one or other of the drugs or the or usual care drug combinations registered as a trial and watch what happens to them as the go through so that it's not going to be a perfect trial but we don't have time for a perfect trial. We just go to be able to get people. On these study drugs we know on average. What percentage goes on to develop serious disease and needs to be ventilated and we know roughly what percentage will go onto dine. Can we developed from that and then we'll do comparisons between the different drug groups. How do they know that these drugs are ones that might work? The don't really so some of it is a bit theoretical but there have been some small pilot studies which suggests that there may be ineffective anti-malarial the not very good studies. But they're not good enough to say to everybody let's get onto Corcoran and there are side effects from from these drugs as well so you don't want to recommend them because it distracts from what might be the cure and your door to real mess out there. So you really want to know. Divided all up. There's some indications from small studies uncontrolled studies relatively uncontrolled studies. These drugs may have an effect. And I were GONNA do scale up the trial and see when you compare them in a reasonably scientific way which one standout if any because non may but we gotta get on and find out.

Influenza Clara Norman Swan Ezra Diabetes Australia Lung Disease Adelaide Corcoran David Le Vian Cancer Chloroquine W. H. O. The World Organizatio Stimulant Interferon
Eyes on the Virus: The View from the CDC

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

15:00 min | 1 year ago

Eyes on the Virus: The View from the CDC

"Is working around the clock to produce and stand out more test. That's what the CDC has recommended you know how many CDC is administered these days the Centers for Disease Control and prevention also known as the CDC is probably the most recognized institution managing the Corona Virus Pandemic. They're the ones offering guidelines on symptoms travel and prevention. He might have already been to their website. Given the level of fear and confusion surrounding this pandemic I wanted to talk to one of the. Cdc's top leaders and get answers to some of your biggest questions. I'm Dr Sanjay Gupta. Cnn's chief medical correspondent and this is corona virus fact versus fiction. The American public really needs to steady ourselves for a long haul here. This may be more disruptive than other outbreaks. We've been through. Dr Ranch shook. It is the principal. Deputy Director of the. Cdc This is not her first Rodeo. She's been with the CDC FOR OVER THIRTY YEARS MANAGING RESPONSES TO H One n one SARS and Ebola. I've spent a lot of time with her out in the field. I know we've already talked about the movie contagion but remember Kate. Winslet's character the virus hunter. She was modeled after. Dr Shook it. I asked her if she knows anyone. Personally who has contracted the corona virus? No not yet. But you know the epidemiology that we're seeing suggests that all of us are GonNa know someone you are the principal deputy director of the CDC talk us through a typical day for you now. Typical Day doesn't exist to every day is a new adventure But you know we're taking this really seriously for the past several months and so my days start early and they go late and they involve many calls. After I do get home we have over fifteen hundred. Cdc staff involved in the response so my day is always interesting and always challenging and involves connecting with people around the country the states and local public health. Who are on the frontline. You have worked on lots of pandemics and outbreaks in the past. Have you ever seen a response of this magnitude? The National Guard now just deployed to new. Rochelle all that. We're seeing around the country. The extent of this outbreak in the United States and around the world is is serious I was in in Beijing in two thousand three during the SARS outbreak and I saw firsthand Society really stopped I think we all saw that on. Tv when we saw Wuhan China and then who bay province literally shut down. I think each community will be making some decisions about what's the best strategy for their environment. Cdc's working closely with the state and local public health authorities to provide guidance and advice. I have seen some pretty dramatic interventions in my experience I actually was also in West Africa during Bola but I think for Americans. This is quite surprising and stunning in some of the communities. There's been a lot of news about testing and I WANNA ask you some specific questions about that but I just give me your your taken. Hell has the United States done with regard to testing compared to other countries in the world. The rollout of the laboratory testing to the public health system didn't go as quickly and smoothly as we usually see. We had hoped to be able to skill up the testing at the public health. Labs states and cities earlier than we were able to so that was a bit delayed in most of the country the commercial sector really was slow to take this on and scale up and what we saw in a couple of other countries was rapid. Scale UP OF TESTING. I would say that the jury's out about exactly what's the best way to roll out testing? I've heard from colleagues and other countries about concern that there was so much testing going on of people with no symptoms and people who really were not at risk that it clogged up the healthcare system. So I think right now. We're seeing you know we've done more than eleven thousand tests. I believe between CDC in the state and local public health labs now and the commercial labs are just coming online right now. So I think it's going to be important to use them but I know what the American public to get the impression that the right thing is for every single person who wants a test to get tested that could have negative consequences both for the healthcare system in the testing ability for everyone who really needs it right now if somebody is concerned because they have symptoms. They don't seem to have the flu. Maybe they came in contact with somebody with the corona virus as things stand now dr shook. At how easy would it be for that person to get tested? Well I think an important thing is to be connected with the healthcare system to figure out if you need testing you know. It may not be the best thing to go into a clinic and ask about that. It may be better to call. I would say that based on what I've seen so far and learned about this virus. The average person who's young and healthy without underlying conditions like heart disease lung disease kidney disease diabetes who develops cough and fever can probably stay home and Essentially self isolate until they feel better and Doesn't really need a test. Over the course of the weeks or months ahead there may be so many people with these symptoms that testing individual ones may not be as efficient and we really need to shift into the community interventions. And not the one on one or the the man to man you know. We need to move to the zone approach. It sounds like what you're saying. At some point there is going to be this acknowledgement that the virus is spreading in the community and testing every individual given that. You're not gonNA do anything different. Based on the result that testing may not make much sense. But we're not there yet right. I mean we. We still need to get an of how widespread this is in the United States. And it seems like we don't really know the answer to that question right There are a couple approaches to get an understanding of how widespread this is. So you know. We have a number of systems that we use to track a seasonal influenza and those systems are being adapted to also track cove nineteen but another of the systems that we're using as our hospital surveillance that looks at Individuals who are hospitalized for infectious respiratory disease who get influenza testing or adding the coveted nineteen testing for those individuals. So I think we're GONNA have the broad perspective of where things are going and how bad this is with some of these systems so essentially outpatients in patients critical care and also fatalities will all be tracked the way that we track for flu. But we'll be adding in the Cova testing and we're just beginning to get. Those systems rolled out in different areas. One of the questions. I get a lot Dr shook it. I'm sure you do as well has to do with schools We do see that. There are school closings and the United States. And I wonder if you think that's warranted. If that's really going to be of benefit we know that children are very important in the transmission or spread of many respiratory viruses but for the covert nineteen disease. We don't know that children are an important part of the transmission dynamics. We haven't seen that yet. That said school dismissals or school. Closures may be warranted for certain situations for instance a case in a school may appropriately prompt dismissals for cleaning. That's you know dismissals. For just a day or two so sufficient cleaning of the environment can happen. There may be schools that serve a high risk population special needs kids who have many medical problems or have staff or faculty where there's a high percentage of people who are at risk for severe complications. Those types of facilities may need to want to alter their their procedures to be able to protect the vulnerable Schools May in the weeks or months ahead experienced high absentee rates where it's really not feasible to keep the school open but we know that closing a school has a lot of unintended consequences Many times it means parents have to stay home Because their kids are home and those workplaces the parents go to. We'll have unexpected high absenteeism. We know also that A high percentage of American children depend on schools for lunch and for meals. And so What we really want schools to be doing now and communities to be doing is to think through if we do end up needing to close a school for a shorter learn longtime or needing to dismiss students for shorter longtime. What can we get ready to go? That will help. Kids be able to learn while they're home. People who need to be fed be be able to be fed while the school was closed and You know making sure. There's good communication systems so that the community knows what to do when the school will reopen and so forth with Spring break next week. This is another question I get a lot. What is the guidance the? Cdc is giving on travel leaving aside international countries for. Why would you recommend people not travel this next week during spring break? We'll we think that People who are vulnerable those who are elderly with underlying conditions or those with series underlying conditions. Who aren't that elderly Should think twice about about travel. One of the issues is the uncertainty of where you're going and You know what the circumstances will be where you're going We also think that large gatherings you know these. These conferences that bring people together from all across the country. It's not necessarily that being at a conference itself is that Dangerous or being at a large event like in a one of the festival's but I think what we're concerned about. Is that individuals who come from across the country to a large event in then returned to you know fifty or a hundred different cities could bring that virus back into many communities and really speed up how this virus spreads across the country and a mass gathering is. How many people would you say you know? This is going to be variable. We've posted some recommendations on our website. They're called community mitigation strategies. Really what we call social distancing so there's not an absolute number for mass gathering you kind of know it when you see it. But if it's filled with high risk people or people like on a cruise ship where there's lots of high risk people and they're going to be going back to a million places and the shared environment is difficult to keep clean. Those are the kinds of settings that were concerned about. You know I've really been struck by the fact that most of the headlines make the point I think correctly that eighty percent or so of the people who are infected by this virus will recover and be okay but we have defined the vulnerable population as you've mentioned and I wonder for you know people who are in their seventies or eighties. Who are listening right now. People who may have an underlying condition the here this Dr shook it and for many of them. It feels like a death sentence. Just waiting to happen. How do you? How do you respond to them? Yeah every individual's different and there's not a a certain age cutoff or a certain disease that puts you at astronomically higher risk than someone else But there's things that everyone can do Higher Risk and lower risk certainly reducing the context that you have if you are in one of these high risk groups reducing the social exposures finding alternative ways to socialize whether it's by phone or online or video chats with loved ones making sure that you have you know supplies at home medicines at home So the most important things are to reduce those exposures and limit the chances that Joel contract the virus. Now if you do get the virus Most people Will Not have the severe outcomes is just the the risk for the elderly and those with underlying conditions is higher that you'll have those more complicated courses One of the reasons we're trying to slow the spread and really strengthen the healthcare system is so that if you do get infected and you do have a difficult pneumonia or a complicated course of the illness. We WanNa make sure that the healthcare system conserve you. Well one thing that people should know is that their clinical trials going on right now of new drugs that may be promising to reduce the seriousness of the infection. And I I hope that we'll have results of those in the next few months. We've all heard about vaccine studies. Those are going to take much longer but the therapy trials should have some results in the next few months. And that's the kind of thing that would be very helpful to know in the future and just finally stare into your crystal ball for a second. It's early March. How long do you think we're GONNA be talking about this? Well I think we need to be ready for this to be a problem for some time. Many respiratory viruses have a season -ality more disease in the winter and spring less in the summer But YOU. You will recall that with influenza in two thousand nine. When in very new influenza pandemic strain emerged we had disease during the summer to. It didn't go away completely. We had large outbreaks in summer camps and so forth. That was a virus where schoolchildren were really important and it may have been that the summer break from school reduced the circulation and then soon as kids went back to school. We saw a big increase again in the fall. I have to say. We're preparing for a response that lasts months and I think if this virus turns out to be one that sticks with us as a I in terms of humans until we have high levels of immunity either because so many people had mild infection and got protected or because we have a vaccine. We may need to be ready to deal with this virus for years and I think the systems that have led us down or been less robust than we had wanted are going to be critical for us to invest in and to make sure that we do better during this response and that we do even better for the next

CDC United States Influenza Dr Sanjay Gupta Sars CNN Dr Shook Dr Ranch Deputy Director Principal Principal Deputy Director Winslet Kate Beijing Rochelle National Guard Seasonal Influenza Wuhan China
"mild infection" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on WGTK

"Your immune system lies right there in your gut in the bacteria in the lining of your gut because think about it what's your first line of defense when it comes to something getting into your body usually at your digestive tract the number one way for bacteria and flu viruses and the flu to get into your body are through the foods that we they get transported through the foods and if your first line of defense isn't working properly then of course you're immune system's not going to be able to fight off that infection and he'll that infection and suffice it to say with your immune system that without that first line of defense working properly you're starting off at a deficit and your body's gotta overcome that and that's when you start seeing things like fever and you start seeing things like vomiting diarrhea and that's because your body now has to use them to try to rid your body from that infection that's already wreaking havoc in your body and we talk a lot about the importance of having a good healthy gut flora and what what bugs me so much as when patients come into the office and they and they talk about how they had to get a steroid packer had they get how they had to get an antibiotic for a mild infection in their body and there are so many other things that you can do instead of taking an anti attic for some kind of infection and what that antibiotic does is it destroys your gut flora so most doctors now a day which this is good they'll if they prescribe you an antibiotic they also prescribe your probiotic so that that does not happen but every time you take an antibiotic it takes eighteen months a year and a half four your gut gut flora to be restored and you need that got floor so if you're constantly taking antibiotics one.

flu fever eighteen months
"mild infection" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Bacteria face on her arm and i was like that should be i want to it's beautiful now that's great yeah so anyways this bacteria phased has basically inserted part of its genome into the cholera genome and that is what's actually producing this toxin which is super interesting to me that's fascinating yeah and also are you going to tell me how this toxin works because i need to know yes so basically this toxin is centrally prevents your body from absorbing any water and forces you to push out all of the water in your body out of your intestine which means you're basically pooping water oh my god yet i'll talk more about it in just a minute okay so the incubation period which we've talked about before as the period from when you get infected until when you show symptoms for caller is about one and a half days while as yary faster super facile swimmers and they usually attach themselves to your small intestine within twelve to seventy two hours of infection said so there superquick and another thing that's interesting is that there's kind of a range of symptoms so some people who get infected are almost entirely a symptomatic some people have a rather mild infection and the ones that will talk about the most today have very very severe infections and the severity of the illness is likely based both on prior exposure so if you've got it when we you were young and then you get it again when you're older you're a little better off but also on infectious dose since like i said previously it actually takes quite a lot of bacteria to really get you infected but in the severe cases which let's face it of what we're here for whom basically what happens is you just start pooping your guts out who wore a so really like you just poop all of your water out adults that have severe infections can poop out yet this more than a leader of fluid per hour oh my god are you serious i'm totally serious i have so many questions yard now yup how long can you live.

incubation period seventy two hours
"mild infection" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Who had active smallpox infection yeah yeah taking that and then in jack thing it or inserting it in some way into an individual who had never been exposed a smallpox basically like exposing them directly exposed you name it factious gung but through a non but through a eru which was not as calm right because it's a respiratory virus right so and so what was the usual outcome of a noculars shen was a mild smallpox infection the majority the vast majority of patients who were inoculated survived okay so uh the mortality rate for an occupation was two point five percent while that's a lot lower than twenty to forty percent right so you were way better off with becoming inactive lower yeah and so you you i had a mild infection and you generally recovered without any scars our pockmarks however during the time that you did show symptoms of your miles while bucks infection you were infectious to others so it was still really a dangerous practice in some way okay that makes sense in occupation was not very popular then in western culture so in europe or in parts of europe and in north america okay but then around the same time in early eighteenth century which is the early seventeenhundred i was gonna ask because i'm young worse took those threats are going to members to people onto different continents one a highborn woman in england his name was lady mary montague who and the other a reverend and colonial boston named cotton mathur yes cotton good old cotton mathur where did she say he was born.

mortality rate europe england lady mary montague smallpox north america boston forty percent five percent
"mild infection" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"So the probiotics within three week are restoring function to the immune system of the elderly i mean it let me find dish to studies i have very interesting stories that when people inhaled cold viruses if they took a probiotic they were inhalen to cold virus right to their nose if they took a probiotic they weren't getting sick but if they did happen to get six summit of gotcha it was a mild infection and it didn't last long short really matters it's the intensity of the infection that matters and older people of course and people compromised immune systems like um uh people have been on chemotherapy or raw people of severe diabetes chevere hypertension it's not treated their means just must respond well to infections there in the most danger dead ones that are gonna develop things like viral pneumonia so take the probiotics at set your immune system up to work properly to fight off infections here's a study it's an a british journal nutrition as from york health consortium in the uk and a dairy had food culture technologies in california and the global alliance for health um they're looking at twelve human clinical trials and they found like taking a probiotic if it's a good one that usually at the lunch for your immune system to make it work properly so it's less likely to attack your body and more likely to.

immune systems uk california york three week
"mild infection" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

WVNJ 1160 AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on WVNJ 1160 AM

"Probiotics within three week are restoring function to the immune system of the elderly i mean it let me find dish to studies i have very interesting study that when people inhaled cold viruses if they took a probiotic they were inhaling to cold virus right to their nose if they took a probiotic they weren't getting sick but if they did happen to get six some of them gotcha it was a mild infection and it didn't last long short really matters it's the intensity of the infection that matters and older people of course and people compromised immune systems like um uh people have been on chemotherapy or raw people of severe diabetes are severe hypertension it's not treated their means just must respond well to infections there in the most danger dead ones that are gonna develop things like viral pneumonia so take the probiotic at set your immune system up to work properly to fight off infections here's a study it's an a british journal nutrition as from york health consortium in the uk and a dairy and food culture technologies in california and the global alliance for health um they're looking at twelve him clinical trials and they found like taking a probiotic if it's a good one that usually at the lunch for your immune system to make it work properly sorts less likely to attack your body and more likely to help fight off infections or lactobacillus remnote lactobacillus.

immune systems uk california york three week
"mild infection" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"mild infection" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"In 2015 wenda zeke epidemic hit south america leading to the shocking increase in microcephaly in newborns scientists were is alarmed us the rest of us of more than doubt they were mystified zico was not a new virus it had been first discovered in the 40s it was well known in africa and asia as a mild infection that for the most part didn't do much more than cause flu like symptoms that quickly passed and now this ordinary virus was exploding into a new population and suddenly causing shocking birth defects so what happened that's the question dr pay she from the university of texas medical branch in galveston and his colleagues set out to answer and recently they announced new results about what was to blame dr she welcomed the courts and quarks thank you well how did you go about understanding what was behind the new behavior of zeka and the outbreak that began in 2015 it really puzzle the whole community and we will really scratching their heads trying to understand why or all of a sudden as you mentioned the virus became explosive in a one possibility might be the virus has just recently changed so how did you then go about figuring out the mystery so in 2000 back in two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen we started to experimentally to interrogate whether the virus has changed and if so which change causes what a fat so in may of this year we published a paper and while we did in that paper is we compare the sequence of disease of hours before epidemic and a post epidemic and then we identify a dozen of mutations that has a coat and then you can study each of these changes there a fat.

asia galveston america microcephaly africa university of texas medical br