35 Burst results for "Milano"

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

14:00 min | 2 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Who i don't even have to tell you political affiliation. But here's his voting record. Let's say it's like ted cruz or something like that where you can't deny that there's some ego stuff going on there some power so what you do. It's a great question. That's why i said early on. There's a difference between politics and partisan politics right so everything is inherently political. Politics is personal exactly and one of the ways. I use my platform. As i try to always talk about those issues. The i think that we oftentimes get stuck in these echo chambers. Where we're only if you will preaching to the converted that's why the algorithms on all these social media channels are so dangerous because you are only getting side that you can digest that palatable the side that doesn't challenge your fragile ego exactly even is there are plenty of highs and one of my dear friends started an organization that i think you would love. Call the tahari justice center which is one of the largest nonprofit coalition of attorneys. Who are on the frontline fighting for the rights of immigrant women and girls who are fleeing domestic violence and gender based violence and genital mutilation etc and. They're actively always campaigning to change policy. And that's different right policy while it may seem like it is intertwined with partisan politics. Actually i believe in many ways is separate because i think we need to be moving in a direction where it is about the outcome and not about the party and that is where spirituality comes. That's where justice comes in. That's where we have that strong sense of the personal political of understanding that. Okay what am i fighting for gun. Violence great well. I'm not going to go take on the nra because guess what the nra's never going to change their mind. But there are a lot of people that i believe that live in places that may vote in line with the way that party votes who are deeply compassionate spiritual sensitive people but they've been completely written off because they've always voted for a certain party and the more that we do that the more that we're forgetting that we're all human beings that we all are empathetic compassionate sensitive people. We all love. We all have dreams and hopes and parents and we all suffer and we all feel pain. And if i can reach these people then maybe i can change. That law can change that world and that's separate than just jumping on the bandwagon and talking about a person. We're voting for campaigning. And there are some deeply spiritual fundamental truths missing from our current two party system that will never change by someone being elected or someone else being elected. I have met with ted cruz on gun. Violence prevention and it was a two hour meeting. And i thought it was super important for us to go in. I went in with ben jackson. Who's our producer of this podcast. And also fred gutenberg who lost his daughter jaime at fourteen in the parkland shooting an unlikely meeting at the us. Capitol tuesday between senator ted cruz and actress and metoo movement and now gun laws activists elissa milano. It started with this tweet from milano. September i in which she asked can someone site which passage of the bible. God's states it is god given right to own a gun crews replied an excellent question worth considering carefully without the snark of twitter. I thought it was important to take that meeting. It was hard for me. Because i got it from both sides people like. Why are you meeting with the enemy but also people from the right like. Why would he meet with you. You're just an actress. Stay in your lane guy. You gotta love that show up dribble. Stay in your lane. But this isn't that the problem. Yes exactly. isn't this whole idea of the other and it happens and unfortunately it happens on both sides and one of my favorite quotes from our faith is paolo when he talks about what happens to argue about a principal or a teaching. He says they're both wrong. And this idea that we have an enemy but yet we're fighting for a common goal is antithetical to unity and we have to start to see each other as you don't like each other. We have to love each other. We just have to recognize the interconnectedness of all of us of everything of everything. And i think that we have completely lost that and in a way. It's bizarre because we are more connected than we've ever been before with the internet and social media. I always say social media's like time travel like we can be with people who are fleeing from afghanistan and the taliban at the same time that we're getting the score of the baseball game. It's really remarkable. But i don't know how we got to the point where we can't connect that all of this is connected that the individuality is not a thing every once in a while and this is such a silly thing but i'm gonna share with you but every once in a while i will look at my coffee and i will specifically think there is someone across the globe that pick these coffee beans that ended up in my kitchen and i just feel like if we did a little bit more of that and it is a tale as old as time right at that. We're all under the same stars. We all look for the same moon and yet it feels like we have just gotten and i think a lot of it has to do with people are just working way too hard. I think that to make a living in this country but a lot of countries. You have to work too hard that you don't get to work on your soul to work on your heart to work on your spirituality. I wanna talk about your book man enough and also you co host. A podcast of the same name. Will you tell us about both and really tell us what you're looking to achieve with those. Yeah so i wrote man enough. It's a personal kind of meditation. Masculinity and i use my life and my story and my mistakes as an example i never had men in my life model vulnerability. Imagine with me for a moment. A world is peaceful and loving as you can. What do we think that world would say what it means to be a real man when i was young. Heard the mighty tales mighty warriors and their crusades. The superheroes saving the world in their uniforms and capes. I wanna be a hero mom. I ikea fly in the clouds. Hey dad look wackadoo. Doesn't it make you proud. They cheered me as i beat up the bad guys and put them all in jail. My superpower never ever fail and then one day too. Soon i learned didn't have those superpowers and that cape was just a piece of cloth cried for hours. I've put on every mask every suit of armor that you could put on as a man. I have hurt. Countless people have hurt myself. I've been deeply hurt. And this is a personal journey. Where i kind of take the mask off. And just say hey. I'm sharing this. Because i believe that there are hundreds of millions if not billions of men that identify with these same issues and one of my favorite compliments came from brother. Who's trans man. Fifty year old black trans said for the first time in my life. I read your book and i felt seen and that was the most important message i got because i couldn't think of someone farther away from my story than this person and yet it showed me that the universal truth of suffering the way that we treat men the way that we put us men in a box and then train our men to then hurt to acquire to dominate happens to everybody regardless of gender. So it's pretty gnarly and vulnerable and honest. I talk about things like my struggle with porn and my first sexual experience which honestly was salt which. I couldn't say those words in the book at the time. Because i hadn't truly healed enough to be able to. I've been on personal journeys since then of recognizing what actually happened to me and just not honoring. My feelings as bell hooks writes about and thinking that bravery is actually about physical risk and fiscal feats versus emotional. And so the whole book takes you on a journey from a lot of different viewpoints of what i've experienced in my life even down to dating and marriage and success you talked about work and work addiction and my hope is that people see themselves and what i'm loving hearing right now is that let's be real. I knew that women would buy before men but an reading so many messages from women who have read this book and who for the first time. Feel some compassion for men. And that's what. I want to say like not that. They're listening to your podcasts. Elissa but if they are that's awesome but guys who maybe are put off by that phrase toxic masculine the new year guys that maybe feel like they're under attack the feminist movement. It makes them feel like they're under attack the end of the day. This is about compassionate empathy and recognizing that all of us are enough. But we're not taught to believe that growing up. We're taught that we have to become ex in order to feel this. Masculinity is a performance that we must earn. And if you just think about that if you think about the fact that masculinity can be taken from us then you know it's not real. I can't take your feminine. You eliza i could maybe say that you're in your masculine but i can't take your femininity away. You can take my masculinity away from this fake word called them escalation you can take it away from me because it's not real because it's a performance and if i spend my life trying to perform for approval to be seen as enough that never going to be happy. I'm always going to be chasing a carrot into my grave and at the end of the day. Happiness comes from contentment and from recognizing that we are enough as we are so. That's the book and the podcast is really just about expanding the conversation to have awesome people on like yourself maybe one day and anytime anytime thank you. I'm a whole litter but folks that have deep conversations about this stuff because it's one thing to read a book another thing to listen to. Maybe somebody you admire or somebody. You wouldn't think would go deep on this topic and talk about the things they've experienced in their life because that's how we learn it's so important to have conversations about things that are filled with nuance. Because i think we're in a time when nuance just doesn't exist especially on the internet because of context collapse exactly and finally my last question for you is what gives you hope my children and all the children well justin bell doni. You give me hope. Thank you so much for all you do. And being a part of the podcast. Thank you for your bravery over the course of my career. I've had the great honor playing some of the greatest male role models ever represented on television. You might recognize me as male. Escort number one. Photographer date rapists. Two shirtless tape rapists from the award. Winning spring break shark attack surely medical student shirtless steroid using conman and in most well known role as rafael. a brooding reformed playboy who falls through all things virgin and his only occasionally shirtless. Now these roles don't represent the kind of man. I am in my real life. But that's what i love about acting. I get to live inside characters very different than myself. But every time. I got one of these roles. I was surprised because most of the men i play uis. Machismo charisma in power. And when i look in the mir. That's just not how i see myself. It should be no secret by now that we live in a world which expects women to change to accommodate the failings of men all the time. You hear well if you don't want the attention don't dress like that or she shouldn't have been at that party. Man by and large are the perpetrators of sexual harassment and discrimination domestic abuse and other expressions of patriarchy. It can be easy to forget that men are also victims of the same system. We expect men to change but far too few of us are teaching men how to change in a way that validates their humanity and leads to positive outcomes. That's why people like justin and the work they do are so important redefining what it means to be a man in healthy ways and showing men the path to define their own enlightened masculinity is such a critical part of creating a culture which is safe for all of us telling men to do better without showing them. What better looks like is a fool's errand so this is my challenge to men now. You know there are tools out there. There is a path where men are leading the way for you to follow to a better version of you now. You have to choose to do the work. Don't buy into the red pill pickup artist bullshit. you know. that's not good. You know it hurts women and ultimately it hurts everyone instead book to justin or to ted bunch of a call to man or to any of those men who want to help you set yourself free from a truly broken system. Be a man. Make the right choice. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by listen milano. that's me. Our associate producer. Is ben jackson editing and engineering. Natasha jacobs and music by josh. Cooke alicia eagle and milo locally ari. That's my please subscribe on spotify tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

ted cruz tahari justice center nra ben jackson fred gutenberg senator ted cruz elissa milano milano jaime paolo taliban bell hooks ikea afghanistan twitter baseball justin bell doni Elissa eliza us
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Power and all of the ugly things. And if you think about it who controls politics mostly men mostly white men and who thinks they have the most to lose from gender equality the people with privilege white men and we know for those with privilege equality can feel like oppression and when you enter the political debate and you have terms like toxic masculinity being used to enhance liberal agendas than what you end up doing is ostracizing an entire segment of the population. Who actually needs that message. And so for me. I don't want what. I'm trying to say my actions. The work that i'm doing to be met with the wall because of a word that i use and while words matter languages all created and so what i'm trying to do is simply say like okay. Men let's talk. I'm a guy i'm a dude. I was an athlete. Albro out with you in the weight room all you want. We'll talk about sports whatever. Let's talk about this actual issue and the second. I noticed that. I've used the term toxic masculinity. It's almost as if i can see the divide happen in real time. It's like the waters part and then suddenly folks that were open. Then look at me and think that i'm trying to push a liberal agenda on them and think that i'm using a word to try to take them over to what they view as the dark side because they have a hatred for this other side when in reality as i said earlier. We're all the same. We're the fruits of tree in the leaves of one branch and so i don't use the word toxic masculinity because at the end of the day i honestly believe there are no men that are exempt from this conversation liberals and conservatives if you are a man it's a conversation plenty of liberals that are toxic and that is something that is important to recognize is that you don't get a free pass to not do the work because of identity politics if you will. So that's why i don't say toxic masculinity..

Albro
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Let's just take trump out of the equation. Because clearly he messaged it wrong. But i feel like once biden got into office. There was a moment where he could have chosen to say. You know what this thing's not going away. It doesn't matter if you're vaccinated. You're all going to get vaccinated. We're gonna make this available to everybody. It's going to be free the closest center that you can go. It will be five miles from your house all the same things but instead of saying we need to get vaccinated to eradicate this just saying we're gonna live with this for a while so we all have to make compromises. We all have to take care of each other. We all have to figure this out because now what it looks like is that the vaccine doesn't work and then the argument becomes well. What's the point. You still get kobe. I agree with you came from a place of like once you get vaccinated this horror stories over which was never going to be the case. Unfortunately i think if we would have been honest about that right from the beginning. Maybe we would be in a different place than we're at right now. Do you think new york schools. Do you think your school is doing enough to protect you to protect kids. I think they're doing as much as they can. A situation where. It's not up to them to do anymore at this point right so i think they're going to do their best to socially distance in the classrooms and have those type of filters installed and have a very strong assertive mask policy with repercussions. If you don't wear a mask we are working on a campaign to get teachers and students in school staff to make these. I did want to check talk video. About why i got vaccinated to make cool. I don't know if i make it seem cool but to get some of the cool kids to do. Make everything seem paul banks. I'm obsessed with. Jake talks and i'm not very good at it and that's kind of the joke of my students so i did that kind of to show them like i can be foolish best. Why don't you guys do it. The goal is suggest my school make it very clear that we are pro vaccine. We are standing strongly behind that you need to wear mask. And i think the one thing we're learning i've always felt like if i did xyz. I can control what goes on in my life. And that's cute right. But i think this pandemic really has forced us to realize that we can do everything right and we still can't control things so i'm just trying to manage my anxiety around it now because the last thing i want to do is to go into the classroom and bring that anxiety to that so if i students are listening i am anxious but when i santa classroom i'm gonna ask cool and calm and just try to make it the best learning experience if they can have this year. What are you hearing from your colleagues. In places like florida and texas where the state governments are literally preventing solutions like mask mandates for school students. Here in florida are heading back to school but also in georgia in arizona. These students well. They're going be entering classrooms at a time in which their governors have banned school districts from requiring their classmates from wearing masks. What we're seeing. Is that school districts for the first time are now beginning to try to directly. Challenge those governors orders. I'm in several groups. And as you know. I host this. Pbs newshour extra educator serious with teachers all around the country and the reason why maybe i feel more fortunate. Even though i am scared to go back is that. I'm comparing myself to my colleagues in this profession. Who are already back. A lot of them are too scared to speak up on twitter. That's why i'm always tweeting about it. Because i'll get a message privately from someone and then i think okay. I don't have the hugest platform. But i have a big enough one. That people will see it. Also i don't live in a place where i fear retribution or job loss or parents coming after me but what i'm hearing is that they're terrified. One teacher took a photo of before the students were coming. There's usually staff professional development. They were doing activity. Not wearing masks holding hands all on top of each other because in a lot of these parts of america they're still acting as if this doesn't exist and they are gas lighting and bullying teachers school staff members students and their parents if they otherwise and it's outrageous and i wish there was more that can be done. I know that we have federalism a history and civics teacher. So there's just so much you can do on the federal level to get these states to comply with the science. But i just wish we could be doing more because it's almost like watching a car crash in slow motion and still knowing. You can't stop it but again i also feel like this is a situation where we fucked up the messaging because i think in the beginning we said it's not impacting young people. It's not you you kids. We did not say what we should of said. Was you know what this strain right now. Seems to but that does not mean that the next variant is not going to impact children's so we gotta keep those kids safe so a lot of these states are still going on that old information that kids are fine. Even hospitals or filling up as there are a limited number of pediatric. Icu beds and that's.

paul banks biden florida Jake new york Pbs georgia arizona texas twitter america
Alyssa Milano Involved in Car Crash After Uncle Suffers Possible Heart Attack

Fred and Angi

01:09 min | 3 months ago

Alyssa Milano Involved in Car Crash After Uncle Suffers Possible Heart Attack

"Is a crazy story. I don't know if you guys saw this, but Alyssa Milano was involved in a car crash yesterday morning after her uncle suffered a possible heart attack while driving on an L. A highway. So I guess she was in the passenger seat. Her uncle started to have some sort of medical issue. He became on conscience unconscious. Excuse me. The SUV drifted out of its lane hit another. Car, So she had to reach over and use her hands to hit the brakes. Oh, wow. So like she had to think fast. Um, she then gave her uncle CPR until the police could get there. They took her uncle to a hospital, and she was able to leave the scene uninjured after her husband her up. That's insane. That's frightening. Yeah, Yeah, So they did hit another car, and she did have to, But I would be nervous like if it was moving to, like, Put my head down there because you don't know if I write something else. But and then there Like some good Samaritans that we're helping out, but no update on her uncle. I hope he's doing okay. Though he didn't even really have a scratch. Which is crazy. You used to be able to grab the emergency brake like when it was in a situation like that, when when they sort of pulled up, But a lot of them now are electric. Yeah, I don't know if it would work the

Alyssa Milano Heart Attack
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:17 min | 4 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Dollars a year was so incensed this entire pandemic as companies would throw up the signs saying hero works here tanko worker. Or how greater these essential workers. They're just wonderful. But don't trades people pay them but we're also a state where we have the highest number of votes who have crushing student loan debt which puts people in a position where they're not able to buy that first home or to start that family or to take a risk and maybe start at enterprise with the dreams and talents that they have because of the weight and because of being affordability. We've seen in higher. Ed there a lot of folks who say well now come. You're black and you're gay. How can you ever win in pennsylvania. Because i will tell people don't have to look like me or love like me to know that i will fight for them because i'm also fighting for myself and i'm fighting for my community. I represent the third poorest districts in the commonwealth parts of my district. The average annual income is under ten thousand bucks there. He'll section on my district. Last time. i saw the numbers on this. We were talking about nine thousand seven hundred and eighty three bucks average annual income in so these are the families who are working two and three jobs who are driving uber. Who were part of the gig economy. Who are working in the grocery stores that kept everything going for doing the service jobs that have become so arsenal of our economy but we have left them out again and again. And you'll sony. People talk about the new deal. The fair labor standards without talking about the fact that in the fair labor standards we actively left out domestic workers on the accuracy left out agricultural works right which make up a lot of the workers in pennsylvania workers who were seen the highest rates of infections. Because they couldn't work from home. Okay you can't do. Agricultural work from home they were out working but yet we don't give them the pay or protections that they deserve. I mean the care industry it needs to be completely restructured from the ground up and we're seeing the repercussions of what happens to a country when they don't put certain respect behind certain positions the two million women that had to leave the workforce because they didn't have childcare. That's a lot of money that has been taken from our economy because of shortage in child and elder care and we need to do better for sure. It's seems correct me. If i'm wrong but it seems like the gop in pennsylvania is not a lot different from the gop and rest of the united states. They're worse and they tried very hard to crush a free and fair election so absolute tell my listeners. What is happening with them in your state right now. A lot of people i think. Got me for the first time nationally. When i was on rachel maddow using the legislative process. And using things i've learned as community organizer to block a bill that i think had it become law. I'm not sure what it would have happened in. Pennsylvania this resolution. Excuse me not build. This resolution will stay called an election. Integrity committee okay which you have to use air quotes four because there was nothing about it at any level of integrity would've allowed them to investigate the election as it was happened to investigate allies that they told they create it lies and then they wanted to investigate their fever dreams. They would have allowed themselves to subpoena ballots to impound voting machines into physically compel elections officials. Were supposed to be counting the votes physically compel them to come before sham hearings to talk about the lies that they were telling about the election and i will never forget. And it's one of the best moments of my career there. Little scooby doo villain press release that they put out after for basically saying you know we would have gotten away with it too if it wasn't for exa radical democrat. Forget all the things. They called me but this is what they have been up to for a long time and it hasn't stopped with the election. I had members my colleagues. Sue me in my personal capacity because the president asked me to be an elector to the electoral college. Personally sumi to try to stop me from going. And exercise that responsibility while taking a look at pennsylvania now where the state's highest court dealt another blow to the trump campaign's efforts to overturn election results in a unanimous decision. The court rejected. The trump teams baseless claims of mass voter fraud. This comes one day after the state dismissed a lawsuit brought by republican representative kelly that argue that the state. Gop legislature violated the constitution when it expanded absentee voting. This is bonkers stunts after the election was over the house. Republicans state government committee of which. I remain a member a really powerful committee because it oversees all of our elections as well as just you hear it from the title state government. Almost anything can go to that committee that affects state government and we conducted ten different hearings. Where we heard from elections officials we heard from so many people we also heard from unfortunately members of the heritage foundation and other bonkers. People who were a part of spreading. The election is and are still spreading. These lies today ten different hearings to try to prove their lie and now they want to do things like voter. Id in the state they wanna do. Things like limiting drop boxes limiting the amount of time that people have to utilize the drop boxes. They wanna do all of this stuff because they believe that the way they hold on. Power is to gerrymander districts. Every chance they get every ten years and then to make it as difficult as possible for people to participate in the electoral process in. I am sick of debating these issues with them every single day. Tell people what that's like. Because i think right now. People are thinking about running for these offices on a state level and it might help to hear you. Tell us what it's like and what they're getting into the first advice that i give anybody who's thinking about running for office is to run. You have to run. I would encourage anybody who's listening. You have something to offer. I would encourage you around in a lot of what keeps people from running. Is this belief that the folks were an office are just so much smarter so much better prepared or something then you i work with these folks and i promise you. We're not sending like rocket scientists. Okay these people in many cases don't know what the hell they're talking about and that is what it's like. I'm dealing with a lot of who don't know what the hell they're talking abou. Who are what. I call button. Pushers we have electronic voting in the house and they go in and their job is to look and see how all the other republicans voted and they just vote that way. And that's incredibly unfortunate because we're not having serious conversations about just. What are the best ideas. What are the ideas that have the most support from the pennsylvanians one of the things. We do all the time as we renamed bridges in the state house. We're not fixing lot of time changing names and naming them what it's like. Let's actually invest in making them saying the infrastructure.

pennsylvania tanko gop Gop legislature rachel maddow Republicans state government c Ed sony sumi electoral college Pennsylvania united states heritage foundation kelly abou
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:06 min | 4 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"The first time i saw him in iowa is a second trip that he took to iowa. We're in a town called the tamwe and there's a theater there that i think the fire department says holds about eight hundred people and we walked in. There was a setup for chairs in a hallway on the side of the theater. And i thought oh. That's i guess where the reporters are gonna hang out with have for us to type our stories or do the shots and then i realize no. That's the event space that they'd picked. They realized that they couldn't fill this year. And so they had eighty chairs set out and there were super excited when they got about two hundred people there and there was standing room. Only that's not good enough to what presidential campaign and especially if you think about what it would have been like trump had been having big rallies all over the country which would have been. He always draws a big crowd and fed this idea that people are more excited for him than for biden. So there's like the political theater aspect of this. That probably would have been not in binds favor but i also think just in general there were so many issues that popped up over these four years. That trump is president. This is the thing that's going to define the twenty twenty alleged remember when he got impeached. It's only been three times now. Four but at that point three times at a president and it was like this is obviously going to change everything and it was like gun as an issue by november. Everything else was except for covert because we were all feeling no matter who you were what you were doing. If changed your life. Most of us were sitting at home. Obviously not everybody but even the ones who weren't a chain relies were all wearing masks. While we're we're going to get sick all these things and we were all feeling at least in some way the effect on the economy..

iowa biden trump
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:53 min | 4 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"To their local legislators to ensure that state government's work better for the voters in their specific states. And finally what gives you hope. The community really gives me hope. They inspire me every single day by their voice by their actions by everything that they're doing right now to ensure that america is a better place not for them and them alone. It's not so that they can necessarily secure their wealth. It's so that america is a better place. I often feel that the quilt. That is america. The part of the quilt. That is still being stitched into the fabric of society in the fabric of america is that last. Api patch and when that is fully stitched then in only then will. The fabric of america truly be complete. We've got a long way to go. I mean i would say that other communities probably feel like they have a long way to go. We stand in ally ship with indigenous communities and black and latino communities and frankly all those under represented in america and that's what gives me hope. Is that the optimism of working with folks like you and folks in the movement the progressive movement. When i don't think i've got one ounce left to give when i say i can't get through one more frigging election. I get hope from folks to are just so tireless. And so that's what really gives me. Hope and i know america's going to be a better place for you give me hope. Thank you for all you do. And for being part of the podcast. Thank you so much for your time. Today i said from the beginning mike campaign for president and we needed to come together that we needed to unite as one people one nation. One americ- i said i- kickoff speech in philadelphia said that very same thing when i spoke at gettysburg. I said that my inaugural address. And i believe with every fiber on my being her simply some core values and beliefs. That should bring us together as americans. One of them is standing together against eight against racism the poison as long haunted in plagued our nation. We have a history and an epidemic of hate in america. It's fueled by fear by greed by stupidity by arrogance and it needs to stop. We cannot look at our nation and say in good faith that we do not have a problem with identity based. Hey if you're fighting against racial injustice it's important not to overlook one marginalized community in favor of another. It's all the same height and it has many of its origins in the same places. I worry that his activists people who care deeply about america that we sometimes get so deep in our specific causes that we miss the intersections. No-one should be left behind. It's on each of us to take a look outside of our chimney once in a while and make sure you know what's happening outside. We need to work with our allies and not against them. It's the only way win. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by listen milano. that's me. Our associate producer. Is ben jackson. Editing and engineering. Natasha's jake guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo bully ari. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word sorry..

america gettysburg philadelphia mike ben jackson josh cooke Alicia eagle milo bully ari milano Natasha jake
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:50 min | 5 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Thank you so much for having me. The number nine is not in the united states constitution. Originally we only had six supreme court justices. We want to begin this fate of because of the historically unprecedented actions which the republicans have taken over the last five years to steal two supreme court seats. What do you say to people who say. This is a kind of maximalism. That's dangerous and crazy and wild. Well i would say that. The republicans just engaged in crazy. Why old overreach where justice. Scalia passed away The republicans decided they were going to keep the vacancy for fourteen months. And then after saying it was a sacred sank tradition. There were no confirmation starring election year. Twenty twenty when the lake. Great justice ginsburg passed away a week before the election. The republicans confirmed amy conybeare and so they stole two seats who is outrageous. And it's led to a six to three a court a which unfortunately will be in a position on civil rights women's right to choose environmental issues on voting rights issues to now overturn of settled law in our country that has been on the books to protect ordinary americans for generations. The judiciary supposed to be above politics. Justice is supposed to be neutral but that relies on a senate which puts america above. Its own power and since mitch. Mcconnell has been there we have not had that senate everything that matters from racial justice and allowing women control over our own bodies to holding those in power accountable when they commit crimes relies on a thoughtful neutral. Competent judicial system led by judges of integrity. The trump regime set america back decades in its assault on the judiciary. We need to follow in the footsteps of history and fundamentally reform our judicial system so that it lives up to the ideals the framers set for it we need to reject the partisan hacks in the senate who would gladly do this much harm to america. It matters it matters for all of us. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by listen milano. that's me. Our associate producer is been jackson editing and engineering by natasha's jacobs and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo bully ari. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word sorry..

supreme court amy conybeare america Scalia ginsburg senate Mcconnell mitch josh cooke Alicia eagle milo bully ari milano natasha jacobs jackson
New York Post Miranda Devine Says Some Reporters Are Acting as Ciphers for Biden White Hosue

Mark Levin

01:29 min | 5 months ago

New York Post Miranda Devine Says Some Reporters Are Acting as Ciphers for Biden White Hosue

"What do you What do you think about these so called media Reporters like it's CNN and the Washington Post. Got this guy Jeremy Bar you've got Brian Stelter. Young people focus on We're going to report on the media industry. Do you ever get contacted by them asking you to explain Why the media won't pick up on these major stories. No, it's not. It's a joke. Right? Contact us is the opposite is to pull pull apart what we've done. You know. Glenn Kessler at The Washington Post, tried to pull apart our story on just recently on the cafe Milano that story very gullible, Accepting the word of the White House against what? You know the evidence that we've produced. It makes no sense. These are not. These people are not acting as reporters or journalists, but as ciphers for either the surveillance, state or champions of Biden White House and which you know is extraordinary. Considering for four years under Trump, Um the the media was so ferociously antagonistic and I'm not even against that. You know, I think you you hold power to account that's sort of what journalists are meant to do, But then you don't turn around and become Supine puppy dogs When you know the other side gets into office, Um, I It's just

Jeremy Bar Brian Stelter Washington Post Glenn Kessler CNN White House Biden Donald Trump
New York Post Miranda Devine Reports That Joe Biden Knew About Hunter's Overseas Business

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 5 months ago

New York Post Miranda Devine Reports That Joe Biden Knew About Hunter's Overseas Business

"Back in 2015 with Hunter and his dad Joe, with two Mexican billionaires, one of them being Carlos Slim, who at one point was the world Richest man and didn't hear it. Doesn't he own part of the New York Times as I require my wrong, But exactly, he bailed out The New York Times. Exactly. So maybe that's one clue why there's no coverage of this. Who knows why there is the Praetorian God as you say, But you know these We're Hunter Biden's business associates. There were people that Hunter Biden either was making money from always hoping to make money from was trying to get involved with or was involved with. And you know, we have already just recently ran another story in another photograph. Of Joe Biden, who popped into a dinner that Hunter was having with business partners from Kazakhstan, Ukraine and Russia and Mexico. And that was at Cafe Milano with a private room in Washington, D. C. And we know that Joe Biden popped in there and Now we have this evidence of a breakfast meeting and November 1920 15 in the living room of the residents of Vice presidents, residents with four hunters, business partners. So, um, I just don't understand how the White House Is not addressing this. At some point. They're going to have to confront the evidence that the president was involved in the hunter Biden's overseas business dealings and at some point, Joe Biden is going to have to admit that he lied when he told The world several times during the election campaign that he knew nothing about Hunter Biden's business dealings

Hunter Biden Carlos Slim New York Times Hunter Joe Biden Cafe Milano JOE Kazakhstan Ukraine Russia Mexico Washington White House
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:28 min | 5 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Seize it before the summer's out. Well thank you so much. Senator merkley both for your hard work on this bill in the hard work you have always done on our behalf Well friends who are listening. You've just heard it. Our democracy is under threat. We've seen direct at Attacks from elected officials and continued attacks from special interests. Anti-american forces like the proud boys and q. And on and from states and state parties who are more interested in power than people. It can't stand and it really is on us to do something about it because clearly the gop. Won't i know this is not a federal election year. We can't check out of the political process. Saving america is a full time job. It's a full contact sport every day of every single year so we can't wait for that twenty twenty two midterms or the twenty twenty four presidential election to get involved right now in each of our communities activist groups and local candidates. They need you. Maybe local elections need you to run for office. If we can't fix this from the top we damn sure better fix it from the bottom. The republicans in washington and sadly more than a few democrats have chosen to abandon their role as leaders. So let's make them follows of the people by the people for the people. Thank you so much for being here. Make sure to subscribe to a of milano. Sorry not sorry everywhere you find your podcast and if you like us please rate with you until you said blessing. Thank you senator. Thank you very much. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by alyssum alonzo. That's me our associate producer. Has been jackson editing and engineering by natasha. Jacobs and music by josh cooke. Alicia ego and milo. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

josh cooke Alicia ego natasha milo washington republicans alyssum alonzo Senator both democrats each twenty twenty two american Jacobs spotify milano twenty twenty four presidentia merkley itunes america
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:30 min | 5 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"You mentioned. Mayor bowser she was recently admitted to the democratic governors association. Do you think that this is going to help move statehood efforts forward. I think any time that you can talk about the unfair any of the differences. Any conversation about that moves the needle forward. It's why we've seen again of twenty points in support of state of the last four years but absolutely the district operates already as a state county city all same time so anytime somebody tells me we have city mexican will because we have a state board of education. We do stay board of transportation. We do everything the state does any county does so it just makes sense that she's part of the dj our attorney general part of the democratic attorney general's associations well and our district council members of the mcas el national council state legislatures. So it makes sense to elevate all of those officers whether it's Or dj holds office because we are assistant and she acts with the exception. Odyssey nationals who are the proponents of statehood in congress and where is statehood in the legislative process recently passed the house of representatives so there are two hundred sixteen advocates for stated in the house. One to sixteen to two zero six in that one obviously the largest champion of stated in the house of representatives is eleanor holmes norton. Our delegates represented jamie raskin from maryland obviously is a huge supporter as well. There's a number of former zone of debt halland now attorney general of minnesota keith. Ellison there's a number of folks who have advocated loudly In the house on the senate we stand at forty four cosponsors original sponsor for a total of forty fives all of them from democratic hopkins. Senator carper is the lead on the bill. Senator van hollen of now because champions over on the senate side and we expect at some point here relatively soon a hearing in the senate homeland security committee on the bill which would be the first hearing about some end arises afternoon along with several of our colleagues to discuss the key to end the policy of taxation without representation which millions of americans in the district of columbia have endured over for over two hundred years and hundreds of thousands still endure. Today is policy was wrong. In seventeen seventy six when thirteen colonies took on the mayas thing on earth to end. It is wrong today. Wow so the time is now absolutely. There is no reason to wait anymore. Tell us about. Dc vote and how my listeners can support the work. Do vote is one of the longest established dc statehood organizations. We've been in existence for twenty three years you can head to. Our website is the most obvious. Dc vote dot org. You can follow us on twitter at dc underscored vote to forget these discover website where swings through all of that but we actually need folks outside of dc almost more than we need. The folks in dc get invoked ducey residents who fired up showing up and we need people from across the country to take that next step as i said we don't have center some. We don't have a representative that can vote passenger this legislation and to educate people about it. We need to lean on people outside of the district so go to our website. There's tools you can use to talk to your friends and family that is sample tweets and sample post for facebook. You can start a conversation with anybody you know and get them involved in this effort because it is going to take folks from outside this area working on our backs are you hopeful and then my final question is what gives you that hope. I am cautiously optimistic. What gives me that. Hope is where we have common the last four years one example. I can get when we first past the ballot initiative and really focused on statehood. We developed a sign on letter to where we could get organizations to join our efforts in support it and we struggled to get to fifty one organizations fifty one scottish a big thing around here. It's one of our favorite numbers so we pushed to get to there and it was a struggle to get fifty one organization signed off just before the recent house vote. We submitted another letter and it had two hundred seven organizations including some of the largest political organizations coach. We see public support going from thirty four to fifty four percent of the last five years we obscene our cosponsor was. We almost a fireworks. Got one hundred four sponsors the first time we've now passed the bill through the house the first time and the second time in history hasn't happened in two hundred years. We set a goal. Last year of forty cosponsors may hit twenty two when out forty five in the senate and so the trajectory is our direction et grew in orange county california and spent it fair bit a time at the beach and i have often said you can have a really great surfer. But if you don't have the waves and the atmosphere and the win all of the right moment all right time you're not gonna make it to the end and i feel like we're at a point where those things camel on. There's a lot of work still. There's a lot of effort. We need to put forth stuff like this is super helpful. But i think we've got the shot and we've ever had. Well you give me hope. Bow and please call on me if i could be of service to you and dc vote. I really appreciate you being a part of the podcast and sharing your expertise with my listeners. Ventures and much for others. I now yield five minutes to the gentle lady from the district of columbia the author of this bill and moment in history. The great eleanor. holmes norton. Five minutes gentleman is recognized for five minutes. Thank you mr speaker. And i find my good friend. The gentle lady for her leadership on this dc statehood bill congress has both a moral obligation and the constitutional authority passed. Hr fifty one. This country was founded on the principles of no taxation without representation and consent of the governed but dc residents are taxed with representation and cannot consent to the laws under which they as american citizens must live. Okay make no mistake. The republican party opposes statehood for dc solely because they fear giving equal representation to the residents of the nation's capital will be a political nightmare for them. Their entire argument rests on keeping nearly a million people. A million mostly black and brown people out of the national political dialogue because they fear it will hurt their majorities heaven forbid they changed their policies to better reflect the will and needs of these people. Why do that when you could just ignore them. That's what dc statehood is about. It's about telling the government they can't simply ignore hundreds of thousands of residents in the shadow of the capitol building. It's that simple. If congress truly holds to the self evident ideal that all people are created equal then it must allow those people to have equal representation in our government. I mean why are they so afraid. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by alyssa milano. Our associate producer has been jackson. Editing and engineering. By natasha's jake guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and that's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word sorry..

josh cooke jamie raskin twitter alyssa milano facebook today twenty three years one hundred twenty two second time Five minutes spotify forty five five minutes fifty four percent hundreds of thousands first time Today Ellison thirteen colonies
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:23 min | 6 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"F. kennedy reason brock obama the super charismatic savior parents shared not only an improbable love. They shared an abiding faith in the possibilities of this nation. I stand here knowing that my story is part of the larger american story that i own a debt to all of those who came before me and that in no other country on earth is my story. He was a good man but he needed the support of a lotta people and a lot of people who are willing to speak up and do things that they hadn't done before and get gauge politically and why they haven't done before and people around the world saw that and that gave them a lot of hope that it wasn't as joe biden one on election day. Was those americans. That's a nice sentiment. I like it in your dream outcome. What actions do we as americans take today. That will shape who we become in the future and to you. What does that future look like working backwards. The future that we want is a multi-racial multi-ethnic democracy in which all people are treated equally that is capable of solving big problems like dealing with climate change like give people opportunity. That's what we want to. How do we get there. can people do. I mean first of all. I think people can get involved in any way. Some people will run for office. Some people will volunteer and campaigns but some people will just make their piece of their community. More just an inclusive or some people who have a voice will use it from time to time to speak out on on things. What i found around the world is a sense of local grassroots building. Up that's when opposition movement succeed in again. That doesn't mean that everybody has to call you. Remember congress every day. Although people should do that sometimes it means just like caring about what's happening your community and being activated because if people are activated like i said if everybody in this country voted also like the elections. Were not be close at all if you look at what people actually leaving so my ask and hope for people to believe in the reality of what i talk about. When i talk about a multi-racial multi-ethnic democracy that can solve problems and recognize it. You have agency on that every choice you make everything you do not just the political ones but even just how you go about navigating communities can be in service of that goal but once you succumb to cynicism or apathy or something worth it. That's just holding the door open to january six mob. And it's what they want. What gives you hope. One hundred percent just people you remember when we were those young people ben. I know we were the people that older people talked about. Yeah i do. I mean obviously you were part of my life as a young person and then i was on that away. How are we talking. I feel bad about that too by the way we got everybody's hopes up wait campaign. Obama said something to me that i put in the book to calm me down a bit. He's like displays that every generation a version of this right the same competition stories who we are whether young people get involved on the stakes are particularly high now but they've been really high before they were high in the civil rights movement there high two. Certainly they're hiring the cold war so i think we can all chill out and let ourselves huck a little bit to say we're just watching version of the same conflicts play every generation. This is just the flavor of it now. But i'll tell you what has changed because people talk about the downsides of globalisation. Right people lost a sense of identity. I talked about these things earlier. The kind of positive side into sound like a globalist but you go to hong kong utah young people from russia. You talk to young people from hungary you talk to young people from india brazil. They have a lot more in common with each other than they do with aging supremacists. That's not to say there aren't some young people who take that path to but gives me hope is that i think that young people naturally but this generation in particular understand the stakes and understand that they have agency and that they don't put up with this shit. I mean that's why. Greta thornberg is a more eloquent spokesperson on the climate than anyone. Who could be. Who's over the age of twenty one. Because she can look the older generation. Be like just you guys are fucking it up and we're not gonna put up with that anymore and i think that mentality you see that all over the world now it's true and you see it in every issue. These citizen activists set rise to the top. Ben rhodes you give me hope. So thank you for all you do. And for being a part of the podcast. And i really loved her book as the seeds of world war. Two were starting to grow sinclair lewis. Imagine a fictional future in which america to could fairly easy to fascism. He wrote of the politician rose to the presidency but promising. The nation great economic reform a return to traditional patriotic values. He was a politician vowed to save the country from welfare for sex crime liberal media. And you know what you're thinking but this really was all in lewis's book it can happen here which was written eighty years ago and which ends with the president all but ending democracy in favor of an authoritarian regime zone. It was meant to be a warning. Just how fragile. American democracy may be when you take responsibility for being the leader of the world. You have to take responsibilities for your failures to lead. America has failed spectacularly in many of the ways we lead over the last several decades. We have enabled dictators and then gone to war with them. We've provided military aid to nations. Which went on to use military force civilians. We've propped up authoritarians because it was politically advantageous to do. So it's no wonder. Those chickens came home to roost. We've seen the tactics. We deployed globally. Take root here at home. And it's destroying us. We need to root out authoritarianism. Wherever we find it in our nation we need to take this opportunity to redefine what it means to be american. We need to be a better people with a kinder take on the wound. If we are to lead abroad we need to leave at home if not. We don't deserve to leave at sorry. Not sorry is executive produced by alyssum milano. That's me our associate producer. Has been jackson editing and engineering by natasha. Jacobs guts and music by josh cooke. Alicia eagle and milo locally. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Greta thornberg Obama josh cooke russia Alicia eagle congress natasha hong kong eighty years ago obama spotify hungary alyssum milano America milo Ben rhodes Two One hundred percent twenty one india brazil
Italian cable car plunges to the ground, killing at least 9

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Italian cable car plunges to the ground, killing at least 9

"Authorities say a cable car taking visitors to mountain top view of some of northern Italy's most picturesque lakes has plunged to the ground killing at least nine people and sending two children to the hospital a photo of the wreckage taken by this fire department show the crushed and crumbled remains of the cable car in the clearing of a thick patch of pine trees near the summit of the Motorola peak overlooking lake majora the course hasn't been determined Milano to that the cable line had been renovated in two thousand sixteen and had only recently re opened after coronavirus lockdowns forced the closure of ski lifts across Italy I'm sorry I shockingly

Italy Motorola Milano
"milano" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

02:28 min | 7 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"I <Speech_Music_Female> don't <SpeakerChange> really know <Speech_Female> that. I'm <Speech_Female> the type of person that <Speech_Female> could ever just be like. <Speech_Female> Okay yeah i've <Speech_Female> i've done <Speech_Music_Female> it a feeling <Speech_Female> success <Speech_Female> at this point my <Speech_Female> life right you <Speech_Female> you know. I think that <Speech_Female> there's always <Speech_Female> actually oddly <Speech_Female> enough just having this conversation <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> my a <Speech_Female> very very kind <Speech_Female> therapist the other <Silence> <Advertisement> day and he was like <Speech_Female> you know. <Speech_Music_Female> I think it's okay <Speech_Female> if you look around. <Speech_Female> And just appreciate <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the victories <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And i was like. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Oh yeah. I guess <Silence> <Advertisement> i can do that. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> It <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> doesn't feel like i <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> can do that because <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> it feels like. There's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> always <SpeakerChange> worked <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> be done. <Silence> But <Speech_Female> you know. <Speech_Female> I think that <Speech_Female> that we're we <Speech_Female> all find fulfillment <Speech_Female> in different <Silence> ways <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> we all find hope <Speech_Female> from different places <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> most <Silence> of my hope <Speech_Female> comes <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> You know from <Silence> my my <SpeakerChange> children <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> They give <Speech_Female> me a lot of hope <Speech_Female> that the <Speech_Female> way in which they <Speech_Female> see the <SpeakerChange> world <Speech_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Teaches me <Silence> really <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Almost daily <Speech_Female> the things that <Speech_Female> they say the things <Speech_Female> that they are able <Speech_Female> to comprehend <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Is is <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> to me. Also have this <Speech_Female> way of breaking <Speech_Female> down. These <Speech_Female> things that i think <Speech_Female> are such massive issues <Speech_Female> too <SpeakerChange> just <Speech_Female> the simplest <Speech_Female> form which is <Speech_Female> like we need to be good to <Silence> each other. You <Speech_Female> know <Speech_Female> So yeah so. <Speech_Female> I get i get a <Silence> <Advertisement> lot of hope for my kids <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and <Silence> i'm hopeful <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Female> things like this conversation <Silence> gives me hope <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> know the fact that we're <Speech_Female> hit saying things out <Silence> <Advertisement> loud <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Music_Male> gives me hope when my sister thank <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> The this was <Speech_Male> a hopeful <Speech_Male> very hopeful conversation. <Silence> And <Speech_Male> thank <Speech_Male> you for <SpeakerChange> being our <Speech_Female> guest today. <Speech_Female> Of course <Speech_Female> they always my. It was my <Speech_Female> absolute honor <Speech_Female> and privilege <Speech_Female> and thank you for <Speech_Female> having me <SpeakerChange> and giving <Silence> me the opportunity. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Thanks <Speech_Female> sharing your mic <Speech_Female> with me. <Speech_Male> Yes <SpeakerChange> come <Speech_Male> on my podcast. <Speech_Male> Yes yes that's <Speech_Male> got so again that's <Speech_Male> a that's a done <Speech_Male> deal but okay <Speech_Male> thank. <Speech_Male> You could ask hard <Speech_Male> and fun questions <Speech_Female> although sounds <Speech_Female> good and you know what <Speech_Female> call on me if <Speech_Female> i can ever <SpeakerChange> be of service <Speech_Male> to you <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but i think i think <Speech_Male> we're gonna <SpeakerChange> need a <Speech_Male> lot of us to come together <Speech_Male> to be successful. <Speech_Male> Well i'm <Speech_Male> right by your <SpeakerChange> side. <Speech_Male> Thank you my sister. <Speech_Male> That's that's <Silence> our guest today. <Speech_Male> She is <Speech_Male> actress and activist <Speech_Male> list milano. <Speech_Male>

today milano Speech_Male
Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:04 min | 7 months ago

Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

"Christian. I'm really glad that you're here. Because it feels like. We are at a precipice in america right now. Where one misstep will send us plummeting into generations of racial hate and violence. And i think it is so very important to understand how people enter hate groups and white supremacist organizations so in order to get a better understanding. Can you tell us a little bit about your story in particular. Yeah thanks for having me. It's an honor to be here but it's also a privilege. I want to acknowledge that. Oftentimes people that look like me Second chances and we still live in world. Where black and brown folks aren't getting even first chances many cases so i wanted to point that out too. But thanks for having me. I was recruited at nineteen eighty-seven was fourteen years. Old into america's first neo nazi skinhead group. I spent eight years as a member of that. Until i was almost twenty three years old but before that the take a step further. I wasn't raised to be a racist. My parents are italian. Immigrants who came to the united states in the mid nineteen sixties and. When they came over they were often the victims of prejudice. They also had friends from all over the world different religions and backgrounds and it was always exposed to that so it wasn't a matter of my parents rearing that in me but because my parents are telling immigrants they also had to work extremely hard when it came over and they started a small business. They were gone seven days a week sometimes fourteen or sixteen hours a day so i didn't really see them a lot and i knew that they loved me. I was surrounded by a lot of love grandparents. Aunts and uncles. But i never saw my parents and i always wondered where they were and why they weren't around than it always came back to. Maybe i wasn't good enough. So i never really voiced that so i went looking for that elsewhere looking for that sense of family and when i was fourteen years old in nineteen eighty seven. I was standing in an alley and was smoking joint and a guy with shaped head came up to me and it was eighty seven so nobody really knew what skinhead was. I certainly and this guy walked up to me. And he pulled the joint from my mouth and he looked me in the eyes and he said that's what the communists and jews want to keep dessel

America Dessel
What's the problem with the EU vaccine rollout?

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:17 min | 9 months ago

What's the problem with the EU vaccine rollout?

"Eu has exported almost thirty five million doses of the coronavirus vaccine to nations such as canada mexico japan and saudi arabia. It's led to questions being raised about. Why so many doses of being exported while there remains an acute shortage of people in the block and claims of emerge that not. Everybody is being generous. The suggestion that outside the e u the uk and now perhaps even the us could be unnecessarily with stocks of the vaccine well to discuss this latest development in vaccine diplomacy. I'm joined by matina. Stevis gridneff brussels correspondent for the new york times covering the european union. Good morning tina morning. So just tell us. What is this argument or boiling down to in terms of the exporting of e you vaccines when countries such as france italy germany as saying where it our share it's really become a politically toxic situation in the european union which has had a an underwhelming to be polite rollout of the vaccine the eu was a few weeks behind the us and the uk in striking agreements with pharmaceuticals that wasn't catastrophic. But what's really bedevil. The rollout has been made supply shocks of vaccines Due to problems with production by the pharmaceutical companies in particular in the first quarter of this year that's really set things back and europeans have watched. Americans israelis british people just race past them In terms of getting vaccinated just as an indication six and a half percent of european union nationals have received at least one dose of the bow of a vaccine contrast that about a third of brits at eighteen percent of americans so it really stinks at the same time. They has come under criticism for vaccine nationalism for curbing experts in particular when Last week at stopped small shipment of astrazeneca vaccine to what are stories revealed is that in fact the eu has consistently been at the top of the a game of vaccines in the word. It'll as you said. Nearly thirty five million doses. Since february first so that's raising questions in the eu why we not forcing the pharmaceuticals to keep those doses here since they're not making hole on their promises for what they should be distributing to the e year where. It's a decision being made here. Is it astra zeneca or saying. We don't have enough supply that's been reported or is it a decision by the european union itself to make sure that it is seen right around the world as being generous. I don't think this is about generosity. I think the eu we all have to remember is primarily a free trade block and once aspires to be a global powerhouse of of exports It would be catastrophic. They think to their reputation to stop. In any large numbers such exports at the same time it would also be self-defeating in the long run because the global supply chain for the components to make vaccines is incredibly diffuse the easier based manufacturers just depend on certain many countries around the world to source the materials that go into making the vaccines so really initiating global trade war over the vaccines is not smart for anyone the unified one else but tell that to the europeans who are dying to get back to life to get back to work and can't initially. I mean we have reports today in germany saying that they have a big problem that they're going to surge speaking to friends in italy there. Yes yesterday in milano. Saying we're just about to go back into lockdown. If we're not careful so this is a genuine problem is possibly creating a more longer term. Trust issue when it comes to european people looking at what the e u is supposed to have done for them to protect them in a way that many a single the uk is doing without any problems outside the european union. Well the issue here is an again. It's just this whole topic is incredibly complex. The issue here is first of all this. The problems of the eu faces with a slow rollout are not just down to supply while germany complains very rightly. so it's in fact performing worse than many poorer. Eu countries in his rollout out is not is also the fact that they're doing a bad job logistically getting those vaccines out to their people on the ground. There's nothing really to do with the your. And were the with regards to what the u k and indeed as we're finding out today from reporting from my colleagues in america the united states are doing is well not stopping exports of the vaccines. They are effectively telling the companies. Well you need to keep those vaccines in our countries because we have bought them up. Which means that in terms of making sure that those vaccines are also getting to other countries. They're potentially can be criticized that they're not doing their fair. Share in particular in the case of the united states which is a massive manufacturer vaccines and exports virtually zero. As far as we know so

EU Matina Stevis Gridneff Astrazeneca UK Germany Saudi Arabia United States Italy Tina The New York Times Mexico Japan Canada France Milano
Serie A Race Tightens

ESPN FC

03:04 min | 11 months ago

Serie A Race Tightens

"We saw in italy where a c milan are windsor. Champions at the halfway stage in syria they are top of the table. Two points clear of into despite the fines. They lost three now at home against atalanta. Insecurity manage a nil nil draw. Meanwhile away against 'euthanazi and romo a seven goal thriller against four three moving them up to third in the table. It's welcoming shall we shoot robson show robot. Let's start with milan against atalanta talk about impressive. The visitors are brilliant. That difficult i ten or fifteen minutes but once they start planning football and they get illegit you vote and he kept on coming in off of that right hand side onto his left. The patter led the line brilliantly. Froylan back in midfield ghosts down one side patty board down the other three centre backs defended really well as well as i've seen the defend for quite some well they dominated the game. I mean thrown in midfield kept on making challenges and milan could get into their front plays enough. So he was at the game for long periods the young plas- planning behind him and mehta and on the other side castillejo. They couldn't get involved in the game for once able to dominate midfield so brilliant performance by its atlanta and now the informed seem at the moment and if they depict their best side against tonight as a earlier on earlier this week and last week they would be right up with the front runners of course is at the moment who are the front runners. I it's interesting is this same regressing to the mean slightly robots. Yes they're a good side but not a great side you know when you go abraham of issues who's thirty nine and he's Lead the line. The three young players played in behind on several different occasions came on on. He's going to be quite good enough to take them to the next level. Amac is got saints off last week. And he's quite good enough at the moment guests. The good game in midweek against calgary didn't play whatsoever today. May you make these Food first full appearance didn't really impress. So they're they're aside. That can improve. But let's do what some young players that needs to improve quickly to narnia didn't think dominated the midfield. And that's what kissy had a problem today. Impressive milano after that defeat which not forget. It was their first domestic defeat against events as they bounced by. Didn't they they got the win. Against torino gonna win against cavalry as well so after this defeat robbo you would be hoping for the same sort of mentality going forward. You think they can get themselves together. They can regroup because it's against the small teams in which they've picked up those crucial points this season. I need some of that players. Back the nia challinor who need right. But you wanted to substitute. He'll you him back. The got manzu kitchen now to help out ibrahimovic if he if he needs to be swapped any point so i think they've got the mentality pill has done a really good job mentally with them. He's a good coach as well. They got the you know exactly what they're trying to do but he's also got them on that even kill so when they lose games they don't panic too much. They come back again. So i think they'll they'll certainly putting performances but i still don't think they're quite good enough to win syria

Milan Euthanazi Castillejo Atalanta Romo Robson Windsor Syria Mehta Italy Football Atlanta Abraham Nia Challinor Calgary Milano Robbo
"milano" Discussed on eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"milano" Discussed on eCommerce Fastlane - Shopify - Shopify Plus - E-Commerce - Ecommerce Business

"From that experience until we see on average about a two three percent repeat purchase rate which is phenomenal. You think of high brands being able to scale that repeat purchase rate driving up is crucial to your long-term growth trajectory. So that's an important metric track a lot and then on average we see about We we this is a metric. That i love. It's it's we track it on a per-share basis. How much revenue does merchant drive per shipment. They tracked through milano and that number is ninety seven cents so you think merchant that that shipping ten thousand orders. They're driving about ten grand and repeat revenue each month. So the revenue per shipping. Because i know tracked. I'm average average revenue per store visitor. And so that's interesting metric. But you're doing average revenue per shipments using ninety seven cents. Almost a dollar for every transaction in increased revenue because of a malome all activated post purchase experience. That's exactly right. Those are compelling numbers. I mean you're making it sound like it's a no brainer to like really for those that are not are. Don't have a great post purchase experiencing an end based on the show aired learning that. Wow okay this is. Quantifiable like to the c. Suite that like we could you know on average of generating extra dollar order increased revenue lt. That's just that's amazing. it's mine going honestly like we. We didn't even expect these types of results. We kind of thought. Well we think the like really broad strokes assumptions. Here's what we think's going to happen when we implemented it like brand after brand it was just like. Oh my gosh. There's dislike earned money just sitting on the table and if merchants can just activate this channel like they cannot walk a flood of rookie revel so. Let's talk about the those entrepreneurs that are listening today. And i do have a very diverse range each week. I have also some people that are in the. We'll have an started. Some people listening like that today. There's also people that Do have product market fit there on shop fi..

milano
Real Madrid Cruise Past Inter

ESPN FC

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Real Madrid Cruise Past Inter

"Allie moreno joins us alley weeping harsh real madrid and rightly so but they pulled a performance. I when it was needed today yet. They did and even before the red card happened. I thought that the we're far better than inter Deploying to where you just saw full control through the with grows and moderate and then look at rutgers helping defensively other guards serving us to link and even have to sometimes drifting inside and you just saw team that was fooling controlled through the middle area of the field in doing that Enter just been having sort of said. They didn't have any sort of connection to martinez or luke outcome for a long time in the first half even at breda to read you read build the momentum building momentum really caring the procession really carrying the pace of the game and enter was merely reacting to that. I thought it was a flat performance when you need a little bit of life and energy and urgency for inter he just. Wasn't there a little bit of life early on in the second half and that was about it appear team and they were the two point here. And what was wrong with said today vega question. Obviously it was not enough to put real madrid in into any danger and The control the game from the beginning on after the the red card of and Yacht it they look the whole game like the the certain winner. It comes in a very delicate moment right now for for my team because obviously in a championship in almost area league. they're fighting railway through. They haven't taken on a rhythm yet and the expectations are very very high in milano. The people the adobe they expect they expect a championship winning the title ahead of uber. Because that's filed too long since it happened the last time and they were expecting big things from the champions league so now it looks really kind of ugly if they can go through in the champions league and and create only more uncertainty around around into milan right now

Allie Moreno Madrid Rutgers Martinez Vega Milano Adobe Champions League Milan
We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:00 min | 1 year ago

We Gather Together - Creating an American Thanksgiving with Denise Kiernan

"So denise. I want to start by asking you to cover the early history of thanksgiving were all taught. From a very early age that the pilgrims landed in plymouth and shared a feast with the native americans living in the area. How close is that accurate. What's so interesting about thanksgiving as we celebrated versus thanksgiving as it has been on this planet for much longer. I'm always fascinated about how traditions and practices evolved the concept of gratitude and giving thanks has been around basically as long as humans have walked the earth. The word thanksgiving and even the practice of thanksgiving has been around for centuries before even conception of the united states of america. Yes the pilgrim's did land at plymouth. Yes the pilgrim's did have a meal with the woman. Og indians was. That proclaimed a thanksgiving now. When thanksgiving became a federal holiday in the united states of america was that event singled out as the reason for establishing that holiday. Now i want to be clear. I am not putting anything out there. That other people haven't said for a while and what's really interesting. I think is that every year. You'll see these. Hey here's the real. This part of thanksgiving and i think part of the reason. Is we tell these stories. We tell this. Essentially two kids in school and then later on when they get into high school or college or whatever we don't necessarily re contextualised and give them the full story so every year it's almost necessary that we keep trotting these things out and contextualisation of history is so important to really kind of look at everything that went into a particular event and thanksgiving again. Like i said you know. I am not the first person to come out. And say yeah. That's not exactly how it happened. But what i'm interested in. And what was one of the linchpins at making me want to do. The book we gather together was the ageless. Timeless concept gratitude view stevens. I'm and author here in madison wisconsin. And i'm thankful for men. Women working press in use of the people. The you don't have a great thanksgiving. There is an alternate true factual story about thanksgiving and gratitude and harvest festivals. And all of those things. And how. The actual holiday came to be in america and evolve and erica so i thought was an alternate entry and wouldn't that be fun and i'm interested. How thanksgiving celebrations changed in the seventeenth and eighteenth century. So a lot of what thanksgiving is rule out of things like harvest festivals. Which again go way. Way back thanksgiving's were often religious practices in various parts of the world. You would set aside a day sometimes for fasting and humiliation as they would say to give thanks for could be particular event. When i was working on we gather together. I came across some really interesting articles including some archives from the atoms stanley. john adams. John quincy adams. Abigail adams and john adams writes in his diary thanksgiving for the repeal of the stamp act. So like that was something. You would have a thanksgiving for declare thanksgiving for thanksgiving's for various wins in battle or days of general thanksgiving or like. I said fasting and humiliation so those sorts of advance existed outside of north america. What we now consider the continental united states they existing europe and those traditions were obviously brought over when people came over but the concept of having days set aside for saying thank. You is something that goes back a very very long time. Tell us about. Sarah josefa so sarah of a hail was so compelling to me because she was a young woman born in the early nineteenth century actually of the eighteenth century. She had no formal schooling but her parents instilled in her a deep deep love of reading and learning and she was obsessed with the written word. She married a man who shared her love of all these things. They used to have study hour together in the evenings. She lost him fairly early on in their marriage and so she was a widowed mother of five children and because of her desire to write ended up becoming one of the most influential editors in the nineteenth century. She edited to popular women's magazines. The american ladies magazine and then go. Jeez ladies magazine which was one of the most popular magazines in the nineteenth century. And just to be able to do that to me whether thing but what really moved me about her was that she had all of these things that she needed not wanted but like needed to do for herself and her children but she still found time to raise money for people who have less than she did and to bring people's attention to causes she thought worthy and her ten city was just. I mean seriously. I was interviewing her thinking good. What have i been doing with my time. You know how i feel like. I'm talking to her. You know when. I am interviewing her. I'm looking at what she wrote. I'm looking at what she was quoted as saying. I'm looking at the book she put out. I'm looking at the end. Policies that she curated

United States Plymouth Women Working Press John Adams Denise Sarah Josefa Abigail Adams Stevens John Quincy Adams Erica Madison Wisconsin Stanley American Ladies North America Sarah Europe
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Thanks for being here. . So so be tell us about promised the polls, , what it's all about and what promised polls doing in the weeks leading up to the elect show prometheus polls is a youth led civic engagement event meant to take back twenty twenty, , and we're doing this through a series of social media challenges and different fund ways for young people and adults to get involved and make the voting process. . Exciting. . We lost our promise graduation. . We lost so many things due to the pandemic and we're GONNA, take , that back with prompt the polls we are creating excitement around voting through the challenge. . Hashtag proposals and Hashtag address up to vote. Those . are the two main things that we're working on now and all the way up until the election. . So the first one we're using the HASHTAG proposals is challenging someone to go to the polls if you or to vote by mail with you, , and we're doing this to create a big wave of youth voters and to get so many more people engaged to wouldn't have before. . So if I challenged my friend to vote and they vote with made than they challenged someone else I'm reaching so many more people than if I just voted alone so. You . may ask what is a puzzle so a proposal similarly to proposals in highschool for problems or forms <hes>, , it is asking someone to go out with you. . So in our case, , we're asking people to come with us to the polls or to just vote with us from the comfort of our own home. . The other aspect of this is dressing up to vote. . So we're using the HASHTAG dress up to vote, , and if you participate in any of these challenges, which , we really encourage you all to do make sure to use the Hashtag online. . So we can spread the word and share the. . Content that you're creating but dress up to vote is exactly what it sounds like. . It's putting on prom or formal attire and either going to the polling place or walking to your mailbox or going to a dropbox to cast your ballot. . But making sure that you're voting in style and just making voting fun and exciting for everyone and up until the election will be participating and we have some really interesting people and Super Cool influencers who are participating, , but it really comes down to the youth and the population participating everyday people getting out getting excited about voting and participating in these different challenges. . Tell us a bit about how promised the poll started promised. . The polls began when you actually introduced the five of us and put us in kind of a think tank room and we all are really passionate about getting out the youth vote and making sure that every young person in this country knows that their vote matters and that their voice matters and we wanted to come up with a fun and creative way to inspire young people to go to the polls to vote and make their voice heard on election day. . Nicole Brown celebrities are really stepping forward. . So just one quick word of encouragement. . Please encourage other folks to get involved in their platforms the way you are. . I WANNA say that first of all is not lost there is still time there's eighteen days as a young man named Jerome, , Foster, , the second who created prompt the polls. . That's the thing we joked about at the beginning he's trying to encourage young people to enjoy their senior year at the polls. So . find somebody you WANNA, , take to the polls and and shout them out and shoot your shot, , and then just encourage people to find different interesting Korean of ways to go and make a different voice matters use it out of the first meeting after you connected us we came up with this idea and ever since then have been meeting daily to pull it off and make it happen. . Where can people find out more information? ? We have a website promised the polls, , dot com but most of our information at all of our content is on all of our social media platform. . So twitter instagram tech, , pock facebook you can go there and we'll be posting some super cool content from now until election day on the various platforms and you can find more ways to get involved. . They're amazing. . And Matthew. . What do you think is the goal for promised the polls what do you hope that promised the polls will accomplish I. . Think we succeeded if we have even just one person vote in planning on voting before obviously the goal is a lot bigger than that. . But at the end of the day when we sit out to start the prompted the Bulls project, , you said to results what do We want to accomplish how do we WANNA help and how do we think the country needs to change and one of the big things that we talked about that the vote isn't being considered enough is being cared about enough and there's people in the country in our generation that are voting. . So we thought let's take that opportunity. . Let's take that situation and make it something fun. . Make it something. . that. . They can enjoy but also make it something that they're going to participate in for the next. . However many years they want to see you know really at the end of the day the goal is if we get as many people voting as possible that haven't voted before as many people involved in the political process that weren't involved before and there's many people interested that weren't interested before we've succeeded. .

Matthew Weinstein Randy Garcia Jerome Foster Sophia twenty twenty Watson Nicole Brown Santiago Meyer Jay Netflix Travis twitter California Bulls DNC Shapiro R. N.
Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Prom at the Polls - Young Voters Taking Charge

"Thanks for being here. So so be tell us about promised the polls, what it's all about and what promised polls doing in the weeks leading up to the elect show prometheus polls is a youth led civic engagement event meant to take back twenty twenty, and we're doing this through a series of social media challenges and different fund ways for young people and adults to get involved and make the voting process. Exciting. We lost our promise graduation. We lost so many things due to the pandemic and we're GONNA, take that back with prompt the polls we are creating excitement around voting through the challenge. Hashtag proposals and Hashtag address up to vote. Those are the two main things that we're working on now and all the way up until the election. So the first one we're using the HASHTAG proposals is challenging someone to go to the polls if you or to vote by mail with you, and we're doing this to create a big wave of youth voters and to get so many more people engaged to wouldn't have before. So if I challenged my friend to vote and they vote with made than they challenged someone else I'm reaching so many more people than if I just voted alone so. You may ask what is a puzzle so a proposal similarly to proposals in highschool for problems or forms it is asking someone to go out with you. So in our case, we're asking people to come with us to the polls or to just vote with us from the comfort of our own home. The other aspect of this is dressing up to vote. So we're using the HASHTAG dress up to vote, and if you participate in any of these challenges, which we really encourage you all to do make sure to use the Hashtag online. So we can spread the word and share the. Content that you're creating but dress up to vote is exactly what it sounds like. It's putting on prom or formal attire and either going to the polling place or walking to your mailbox or going to a dropbox to cast your ballot. But making sure that you're voting in style and just making voting fun and exciting for everyone and up until the election will be participating and we have some really interesting people and Super Cool influencers who are participating, but it really comes down to the youth and the population participating everyday people getting out getting excited about voting and participating in these different challenges. Tell us a bit about how promised the poll started promised. The polls began when you actually introduced the five of us and put us in kind of a think tank room and we all are really passionate about getting out the youth vote and making sure that every young person in this country knows that their vote matters and that their voice matters and we wanted to come up with a fun and creative way to inspire young people to go to the polls to vote and make their voice heard on election day. Nicole Brown celebrities are really stepping forward. So just one quick word of encouragement. Please encourage other folks to get involved in their platforms the way you are. I WANNA say that first of all is not lost there is still time there's eighteen days as a young man named Jerome, Foster, the second who created prompt the polls. That's the thing we joked about at the beginning he's trying to encourage young people to enjoy their senior year at the polls. So find somebody you WANNA, take to the polls and and shout them out and shoot your shot, and then just encourage people to find different interesting Korean of ways to go and make a different voice matters use it out of the first meeting after you connected us we came up with this idea and ever since then have been meeting daily to pull it off and make it happen. Where can people find out more information? We have a website promised the polls, dot com but most of our information at all of our content is on all of our social media platform. So twitter instagram tech, pock facebook you can go there and we'll be posting some super cool content from now until election day on the various platforms and you can find more ways to get involved. They're amazing. And Matthew. What do you think is the goal for promised the polls what do you hope that promised the polls will accomplish I. Think we succeeded if we have even just one person vote in planning on voting before obviously the goal is a lot bigger than that. But at the end of the day when we sit out to start the prompted the Bulls project, you said to results what do We want to accomplish how do we WANNA help and how do we think the country needs to change and one of the big things that we talked about that the vote isn't being considered enough is being cared about enough and there's people in the country in our generation that are voting. So we thought let's take that opportunity. Let's take that situation and make it something fun. Make it something. that. They can enjoy but also make it something that they're going to participate in for the next. However many years they want to see you know really at the end of the day the goal is if we get as many people voting as possible that haven't voted before as many people involved in the political process that weren't involved before and there's many people interested that weren't interested before we've succeeded.

Nicole Brown Twitter Bulls Matthew Jerome Foster
Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:12 min | 1 year ago

Bringing Democracy to the People With Amanda Litman

"So Amanda Run was founded on the day of trump's inauguration. So tell me a little bit about the organization and why you founded it. So I worked for Hillary's for two years before that for President Obama for the Florida Governor's race in for nonprofit and between the week after election day I, got a facebook message from somebody I went to college with Hey Amanda. You've worked in politics. You know this world I. Want to run for office because of trump president seems like anybody can do this. What do I do and I did? Not have an answer for him. I did not know what to tell him to go. He wanted to be more than just a volunteer and more than just voter. If he wanted to actually lead, there was nowhere that would be guaranteed to take this call. So I reached out to a whole bunch of people. One of whom became my co-founder that's incredible operative, Dross Morales for Cudjoe we wrote a plan we built a website and me launch run for something. As you said on inauguration day we thought we'd got maybe a hundred people who wanted to run for local office instead in the first week, we had a thousand as of today we're up. To more than fifty one, thousand young people across the country who've raised their hands just say I want to run for local office what next so we've built an organization that does best that we find more people who wanna run things like School Board City Council and state legislature and we help them through the process I think it's so cool and one of the things I love so much about run for something is that you proudly self identify as progressive and that you came from the Obama and DNC campaigns and I, think there is this kind of lake mistaken belief that you can't be progressive and be a traditional. Democrat. So what are your? Thoughts on that lay that out for US unpack that a little bit. How does it work for us? I think we define Progressive Democrat really broadly, we look for a set of shared values shared belief that everybody deserves access to affordable healthcare that everybody's sort of access to education that we need to fight for working families that we need to protect organized labor that we need to protect it and for the environment, and we can share those goals and disagree on the tactics that we need to accomplish them. But the only way we get to really implement those tactics or even have a starting place to decide a meme is to win elections. I. So, for us a Democrat or progressive in New York might look a little different than Democrat in Vienna right. But we gotta be willing to win everywhere to run everywhere on our set of shared values and we also know that for most people especially for local elections. Partisan identification is the way they make their voting decision they look at the ballot and they say, this one's a democrat. Cool. That's all I know about them. So for us, right really important to support people running under that party line knowing that that's the way the most voters make up their minds. It's so smart and it makes so much sense because every district of restate the. Issues are different and I think people forget that when we live in these big cities that when you look at some place, a state that isn't sort of a metropolitan city, you get such tunnel vision about what the issues are in the context of your life that you forget that it could be different in the context of someone else's life and especially because what we only work on local elections. So Library School Board, Water Board, University Board and Community College Boards and Yes State House and State Senate. The issues that you're focusing at these levels is often a little bit more but also a lot less partisan it how keeping water clean how are We getting trash picked up are we funding our roads and our schools? The tangible delivery of those issues makes it so that what it means to be a progressive on them are things like my favorite example here we work for the Coroner Candida in Jefferson County. Colorado which factor more than thirteen hundred counties they'll elect corners he was reading on a progressive platform. The thing that he wanted to ensure was that after death trans people were not being this gendered, which was something that the current coroner was doing, and that is a really important thing because the way that gender is recorded on death certificates affects crime statistics and homicide statistics and suicide statistics. All of which are really important especially as they relate to a community that is disproportionately represented in things like suicide homicide. So as you think about what is the progressive value look like an issue like a coroner's office? That's one of the ways in which you can show up and it was a really interesting way to see the way that our values can trade themselves into progressive policies and all kinds of offices

President Obama United States Amanda Run Donald Trump Cudjoe Facebook Hillary President Trump Florida School Board City Council Jefferson County New York Yes State House Dross Morales Co-Founder Colorado DNC State Senate Vienna
Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Cassandra Speaks and the Power of Women as Storytellers with Elizabeth Lesser

"So Elizabeth let's talk a little bit about storytelling. Why is it so powerful? This is the way humans learn. We've always learned through story. I. Mean I often think about the first human sitting around the first fire kind of grunting pointing and telling stories about What's going on here? How did we get here? Where do we go? When we die? What do we do in between the way we learn the bestest through telling stories, making up stories to explain mysteries to create power structures. It's all done through stories I totally totally agree with you and I also think storytelling is the greatest tool when we're trying to change narratives but I do think that throughout history stories have mainly been told through the eyes of men do you agree? That's how our stories have generally been told. Well, I certainly do agree I've written a new book. That's all about that. I wrote it because I've led these conferences for years for women maybe about fifteen years ago I thought to myself why do I get so uncomfortable when I put the words women in power together women empower those even makes me uncomfortable and it certainly makes other people uncomfortable makes men. Really uncomfortable. I. Just thought why is that I wanNA gather women together whether they're in the arts or leadership or astronauts or any place where women are in that space and say, what do you think about power had a you feel about the word? Is there a way to do power differently and over all those years I heard from so many great women but I never got to the bottom of why Why did we get to this place where we trust ourselves? So little women why we're always apologizing and giving space to the more powerful and how do we get back and how did this happen? So I went back into the oldest stories I could find five appre bio Greeks, Chinese, the stories and elicit. It's just bizarre and amazing. How many of the earliest origin stories are about I to be created male second in creation female She's the first to sin, and that story is repeated over and over whether it's eve or Pandora or Cassandra or other tales we were born second, but we send I and there's a lot to unpack in that idea that women got blamed for a lot of the general problems of being human and that sticks to us stories, stick to humans. Created only by men are really stories about men. This is the problem with many of our origin tales hero's journey myths. And Foundational Literature left out of that Canon. Are the voices and the values and experiences and priorities of women. When women join the storytellers, the human story changes. You might think I don't read the Bible. I. Don't even know who Pandora is what, but it sticks to us and we're still run by those stories. And I think that also when you look back at how women have throughout history for as long as there is time been basically property of men and you think about how we are today and how those stories have evolved you know like I just learned recently that rape was always almost justified if it was someone who owned their woman whether that be through marriage whether that is the enslaved and so throughout history I don't think there's ever a time that we can look back to where true feminism has ever been even within our reach any country I think it's something that we strive for I think it's something that we understand the intersection -ality of an how really vital it is but I Don't think you can go back to a time where we were empowered. So my question to you is what changes when women become the storytellers we're seeing right now how hard it is to change narratives, Anna how much effort disruption it takes, I. Mean we're seeing it with white supremacy. Now, that story is being exploded in front of our eyes so that we can change it. You can't change something that you don't see.

Elizabeth Rape Foundational Literature Anna Canon
Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Children of Incarcerated Parents with Ebony Underwood

"Hi, my name is under would I'm fighting for the rights of children and young adults impacted by parental incarceration? Sorry Not Sorry Evans thank you so much for doing the podcast. I WANNA start by talking about your story your father has been in prison for more than three decades. Only. Right now they're still funny. Listen I'm GonNa play so you could hear. Paid. Call you. I'm happy charged for this call college from. Being, recorded for. Monitoring. Hold on I'm doing interview but I'm GonNa get into politics because he can talk they're. Sorry no don't be sorry at all I totally get it. You don't WanNa. Miss that phone call. Oh my God. You know why? Because the federal prison system is on lockdown this is the first time national lockdown and like twenty five years. been on lockdown. So the way that he called like we speak very frequently prior to Kobe, but since Calvin with whenever he calls so I can't miss his call. No of course, not especially when it's public health going on just he feel like he is being exposed in a way that makes him very vulnerable. He's sixty six years old. So he is part of what the CDC considers the most vulnerable population to cove is. We did look at. A time for y'all get it. There is an added touch desperation two calls coming out of jails and prisons. Around the country these days guys is called in it and there's no way to escape us. Oh This is what you see. Me noted I love you and you know. I mean at this hour Dabbagh Israel. Confinement. and social distancing are mostly incompatible. Sale. You have to basically figure out how are you going to just because a few feet down from you is another person. Learn scary for me every single day. I. Talked to him over the weekend. So that's why I was okay with letting my sister taught him because he didn't talk to him but I talked to him over the weekend and he shared with me that he actually was tested and he's negative thank God how do we keep him negative? I mean do they have any protocol whatsoever in place because from what we're hearing it's close quarters there's no masks there's no sanitation is that true? So this is what I know about federal institutions right there oldest. That's number one no error. He has been social distancing till the way that they've been doing it as separating people and allowing each group of people I think it's like ten people at a time. So they're like dorms and bunks, and so within his dorm, they allow the men to go out but because of his age he's like it just seems like there's too many people out and I'm a little tired but which is Kinda bad. Because every other day he gets the shower go commissary and like either email or call all within one hour the twenty three remaining hours he's shelter in place in a cell he basically on lockdown. So it's really heartbreaking sides calling his daughters is there anything that is giving him hope in this time the work that I've been doing tell me how old you were father was incarcerated. I don't actually say my age but I'll say this. I like that. Because of the issue that I'm talking about mainly but I was an adolescent young adolescent when my father was incarcerated and it completely devastated me completely I'm sure and that's such a hard age for a young woman anyway. Yeah. I was a young adult. So it was like thirteen fourteen years old when it occurred what effect did it have on you? I mean besides just being hard how did that manifest itself on your being on your heart? Right, so you know the stages of grief I would say most immediately. Just, Kinda give you an overview what happened. So my father was in the music industry he was a music manager promoter and publisher, and at the time of his arrest, he was like the pinnacle of his career like really doing well. So he traveled very often because he promoted records, he would often go to different states go to radio stations to promote different aren't because he couldn't go to everyone he worked for all different labels and so he promoted many different artists. From like Michael Jackson to like Kenny loggins well under yeah. It's a Ray Charles like all of people and so when he was arrested I guess my gut reaction was to just assume that he was on the road writings traveling because there are no real instructions for how this occurs. Right? I believe it was a coping mechanism. Yeah. Probably that is true it amazing how resilient we can become right after Moodley, and so for the first nine months, we act that way so. It's me and my sister, my sister we have the same mom and then I have two other brothers, an older brother and a younger brother and my younger brother was actually president when my father was arrested he was five years old and he was actually there hasn't of the whole arrest fathers in federal prison. So big like da you know these drug charges. Yeah. It was not good. So my sister and I weren't there and so we just kinda like to him being. On the road some of the first nine months we did not see him right and then he calls and he had been calling all along and now it's this new format calling receive a call and you hear this sweetness from a federal institution. Blah. Blah Blah and so okay, that's new. But whatever again Kinda put him in mind and just assuming that he's where he is but he says the US at that nine month part. Are you guys GonNa ever come visit me?

Wanna CDC Evans United States Dabbagh Israel Ray Charles Kobe Michael Jackson Kenny Loggins Moodley Publisher President Trump Calvin
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | 1 year ago

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Find the Helpers with Fred Guttenberg

"Hi My friend Fred I love you so much. Can you start please by reminding listeners of your story briefly tell us about who you were before Jamie was murdered and who you've become after. Was Murdered? It was just nothing more than your. Typical Dan of two kids to teach kids as a husband. Suburban lifestyle now. This week, that's the lifestyle community that was known to be super. And secure I also was rubber at a son. Who's going through the loss of mine? Her brother Michael From cancer related to service and. He died in October two, thousand seventeen. I want to thank Mr Collins Mr Naylor putting this together. But as I sit her today, I can't help but think. What an incredible metaphor. This room is. For the entire process. That getting healthcare and benefits for nine eleven. First responders has come to. ME. A filled room. Of nine eleven first responders. And in front of me. A, nearly empty congress. So, my wife took A. Forty. Two, thousand, eighteen. Months after my family's call to the loss of micro and as a family, we've never been through anything wiped out before this kind of significant loss we were fortunate. We just all were managing to live our lives and my brother's loss was the first. My parents had outlived their son and that's the worst thing that happened to her family. Right. It should have been the most overwhelming family ever experienced except four months. Later, my daughter was hard because I sent her to school I to school at fourteen to learn to be safe to laugh to be excited about coming home on Valentine's Day for the plan. I had set for life family and didn't work out that way shooter came into school at day my slide Jesse. Thank God I still get to. But J visitor cemetery and. As only, this kind of thing had harrison was the outlet. Grandparents should alain grandchildren. It. Stops inning for me and really understood the gravity of what happened. I went into this whole new life. I don't have the same life I had before and my wife actually became depended upon me. But upon the amazing people who I got to surround myself with WHO became a part of my life or who were already a if my life and I would emission and we're going to succeed we're going to change the. Politics of country we're going to pass on safety after November third every time I hear you till the story I feel like there is something a little bit more grounded in the way in which you tell your story, and I'm wondering if it is because you had this time to write this book and really reflect you've got a book coming called find the Helpers and before we get into that I, want to note The huge amount of praise. This book is already getting new have blurbs from members of Congress actors, activists, people from across the social and political spectrum, and they're all raving about it and I don't think in my life. I've seen such hype about a book even before it is released. So what do you think it is what do you think it is about finding the helpers that makes it so universally loved and also. Tell me about the process of writing it, and if it was Cathartic for you because I think we hear. So often people that tell stories an especially stories that are so close to your being your heart people always say you know it was Cathartic and it was their -Peutic for me to write. This is that how you felt writing it such a great question because this was not the case before Jamie was killed. Afterwards. Writing became my therapy in started doing social media. You know I became very prolific on twitter and I considered people twitter became force. My way of getting things out of me and those book just took to another level being able to sit down and think about all of the relationships what they meant to me about my daughter and what hurt lost means to me and others, and what my book really got to think about is people in a very different way because you hear the same things I hear people sock opticians, sock media. And I writing my book and I couldn't come to that conclusion any of these

Mr Naylor Jamie Congress Harrison Twitter Fred Mr Collins A. Forty Michael Jesse Alain
Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

Daily Pop

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Rose McGowan Claims Alyssa Milano Made the Charmed Set Toxic AF

"There's is daily top. We have so many feuds to talk about today starting with rose McGowan claim that a listen the Llano. made the charm set toxic A. Okay this whole thing started as a political view, but then it got very personal rose accused of throwing fits in front of the crew on the set of charmed rose even says she cried every ten shows renewed because a listen made the set. So toxic in a statement to news listen. Milano said hurt people hurt people commenting any further doesn't align with my wellness plan we have not yet heard back from rose or or Warner, brothers, which produced charm. So a lot to unpack here. Again, it started off very political was a Democrat argument but then rose went there why he thinks she went there to bring charm to behavior. Look, hold. One hundred percent and if we're fighting and I'm holding a grudge against somebody I'm pulling out every receipt I don't care it. One Thousand Nine, hundred, ninety, nine, hundred. This is an audit. We're going to have this fight whether you like it or not. I guess that's true and also she's trying to discredit a list right? That's her way of saying like you shouldn't. You can listen to. Elissa because she's not as relatable as you think because listen to this she may two hundred thousand dollars a week on charm and was still throwing right she didn't get paid enough. It's like a way to discredit. I don't know. That is also. To your argument, sometimes, people will buy into that and be like absolutely. You know what? She's right rose you. If she's FELICIA's really as bad as you say that I'm listed work she says, but then other people can see right through that to say like obviously you have a grudge obviously, you don't like her you've made that very clear. You said it in an interview you do not like or. Do we really trust your opinion because it's obviously very biased. I just feel like this has become somewhat sticky with rose like we can just expect her to just go off and sort of sale of these things and quite frankly does anybody really care twenty years later if the listen. Milano through set like threw a fit onset of charms like I just don't think that's relevant to the conversation like none of us were there. None of us really really cared that much about how she behaved obviously, you want to be respectful to the crew and people that work really hard. To put on a production as we all know but we've all had bad days on this show I just feel like if in fifteen years, one of us were to be like well, she was impossible to deal with. It's like, okay. Then you should have said something then I feel like it's just so kind of in line with WHO rose is trying to be now and I'm not saying that she likes her and I'm not saying that she feels like she's credible or that she believes in anything she says. Every time someone says something that has nothing to do with you. That doesn't mean you need to go and jump in on it. And I, I hate to say this because I'm not away from everybody's experiences and I always say this you gotTa pick struggle and you've got to stick with that struggle and pick up a fight and fight as hard as you can. If you're fighting in the me too movement because it happened to you I totally get it. You're also writing because somebody was in a toxic work environment made something toxic fighting another break, and then what's next if something else comes up and you're fighting about that as well take you just take it away and makes it seem like you're only saying those things because. Of the week, right right and it's also like she made two, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a week like made that much money. It was a hit show like I don't I also don't see how that's relevant. You know what I mean like you don't need to also bring up how much somebody made I. Don't think that that's her pleasure bill, but I will say. It rose McGowan felt leg she made. made the workplace toxic that are that's her feelings. That's her way of engaging and listened with tolerance to her. She don't have to do it over the air. She can do on the phone and just throw rose a my dad if I if you thought that way and I did that to you but I, don't think. Anymore. I don't think. I'm. Giving that apology I'm sorry I. Think we know a lot of different people not everybody has a good day I. Think People think just because you're on television or you're part of ensemble cast like your life is so easy. It's a lot of hard work that goes into this. So maybe she maybe she had a bad week or month or whatever. But there's a lot of people that we've experienced that can be toxic or disruptive or difficult to deal with. But that's just sort of this part of this dysfunctional family you keep that within yourself. You don't need to go and spread around and the and the truth is like the whole point rose trying to make was was again a political argument and so politics you know just keep arguing your facts and I think that's a fair argument to have. We argue politics stop in this country. So if you want to argue that with Eliza and you guys want to go back and forth about what who vote for do that. But I say again as you guys said, keep the history out of it because honestly just makes your arguments. Lesson weaker. We aren't just there's no right word. Thank point.

Rose Mcgowan Milano Warner Elissa Llano. Eliza
Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

"I'm Senator Doug Jones from Alabama and here's the truth it all my work in the Senate I have your back and no one else. Sorry, not sorry first of all senator thank you so much for taking the time to do the podcast I would like to start by talking about Kobe nineteen and we're recording this in the middle of July. We knew in February and March, what needed to be done right now one hundred, thirty, eight, thousand people have died projections indicate more than two hundred, thousand people will die by November, cases are rising almost everywhere in the. Country especially in the South and the trump administration is just I don't know how else to say it, but he has just failing in every possible way in managing this pandemic. So what is your opinion? What should we be doing nationally and what should Alabama be doing to combat covert nineteen listen first of all, thanks for having me I really appreciate this opportunity to speak with you. It's good to talk to you. See you again. Let me tell you I think we have to do what I've said all along that we have to do and that is listened. To the healthcare experts listen to the healthcare experts that are the national voices like Dr, Fallacy and Dr Redfield and those that are on top of this, listen to your local healthcare professionals, listen to the statewide healthcare professionals and follow their advice. The problem that we have right now is that clearly we have a lack of leadership from the administration. We have not seen the kind of leadership that we should have from the very beginning of this administration was downplaying it, and then as I think the president realized that we had to shut the economy down which was. His Pride and joy Dan, he started to try to intimidate people too much to open the economy up. He was intimidating protesters in Michigan and elsewhere, and that had a ripple effect around the country. Then it was politicizing the wearing of masks as we learned more and more about this virus it became clear that we needed to wear masks, and then all of a sudden became a political issue. It's not as much anymore, but it's still in places a political issue, and now we're politicizing the opening schools schools. Do you think that Alabama was too quick to Rio Ben? I think we tried to accelerate. The process and I think you know From our standpoint that has had a negative impact on our progress and I think that's why we've regressed. And we've seen a three hundred percent increase. In cases month over month after going the first three weeks of this. At a forty percent club if people would listen to the healthcare professionals, follow the guidelines and understand the world had never seen this virus before like December nobody has the antibodies at that time. Nobody had the immunities and this is a work in progress. We are learning more and more and more about this virus. As we go along, we have no vaccine are therapeutics are getting better. The only way we can stop the spread of this virus is for us to do our part. We're in this together, we need to act like, do you think we need some sort of coordinated national shutdown? To try to get this under control I. think that would be very, very difficult to try to do that in there are places in this country where I think that you wouldn't need to shut down nationally right now if they take some of the precautions, we're a big country where diverse country we have seen the virus spread in different areas I think it would be very, very difficult to try to have any kind of national shutdown but you know a lot of the governors are stepping a lot of them are not and lot of them are seeing their states ravage along the governors. have been stepping up doing the right thing. Our governor in Alabama issued a statewide score. She's the only governor in the deep South that his issue that in fact, the governor of Georgia, which is raging as much as Alabama yesterday issued something banning local officials from issuing a mask order. So damnedest thing I've ever heard of and so I think that the states are stepping up individual beers have been stepping up. I mean. When you have a lack of leadership coming from the administration, you've got to have the local leaders stepping up. So I think we're doing it on a hot spot by. Hotspots state-by-state by state community, mount community basis be tough to do it on a national basis, but there's plenty of spokesman out there illicit from the national level better telling people to wear masks and suggestions and do those things. It's amazing to me how the masks were politicized and I saved a lot on this podcast. But anytime, we politicize something we dehumanize it and I think this is a perfect example. But when you look at deaths, the numbers don't lie. So even if you were the type of person to say you know what? I don't believe in science I think truth and fact is. Relative there's concrete numbers here that are undeniable and do you think that there's any chance that we get this under control while this administration is still in place or do you think that it's going to continue to rage and grow until we have leadership in there that can at least be willing to listen to science? Are we gonNA answer you with a glass half full and I'm going to say I put faith in the majority of the American people to start doing the right thing. They're seeing these numbers to their seeing the lack of leadership they're seeing the numbers in the deaths in. The virus, they're seeing the fact that the average age of someone catching this virus now has gone down fifteen years fifteen years from when we first started to. This is just not a senior's forest anymore. So I'M GONNA put more faith than I guess I have more faith these days in. Awadh. The governors of whatever political party and local leaders and mayors to lead by example, and to do those things necessary. What's interesting to me is that her so many folks in Alabama and we had a problem with folks not wearing masks we still do but the so many people aren't listening to the Reason why you wear a mask they think it is just to protect themselves. I've heard so many people say well, I don't need to wear a mask I may get it but I'm gonNA low risk category. So I'll take my chances. It's not about you. It's about the people with preexisting conditions, the diabetes heart disease that things like that puts them at risk. You could be a symptomatic and spread this disease spread this virus so easy without wearing a mask and you not even know it and putting people at risk. So I'll tell folks down here. Look this is golden rule time. Okay. This is new unto others as you would do unto yourself and so wear the mask for others where the mass for those healthcare professionals that are on the front lines that are just having mental breakdowns these days with all that they are overwhelmed about look I'm going to again go back to your question I'm going to have a glass half full I give a lot of faith in the American people to see where we are at start making these comparisons and see through the like of leadership and start doing the things necessary for themselves.

Alabama Senator Doug Jones Senator Senate Kobe Dr Redfield Joy Dan President Trump Rio Ben Michigan Georgia
'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

Steve Cochran

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

"For Who's the Boss fans? Yeah, looks like the old eighties nineties, Siri's is going to be coming back Tony Danza and Alissa Milano. I've already signed on for the reboot. Tony Danza's character will be playing a former major league baseball player, Alyssa Milano, his daughter on the show will be playing a single mom. Judith Light, has not yet signed on for the project, although she is said to be very supportive of it on the young man, Danny Pretoria pin Toro. Was the younger son of the show. Jonathan also has not signed on for yet. I thought the most hilarious person on that show what was the mother, Mona actress Catherine Heldman, and she passed away. Last year, but it was it was a popular show for 8 10 years. Something like that,

Tony Danza Alissa Milano Judith Light Catherine Heldman Siri Danny Pretoria Baseball Jonathan
"milano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"milano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"My name and I guess for my things that I like maybe then I'm Italian American so you know what that means that means I love Italian American food and you know that all the Italian restaurants in the city are closed a few of them you can do take out but you most of them are closed and you should know by now that I don't cook because I tell you I don't cook and whenever I whenever I start dreaming during the day about eating I think about one of my Italian American restaurants and having something there and for the last six weeks this could have been terrible depression except for Milano market on eighty ninth and third Avenue south and his family have owned and run model market for almost forty years they prepare their specialties Mike Mike the prepared home they got a sandwich X. actually they just sent it over to me the Rudy steak sandwich one of my favorites it down Dr sure department salami cured meats fresh made mozzarella you could also get imported cheeses you can get homemade pastas and get steak you get anything you want can get to know each man it's not bad and these people have big heart and they're accepting cash catering donations on their website mono market NYC dot com that'll help aid the frontline workers in the fight against covert nineteen really never have to cook again you probably want to a lot of people.

Mike Mike NYC Milano
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Silence> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Twenty Nineteen <Speech_Female> Jeff basis <Speech_Female> saw all <Speech_Female> his wealth. <Speech_Female> Drop by <Speech_Female> nine billion <Speech_Female> dollars due <Speech_Female> to divorce settlement <Speech_Female> and he's <Speech_Female> still the <Speech_Female> richest man <Speech_Female> in the world <Speech_Female> that's right he <Speech_Female> lost more <Speech_Female> than the annual <Speech_Female> GDP of <Speech_Female> at least twenty <Speech_Female> countries <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is still <Speech_Female> so rich. <Speech_Female> Nobody <Speech_Female> can catch him <Speech_Female> and yet <Speech_Female> until <Speech_Female> very public <Speech_Female> pressure forced <Speech_Female> Amazon to raise <Speech_Female> minimum wage <Speech_Female> to fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> per hour. <Speech_Female> More than half <Speech_Female> of its workers has <Speech_Female> made less <Speech_Female> than twenty <Speech_Female> eight thousand <Speech_Female> dollars <Silence> per year. <Speech_Female> They earn <Speech_Female> ten percent less <Speech_Female> than the national median <Speech_Female> income <Speech_Female> while laboring rang <Speech_Female> for the world's <Speech_Female> richest <Silence> man <Speech_Female> I'm talking <Speech_Female> specifically to <Speech_Female> the Republicans now <Speech_Female> and those <Speech_Female> who complain about <Speech_Female> Food Stamps Welfare <Speech_Female> Medicaid housing housing <Speech_Female> benefits <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> other social <Speech_Female> safety net <Silence> <Advertisement> programs. <Silence> Here <Speech_Female> because <Silence> this is important <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> we need those <Speech_Female> programs in in <Speech_Female> large because <Speech_Female> of situations <Speech_Female> like this <Speech_Female> huge corporations <Speech_Female> and extremely <Speech_Female> wealthy <Speech_Female> business <Speech_Female> owners like <Speech_Female> basis <Speech_Female> and the Walton family family. <Speech_Female> Use these <Speech_Female> programs your tax <Speech_Female> dollars as <Speech_Female> an excuse to <Speech_Female> not pay <Speech_Female> living wages <Speech_Female> and benefits <Speech_Female> to their <Silence> workers. <Speech_Female> You'll notice Chris. <Speech_Female> They never <Speech_Female> seem to take <Speech_Female> smaller bonuses. <Speech_Female> Stock <Speech_Female> payouts golden <Speech_Female> parachutes <Speech_Female> or other multi-million. <Speech_Female> Dollar perks <Speech_Female> but their workers <Speech_Female> can't afford award <Speech_Female> housing <Speech_Music_Female> or food <Speech_Female> or healthcare <Speech_Female> or any of <Speech_Female> the other basic <Silence> necessities in <Speech_Female> life. <Speech_Female> Now if you <Speech_Female> have a problem <Speech_Female> with social all <Speech_Female> safety nets <Speech_Female> then you should be <Speech_Female> demanding <Speech_Female> that these incredibly <Speech_Female> powerful <Speech_Female> and wealthy people <Speech_Female> pay <Speech_Female> their workers <SpeakerChange> instead <Silence> of themselves. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's <SpeakerChange> corporate <Speech_Female> welfare <Speech_Female> going to those <Speech_Female> who absolutely <Speech_Female> do not <Speech_Female> need it. <Speech_Female> I can already <Speech_Female> hear you screaming. <Speech_Female> Socialism <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> redistribution distribution <Silence> of wealth. <Speech_Female> Will <Speech_Female> guess what <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> you can't <Speech_Female> redistribute <Speech_Female> something <Speech_Female> which has never <Speech_Female> been distributed <Silence> in the first place <Speech_Female> the the <Speech_Female> vast amount <Speech_Female> of money <Speech_Female> in the hands <Speech_Female> of so few <Speech_Female> has been taken <Speech_Female> out of communities <Silence> across America. <Speech_Female> Your <Speech_Female> purchase at <Speech_Female> Walmart doesn't funder <Speech_Female> schools <Speech_Female> it funds the <Speech_Female> Waltons. Next <Silence> mega yacht <Speech_Female> azure <Speech_Female> towns roads <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> infrastructure. <Speech_Female> Get worse <Speech_Female> and closed storefronts storefronts <Speech_Female> appear <Speech_Female> on Main Street. <Speech_Female> Jeff Faso's <Speech_Female> is personally <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> funding a <Speech_Female> private spaceflight <Speech_Female> company. <Silence> <Speech_Female> How many any <Speech_Female> fifteen dollars <Speech_Female> an hour Amazon <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> do you think <Speech_Female> will end up <Speech_Female> on those luxury junkets <Speech_Female> to orbit <Speech_Female> back? <Speech_Female> Businesses <Speech_Female> have a responsibility vence <Speech_Female> ability to their <Speech_Female> workers <Speech_Female> and to the community <Speech_Female> is where <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they operate <Speech_Music_Female> period. <Speech_Female> That's it <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the deal has <Speech_Female> always been hard <Speech_Female> work for a fair air <Speech_Female> wage <Speech_Female> but not <Speech_Female> anymore <Speech_Female> when someone can <Speech_Female> lose <SpeakerChange> nine <Speech_Female> billion dollars <Speech_Female> and not <Speech_Female> notice it while <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> their employees are <Speech_Female> losing their homes and <Speech_Female> to enable <Speech_Music_Female> this extreme <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> wealth. Something <Speech_Female> is fundamentally <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> broken. <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Female> GonNa take good. <Speech_Music_Female> Corporate Governance <Speech_Music_Female> and more importantly <Speech_Music_Female> good <Speech_Music_Female> government <Speech_Music_Female> affects <Speech_Music_Female> we <Speech_Music_Female> live in the new <Speech_Music_Female> roaring <Speech_Music_Female> twenties. <Speech_Music_Female> And we <Speech_Music_Female> know of last <Speech_Music_Female> bill around we <Speech_Music_Female> get <Music> to act <Speech_Music_Female> now <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> before it's <Music>

"milano" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"A restaurant three miles from where we are on our to kill the Milano to kill an ambassador in a crowded in bass into that only came to light because the Iranian backed terrorists reached out to eight on the cover D. E. A. informant to plan the hit we are in America and when told that it would cause a ton of civilian casualties were to someone and say after good he said the more the merrier so here's what's happening the Democratic Party first they rooted for Russia collusion didn't happen then they refer recession do you happen either are you can track of this a hang up first it was the wrong solution or write this down and it was a recall recession now they're effectively ready for a ran to respond okay let's let's let's go to exactly how bad it is if people think these two crazy conservatives who work for Donald Trump in the White House to just making stuff up a couple guys to get a couple guys okay let's list admits he we have the empirical proof first is the man who almost became the Democrat nominee in twenty sixteen who won't have bean the Democrat nominee if Hillary Clinton in the establishment hadn't stolen that from him will not Bernie how did you know with this super delegates this is Conrad birdie side is the man who honeymooned in the Soviet Union when it was still a dictatorship but one of those anti semitic regimes in the world as an American Jew this is what he said Anderson Cooper about the strike all Major General Qassem Soleimani cut one the bad as he was an official of the Iranian government and you only spend if China does let you know if Russia does like in a rush sure has been implicated on the potent with assassinating dissidents so once you're in the business office fascination you wanna leave some very very terrible forces so that's the first one hold your fire we have Bernie Saunders St Donald Trump is like Vladimir Putin because Vladimir Putin assassinates decision on us so just stay with that and then we have Chris Matthews listen to this audio cat with Amy club Shah who also think she should be president unless lean fit but this woman Amy Kolbuszowa Emma pronouncing it right you are right but who is exactly it's it's just like like that guy from what's his name Castro similar kind of whatever a small all present rentals this is Chris Matthews's service business Boris cop three and I don't think you're an assassin anyway thank you so much of what this president is anyway thank you center stop if you miss the gonna play it again at least he says the enclosure at least you'll not an assassin like vice president is it's it's it's files but played again Jeff and I don't think you're an assassin anyway thank you so much of what this president is anyway thank you.

Milano
"milano" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on Cinemavino

"Anyway, guys limit best life right now. You can subscribe and rain on apple. You can listen subscribe and rate us on apple podcast or on Spotify. What do that? You can listen subscribe and rate us on apple podcasts or on Spotify. And we're gonna try and step up. Our Twitter presence. And we're going to be at the real dumb Trump real. Also, alyssum Milano because we're all on both sides. Posit on that tonight..

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