40 Burst results for "Milano"

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Radio From Hell

Radio From Hell

01:43 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Radio From Hell

"I'll see what my dad said to me when I told him about Jack, he said. Are you sure? You know what? You don't Yes, I am that They're in often. Good man. Making your own way. I'm proud of you. Thanks. Appreciate it if we were different people, okay? Why not? So I want understood. Follow Bill already on Twitter are Bill this is radio from hell on X 96. OK, it is a 47 things that must go next. Let's quickly award boner around to stand is brought to you in part by Utah corn on the cob and feeling like a drink. Check out the Park City cocktail contest through August, Park City's best mixologist will feature a plethora of delicious mixed drinks. You must be at least 21 to participate. Learn more at park city restaurants dot com. I'm always interested in the 12 people who decided they would vote for Eliza Milano, the barn candidate featuring Alissa Milano. And I'm kind of puzzled by the 44 people who thought that I mean any other time. The boner candidate number two, the conservative Cuban on Congress woman in Georgia. That's a pretty good candidate. 44 people. But how do you beat? I guess he couldn't resist. Fondling a dead woman, the police officer who fondled a dead woman. I just don't know that wind spoil yours around here. That's your winner around to it goes forward now might be boner of the day. We're going to take both of our winners and put them against each other at 9 20 this morning. That's when you will vote. That's one boner fight happens and that's when you decide..

Bill Alissa Milano Park City Eliza Milano Jack Twitter Utah Congress Officer Georgia
Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:59 min | 2 d ago

Getting Things Done with Senator Doug Jones

"I'm Senator Doug Jones from Alabama and here's the truth it all my work in the Senate I have your back and no one else. Sorry, not sorry first of all senator thank you so much for taking the time to do the podcast I would like to start by talking about Kobe nineteen and we're recording this in the middle of July. We knew in February and March, what needed to be done right now one hundred, thirty, eight, thousand people have died projections indicate more than two hundred, thousand people will die by November, cases are rising almost everywhere in the. Country especially in the South and the trump administration is just I don't know how else to say it, but he has just failing in every possible way in managing this pandemic. So what is your opinion? What should we be doing nationally and what should Alabama be doing to combat covert nineteen listen first of all, thanks for having me I really appreciate this opportunity to speak with you. It's good to talk to you. See you again. Let me tell you I think we have to do what I've said all along that we have to do and that is listened. To the healthcare experts listen to the healthcare experts that are the national voices like Dr, Fallacy and Dr Redfield and those that are on top of this, listen to your local healthcare professionals, listen to the statewide healthcare professionals and follow their advice. The problem that we have right now is that clearly we have a lack of leadership from the administration. We have not seen the kind of leadership that we should have from the very beginning of this administration was downplaying it, and then as I think the president realized that we had to shut the economy down which was. His Pride and joy Dan, he started to try to intimidate people too much to open the economy up. He was intimidating protesters in Michigan and elsewhere, and that had a ripple effect around the country. Then it was politicizing the wearing of masks as we learned more and more about this virus it became clear that we needed to wear masks, and then all of a sudden became a political issue. It's not as much anymore, but it's still in places a political issue, and now we're politicizing the opening schools schools. Do you think that Alabama was too quick to Rio Ben? I think we tried to accelerate. The process and I think you know From our standpoint that has had a negative impact on our progress and I think that's why we've regressed. And we've seen a three hundred percent increase. In cases month over month after going the first three weeks of this. At a forty percent club if people would listen to the healthcare professionals, follow the guidelines and understand the world had never seen this virus before like December nobody has the antibodies at that time. Nobody had the immunities and this is a work in progress. We are learning more and more and more about this virus. As we go along, we have no vaccine are therapeutics are getting better. The only way we can stop the spread of this virus is for us to do our part. We're in this together, we need to act like, do you think we need some sort of coordinated national shutdown? To try to get this under control I. think that would be very, very difficult to try to do that in there are places in this country where I think that you wouldn't need to shut down nationally right now if they take some of the precautions, we're a big country where diverse country we have seen the virus spread in different areas I think it would be very, very difficult to try to have any kind of national shutdown but you know a lot of the governors are stepping a lot of them are not and lot of them are seeing their states ravage along the governors. have been stepping up doing the right thing. Our governor in Alabama issued a statewide score. She's the only governor in the deep South that his issue that in fact, the governor of Georgia, which is raging as much as Alabama yesterday issued something banning local officials from issuing a mask order. So damnedest thing I've ever heard of and so I think that the states are stepping up individual beers have been stepping up. I mean. When you have a lack of leadership coming from the administration, you've got to have the local leaders stepping up. So I think we're doing it on a hot spot by. Hotspots state-by-state by state community, mount community basis be tough to do it on a national basis, but there's plenty of spokesman out there illicit from the national level better telling people to wear masks and suggestions and do those things. It's amazing to me how the masks were politicized and I saved a lot on this podcast. But anytime, we politicize something we dehumanize it and I think this is a perfect example. But when you look at deaths, the numbers don't lie. So even if you were the type of person to say you know what? I don't believe in science I think truth and fact is. Relative there's concrete numbers here that are undeniable and do you think that there's any chance that we get this under control while this administration is still in place or do you think that it's going to continue to rage and grow until we have leadership in there that can at least be willing to listen to science? Are we gonNA answer you with a glass half full and I'm going to say I put faith in the majority of the American people to start doing the right thing. They're seeing these numbers to their seeing the lack of leadership they're seeing the numbers in the deaths in. The virus, they're seeing the fact that the average age of someone catching this virus now has gone down fifteen years fifteen years from when we first started to. This is just not a senior's forest anymore. So I'M GONNA put more faith than I guess I have more faith these days in. Awadh. The governors of whatever political party and local leaders and mayors to lead by example, and to do those things necessary. What's interesting to me is that her so many folks in Alabama and we had a problem with folks not wearing masks we still do but the so many people aren't listening to the Reason why you wear a mask they think it is just to protect themselves. I've heard so many people say well, I don't need to wear a mask I may get it but I'm gonNA low risk category. So I'll take my chances. It's not about you. It's about the people with preexisting conditions, the diabetes heart disease that things like that puts them at risk. You could be a symptomatic and spread this disease spread this virus so easy without wearing a mask and you not even know it and putting people at risk. So I'll tell folks down here. Look this is golden rule time. Okay. This is new unto others as you would do unto yourself and so wear the mask for others where the mass for those healthcare professionals that are on the front lines that are just having mental breakdowns these days with all that they are overwhelmed about look I'm going to again go back to your question I'm going to have a glass half full I give a lot of faith in the American people to see where we are at start making these comparisons and see through the like of leadership and start doing the things necessary for themselves.

Alabama Senator Doug Jones Senator Senate Kobe Dr Redfield Joy Dan President Trump Rio Ben Michigan Georgia
Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Radio From Hell

Radio From Hell

01:19 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Radio From Hell

"21 right now, and it is time for round two. Of your boner candidates. Here we go. Three new stories. They are examples of bad, stupid or funny human behavior and you will decide with your votes of these three candidates, which one is the worst, which one deserves to go forward to Boehner, fighting possibly become boner of the day facing off against the winner of Round one. That we did an hour ago will take both of those champions and put them against each other at 9 20 this morning is when you decide boner of the day with Boehner fight Right now, you're picking the champion for round to send one of these three candidates forward. Here we go. Two candidates now 1/3 after the news Once you've heard all three, then you will vote. One of you lucky random boner. Voters will receive the promise of a can't buy it. Gotta win it radio from hell Boner T shirt. I won't see your fingers. Hold up your hands. My me? Yes, you Okay, Okay. I just want to make sure you didn't have your fingers cross when you made that promise. Boehner, candidate number one You tell him, Eliza. You will hate him. Melissa Bolano. She has been More than honest, very transparent. About her with her social media followers about her ongoing battle with Corona. Virus with covert 19 and it's frustrating side effects. So when one Troll. Accused her of lying about her hair loss. She stood her ground. She, she said, I've been losing hair because of it, 47 year old went on Twitter to film a video of herself brushing through her wet hair. I thought I just show you what covert 19 actually does to your hair, she said. Please take this seriously, where a damn mask. In the 1.5 minute clip. Listen, Milano, looking fresh out of the shower in a robe. Using her favorite detaching galore Brush, she slowly brushed it through her hair. And once he was finished, he gave social media users a look at the large clump of hair that comes out of her head. In response to the video, One Twitter user accused Milano of brushing out fake hair instead of the real strands. It's hair extensions, the person tweeted. It wasn't real hair. I know because I have long natural hair. She was just brushing out the glue and part of the extension to which Alyssa Milano clap back. You. I don't have hair extensions. Be a human being. You tell him, Eliza. Boehner, candidate number one Here's boner. Candidate Number two. You know, we're going to kick that be out of Congress. A Republican candidate. Who has expressed support for the far right conspiracy theory. Q. And on And being criticized for a Siri's of racist comments. Has won the Republican nomination for George's 14th congressional run off For the open seat on Tuesday in the Deep Red district in north west Georgia during her Victory speech was to a shared on Facebook. This candidate, Marjorie Taylor Greene, who beat neurosurgeon John Callin in a primary runoff for the Open seat. Has heard calling Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. A bitch. I just want to say to Nancy Pelosi. She's a hypocrite. She's anti American, and we're going to kick that bitch out of Congress. She said remarks were met with loud cheer..

Boehner Alyssa Milano Nancy Pelosi Twitter Melissa Bolano Congress Eliza Marjorie Taylor Greene Democratic House John Callin Siri Facebook Corona George North West Georgia
'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

Steve Cochran

00:52 sec | Last week

'Who's the Boss?' reboot confirmed by Tony Danza and Alyssa Milano

"For Who's the Boss fans? Yeah, looks like the old eighties nineties, Siri's is going to be coming back Tony Danza and Alissa Milano. I've already signed on for the reboot. Tony Danza's character will be playing a former major league baseball player, Alyssa Milano, his daughter on the show will be playing a single mom. Judith Light, has not yet signed on for the project, although she is said to be very supportive of it on the young man, Danny Pretoria pin Toro. Was the younger son of the show. Jonathan also has not signed on for yet. I thought the most hilarious person on that show what was the mother, Mona actress Catherine Heldman, and she passed away. Last year, but it was it was a popular show for 8 10 years. Something like that,

Tony Danza Alissa Milano Judith Light Catherine Heldman Siri Danny Pretoria Baseball Jonathan
Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

00:30 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Sure. Okay. It. Goes on on and on and on with this guy on. Plus the lies I mean, this started a long time ago with the light and he's really good at it as we reminded you yesterday law school. And where did you? I think I think I have a much higher I q than you do I suspect I went to law school on a full this show the elitism right? It just shows the like you're you're nothing put a bug to me. I'm way smarter than you. That's why I'm in control of the academic scholarship the only one in my in my class have a full academic scholarship. No first year in law school I decided I didn't want to be in. Law School, and ended up in the bottom two thirds of my class decided I. wanted to stay went back to law school, and in fact, ended up in the top half of my clan I wanted a national moot court competition. I was the outstanding student in the Political Science Department at the end of my graduated graduate degrees not graduate school in one hundred, sixty, five credits only one, hundred, twenty, three credits and delighted to sit down and compare my cudi. now concedes he did not graduate in the top half of his wall school class. What does not have three degrees from? And that he was not named Outstanding Political Science Student In College. Says Biden naturally went to school and a half scholarship ended up near the bottom of his class and went on the one degree not three Joe Biden ranked seventy sixth class of eighty-five at. Like me. Homes off this whole thing as a flyweight now Biden says. He's memory had failed. So He's been having memory issues for forty years. That's what I learned his memory failed. How do you miss remember getting degrees? You didn't get. That's not that's just flat out lies and did you notice how even slipped in there when he was bragging to that guy, he goes I decided I didn't want to be in law school so I slipped to the bottom two thirds of my class. So he's able to just say no I. Admit admitted I did but I Cared. Back, then to the upper half which the upper half correct me if I'm wrong let's say there's eighty six people at a class can be math. If the upper half If you're if you're seventy fifth, that's not good out of eighty six is that the upper hand? I mean you're asking the wrong guy, but it feels feels wrong. Not Accurate does feel inaccurate. To say, the least SOB and. You'll. Be. Show. Stop Racist does that work there? No 'cause he's shoot. So Okay I. It's almost to the point though even if they're white if they're Democrat and you say anything against him, that's still racist yet burs. We're about their. Pretty soon, they'll be telling us that pretty soon that'll be the next deal. Triple Eight, nine, hundred, thirty, three, ninety-three edit pat unleashed on twitter fortunately. There are some blacks who were educating whites. Like we've never noticed before, maybe this has always happened but we just. We. Haven't paid attention but want conservative blacks. Yes. Yeah. I'm talking about this black person at a and it's probably a black lives matter. Event but a black. Female shows. Up. And a white black lives matter supporter is trying to educate her and here's what happens. Tammy. Black why have in America? School. I want. To. Ask. Am and them and. You. connected. Black. Tell you how important plant? The plant family. Them are nothing you? Push up the way we need. Talk. Debate. Wasn't for a second. Going on there so much I she calls him out on your supporting a group that doesn't like black men. We need black men. Then, she pivots to the womb. Covered all the bases and he really kind of it seems that he tells her. A black lives in the womb don't matter. Check this out. Go back a little bit. Hard to understand what you say now from here on out but here's this. Here's his doofus trying to white splaine things to her of why she should be in favor of black lives matter the organization. And she tells him, you need you to tell me my life matters. Thank you for that. Thank you. If the lives in the womb don't matter, they can't matter later if they don't matter I in the womb. Yeah. I mean so inconsistent. So hypocritical you can hear through the honking. That's just asinine. They'll be Hong. Triple Eight, nine, hundred, thirty, three, ninety-three, and unleashed twitter. Let me tell you about keeps. This is something alyssum Milano could use right now and because it is not just for men. You're having. You know if you had co ED nineteen and it's causing clumps of hair to come out when you brush your hair. Well. Need keeps. Go to keeps dot com slash pat and check out the generic versions of the only two FDA approved hair loss products. You don't to leave your home to do this whether male or female whether it's your you know your male pattern baldness.

Joe Biden Twitter Hong Cudi. Political Science Department Milano America FDA Tammy
‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

Jason and Alexis

00:14 sec | Last week

‘Who’s the Boss?’ Sequel Series in Development With Tony Danza, Alyssa Milano Attached

"All you fans of who's the boss, a sequel. To the hit series is now in development at Sony Pictures Television. It's going to take place 30 years later, Tony Danza and Alissa Milano will overturn is Tony and Samantha. Miss Ellie.

Tony Danza Sony Pictures Television Alissa Milano Ellie Samantha
Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Fred and Angi

Fred and Angi

00:54 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on Fred and Angi

"Of. So that was that Was Elizabeth Berkley talking now? Yeah, so this is gonna be streaming on peacock on that service, But there's no date. As for release one. I gotta get my daughter's going to be so jacked about this. After years of playing second fiddle to SpongeBob Patrick's star is getting his own show on Nickelodeon. Huh? Yes, Fairly says anything he's done. Not much known about the show. Yet. Patrick is the The best thing on SpongeBob. It's gonna be called The Patrick Star show build Failure Bay. He will voice that's exactly what he's always done it on SpongeBob. It's actually the second SpongeBob spin off, along with the prequel. Siri's called Camp Coral, which will debut on CBS all access next year. More to check out online today You can see that saved by the Bell trailer. It looks pretty good. Oh and Alyssa Milano. Came out recently saying that she had Cove it and she had this video that she posted. I guess one of the side effects that a lot of people don't know about is hair loss. You have to see this video. It's nuts. She's fresh out of the shower. She's gotta brush and she's like I just have to show you what I'm dealing with. She, like does one pass on her hair, like tons of air coming out with it? It's crazy. It's up. Fred angie dot com Riches for whop. Through the roof. Cardi beanbag in the stallion after right wing conservative radio host Ben Shapiro recites the lyrics in reference to feminism hears on the lyrics. You ready? Wars in this house. There's a horse in this house. There's a horse in this house. There's a horse in the south pose, but hold up. Yeah, no, no, I said certified freak. Seven days a week Wet asked P word. Make that pullout Gameweek? Yeah, you happen with some wet ask P word P word is female genitalia. They a bucket and a mop for this wet ass P Ward. Give me everything you've got for this wet ass P word game struck. What does he know about that? He's married guy. I don't know how he knows. So he's trying to say that the song is not like other people, people fighting for feminism and then sing this song. I don't I don't know what his point is. Her feminism means you get to say whatever the hell you want. I don't I don't know what his point is. I'm not exactly I didn't listen to the rest of it. I just viral video I click on and him reading the lyrics. Made it from a C low on his show. Seen actual video from the What video? It's Guy Win. What? No, I don't because I just got an email from my publicist saying that the searches have gone through the roof of the video, so I wouldn't watch the video. Yeah. Scared. You think enjoyed it tremendously money in your pants. It did. And I want to thank our mani want. Think what Ben Shapiro for bringing attention to this thing that he was I.

Patrick P Ward Alyssa Milano Ben Shapiro Spongebob Elizabeth Berkley Nickelodeon Fred Angie Dot Failure Bay Siri Mani Bell CBS Camp Coral
Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Femicide and the Forgotten Women of Juarez with Oz Woloshyn and Monica Ortiz Uribe

"For nearly thirty years, women in the Mexican border city of Juarez. have been disappearing many of them turning up dead in mass graves. We. Don't know who the killers are very few have been charged and fewer convicted. My guest this week. Our odds volition and Monica Ortiz Rebbe. Of the amazing podcast forgotten the women of what is the final episode two, which is now available, they are incredible journalists with an infuriating story to tell. If! You've ever been to war with disposing of bodies, Israelis. You don't have to dig to her dirt. You're digging through saying. Just across the bridge from El Paso Texas, hundreds of young women have been tanning up dead in Juarez Mexico. Many artists covered in mass graves. Some have strange symbols coughed. Some. have their hands bound with shoelaces? And? Everyone from the families of the victims to the United States. FBI has tried to uncover who is behind these crimes. But one thing is clear. The crimes are connected. They're not just random victims. The women were picked. They were selected I mean there could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one saw it. No one talked about it. These are like ghosts. The numbers started to rise, and then a lot of theories were floated up the gangs serial murder. The cartels organ traffickers the possibility of some sort of strange devil worship. It's been fifteen years since I first heard about these murders, and I've been haunted ever since. How is it possible? These crimes remain unsolved on journey to find out we talk to victims, families FBI agents and a psychologist who claims the new one of the culprits. We visit, the site of one of the mass graves and traveled to a dangerous part downtown. Where many of the women disappeared? I Voloshin, I'm one of the hosts of Forgotten Women of Juarez. The podcast explores what happens when this become targets, and when the judiciary is compromised, I'm fighting for bust institutions and freedom of speech. Sorry, not sorry I'm Monique, our three, they co host of the podcast forgotten. The women of what is I believe workers everywhere should earn a fair wage and women ought to live free from violence Nazari Period I. WanNa give the listeners some back story on what's happening in Juarez. How many women have gone missing in the crimes not being? Even really investigated by authorities and then go into why you felt it was important to do. The podcast I first started working on this podcast of several trips to the Texas Mexico border specifically El Paso Texas and In Mexico. And it took me several trips before I learned something that everybody in the region knows, which is that? Since the early nineteen nineties, hundreds of women have turned up dead in Horace, and many of them met incredibly brutal fates, which was evident from that bodies when they were discovered. That been five mass graves of Women Discovering Juarez since nineteen ninety five. And yet, all of this was happening right across the border from one of America's safest cities, a prosperous suburban Texans city, and so I was just very curious. How could this be happening? How could the crimes not be solved? And it ended up being this journey with Monica that open up. All kinds of other questions particularly learn things like the FBI had tried to solve the crimes, not once not twice, but three times. When the mass grave was discovered, and suspects confessed harder Crawford was the FBI special agent in charge of El Paso. Is Office was just a few miles away from the site. The mass grave and he taken a special interest in the murders of women in Juarez and was following this case closely as a potential breakthrough. You could sense that the pressure was mounting. Political pressure public pressure international pressure. The families and relatives and friends of the disappeared. Women were allowed. Those women would hold use. Mourning the deaths and George attention to that. That was huge. There was all kinds of attention from the international press. People like Jennifer Lopez. Eve ensler involved and yet these crimes remain stubbornly unsolved wasn't clear. Who was killing these hundreds of women, and why and it was a story of vulnerability, but also a story of the deep paradox irony of the border that many of these women were working in factories, which were American owned could see across the border into a Passo a city of. A Fred safety enormous safety by comparison and that Alpes Owens could see back into war as many of them had relatives there many of them. Have Friends there and yet. Those this seeming inability to do anything and that struck me as something which was I had to know more

Juarez. FBI El Paso Texas Juarez Mexico Monica Ortiz Monique Crawford Eve Ensler El Paso Jennifer Lopez United States Alpes Owens Murder Texas Mexico Voloshin Horace America Special Agent In Charge Mexico George
Fresh update on "milano" discussed on WIBC Programming

WIBC Programming

00:38 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "milano" discussed on WIBC Programming

"Coming back. And it's not just like a reboot. It's not like a redo. It's actually Tony Danza and Alissa Milano in a sequel. If you Will of Who's the boss, they're going to reprise their iconic roles as Tony and Samantha. Michelle isn't Micelli Miss Ellie Sally because that's how little I know about this show Sally bonus dead and they're not. They can't bring her back. They will not and Judith Light on Danny Kentaro. They are quote supportive of the new Siri's, but they're not going to be fixtures. They may have some cameos from time to time. Wait. The whole premise was the tension between Judith Light and Tony Danza. Well, no, Because now the new The new premise is that Samantha is going to be a single mom living in the same house that the original show was set in. But now this is going to this new comedy is going to quote explore generational differences as well as opposing worldviews and parenting style. You know what within the dynamic of a modern family, there's going to be politics. There's gonna be poet was going on. I would never agree to do this. Unless there were politicians can be so much politics. I for sure I'm out. I mean, I was out before it was ever not deal with her so, but this is supposed to happen when I think ah, well there, I know that there's shopping. This whole project to buyers with the opportunity also license the other 196 episodes of the original Siri's.

Tony Danza Judith Light Samantha Ellie Sally Alissa Milano Siri Danny Kentaro Michelle
Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | Last month

Alyssa Milano hits back over alleged blackface photo

"Alyssa Milano is fighting back against claims she wore blackface in a 2013 parody video. Defending herself on Twitter, the 47 year old actress explain that the video was from a funny or die sket. She appeared in parodying Snooki from Jersey Shore. She also included a link to one minute clip from the video documenting your transformation into the reality star who, like her other jersey shore cast members turned tanning into an art

Alyssa Milano Jersey Shore Twitter
`Recipe edition, Massimo Bottura

Monocle 24: The Menu

01:53 min | 2 months ago

`Recipe edition, Massimo Bottura

"Famous shifts. I M Massimo Dura. I am the chef of Austria Francis Ghana in Heart of Modena Their Food Valley. My recipe today is this. It's pistol I always look at my past in a critic way and not in a nostalgic way and I always thought the pistol was too heavy and too oiling so once I was the referee Milano. I add the necessity to create a pistol because the people they want pasta. They love Pasta and So I created a very special best just following my mental pilot. I didn't have enough basil so I mixed with different herbs like time and mint was summer so the men gave some freshness to the basin. Basil meant and time together. Then I a classic grated Parmesan Journal some Extra Virgin Olive oil. A little little touch of garlic at this point. You need peanuts. But we didn't have any pilots and the pints a lot of money. So what I use. I had this idea to put some breadcrumbs so what I did. I got the job that was like three days. Old and graded I put everything into blender adding a little bit

Basil Heart Of Modena Their Food Val Massimo Dura Austria Francis Ghana Milano
"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"Rogue Secretary of State" Jocelyn Benson

"In two thousand eighteen Jocelyn Benson was elected as secretary of state in Michigan. It was part of a historic sweep. Where women were also elected to the governorship and to the Attorney General's office then the corona virus hit and Donald Trump went on the warpath personally attacking governor. Whitmer as she fought to get her citizens access to needed medical equipment. Well now he's also attack. Jocelyn calling her a rogue secretary of state for her plan to make sure all Michigan voters can apply to get an absentee ballot. This fall keeping them safe from the virus and ensuring everyone has a chance to vote. Jocelyn joined us to talk about the monumental importance of voting rights in the age of trump and the corona virus. This year we saw the. You're the woman. Two Point Gretchen. Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Benson Debbie Stamina and the list goes secretary of state of the Great State of Michigan. Four four my duties to invest in my abilities regard. Help me guys. The Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson says. She sees nothing wrong with paper ballots. Secretary of state says the voter absentee ballot. Applications are great way for voters to vote in coming elections without risking their. How ahead of a planned visit to Michigan Tomorrow? President trump is targeting the leaders of the state on twitter president trump on Wednesday threatened to withhold federal funding to Michigan after the state announced that all of the states registered. Voters would receive applications for absentee ballots in the mail this year. Benton Secretary of State of Michigan on fighting every day to ensure that every voice is heard and every vote is counted. Sorry not sorry first of all. Thank you so much for doing this. I really really appreciate it. It's interesting because you have a job that I don't think a lot of people fully grasp what you do as secretary of State in Michigan. You're responsible for overseeing elections. But can you give my listeners? Really an overview of what that entails. And just broadly what? The job secretaryastate position in most states overseas democracy and that means everything from money in politics and regulating promoting disclosure of bat to the actual act of casting a ballot and making sure those votes are counted accurately protecting the security of the process. Anything that goes into ensuring that our democracy runs well flows lows through each state secretary of State and from your perspective. What is the biggest threat to our democracy? And you can do that. Broadly but you can also do that in Michigan. Well Yeah I always say that. A healthy democracy requires an engaged. An informed electorate and so in that way biggest threat is disengaged and misinformed electorate. I think you need both. You need everyone. Voting particular especially systems of underrepresented communities whose voices has historically been at the table and decisions. That are made them. But you also need to to be informed about all the aspects of an issue that they can make independent decisions about what's best for them. We're having our communities so to me really. You need people. Running the system secretaries of state and we need elected representatives who all kind of flow into that any neighbouring and encourage engagement and Commission. Of course the media as well but if you poke short on either of those two metrics those two pieces than democracy is threatened and. I think that's some of what we are seeing today where you have in some cases. Low turnout or disengagement or feeling of apathy or. My vote doesn't matter. My voice doesn't matter which is the exact opposite of which real and democracy or people not having access to accurate information about the decisions that are being made note decision makers that are making them can hold them accountable. We here and we've heard a lot about Michigan this cycle. So what makes it so important in this election besides the Electoral College? And how did it become a battleground? These chicken is a collection of voters that really reflects the entire country in many ways certainly in the Midwest and you've got a very diverse population we've got the largest concentrations for example Arab American voters in the country. We've got strong urban areas with unique stories and history like Detroit and Flint and high levels of communities of color growing Tino population and then a lot of the state is very rural. And so the racial demographics. The economic demographics -cation you have also right next to Detroit. One of the wealthiest per capita community in the country and they got in some ways integregation and many of the problems that afflict and having the country historically are reflected in Michigan. There's a great thing I saw when I personally hear when Michigan accuses the whole country gets a cold that in some ways is a bellwether state. Her a lot of different things is that because of the people because of history because of the community that can indicate how rest of the country like feeling going and attention on our state certainly over the past ten years when it comes to presidential elections. Really underscored that.

Michigan Jocelyn Benson Whitmer Dana Nessel Jocelyn Be State Secretary Donald Trump Detroit Midwest Attorney Commission Twitter Gretchen President Trump Debbie Stamina
"milano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"milano" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"My name and I guess for my things that I like maybe then I'm Italian American so you know what that means that means I love Italian American food and you know that all the Italian restaurants in the city are closed a few of them you can do take out but you most of them are closed and you should know by now that I don't cook because I tell you I don't cook and whenever I whenever I start dreaming during the day about eating I think about one of my Italian American restaurants and having something there and for the last six weeks this could have been terrible depression except for Milano market on eighty ninth and third Avenue south and his family have owned and run model market for almost forty years they prepare their specialties Mike Mike the prepared home they got a sandwich X. actually they just sent it over to me the Rudy steak sandwich one of my favorites it down Dr sure department salami cured meats fresh made mozzarella you could also get imported cheeses you can get homemade pastas and get steak you get anything you want can get to know each man it's not bad and these people have big heart and they're accepting cash catering donations on their website mono market NYC dot com that'll help aid the frontline workers in the fight against covert nineteen really never have to cook again you probably want to a lot of people.

Mike Mike NYC Milano
Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:08 min | 3 months ago

Laughing through the Coronavirus Pandemic with Ben Gleib

"When the global lockdown started they shutdown comedy clubs and all live entertainment and told us. We couldn't have that right now and I disagreed so I decided to create a comedy club. Anyway sorry not sorry so Ben. The last time we spoke you were running for president. I was that like a dream. What was that like for you? It was insane intense. An experience really unlike anything that you could imagine that I could've expected. Even though I was consciously choosing to do it you had some really really great points that were really like even policy points but just like common sense things like what you were saying about certain misinformation and as twenty four hour news cycle. And how these quote unquote news networks. Were not really news networks. They were more opinion. Networks and that the FCC you should probably get involved in labeling them as such and I thought that was so smart because it's really true we don't we don't look at you. Know an article in the New York Times that is just straight journalism and the op eds that we read in the New York Times as the same type of news source that that was really smart. Thank you if only you're -tary things could have been different right now. I don't know why anyone would want to be president of the United States right now. Yes this is quite an unexpected curve ball. The world has gone through and a lot of it. Honestly were some of those same themes you just brought up that. I was trying to talk about how we've just allowed such a high level of misinformation and sensationalizing of our news that it's really become so hard to tell fact from fiction these days and we just don't have clear guidance. I mean it's quite obvious that but this guy in the White House whatever his name is Freddie or whatever. I've totally blocked it out. I think yeah we call him the occupant of the White House in my yes the hostile takeover. Yeah of the White House. It's so beyond obviously ineptitude. That's leading us. It's changing every day. But even through the media to they don't have the ability or the interest to present to us what's most important. And what's more crucial? End To create a cohesive set of for us to follow. It's just whatever the next sensational thing that next day is it feels like there's no standards anymore and I actually have a lot of friends that have said to me coincidentally recently. They've said you know what I'm watching the local news now because it's about their community. It's about what's happening in their community about their school district. It's about where they can go help or where they can find help. And you know local news you get a a half hour to Kinda get it all in there so there's none of the you know the fluff in between that. It's the exact same thing for me. I've started watching local news for the first time. Since I was a child I never was interested in local news always about robberies and bake sales and now. I'm like God do I miss robberies and bake sales right it is. It's just it's something real and tangible and you look at the National News and even though I've been taking quarantine incredibly seriously I have not left except for a visit to the vet and one market trip about seven and a half weeks now but you watch the news and the advice seems to be. We must stay inside to avoid spreading this but should definitely go on walks but not to the beach just to a park and if you go to a beach don't go to a beach and then make sure right. We cannot spread through the air just by touching things so make sure you just stay six feet apart but sneezes and costs can carry a twenty feet and all right might be in the air and we know what it. It's just every single thing. It's like double speak. It's a little creepy. How little even the greatest experts seemed to

National News White House President Trump Freddie New York Times FCC United States
Supporting Women Leaders

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:43 min | 3 months ago

Supporting Women Leaders

"The share of women in the House and Senate has increased over time. But it's still well below the share of women in the US population. And if you dig deeper. Congress looks even less representatives women of color make up eighteen percent of the US population but before the two thousand eighteen midterms the accounted for just seven percent of Congress and LGBT women. Make up about two point five percent of the US population but there are only two openly lgbt women in Congress that's less than one percent even with the recent wins by women candidates in the two thousand eighteen midterms. There's still a long way to go before. They're fully represented. I look at someone like just send our during the prime minister in New Zealand. I the way that she dealt with the terrorist attack on her country. Yeah the way that she wouldn't name the terrorists that was you know. She's amazing. Amazing. We will not talk about their names and then also the way that she's dealing with this crisis she is incredibly humble and that and just real like you really feel like she's telling you the truth this authenticity. Just I think is is one of her great strengths and I think just very clear. Nobody panicked. This is what we're going to do and we're going to do better for. I think she's really good also at hope and inspiration which people need people made in times like best. They need to know. We're all in this together and we're going to get back and we can do this and done things like this before we've done things that have been harder than before. Did you see that? The princess in Sweden actually took an online nursing class and entered into the frontline fighting this pandemic. It's the most amazing thing I was like. This is brilliant. She's a princess and she was like Nope. I'm going to take an online class and I'm going to really make a difference and it's just spectacular. The majority of frontline healthcare workers around the world. Are Women. Yeah actually in China. I think the numbers like ninety percent methods. And then there's also that stat that the country is that have been least hit as far as numbers go with Kobe. Nineteen have women leadership. Yeah so I'm wondering if you could shed a little light on how the challenges women face around the globe are maybe similar or different. Well certainly you've been a huge champion around Combating Violence Against Women and sexual assault and harassment. And that is in my mind. The biggest challenge women face I. Yeah globally there is no country no community no religion no social economic background of women anywhere on Earth who are not affected by gender based violence. That's just full stop. That is the only issue that seems to get worse. Not Better over time right. We're going to get more. Women elected to political office. More women are going to start and grow business. People are going to see. Oh Wow this is great for the economy okay. Yes let's keep funding. You can see steps forward on many of these issues but on violence against women. I mean the harder hit. Humanity is the deeper violence against women growth. Right now with this crisis in China triple. They had triple the cases really at the epicenter of Code. They had triple A. Cases of domestic violence in the height. They're of the virus and that is not a winston. It is a fact that when people lose their jobs and anxiety and stress is running high. That will be my own skin for that. There will be domestic violence. Bounce GonNa Children as well and then of course you add to that. Being locked down with an abuser or higher. Yeah it's horrifying. Yeah so to me. I mean that's that is the biggest issue and of course it takes different forms in different places you know in the DRC have rape as a weapon of war and other countries ravaged by war like Syria or Iraq in places like Afghanistan. You have girls being hung just because they're girls girls being burned with acid late certainly by strangers by partners by boyfriends acquaintances college. Campus Violence Sexual violence child marriage. Honor Crimes Cream genital mutilation. It takes on a different look in different places but we run. Something called an emergency assistance. Fund FOR EXTREME FORMS OF GENDER based violence is called Voices Against Violence Fund. And we will open up the fund and literally the cases that it's small bits of money that we can get out the door within twenty four to forty eight hours to quickly help a woman get back on her feet. Nadia Murad. Who is the is eating woman who escaped Isis in Iraq? Acting twenty fourteen. She was actually one of the first people to receive one of these. Just very quick fusions of financial support to help her family and she get healthcare relocation. You know her brothers had been killed. Most of her family was killed. The bill back something and I'm allowed to tell her story because she tells her story and obviously winning a Nobel peace prize a number of years later for suing Isis. But the fun that we continue to run at a number of cases is just through the roof and we you know quite frankly. We need more money to fund. Yeah believe me I would rather be preventing these Reno. And why should we were throwing money at a problem rather than trying to get it a solution but we're doing both let me ask you this. The numbers are just staggering. But do the numbers go down when women have power. I'm thinking about just even in the United States and domestic violence and violence against women and we have some really incredible women that are fighting in Congress and Senate and yet these numbers are still mind blowing. You know we fight so hard to get a seat at the table and then I'm wondering. Do you see changes within the community. Do you see that numbers go down. What is the tangible evidence of that? This is this is shifting or changing. Well certainly I think when the economy is strong right when other things are stable. That is certainly better. But that shouldn't have to be the case. Things be better never should be that humanity. I think we're not challenges. Honestly with violence against women is what I would call. One of the women leaders will work with called the silent. Majority silent majority is the majority of men who are good and who believed that bounced. Women should never stand but they don't do anything about it I well. I don't know anybody. You know one that. Maybe they don't know enough about it. They don't think there's a place for them to be part of the fight or minimal. And I think it's about. How do we engage those men to recognize that? This is a human problem and that they're part of the solution they have to be part of citation otherwise things will never change. Yeah so I think you see grace forward when Powerful men or influential men get it and they don't just get it and like a check the box way but they they really get it on a fundamental level and every decision that they make it somewhere in the calculus of how they're making those decisions and that's a big piece queer on an awards program here called the voices of solidarity and it's really about honoring those great guys who are in the fight. I love that and often risking their livelihood. We all met all around the world. There's some great. Ceo's and leaders that we've honored but there are also different young guys. I don't know if you're familiar with the Nail Polish undercover Keller's. No that into drank and it will turn a color. If you drink has been Mufi right yes and so these guys came up with this formula basically so that the nail Polish we turn a color if it was and now there's you just young college guys that they had a personal experience with a friend who had been drugged and raped in college and they decided to do something about it. It's kind of engaging men at different levels in doing good. I think that can make a huge difference.

Congress United States Violence Fund Senate China Iraq New Zealand Prime Minister Nail Polish Reno Sweden DRC Nadia Murad CEO Assault Keller Syria
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:09 min | 3 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"So I think the thing that people do not want to do is to just sit at home and think sit at home and read the Internet. I think that is GonNa really tell people some national balance in the wrong direction and finally. I know it's hard to project at this point because we're so fresh in it. But what lessons do you think we can take forward with US after? This crisis is over an into the future to make the world a better place. I mean. That's a beautiful question. I think if you take a moment and look over the trajectory of our own individual alive my guess is we've all weathered some storms some some dark night and I think we can use those as a point of reference and I. I mentioned this because I think it's important. We recognize remember our strength and our resiliency right our ability and tendency to rise above the city. And I think if we even take a broader lens if we look across the whole of humanity from an evolutionary standpoint. We are a wildly resilient species and think about what our ancestors had to experience and endure so we not only have evolution on her side but we have our ancestors at our backs supporting us and I find comfort in that and I think it's important to remember that and really across spiritual practices from Christian Mr Mysticism to Indian Yogis. We we can all speak to that. Deep in print think EPA genetic ability to not only endured times but to rise above them and I think this is providing an opportunity for us to remember that collectively and individually and beautiful gift or opportunity to rise up for me that one of over linings and all of this. I want to say this without discounting all the very real suffering that people are going through because there are people who are you know are not able to pay their rent. People who are I mean? I think a large proportion of our country lives on the edge of survivor all time and so taking into account. I think what we can take away from. This is people eating at home. People nourishing each other. Like I know for me. I haven't cooked this much really there. Ever actually really loving the fact of being able to nourish the people in my life. I loved the idea of maybe trails are more important than we used to view them. Maybe the earth is more important. Maybe connection if we can come out of this and be more kind to the other people around us. I noticed noise. It's like at a minimum. You know yeah people are giving I mean through social distancing. I mean they're giving people more space but also think people are just being a little more kind a little more generous and I'm noticing it gets grocery stores. People are actually. I noticed when this started there were a lot of fights over toilet right and now it's like people seem to be taking that into account and I would love if we could come out of this being a kinder more supportive society because I really feel like we need to remember. Stephen Hawking writing about a crushing saying that it was an evolutionary. Holdover isn't working for US anymore. Because how live and I would love. This could be one of those tipping points where we could say. Do we really need to have to buy stuff all the time? Do we really need to be served productive so that we can just consume? Can we actually find more enjoyment just by sitting with the person across from sitting with our family? So any let me ask you this. Where do you find hope in these uncertain times? I think right now hope is really important and I think one of the ways that we want to cultivate that is underneath. Resilient tends to be laughter enjoy and I think one of the things we really wanNA focus is amidst this deluge of negative information or or intense information. I think it would be. It's really great to make sure that we're still smiling if it's rather than you know. Put something on net flicks. It allows you to smile like something that allows you to Find laster found some joy to find happiness to you. I know there's the John Kuczynski show about trying to find the bright spots amidst all of this. Because I think that's really important like when they say laughter's the best medicine I think right now. It's really salient point for everyone. Well thank you both so much for your insight and guidance. I certainly appreciate it and I know my listeners will to reach out connect be kind to yourself relieve you today with this very special spoken word from Prince. Ea scared yet. They say this thing it kills your immune system attach your lungs makes it hard to breathe spreading spreading like wildfire causing havoc. Your friends and family are going to get it if they don't already have. It is tragic. I tell you madness. Scientists say old people get worse but most get eventually they say this is new. Would no no no? This has been around for centuries look at history is just a different name a different strain and now there's no way to contain. It affects the rich poor young old. The unknown the famous. It's dangerous everyone's on edge. Locked inside of their homes nervously borders a close countries declare state of emergency. Grocery stores are empty. Nobody's praying in church. The world has gone to crap. No one to toilet paper so without first. The stock market crashed laid off work hand. Sanitizer was going for a million dollars. Escort you better not sneeze. Because no one's going to say God bless you pay might even arrest. You don't mean a stress you but washing your hands obsessively in the restroom. Not Protect you. Friends I'm talking about Corona virus. Now this is a virus even more deadly the F. Virus you've seen it is spreads every minute like epidemic lives on surfaces most commonly remote control. Tv's screens cellular. Phone makes you desperate doctor. Say every time you scroll down to feed reinfected it invades the brain and with a mutated turns into hatred. Blame CHINA DID it. No no Italy did no no Iran. They'll Spain a why didn't make it clear. The Virus Ladies and gentlemen is fear. But don't be afraid despite what you hear on Seal Your TV. There is good news during this tragedy to fight loneliness. People up performing concerts on balconies in Iran Japan donated supplies to China for free Britain on them was a poem that said we are waves from the same. See listen to me like every tragedy we can let this destroy us. We can use to our benefit in repair relationships with our sisters and brothers. Wipe away silly questions because when it's all said and done all we ever really had in this world with each other. So let's flatten the curve and expand our hearts social distance boost our moon systems. Be My for the where we put our hands but also where we put our attention be alert not fearful because the virus is a pandemic easily transmitted if you do contracted or exhibit symptoms. We recommend immediately hotline of a level headed friend. If you are exposed to your TV change the station. Decontaminate yourself through dance laughter meditation. Twenty twenty has been morbid from Kobe to cove it. Maybe these tragic moments to finally wake up to what's important right now. Tell someone that you care for them. Yes right now tell them that you cherish them if they are not in the same room ring them up and tell them you will always be there for them because together is how will rise above the only vaccine for this F virus and every other virus is love. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Iran CHINA US Indian Yogis Stephen Hawking John Kuczynski spotify Alyssa Milano Twenty twenty EPA Spain executive Corona Kobe producer Josh Cooke
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

01:44 min | 3 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"If you haven't heard about anger let me tell you a little bit about it. It is the easiest way to make a podcast. I've just joined and I can't tell how much I love it. And here's a few reasons why it's free. It's super easy to create and record podcasts. Right from your computer. Literally anyone can do it. Anchor handles all of the distribution. All you have to do is record or upload your podcast and then they send it out to spotify and apple podcasts and everywhere else and get this anchor can help you get paid for podcasting without any listener number everything you need to make. Your podcast is in one place at anchor. Download the free anchor APP or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. Hello podcast people. Are you subscribe to spotify yet? I am an I love it so much. Spotify has a huge catalog of my favorite podcasts. On every topic including mine. When you download spotify you can follow your favorite podcast so you never miss an episode. Premium users can download episodes to listen to offline wherever you are and you can easily share what you're listening to with your friends on instagram. How cool is that so if you haven't done so already be sure to download the spotify APP search for Elissa Milano? Sorry not sorry on spotify or browse podcasts. In the Your Library Tab also make sure to follow me so you never miss an episode..

spotify Elissa Milano dot apple
Protecting Your Spiritual And Mental Health During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:54 min | 3 months ago

Protecting Your Spiritual And Mental Health During the Coronavirus Pandemic

"My Name's James Bottom Nama therapist bringing healing to the world. Hi My name is Camilo Lofton. I am a specialist and I am working to take on capitalism and patriarchy. Mindfulness practice at a time. Sorry not sorry. Thank you both for being a part of sorry. Not Sorry I wanted to have you on because people are struggling right now and I don't think we're talking enough about the mental health ramifications of this collective pain that we're experiencing so I really want to start with the question of just. What is the psychological toll that this is having on us and especially what about those on the front line that doctors the nurses the first responders a think with those people that they actually have training to deal with this? I think that they have a purpose. And they're working with what's in front of them so I think with people with doctors what they're in frontline people how they're going to suffer is energetically an immense toll on them to be constantly taking care of other people. And it's this deluge that they can't saw. I think that's going to be very difficult for them. I think the greater crisis for people is going to be that the people in the population general population. We moved through trauma by finding purpose in trauma and has a long-term sometimes decades thanked on things like relationships into the work. Consider normalize my fear. Is that especially with all of the messaging that there's not a single message on how we're supposed to move through this and I my fears that people aren't GonNa find purpose right. That people are GonNa stay at home and focus on what they're missing out on the fear rather than finding a collective healing conscious and when people are not talking about that right when we don't have people in the mainstream media talking about that. I think that it almost has that feeling of what's wrong with me clearly. I'm the only one talking but we're feeling this way because nobody's talking about it and I think that that can be a really lonely place to be into. Is that feeling of. I'm the only one that is this anxious about what's happening right now or I'm the only one that's depressed about what's happening right now. Because we're just ignoring psychological toll that this is taking her sure and I also think that part of the issue too is that in general those who are day. We don't invite in in variety in fear and depression. We tend to keep ourselves busy. 'cause that's capitalism asks us to do is turn turn turn and so we we tend to collectively as push all of those fears and anxieties and worries aside and so in all of the sudden we have nothing to do that and all of that stuff has now come to the surface. We almost have no choice but to look at it and yeah that can be incredibly overwhelming and when there is no sort of collective response to what that in due to a person and what that can do to a society for sure there's going to be ramifications for it in spiritual work we call this the shadow war and every spiritual tradition speaks to shadow work on some extent or on some level but collectively as a Western society especially here in the states. We haven't looked at this. I mean this is a complete undoing. If you will the toll is going to be big and so it's like what do we do? What do we do with that? It's interesting because looking at my children right who I think we all as parents at least the way David or apparent we've kept our kids really really busy right. I mean they have sports they have you know. My Son has drum lessons and hockey and now to well this is a couple of things to see him sit and have to sit with potential fear or any anxiety or not feeling good about himself or whatever it is to see him have the sports as a way to exert that just to use for a coping mechanism. The fact all of his coping mechanisms have sort of been taken away. I would imagine a lot of families are feeling this way. We're we're looking at our kids especially are active kids and we're noticing. What a drastic change. It is because our kids are just not having that coping mechanism of going outside and wrestling around boys that social wrestling and playing the sports and everything. And it's made him actually a lot more self reflective. I've seen a lot more creativity sparked and I was. I was Gonna say that same thing. I think what we're all learning is a couple of things mine. We can't rely on this administration or other media sources to solve this straight to. We have to get created in our own homes with ourselves individually within our families amongst our community. We have to search for that creative response to move through this. Go Ahead James. One thing is I just from speaking with so many people friends clients. Everyone's worried about their children. And one thing I've found is that actually children are highly resilient. They seem to be doing well when every person I asked like. Oh just like you said. My kids are being more creative more. Inventive that those certainly a bit of boredom. But they're not suffering adults are the ones who we've tried to always be productive where only valued on what we're doing it dolts that are really suffering by just sitting and this not losing the other thing that I've noticed about the kids which I think is pretty special as they've gotten closer because they're they're all each other has right now as far as playing and that's really really beautiful. I WANNA get to adults in a second but I have one question about how best to speak to our children about this time. Is it better to protect their innocence or to be honest about you? Know the fear factor. What do you think I think the best thing that we can do for? Children is one to be honest because to be honest with them about what's going on is it gives them a sense of self esteem that we believe that they can handle the information. Of course I don't think you want to overwhelm them negatively. I think you want to give them the information. I don't think we want to also gaslight our children by saying Oh everything's GonNa be okay. We're not worried because they're picking up from us that we are worked like everyone's worried and I think to say hey we are worry. These are adult problems that were going to work on yours safe. You're taking care of but there is a lot of your atmosphere and I think that it is important to be honest with them and I think the way that we're really going to show them how to work through. This is not by telling them how to do it but by modeling it ourselves

Camilo Lofton Wrestling David Hockey James
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Hi I'm Melissa Milano and this is sorry not sorry..

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"In New York and also to some extent in Detroit and other parts of the country in places like Texas or UTAH. Or you know you name. It was because we learned our lessons from New York and got on top of this early and implemented social distancing and we have to recognize that we remain just as vulnerable moving into the summer if we don't take aggressive measures to monitor this epidemic and do widespread testing and contact tracing otherwise we could reproduce the situation over and over again. I think what happened is because in certain parts of the country they did not see such a robust full-flowing epidemic. There's a sense of complacency built in and I hope that those individuals don't only learn Bhai suffering the same fate. We just don't WanNa see that. Thank you Dr Hotels. Thank you for all your work on this. And thanks for the update for my listeners. The most important job elected officials have is to keep us safe and the president is failing miserably at this. He's also trying to suppress the vote in November railing against safe and secure mail in voting. And the only way we can correct this is to vote him the fuck out of office so pleased today visit. Www DOT vote dot gov. Check your voter registration status. Make sure you're on. The voter rolls make a voting plan. Make sure your family and friends are registered and they have a voting plan because you see trump thinks he is powerful but we have so much more power than and it's time to use it. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and engineering by Natasha. Jacobs and music by Josh Cooke Alicia Eagle and my. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify. I tunes or wherever you get your podcasts. And if you like the show please rate review and spread the word sorry..

Bhai New York Alyssa Milano Detroit spotify Dr Hotels Texas Alicia Eagle president UTAH trump producer Josh Cooke executive Jacobs
Coronavirus Update with Dr. Peter Hotez

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:24 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus Update with Dr. Peter Hotez

"My Name is Dr Peter. Hotels and I believe that everybody in the United States deserve access to new drugs and therapies vaccines for cove in nineteen regardless of their ability to pay Arina. Sorry Dr Hotels. Thank you so much for joining us again. A lot has happened since last. We spoke some of it. Good and a lot of it bad. Can you just give us an overview about the status of the pandemic in America right now? Well of course the big over you for the US was this really horrible humanitarian tragedy in New York New Jersey Connecticut in the northeast. And we're still not nearly done. It's probably still going to go on for a few more weeks but I never thought we would see that level of the station in terms of death and admissions to the hospital in intensive care unit. And it's given me a real perspective on how things could go terribly wrong here in the United States so for me. Now it's all hands on deck and making certain that what happened in New York especially in places like Queens New York which you know I know you know very well would never happen again elsewhere in the US. Well I mean you call that a humanitarian crisis. Why do you identify it as that? Well it's the level of suffering that I'm seeing and it goes beyond you know it's not just the ticks of the number of deaths. I mean we're hearing about scores of schoolteachers. For instance getting sick and dying. And even you know there was an article that really broke my heart about the doormen New York. Yeah numbers of them have gotten sick and died and I went to medical school and Graduate School in New York at Cornell and Rockefeller. And you know you'd have a bad day in the lab and you just take a walk and the only people up at that hour would be guys standing in the doorway and on some evenings. They'd be your only friend and you'd have a little. You know nothing little informal chat with them and and that all those people are getting so sick and dying is really heartbreaking. So that the situation in New York and New Jersey and the thing that I'm really concerned about now is whether we really learned our lessons from New York and New Jersey. Why do I say that's so? For instance here in Texas. We saw what was happening in New York. We implemented social distancing early on really ahead of the virus so we never saw peak anything close to resembling what happened in New York and New Jersey. And that's been great. We've not had a huge number of admissions in the Texas Medical Center to the hospital the ICU we've got some. But it's definitely a manageable problem but now I think we're starting to hear from the governor that now they're anxious to open things up again right and relaxed social distancing even though a number of the epidemiologic models and I know the epidemiologic models are not perfect they have their flaws are basically saying for some states like Texas. We need to maintain that social distancing until June. One until we go back to containment vote and the problem is that the governor's in many parts of the south and the West. Just don't have the appetite for that. They're going to open things up earlier than June one. And maybe even by next week or the week afterwards and I understand the realities of closing down the economy. I understand the hardships that many people are facing that. They're not getting a paycheck and I understand the need to open segments of the economy. The piece that bothers me is that I'm not confident. We have the public health infrastructure. That's been put into place in order to manage what's going to be a new surge. We don't have places of business well set up to do testing a regular basis. We don't have the staff in place from public health agencies to do the contact tracing. We don't have syndrome surveillance activities in place so I'm very worried not so much for the next few weeks but I'm worried we're going to start to see a brand new round of searches that could even dwarf the ones. We've been seeing what happens starting over the summer. So I'm very worried and going on cable news a lot explaining this that come July and August if we don't have national plan in place not only around the economic recovery but linking at the public health we could even see unfolding situation. That's worse than we saw in March and now the first couple of weeks of April. Well the thing that I don't understand is has it. Peaked and with governors wanting to open up their states. Will there even be a single national peak or are we just going to keep peaking state by state and not get on the same page with this? And is it necessary to get on the same page? That's basically the worry right. The peak in New York according to the models is already happened a few days ago and one in Texas maybe in another week or so and then the numbers are starting to go down. The problem is we often forget. This is like the eye of a hurricane just because the first wave of the hurricane hit and you see the eye doesn't mean I go outside and play. It means the second part is coming so that part has to be considered and then not having a system in place to prevent a bigger resurgence in the summer of great concern. Because if you look at the models and yeah anybody can do this by the way. It's that's what I'm thinking about the models that they've set up in Seattle is anybody can go to just go to health data dot org and you can click on your state and see what's happening the models basically show a peak and then decline going all the way to August and don't really try to predict what's going to happen after that because they don't know what's going to happen in terms of relaxing social distancing by understand the urgency to relax social distancing. It's just that with out a plan in place for my during it. We're just asking for a huge problem. Potentially much bigger than the one. We've already faced

New York United States New Jersey Texas Dr Hotels Dr Peter Arina Texas Medical Center America Seattle Cornell Connecticut Rockefeller
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

09:46 min | 4 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Explained to my listeners. The difference between climate change and climate justice. Well climate change is. What's happening to us? All around the ongoing cheating of the planet and Catastrophic Effect Climate Justice is the reminder that happens a world. That's deeply unequal and unfair and the changes happened deepened at unfairness and injustice. 'cause if you're rich start that you can avoid climate change but you can figure out how to live with it if you lose your summer home in some places to a fire. You probably have another home to go to. But if you're peasant farmer on coast is the day of Bangladesh. They have been gold rises. You know eight inches and pushes salt water into your fields and makes it impossible to grow food there? I mean your other option is to live in a cardboard box and the edge of the national capital. You know and that's what already we think. Last year by twenty five million climate refugees were on the move the UN prediction. For how many weeks expect a little of the century tops out of about a billion people or one of being having to get up and leave your homes you know. I think that there's also a connection between these bona rebel areas and countries electing authoritarian regimes. That come in and make promises but that actually make the issue worse because they are loyal to the oil industry. I think that's true. We watch all over the world. This collection of autocrats all of whom have in common their fealty to with status quo and especially to the richest people in it who are often people from the fossil fuel industry so Putin in Russia the Saudi Royal Family Trump. I mean you know. Trump couldn't be bothered to roll out testing kits for the corona virus but when wanting this big campaign backers racking Baron Herald Ham us two billion dollars a day in the stock market collapse in twenty four hours it proposed a big bailout for those kind of firms right so these guys they get a good return on investment for their campaign donations and it's a huge huge part of the problem. Well Earth Day is coming up. What is your message to Americans and people around the world on Earth Day? Well big deal. It's The fiftieth anniversary. So the use of Said. Let's take the first day the twenty second as a kind of day of commemoration which think about the things that we've accomplished in the things we haven't accomplished and then when that's over issues the next day and the day after that to get to work people. Twenty third Thursday is been called Finance Day. And that's when we're really taking on these banks and others. So that's Today. If you have a chase credit card in your wallet to cut it up and to do it on social media so everybody else can see and your odds of having chase credit card are pretty damn good if you have an Amazon credit card united mileage card whatever it takes a little work to go do that but on the list of things that people have to deal with climate change. It's not like you're having to become a refugee and moved to a camp someplace. It means you have to find a different credit card so you can do it and it would be a huge signal to people like chase that we're sick of. We're not gonNA take it anymore. It's not okay to be trying to make money off the end of the planet right now. The oil gas and coal companies are laying waste to our planet. You take these dry corporations would have all the money. They need to continue full speed ahead but no they don't. They need money from banks to look for more coal oil and gas and the big banks have been eager to comply. Chase is the worst says the Paris. Climate Agreement Chases poured one hundred and ninety six billion dollars into digging up more fossil fuels that makes chase justice responsible for the destruction of our planet as Exxon Chevron. Vp and all the rest the final day Friday. The twenty fourth of April is Politics Day. In young people will be registering. Everybody vote getting them set for November. Because we're running out of four year cycles to waste if we WANNA have significant action by Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty. The latest we can possibly begin to go down that path. You know that governments don't turn on a dime so it's a huge year in so many ways. There are two huge levers to pull on them as political. The other is financial. We need to Yank as hard as we can. Go through them and see what happens. She what kind of change we can still create and speaking of the financial change our their funds people can invest in something like a 401k or investment fund that is managed for people where all the stocks in it are ethical and environmentally conscious. If your investor it's now relatively easy to find fossil free funds if you go to go fossil free dot org. There'll be some ideas any investment advisor now easily you there and the good news is if you if you started investing means a few years ago you would have made out like a bandit system has underperformed the rest of the market by huge percentage over the last inner ten years which would expect because you know someone else's figuring out how to do the job of producing energy or cheap ringing or cleanly so they're going to get their lunch that's why they're stocks are in the tank if you need a credit card. You don't have to go to chase bank. Their aspiration bank on the web. There's Amalgamated Bank on the East Coast Beneficial State Bank on the West Coast. There's local credit unions that are invested in fossil fuel. So these are the places to be keeping your money taking a credit card. These are all places that we can exercise some leverage as long as we do it together and publicly that's why going to stop the money pipeline dot com kind of join this joint effort so many different groups would be a really good idea so personally. Do you think we can make the change in time for this to really make a difference? I don't know I wish I could tell you for sure that if we did everything right at this point it was gonna work out. We know we're not gonNA stop global warming we've already raise temperature one degree. Celsius next enormous effect. We're not taking that back. And in fact the temperature is definitely gonNA rise some more. There's GonNa be more damage done. The best science indicates that we have a narrow window left albeit one. That's closing to make real change. That might still affect the outcome. In Large ways at period of leverage is short as I said the scientists tell us really the next decade is our best chance to be making huge change. This is the existential question of our time. In the same way that a century ago for our parents and grandparents the existential question was about Fascism in Europe and people had to cross the Atlantic and kill or be killed can order to deal with it. We don't have to do anything that hard. But we have to do more than we're doing now. Our Planet is outside. It's comfort zone so we need to be outside our coverage out and we need to be there fast. Well thank you for your life's work. Bill appreciate you so much and thanks for being on sorry not sorry we leave you today with Joy Harjo reading her breathtaking poem remember. Remember the Sky report under no each of the stars stories. Remember the moon now who she is. Remember the son's birth at dawn that is the strongest point of time. Remember sundown giving away tonight. Remember your birth. How your mother struggled to give birth. You are evidence of her and her and hers. Remember your father. He is Your Life. Also remember the earth's whose skin you are. Ritter Blogger yellow earthquake. Earth Brown earth wheat. Our earth remember the plants trees animal life who all have their tribes their families their histories to talk with them. Listen to them. They are alive poems. The win remember her voice. She knows the origin of this universe. Remember they were all people all people are you remember and this year versus you. Remember all is in motion is growing. Is You remember language. This remember the damn slight. Which is that life is remember. Sorry not sorry is executive produced by Alyssa Milano. That's me our associate producer has been Jackson editing and Engineering Natasha's Jacobs and music by Josh. Cooke Alicia Eagle and Milo bleary. That's my boy. Please subscribe on spotify Itunes or wherever you get your podcasts and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word..

Twenty Thirty Twenty Twenty Chase UN Bangladesh Amalgamated Bank Europe Alyssa Milano Trump Exxon Chevron Saudi Royal Family Trump Russia Putin Amazon Vp Joy Harjo East Coast Beneficial State Ba advisor
Earth Day with Bill McKibben

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

06:09 min | 4 months ago

Earth Day with Bill McKibben

"Hey this is bill mckibben. I've spent thirty years working hard for climate justice. Sorry not sorry I wanNA start with trying to get a clear eyed look at where we really stand with climate change today and also what's happening in the US versus what's happening around the world. Most of the news about climate change is pretty bad. Wrote the first book about this thirty years ago. Nineteen eighty nine. A book called the end of Nature. At that time we were offering warning about what was going to happen if we didn't do anything. We didn't do anything so now. Now those things are happening. We've raised the temperature of the earth about one degree Celsius so far and that's been enough to melt about half the Shiites in the Summer Arctic. The oceans are about thirty percent more acidic than they were forty years ago sea levels begun to rise we see huge disruptions to the planet hydrological system the way the water moves around the earth. That's because Warm Air holds more water vapor than coal. She get more. Evaporation and arid areas and with that. Evaporation in that drought comes horrific fires of the kind. We've seen in California or most recently in Australia where we think a couple of billion animals died of course those seven or eight weeks of blazes. Once that waters evaporated up into the air. It comes down again and increasingly. It comes down and kind of gully washing storms. We've just come through. The what is twelve months on record in American history. We've seen the biggest storms and our country's history including the champion of all time Hurricane Harvey which trump something like fifty inches of rain. You can vision that on parts of Houston so this is the new normal now. That's a one degree increase Celsius and global temperature. The problem is working on a path to increase the temperature about three degrees Celsius. A little more right now even if we kept the promises that we made in Paris which of course our country is keeping and that won't be three times as bad as one degree. It'll be many times worse than that. The damage we're doing now is exponential not linear because we're going pass tipping points so that's the really tough news if there's good news and there is it's that the engineers have done their job as well as the scientists. The politicians have done. There's badly you know In the last ten years they've dropped the price. Solar Panel Wind Turbine something like ninety percent. And that means that the cheapest way to generate power around the planets now usually the cleanest way and that gives us way out if we chose take it if we mobilized like we did at World War Two or something then we could make enormous progress very quickly. We're not doing that. That's why we're building movements to try and force that kind of action and we're seeing now you know we're seeing the effects right. We're seeing these fires. We're seeing weather unlike anything we've seen in the past and it still seems like there's people that just don't see this as a critical issue. What do you think could change their minds? How do we get people understand the magnitude of this problem? The first thing to say is one needs to have swallow amount of sympathy for people because for the last thirty years when now no the oil industry has waged an all out incredibly expensive. Incredibly effective dish information's paying to get people to disbelieve climate science. You know they went and hired the same people who used to work for the tobacco industry and they spun the same set of livestock. Science was clear that we didn't know for sure on when as great investigative reporting over the last five years now makes clear the oil companies knew everything there was to know back in the nineteen eighties. You know they understood what was happening. Exxon had great scientists. The product was Qurban. Of course they were going to study it and when scientists told them with great accuracy. How much and how fast it was going to warm. They were believed. Exxon started building. All its drilling rigs to compensate for the rise and she level they knew was coming. They didn't tell the rest of US instead. They embarked on this very expensive and very powerful campaign of lying so I have some sympathy for people who were taken in by that. Why the good news is their number. So fallen dramatically with about seventy percent of Americans. Now who understand that? There's a problem the polling in the Democratic primary shoes. It's either the number one or number two issue back and forth with climate change voters minds and that's true for all voters Republican Democrat Independent. When you ask them below the age of thirty young people really get in our leading on this issue so I think the problem at this point is less trying to persuade the remaining thirty percent who are ideologues and unlikely to get persuaded. I mean if you spent the last couple of decades marinating and rush limbaugh. You'd be resistant to clear thinking to the challenge. Instead is to get some part of that. Seventy percent really engaged in the fight. We don't need all of them. We can get five. Six seven percent of Americans really engaged in this battle. What I think we can win it and change the political and economic ground rules. But it's GonNa take that kind of hype.

Exxon United States Bill Mckibben Warm Air California Hurricane Harvey Houston Paris Qurban Australia Limbaugh Republican
Fighting Youth and Teen Suicide with Kendra Fisher

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:27 min | 4 months ago

Fighting Youth and Teen Suicide with Kendra Fisher

"We are facing an increasing crisis of teen and youth suicide in America and it is especially affecting young girls. Today's episode is a difficult one Kendra Fisher former elite ice hockey player and mental health. Activist and advocate helps me dig into the roots of the problem and what we can do to turn it around years ago. When faced with the opportunity to realize her dream of goaltending for team Canada Kendra was diagnosed with severe anxiety disorder coupled with severe panic attacks depression and agoraphobia forcing her to leave the national program in order to seek help to learn how to live with what had become a crippling disease. She now dedicates her life to helping. Young people get help for their mental illnesses. We turn now to a nationwide tragedy suicide new report from the Centers for disease. Control SAYS IT IS GROWING. Rapidly has been on the rise for more than a decade but nation suicide rate is at its highest point since one thousand nine hundred twelve year old accomplice allegedly harassed. Szechuan included that. You should drink bleach and die. No one likes you and you should go kill yourself. Sedgwick jumped off a near her home. After writing friends nine year old McKenzie atoms last week from other says the fourth grader was the target of Constant Racial Thompson? Name calling I was diagnosed with mental illness and I had no idea where to go so it was actually out at a team. Canada camping in Calgary and leading up to it in the weeks before I'd been to the doctors I've been to the hospital emergency room. I had no idea what was wrong with me. I felt like I was having a heart attack. I felt like it was gonNA Faint. Couldn't breathe swallow and and everybody told me it was fine. I love hockey and I love everything. It's given me both my hockey career. Also it would have had a shelf life and now. I'm in this position where I've learned so much about myself and I've met so many incredible people because of the journey I've been on and hopefully I can be a part of something that might stop somebody else. I'm Kendra Fisher and I'm fighting for the lives of those living with mental illness. Sorry not sorry so I mean. We've got a tough topic today but really before we dive in a love for you to give my listeners. A bit of information about your background. And how did mental health especially in girls become one of your causes? My background is hockey. I mean everything about my background is hockey. I grew up like so many Canadians. Just really wanting to have that red and White Jersey. That had my name on the back and I wanted to play for team Canada. I wanted to go to the Olympics and everything in my life through. My teens really suggests that I was going to be successful in that. I was carded member of team. Canada's National Hockey Program and sometime after high school I just got to a place where symptomatically and not knowing what. It was without a diagnosis. I was off. I just I felt sick all the time I felt like I was making trips to the emergency room constantly. Feeling like I was having a heart attack feeling like I couldn't breathe and it got to a place where unfortunately the perfect storm kind of hit. When I was out at my tryouts for team Canada in ninety nine and I was out at the camp and I just couldn't hide it anymore. It couldn't hide the battle that I was having every single day I grew up in in the greatest. You know possible situation. I had a great family. I had great friends. I was in a small town and I had a dream and my dream was. I wanted to play for team Canada. I wanted to play in the Olympics. That was that was what I knew. That was everything I worked for and I was well on my weight that I went to the coaches and I tried to explain to them what was going on and quite honestly their response to me was what it helps to know. What already made the team? They knew they wanted to select me that year. And I was finally get that chance to live my dream and it's obviously been one of the hugest moments of my life but not for anything I WANNA remember. Kazan's there was no at that point. What I eventually learned was a severe panic. Disorder and AGORAPHOBIA. Ocd clinical depression had literally taken over my life. And I spent the next five years unable to leave my apartment. Valey participating in my diagnosis just kind of scraping by and doing the bare minimum to survive and after five years I realized that just didn't see the point anymore and at that point I knew I had to make a decision and somehow I found it in me to start fighting and I learned everything I could about mental illness and the system and how it works and what supports are available when I really kind of became at the risk of sounding unhealthy obsessed with my own recovery and I got to a place where. I live very comfortably with my diagnosis. It doesn't mean it's gone. I live with it every day but now I live with it as a professional speaker and travel the world helping others learn how to cope and manage. I also work as a firefighter. I managed to go back and play for team. Canada's inline hockey team and it's really just kind of become a journey that I'm so passionate about because I understand how hopeless it feels but more importantly I understand how hard it is to find hope and defined real help and support and understanding about mental illness. And I just want to be a part of that. Narrative does mental illness. Run in your family. Yes yes and no I mean. I've always done this whole. Why did it happen to me and I think we always look for the answers because if we could find the answers we can fix the problem? Certainly on my on my Dad's side of the family. There's some depression but it wasn't so prevalent that I ever knew about. It wasn't something that I was ever made aware of. It didn't show itself to me until I actually understood what I was dealing with. And you said that you're now living comfortably with your mental illness. What does that mean? I'm fully functioning. It doesn't affect my day to day life in a way. It did in the way. It did kind of earlier on in my diagnosis. I got to a place where I just have an incredible system of support set up around me and I have all of my tools and strategies in place and I'm very quick to identify when I'm not doing well and I've also given others the permission to hold me accountable when they see I'm not doing well and in doing so. It allows me to really react quickly and now. I mean I would challenge that on my worst days of anxiety. I'm at worst as a panic on my worst days of depression doesn't affect me any longer than it would affect somebody getting a bad cold or the you know the stomach flu. It's it's a couple of days of really having to focus on what's brought me back to that place and making sure that I am doing all of the things that I know. Keep me healthy and usually I can rectify it. Just by changing those behaviors. I suffer from generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. But I think it's so hard that when we're in the middle of it to do the things that we know will make us feel better right like I know that going out and being in my garden digging in the dirt or taking a hike or taking a yoga class. I know that these are the things that will make me feel better and yet it's so hard to break out of it. Do you have any advice for me? Yeah absolutely with love and affection. Not as an not an onerous way. But I think that we forget to practice the things that keep us healthy when we're doing well We get to this place where we let life kind of takeover and that you know that pace of just going and when we're good we don't feel the need to necessarily revert back to that self care in those things that we know keep us healthy feel like so many people only practice crisis response and I think that it's time that people learn education and prevention are really the way to manage things crisis response is really you know. You're too far already.

Canada Hockey Kendra Fisher Agoraphobia Olympics Canada Kendra Depression Severe Anxiety America Inline Hockey Disorder Calgary Sedgwick White Jersey Thompson Kazan OCD
COVID-19 Special with Dr. Dena Grayson

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:26 min | 4 months ago

COVID-19 Special with Dr. Dena Grayson

"I am Dr Grayson and I believe in health care for all. Sorry not sorry. So you're a Florida resident and we see pictures of beaches. That are full there. How is your governor doing this and managing this crisis? I think that unfortunately governor to Sanchez has really told that trump party line which was denial. Denial denial and too little too late. I mean we were not only the third largest state here in Florida but I think everyone knows that we have a lot of older folks that retired to Florida and older Americans. Older people in general are more susceptible to this virus more susceptible to severe illness more susceptible to die and everyone everyone saw those spring break pictures and videos. Oh I couldn't believe people that later belly belly to belly and then what are they going? One God knows where back to you. Know all over the country and they're not symptomatic so you know you heard them saying we don't care what you're here to party but you can't expect a twenty year old twenty one year old to like have that kind of judgment. Where were the adults in the room? Where was right? And what do you think the cost was of keeping those beaches open for so long? Only we don't know the cost yet. Unfortunately and I think that every single person that came here on spring break and was interacting with other people should be placed on immediate quarantines for fourteen days. They are ticking. Time bombs totally good news for them is. They're unlikely to get severely ill or die but what about their parents. Their grandparents went about their teachers. What about you know somebody? In the store they interact with their ticking time on little biological time bombs and I also think I mean we have to be responsible and say that more and more younger people are now getting the illness and having more repercussions then in the beginning of this and I don't know if that means that the virus itself is changing but it does seem that more young people are starting to get affected so this mentality of I'm young and invincible is really not great not only for other people but also for themselves. If they can't think about other people then they have to be able to take care of themselves and protect themselves. I mean all of those young people had to return home somewhere. And that's what's so terrifying to me. I would look at those pictures of the beach and think how many of those people were from California or you know going be going back to studio city with my parents right next door or whatever it is. That's exactly right and you know these younger folks need to remember that actually even though if you catch the virus you're less likely to get seriously ill or diet doesn't mean you're not GonNa get seriously ill indic- number one and number. Two younger people are actually the most likely to catch the bars right. I know this because if you look at like South Korea thirty percent and they they screen everybody like Walk Outside. Get a test. I mean like you can't move around. I mean they're everywhere testing testing testing. And we know that thirty percent of all the people that tested positive in South Korea were between the ages of twenty and twenty nine. Because those are your Baristas bartenders waiters and they're interacting with people all the time and we call them super scrubbers. They don't know they're infected. They feel fine but they're interacting with the public and you know again prior to all this knowledge being out there. I don't follow anybody's doing their job and they're doing their thing. They're in their twenties. But now that it's out there everyone social media like you said think of yourself don't even be selfless think of yourself. You can die. And it's so crazy to me and even in California where people are very health conscious and very aware people who are at the beaches. They had to close down the beach parking lots because over the weekend. People were still hiking. People were still congregating in the beaches and the parks. It's so crazy to me before the governor took you know the hard stance that he did in California. Everybody I knew was already on lockdown. Right we were like okay. We know where this is going. We'll stay home and you look at what's going on now and people still aren't staying home. It's mind boggling to me but I wanNA talk to you a little bit about how the governors of the country and how you feel. They're doing in addressing the corona virus. And who do you think is standing out as far as leadership goes during this time? Well you are very fortunate to live in the wonderful state of California where I spent A. Oh Gosh at least a quarter. It's not a third of my life and you have a fabulous governor Gavin. Newsom is doing an extremely good job. I think that he's been honest and clear and transparent. I think that trying not to be overly aggressive trying to find that right balance. I mean we have this deadly virus. That is highly contagious. No one wants to lock down the country. No one wants to lockdown community. No one wants to do that. That's like the mechanism of last resort and governor fabulous job and sort of finding that right balance and I think Governor Cuomo of New York has been utterly spectacular. You watches press conferences. And you know I it as a true experts in MVP. I mean listen you know me. I'm not an Uber Nerd. But I listened to his press conferences. And they're spectacular he theory fact-based. He's not trying to freak people out what he's he's honest and I think that you'll people and this is what I try to do as well and you know that. Says I try to just tell people she was one it is. I'm not going to sugar coat it. I'm not trying to be sensational about it. Because it is a scary situation. I Find My interactions with folks just like what Governor Cuomo is doing knowledge is power people feel comfortable because they know that they just want to understand the fast and both of them have done a fabulous job. They've shown compassion. Forgot what I was GONNA say. I think that they've shown great compassion and empathy. And that is what will inspire people so that once we come out of this time. We're going to be better for it. We're going to be better neighbors. We're going to be better citizens we're GONNA take our position in life more seriously and what connection means and how beautiful it is to have connection and interaction and family and all of those things that I think we had begun to question. You know not question in a philosophical way but question because of our actions we were very much especially in this country driven by money and work and status and I feel there's a best case scenario. It's that we all come out of this remembering what it's like to really live a life of service and what that means and how we can do that get back to that fully agree and a couple of thoughts on that first of all. I think the one thing that has been striking the utter lack of compassion from Donald Trump. Right he gets asked a softball question. What would you tell people that are scared? Any blessed the report. This is a softball question. We're all you're just saying it's my Gosh. You know we know you're scared. We're the we're here for you. Not we're fighting every day for every life something Winston Moron. I mean do something. But he couldn't even do that. But more importantly okay. Let's leave trump aside. 'cause we're not going to change that national nightmare until November but talking about you know these relationships or say you're so right and I know that everybody's been using Hashtag social distancing. I gotTa tell you I have a real problem with it because it tends wrong message. We need to be more social than ever. We need our social connections our relationships with our loved ones with our neighbors with our family so we need to be physically distant right. We don't WanNa be intermingling physically but the beauty is is that we have these wonderful tools now that we didn't have right so not so in the distant past where we can facetime relatives. We can skype. We can use zoom or whatever your favorite APP is to interact and actually see people and interact and in fact you and I met through twitter. I mean we met through social media and so I mean we have these wonderful ways to connect with one another because we need each other. This is going to be hard. It already is so. I like to say to people. Hashtag physical distancing. Yeah we'RE GONNA BE F anything more social as you pointed out. We need to help each other. We have

California Governor Cuomo Florida South Korea Softball Dr Grayson Sanchez Donald Trump Twitter MVP Skype Newsom Gavin Winston Moron New York
Nifty Schiff: Adam Schiff Fights Corruption

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:15 min | 5 months ago

Nifty Schiff: Adam Schiff Fights Corruption

"So congressman the first thing I wanNA talk to you about obviously is the corona virus. If I were to have thought that we would be in this place even just a month ago. I'm pretty up to date on the news. And when we started to hear about corona virus it just felt like it was so far away that it could never touch us and now every aspect of life in America has changed in ways that most of us just could not have imagined so. Just walk us through your thoughts on the federal government's response thus far. Well I think you're absolutely right. The speed at which this has moved has been just breathtaking. And I think we're all trying to come to grips with what it means in the near term what it means in the long term for the country in terms of the response we lost precious time frankly while the administration tried to downplay the significance of this even when it became quite apparent that we were not going to be able to keep this virus out of the country. That was never a practical idea. We could try to limit our exposure. But it was going to come here. We lost very important. Time in developing tests and distributing them widely and being able to essentially surveilled this virus where it was and do so at a time. I think when it was very important to try to minimize the spread. That's time we'll never get back and I think that for quite a while the president to use this as more of a public relations crisis than a health crisis Those days are now over but we have a lot of catching up to do and and sadly taught a time. Now in the Congress. We moved to pass a couple bills in rapid succession to try to surge resources to hospitals and clinics to try to speed the development of a vaccine to try to make sure in the second bill that we provided for paid sick. Leave that we've provided extended unemployment compensation food for kids. That would normally get their food at school and other really key emergency measures but even those are really a down payment on what's necessary to address both the health crisis and the verging economic crisis. Talking to Dr Peter Hotel has he is most concerned with the fact that regardless of people's ages it seems like those in the healthcare system are getting hit as hard as someone say past seventy. There's been a couple of ER doctors that are now on respirators. And they're in their forties or fifties. That's not supposed to have them to learn their seventies. There's so much that they don't know but what he said was in. This is what I wanted to pass on to you is he said the government needs to put together some plan for convalescent antibody therapy for our first responders and our doctors and basically what that is patients who cover from Cova nineteen. They develop antibodies to the virus. And those anybody can be collected from a blood donation of a recovered patient and then processed and then turned around either as there be for potentially sick patients or as temporary preventative care for first responders or frontline healthcare workers. And it's a therapy. That's over a hundred years old and was used with success during the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic so I wanted to pass that onto you convalesce. An antibody therapy. He thinks it needs to start happening right now as they're working for the vaccine whoever that makes a great deal of sense and that's something. I will look into immediately. I would hope and presume that are out of government in terms of the administration and our healthcare. Experts are already pencilling out and planning this. Let's not take anything for granted these days absolutely true. So what does it feel like in Congress right now I mean? Is there a sense of urgency and just the functionality of how Congress works I mean? I've walked those halls? You guys are in very close proximity to one another in your offices and with your staff. What's going on in Congress right now? There's a real sense of urgency. We're obviously hearing a great deal from our constituents our neighbors our families our friends and we're particularly concerned with taking every measure. We can't flatten this curve. And do it. We can't push up good information. That's why really eager to participate in your podcast. The more good information we can get out there. The more that people can take steps on their own to mitigate the spread of the more weekend relieve some of the enormous pressure and strain that has been placed on our healthcare system and save lives. But also you know. All the members are deeply concerned about the economic impacts of closing down all restaurants and bars. In movie theaters. And places where people congregate obviously. It's impacting anyone connected with those industries in any way shape or form or those that are the customers and the customers dry up those businesses dry up and so I think there's also a sense of urgency to deal with the economic impacts. I think that'll be the subject of the next big bill. Coming out of Congress and many of us are advocating that we send cash to each and every American immediately to help get them through this difficult time that help keep struggling businesses. Afloat WanNa make sure that the small business administration is fully funded and can provide emergency loans to small businesses but in terms of the mechanics at the capital. We are doing as much teleworking as possible. We're trying to be a good example as well but there are certain things that we're going to need to be present for. We're GONNA need to come in. I think in vote on a new package even now the package that passed the house. We're still running into difficulties among some of the members with that. And if that's so foreshadow of future difficulties where one or two members can hold up Relief for an entire nation than we're going to have to make sure that we're all hands on deck if that's necessary to steer the country through this and how about the White House. Do you feel like they're working with Congress in a nonpartisan way. I'm not even GONNA say bipartisan. Because this should be zero. Partisan or does it still feel like there's headbutting speaker? Pelosi and MNUCHIN administration have been able to negotiate with each other and I think that the experts at the agencies people like Dr Fao Cheer Providing Their Best Advice and recommendations You know the president is as he will always be for the president's always about him and that makes it very difficult to negotiate with their two. Yes when someone's predominant conservatives for themself but we hope that he rises to the occasion they're certainly. I think a different tone in the last day or two in the press conference although he still has a year to lash out at others and the fights that he's been provoking with state governors are very. I think that mental to getting an appropriate federal and state and local response.

Congress President Trump Congressman America Cova Dr Peter Hotel Pelosi White House Dr Fao Mnuchin
Coronavirus Special Episode with Dr. Peter Hotez

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:32 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus Special Episode with Dr. Peter Hotez

"I'm Peter says than I believe that. All of the world's population including the world's poorest people deserve the right access zoo essential medicines vaccines innovation. Sorry not sorry I just from a medical perspective. What makes this virus so different than some of the other viruses that circulate? Why is it so deadly? Well this is one of the interesting things about this corona virus. It's not the most lethal virus we've ever seen by a long shot right. It's nothing like Ebola. Kills Half of untreated people. Nor is it like needs those in terms of transmissibility that must transmissible be no but it's high enough both categories to give it this unique spin that we haven't seen from a lot of other viruses. Let me explain a little bit. So the virus itself overall is between five and twenty times more lethal than seasonal influenza. Which itself is a bad actor. And it's quite transmissible at two or three times more transmissible than flus. You've got something that's not quite as serious as the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic but it's starting to approach that but it only happens for certain age category so this is really interesting. It's highly contagious. And but there's a lot of people walking around with a that are not too sick to stay at home so they could spread it in the community. Let me contrast that was something else so if you look at the original SARS virus this new virus. You're calling it. Sars to the original one which came out in two thousand three. Was You know five or six times more deadly and more serious illness for everybody? So what happened was if you had that original SARS one virus in two thousand three. It's not like you were walking around going to target going to the shopping mall. You are sick. Any were better. You're in the hospital and that kind of kept you out of the community pretty quickly. This one is different than last year. One of those at risk groups and I'll tell you which those at risk groups are. You're walking around spreading the virus pretty widely in. That's why this thing has taken off so much in central China and in northern Italy and then in the US doing this as well but if you're lucky enough to belong to one of the three or four major at risk groups that's when you get very sick and half the go to the hospital for those combination of reasons it makes it a very serious national epidemic and also. I mean you know I don't want to politicize this but the president is giving guidelines and recommendations that I don't know vary from interview to interview right. I mean it's like every single time. We hear him speak. He's talking about something else some other guideline that contradicts the guideline before. So how can individuals be expected to know the right thing to do when they're getting totally conflicting information from our leadership when needed to be done? What still needs to be done is and I've said this in public. Few Times is what you need to do in. This kind of situation is ever have very honest discussion with the American people. Were you say you know? You don't say this is just the flu or a cold or this is contained. What you do is say. Look this is a serious pathogen. These are the three or four things. I'm most worried about you. Talk about older Americans especially those with underlying disabilities. You explain why you talk about healthcare providers. Now we have to -mergency room physicians in critical care this weekend. According to the New York Times and so these are two or three big populations that were worried about. And here's what we're GONNA do about and why we're GONNA do what we're doing and historically the American people responded to that very well at. It's just when you model the message and say you know in in an effort to reassure that language was used which tried to oversimplify minimized. It actually wound up making things much worse. I said you know if you had actually gone through the three or four things that you're worried about. Here's what we're doing about it. I think that in itself would have been stabilising and we might not have seen this volatility for instance in the stock market and everything

Sars New York Times Few Times Peter FLU Seasonal Influenza President Trump United States China Italy
Empty The Pews with Ex-Evangelical Chrissy Stroop

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:33 min | 5 months ago

Empty The Pews with Ex-Evangelical Chrissy Stroop

"Hi I'm Christie stroup. I'm a transgender. Ex jellicoe sorry not sorry so you and I first met on twitter. I think around two thousand seventeen shortly after the election. Your Twitter Bio Reids X. Evangelical Writer and Russian History PhD Trans Girl and sometimes snark Easter. I'd like frito briefly. Tell us a little bit about your childhood. Where did you grow up? What was your childhood like so I grew up mostly in north suburb of Indianapolis called. Fisher's was born a small town in Northern Indiana. But my family moved down there When I was around five years old and after kindergarten and with the exception of half of sixth grade I was in Christian schools the entire time of my elementary and secondary education. And when I say Christian school I don't mean a Jesuit Academy or something like that you know the The schools that call themselves Christian schools or Christian Academy's they're usually more like the ones where second lady Karen Pence teaches art where they're very anti. Lgbtq or they mobilized the kids for doing culture wars kind of advocacy and involvements. Illiberal civics if you will so you know. I had a drilled into my head in church and Christian schools from a very early age that liberals are these horrible people who kill babies and we have to stop them and we also have to stop gay people from having rights. Can you talk a little bit? About the history of Evangelical Ism sure the Histories of Evangelical Ism that have been written a lot of them have been written by people who come out of the more like moderate to liberal tradition evangelical right if somewhat sympathetic to it and they want to locate the origins of Evangelical Ism and things like the second grade awakening in the abolitionist movement. And it's true that a kind of evangelical protestantism was a motivating factor for the abolition of slavery in Britain and the United States. But that's not really the ancestor the direct ancestor of what we call evangelical protestantism or what it has mostly become in the United States today. If you WANNA look at what evangelical ISM is in the United States today. And here we're talking mostly about white evangelical. There are some evangelical of color that would also fall into this category but there are also some Christians of color that some people would call evangelical somewhat not someone self defined as evangelical than some would not clear very different and they vote very differently. But you know this right mostly white evangelicalism. It's the descendant of slaveholders Christianity. It's you know the descendant of denominations involved is still all these denominations as well like the Southern Baptist Convention which split off of other Baptists over the issue of slavery because you know these northern Baptist groups decided that they didn't want they didn't think slave owners should be missionaries what became the Southern Baptist Convention. Thought that was very insulting so they broke away so they could have missionary owned slaves. And you know this is also seriously inflected through the Cold War anti communism and in American history that's really inseparable from the civil rights. Movement are far right-wing anticommunist they denounce Martin Luther King as a communist that sort of thing and you know initially people like Jerry Falwell senior. Who of course built the moral majority you know he? He mobilized Christians around opposition to civil rights legislation and integration and today evangelical. Who are still very much in that tradition They try to distance themselves from that history but it is their history and my history too. I mean I grew up that way and they still vote to uphold white supremacism. Even if they won't admit it and there's another key moment there too that I sort of forgot to go over earlier. Which is there. Were these debates in theology in the early twentieth century between the so-called modernists. Who are able to move away from Biblical liberalism and the fundamentalists and this is actually where the term fundamentalists came from. There is a series of pamphlets published starting in Nineteen fifteen called the fundamentals and today's evangelical are also very much the descendants of the fundamentalist side of those early twentieth century debates so evangelical in the United States. It's best to consider the type of fundamentalist Christianity even if some evangelical fundamentalists would define themselves against each other. If we take a step back and look at it through kind of a scholarly framework. It's it's very much a variety of Christian fundamentalism. I wanted to get a better understanding of really what your life was. Like as an evangelical Christian. Can you describe that to me? I mean were you happy yeah. That's a complicated question. And the kind of things that happen to you. When you end up rejecting the ideology when you change politically and religiously from your family and a high demand religious group and a thorough -tarian religious group like this. You know people will accuse you of quote unquote attacking everything we stand for a direct. I heard from multiple relatives of mine. They will accuse you of hating your entire childhood but I did not hate my entire childhood and they don't hate my entire childhood. Now I also definitely didn't get the worst of Evangelical Ism so as we now know there was a big expose. I think over seven hundred cases as far as I recall last year. Were exposed of child sexual abuse and cover ups in the Southern Baptist Convention. You know that didn't happen to me I. I didn't get the worst kind of corporal punishment. The worst guy was being spanked with a wooden spoon. But corporal punishment is highly emphasized and Evangelical Communities Spare the Rod and spoil the child and all that and any fundamentalist group they create these kind of parallel institutions and structures this whole parallel society alongside mainstream American society. So they look at outsiders as quote unquote the world. That's the phrase that they use. The world is scary. You're supposed to kind of go into it. Sometimes and convert people but most of our social life was people we knew through church and Christian school and so I was isolated that way and then they also build up kind of a whole system of as I said parallel institutions and even publishing houses books a Christian music industry this sort of stuff to reinforce a set of alternative facts if you will and to kind of expose and highlight that a couple years ago I coined the Hashtag Christian facts to look at the kinds of alternative facts that children raised in. This environment are indoctrinated with you. Know things like the Loch ness monster might be real. And that's more proof that humans and dinosaurs lived at the same time you know. There's a lot of really really really wild stuff. Some of it has much more well. Maybe just differently problematic implications and that I mean once you start to get into things like purity culture and what I like to call fake sex. Ed they tell you things like you know. Condoms can't stop the AIDS virus. Abortion causes breast cancer and lots of other stuff that's just completely made up

Christian School Histories Of Evangelical Ism United States Southern Baptist Convention Twitter Christie Stroup Frito Indianapolis Loch Ness Monster Aids Martin Luther King Jerry Falwell Russian History Phd Trans Girl Northern Indiana Fisher Christian Academy Writer
Lorenzo RiccardiMarrying Economics And Travel

Counting Countries

08:46 min | 5 months ago

Lorenzo RiccardiMarrying Economics And Travel

"Lorenzo. I am excited to be sitting down with you in person in Bangkok in. I'm hoping you can introduce yourself. Thank y'all Rica Or so Epa to to Meteo Let's say we've been touched for for quite long diamond. A as we know people who travel frequently They have difficulties in meeting in a specific place. We let's stay in touch online Nathan media but Yeah good that we coordinate today. A brief introduction about myself I'm Tanya so Batna close to a million beautiful town that is Bergamo medieval down UNESCO site I decide that the two moved to China actually for eighteen years ago Let's say to get it in Italy. I started economics. Business Administration. I let's say qualified as a CPA. That means chartered accountant ODA Tax and Finance Professional. I decided to move to Shanghai. I actually Beijing studying Again economics at the University of International Business Economics Shanghai for a long period because I already spent fourteen years Actually doing what I was doing also in Italy so working as a CPA as tax and accounting professional. I the photo quite large low in tax firm and an recently actually during the last nine years so with my own firm with my own team with the. Let's say lawyer. Subsidies accountants financial advisers and maniacs sees the foreign groups investing in the forest specifically In in China and Let's say Shanghai area even more than other regions provinces or areas of of China. Of course. I'm a patient traveler. I travel at the. Let's say too many countries before moving to China and I decided Wena was based in Shanghai to to travel to every country. Not a decision of one day but Let's say traveling traveling and Let's see increasing your experience and expertise in traveling. I decided yet traveler more and more under in order already today I can say that. I traveled to every sovereign nation. One hundred ninety eight said. He contrasts having visited the. Let's say three hundred interbay gone on the third of January twenty twenty excellent Orange L. Let's go back in time. Take me to your UNESCO World Heritage City outside of Milano. And what was your family lake in other words from a perspective of travel. Were you guys homebound where you traipsing through Europe where you venturing outside of your? What was your travel? Dna? I can say I can say that With my with my father we traveled to Europe. And my father always encouraged made to to travel. And that yeah. I always remember Let's say he always recommended a certain level of education that means university glass probably so fully traveling university where exactly the same level off. Let's say education importance for the. Let's say personal life and career and is I think is a is a valued at Dieppe understood from my father probably also based on his business traveling because it was a manager in Indian shadow of a company Italian group in engineering and Manufacturing Electric In in different countries is a he always been basically neatly but he had chance to say short business trips in in many countries and every time he came back from a business trip Let's say transfer to to me is passion is interested. Let's say the venue that he understood from this experience in in addition to that your father this great opportunity to of travelling throughout Europe. Were you at times accompanying him on. Some of these strips are what were your travels like with your family going up. Let's say Miami Miami's the Travis with my family where typically some of occasions saw the let's say and Few countries of course France and few countries close to Italy so I cannot describe Let's say so many trips to remote or exotic location definitely Let's say what I remember is these? Let's say generally Comment on the importance of traveling that I received from my father and I think this was something important ores in his business career. Okay so we have to think your father partly for your passion of travel with him sharing those stories as he traveled throughout Europe. And then you also shared with us. Before he moved to China. You started to do a lot of travel on your own. So what was kind of that first independent trip? You took on your own while living in Italy when you started to spread your wings. What was that like? Let's say the first Solo travel that I did I think was to Turkey was to Eastham born and I really remember crossing Bosphorus Bridge. It is I think an important moment because I remember just these Let's say symbolic crossing between two continents Asia and Europe and for me was relevant. I felt the first time. Let's say far from my hometown and I think from that moment. I always searching other experience where I could feel the same kind of expedience and today. I think like most of people travelling so much I can say that the I never feel far from home because I feel at home everywhere. But that was Let's say unexperienced that that I remember and I can. I can manage Let's say probably the first trip out of Europe was to the United States was again. Ah Summer School. My father is encouraged me to study English in UK or the US. The time was in California in the first three of let's say Western countries sent was to Was to China was to Thailand in China. Okay so going back to the US coming from Italy and you're studying English Kelly. I'm not sure how old you were at that. Point Young Western Europe. Us pretty similar overall but as a younger guy were you kind of noticing any cultural differences or nuances. Anything funny or interesting. Stick out to you when you were standing in California. Let's say what I can say that. What ty note is. Is that Americans they have limited the understanding or knowledge about Europe and about my country and about the place I come from but this is not a comment specifically on Americans. This is something related to let's say or Muslim countries and definitely all Western countries because people from Italy they have limited understanding of the Far East of China of severed countries and not understanding of the fifty four African countries. So Yeah my first the. Let's say tree out of FUTA PA. Let's say teaching needed even in the Western world even in the top economy in the in the most developed country. We don't have a clear understanding or a complete knowledge of geography and about. Let's say the word

China Italy Europe Shanghai University Of International Bu California United States Business Administration Bangkok Bergamo EPA Nathan Lorenzo. Batna Beijing Unesco World Heritage City Accountant Futa Pa Bosphorus Bridge
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:01 min | 6 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

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Our <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> associate producer. Is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Ben Jackson <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Editing and engineering. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Natasha <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jacobs and music <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> by Josh Cooke <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Alicia Equal. <Speech_Music_Female> Please subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> on spotify <Speech_Music_Female> items or wherever <Speech_Music_Female> you get your podcasts broadcasts <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> if you like the show great review and spread the word. Sorry not sorry.

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

07:34 min | 8 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Hi this is Jim Bud. And I'm a former senior border patrol agent with the United States Border Patrol in Campo California and a former intelligence agent with San Diego. Dago sector and I believe and I know that asylum is not a crime in being an immigrant is not a crime and and families do not deserve to die and be held in indefinite detention. Sorry not sorry. Can you talk a little bit about. Is there any protocol as far as reporting if you saw injustices where you meant to keep that quiet. Why it or like what what? What was it like functioning on a daily basis there? So I I guess would be known as a rat you get. They call it dining out. So if I A. C.. Agent Milano hit a migrant. And I go to the supervisor. And this agent Milano hit migrant for no reason then the next day or that night I can expect to find a whole bunch of dimes and my mail drawer right. They're telling you that you're at your dining people out and stuff like that. So you're you're in courage to stay quiet and routinely. I you know I would tell people you don't want me to read on you. Don't do anything in front of me the you know. How prevalent was the behavior? Well I mean fortunately because I worked by myself and I didn't get a lot of backup right. I didn't have that issue but then like if I'm at the checkpoints or whatever it's prevalent I mean it's there are so Kamini especially for the men there so many Sexual assault allegations against the agents from from migrants in the border patrol. Just kind of makes them go away or they a sometimes if they get a lawyer they'll pay the lawyers and just make it go away and then you never ever hear about it so and is that common. Yeah yeah I mean it's really common I would say I think about twenty percent uh of the agents in the border patrol are trying to be professional. That's it twenty percent. Yeah so two two out of every ten. Yeah Yeah I mean. It's a system from from training all the way up to the chief life and the structure this and they teach this through the academy right. It's all it's all set up that way and then when you get host academy it's set up that way and they probably learn really quick the rules right. Well I don't know I don't think I ever really disruptor disruptor you'd be a disruptor no matter what we love about yeah but no you learn. Yeah you learn it's it's it's a brotherhood in all pitcher back. You Pat mine. And that's that's what the setups are like in Post Academy so you graduate the academy and you go to Post Academy at your station for a couple of months. And that's where they decide if you're gonNA play ball or not. Are you gonNA use the racist racist terms. Are you gonNA ignore it when you're Chinese that encouraged or discouraged. Everybody doesn't and they look down on you in question question you if you should be there or not they can fail you on your Spanish boards imposed academy and that's exactly what posts academies fours to find those who are not gonna I play ball the women the women file sexual assault charges against the agents. Who are sexually assaulting them? They are gone too. So it's it's a way to weed out agents that don't fit and it's a closed system. The agents are the ones that during the hiring. The agents are ones doing the training. They're doing the firing. My name is Rafael Augustine. I'm a writer on the TV. Show Jane the Virgin and I am the executive director of leaf and the youth cinema project. Oh did I mention I am a formerly undocumented American. Well sorry not sorry. Every time we have had any immigration system applied in the United States and has always been a reaction to immigrants of color in fact Homeland Security would choose to be immigration. Naturalization Service's started exclusively for Chinese immigrants. There's a guy I'm a geographer his name's EJ Ravenstein And he wrote over a century ago. this thing called the laws of migration but basically basically what it says is that there is an innate desire in most people to better themselves and all of migration is is based on that innate desire to be better and do better or I agree with that definitely. I do too. Why else would you completely Pick up your family. Take this long journey to our country however you need to get here If it's not to you better yourself to better future generations to want to want a better life absolutely or or like my parents. You learned the hard way that the American dream is not for you before your children and I think that was a very hard for them to learn but they were happy to sit did they ever were. They ever doctors in the United States when they got here. I the the language barrier second. Is that you kind. You become a slave to the minimum wage race. You know the guys. You can't keep your head above the water. Just keep going so the the best that they were able to do here was become. MRI technicians which was very funny because my father was arguing with the doctors assessing MRI images and my dad was always right? Smarter Than Pediatrics. This is the great irony of our journey on. My parents. got to a place where they made great money as MRI technicians. They had the beautiful California ranch style home. They had the porsches Mercedes and one day. My Duchess it. I'm let happy I was brought into this world to save children's lives. Your mother and I are moving back to Ecuador and they left. I just got goosebumps. Left it all behind. Wow just to go through that. I'm only child of abandonment issues now because they left me of course Thank you. I have abandonment issues to not Johnson August. But do you think that had they not left to go back that you would have felt a certain amount of guilt. Yeah yeah definitely definitely in fact I found out my dad tried to go back many years ago and my mom who's a very traditional woman who wants to be there for her husband husband that she took her first as a modern American feminist. She was like no. I'm not going back. You can go ahead and go back. Say With my son and she stayed in my my dad. I was forced to stay. So yeah. That's why my parents they try to go back. I guess when I was Like twelve maybe and my mom said absolutely not. We made this huge sacrifice to come here. We're going to stick it out until I guess Rafa.

United States Border Patrol United States Post Academy Milano Jim Bud San Diego assault Campo California EJ Ravenstein supervisor Rafael Augustine Ecuador California ranch writer executive director
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Mother an actor and an activist and like over forty forty million Americans. I live with mental illness. My generalized anxiety disorder was most likely triggered by my postpartum depression and my journey with mental illness began with my journey into motherhood in two thousand eleven two years after suffering a miscarriage. I learned earned that I was pregnant with my first son. Milo and it was a dream. My miscarriage was heartbreaking but this pregnancy was beautiful. I did not experience morning sickness. I went to Prenatal Yoga five times a week. I walk two miles a day and I took naps in the afternoon. Following this Idyllic Tillich image of motherhood. I wrote a strict birth plan no induction of labor. No pain medication. And no C section. A equated a natural birth earth to my value as a woman and as a mother and I was determined not to stray from that course but life does not always go according to to plan on August thirty first twenty eleven ten days before my due date began to have complications. Despite my plan the doctors had to try try to induce labor. I was forced to take an epidural and eventually delivered my beautiful son after eighteen hours of labor and three and a half hours of pushing via via c-section and then with my darling son in my hands I was in excruciating pain not only from my c section but but also from my milk coming in that first night after we returned from the hospital I suffered my first anxiety attack. I felt like I had already ready disappointed my child I felt like I failed as a mother since I was not able to give birth or nourish him with the breast milk. That had not come in yet. My heart raced. My stomach seized up. I felt like I was dying a recovered but a few months later Milo spiked very high fever. Uh and had a Phibro seizure in my arms and my paralyzing anxiety reared its head again. No no no I thought to myself. This can't be happening again again. I don't have time for this. This was still twenty eleven and I was supposed to start work on a television show. The following week told myself that I needed to keep myself together as we began filming my anxiety worsened. I began to develop irrational and obsessive fears like many working moms. I was overwhelmed by guilt for leaving my son during work hours and like many others who suffer from anxiety. My pain was not taken in seriously every day I would drive to work and think about all the ways that Milo could die in the hands of his caretakers every night after working sixteen hour days after I was finally able to hold my child and put him to sleep. My days anxiety would culminate into a debilitating exciting attack. Finally I hit a wall one early morning I went to the emergency room to. Am Ask for a psychiatrist and got help. I felt as though I had no choice I asked to be committed. I stayed in public psychiatric ward for three days. At last I began to fuel as if my pain was recognized but it wasn't easy. One of my doctors dismissed my symptoms and many any of my colleagues even female colleagues still had trouble understanding that I was hurting at all but through this process. I also found angels. I including my psychiatrist and my therapist. They convince me that I had the bravery to face my own business the value to seek help in the strength to recover and I'm continuing to do all three and most likely I will for the rest of my life see. Here's the thing about mental illnesses. You don't always look sick. The answers are not always clear or black and white but we should not confront these challenges by placing more or hurdles in front of Americans who desperately need the care. I was lucky enough to have the means insurance to get the help and support. I needed what happens to those mothers who don't have kind of support I received. Mental health is also not a threat that can only happen to someone else. One in six Americans face mental illness and less than half of them receive any form of mental health services. Let's rededicate ourselves to talking about mental health. Let's demand that our lawmakers pass policies that open not restrict are access to mental health services. Let's remind each other but no one should have to face challenges by themselves and if you see me on the street please come. Tell me that I'm not sorry. Not Sorry is executive produced by a listen Milano. That's me our associate producer. Is Ben Jackson editing. An engineering during bipasha Jacobs and Music Josh Cooke and Alicia Equal. Please subscribe on spotify items. Or wherever. You get your podcasts and if you like the show whose rate view and spread the word. Sorry not sorry..

anxiety Milo spotify Phibro Ben Jackson producer bipasha Jacobs Josh Cooke Alicia Equal executive Milano
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

11:34 min | 9 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"We've seen a rise in anti-semitism recently way can we talk a little bit about the connection with with the NRA and this rise of antisemitism. Sure I think it part of it comes back to do what the NRA does very well and that is sell. Fear in fear and hatred are pretty closely related right that hate speech and the fear are in cowardice really are tied up hand in hand and the NRA has a history of doing two things things. One is giving the appearance of being staunchly pro Israel and staunchly attacking the people that they've you as has anti Semitic on the left loudly and repeatedly if you look at Dana lashes twitter feed. She called the leaders of the women's March. Antichrist's because they did not renounce Louis Farrakhan and you can make really good arguments about why the leaders of the women's march should have made this nunciatures. It should have been more inclusive to all people who wanted to join them. But if you look at what Lash says and what the NRA says it is only at people people on the left when in fact they have an awful lot of sort of blatant anti Semites and other people who engage in identity based hatred on their board Ted nugent. Clearly is the big one. He has made repeated anti Semitic statements both in public on his facebook page. He tweeted a picture of Michael Bloomberg Berg calling him. The mayor of New York City with an image of a number of prominent Jewish leaders always stars of David over them. He's called Jews who support gun violence prevention Nazis. He's done an awful lot of things like he's he's a clear and blatant anti Semite but it doesn't stop there. Another member of their board was a A person who disseminated the WHO worked for and disseminated the ideas of prominent You Genesis other. NRA board member. Bob Barr attended. A White Supremacist spoke at the convention of White Supremacist gathering in the nineteen nineties. As you know this is not something that is foreign to them and in fact the NRA leadership uses really coded language much blake. They accused Ilan Omar of using against prominent Jewish leaders. And you see this. They go against some stayer who is not Jewish of Jewish descent to go against Michael Bloomberg and they continually point out that these individuals are nefarious money lenders. There's who are subverting the American government which is what the NRA does so. It's a little bit hypocritical. But be it's highlighted specifically at Jewish leaders and so there's a huge hypocrisy in their messaging. If you know that they never go after their own they are really really happy to attack. Jack both Jewish leaders and any others they see as anti Semitic on the left but they never ever look at themselves and this this type of hate fuels violence again. We saw the Squirrel Hill synagogue attack in Pennsylvania late last year from somebody. Buddy who believed these anti Semitic messages. We saw the pipe bombs from somebody who believes these messages sent to a number of people that the NRA specifically spoke about including those Jewish leaders there is real world ramifications to this speech and they thrive Yvonne it the thrive on that division just within the candidates that they choose to back from the Republican Party. Vocally yeah I mean they give a lot of money to Steve King in in Iowa they are. If you look at and I will say I have not heard any anti Semitic statements out of the current governor of Florida Florida. But he was very clearly he had some horrible racial misstatements. He had not the cleanest pastor when it came to his racial relations in Florida but they certainly supported the Santa's campaign you look at trump's own history of antisemitic statements and they supported him thirty million dollars. And if you look down the the ultra-right that has sort of taken over the Republican Party and the candidates that it supports the NRA is there every single time financially vocally with thera public affairs machine with propaganda machine. They're always there. So what can we do to actually reduce the NRA's influence. Yeah I think we have to do a few things one is that we just have to get people out to vote and I think part of that is that we look at the intersection of all of the issues that inspire people who think differently than the NRA to go out and vote. We look at the intersection between gun. Violence and domestic violence and women's issues issues and we we bring groups together in both of these arenas to talk about these issues because they are not different. We look at people who are motivated by racial racial hatred and who are motivated by by fighting racial hatred and who are motivated by gun violence and we find where that intersection is and we bring our communities together and we link each of these chimneys in sort of activism in voter motivation in public thought together and work together towards the same goal. That's as part of it part of it is. We don't eat ourselves right like we on the left a really really good at letting the perfect perfect kill the good. And when I when I personally look at the Democratic Field I have my personal preferences but there is not one person in that field who would not be light years better than the president. We currently have an office. So I'm not going to attack any single one of those people coming out of the convention. I'm not going to support candidates. Who Do attack those people unless they stray really far out of the bounds of where progressivism is right? And that's not what do they support Medicare for all in five years or ten years that is do they take money from the Ra. Do they make racially insensitive statements treatments. Do they hold hate in their heart for specific minority populations and then finally. I think we have to think of ways to more effectively. Change the narrative. Right that there's something in our American mythos that ties freedom and our identities to guns and. I think that we have to break break that we have to our heroes needn't be Marshall Anymore that we can have heroes who are thoughtful and still exciting. We can end the culture of the gun by changing the way the culture thinks about what it means to be American right and part of what we do that is is through art through writing through music through your industry right through movies and television that step away from gun culture and still provide really high quality compelling art we get people talking about heroes that aren't revolving around guns that aren't revolving around violence and that we're able able to make that change and that you know. Finally we elect people who are just willing to act as far as we're willing to go right as far as the nation as a whole wants the government to go which is farther than they've gone now right that we make progress in government and that allows us to make progress in culture so I think we have to do those things before we can really be effective. It's been nearly fifteen years. Since a ban. On assault weapons expired inspired it became law back in nineteen ninety four and it prohibited certain models of Ar fifteen and a k. forty-seven assault style weapons one study estimates. There are nearly four hundred million civilian owned firearms in this country. That's more than any other country in the world. There is very good evidence from from our work than others that denying the purchase denying access to firearms by people who are prohibited from having that access substantially reduces uses their risk of violence in the near future we and others have identified a series of concrete flaws in the way background check policies policies are written and implemented that I think needs to be fixed in order for them to have their maximum effectiveness. Firearm violence is a very complex problem. And the correct answer to. What's the one thing is there is no one thing? We need to do. A bunch of things simultaneously in order to have the effect that we want. When you're putting something on your body it's so important to know what ingredients are in it? And that's why I like native. They create create safe simple and effective products. That people use in the bathroom every day. They're D- odorant has trusted ingredients and it's formulated malate without aluminum without parabens and other chemicals and it still works instead they use ingredients found in nature like coconut coconut oil shea butter tapioca starch and more also. They never test on animals which is so important to me. So if if you WANNA use that contained simple ingredients you understand try native. It comes in a wide variety of sense for men and women including Coconut Vanilla lavender in rows which I love using and much more and you are in luck they are offering my listeners. Twenty percent off your first purchase just visit native Deodorant Dot Com and use sorry during checkout. That's native deodorant. Dot Com and use Promo Code. Sorry during checkout for twenty percent off your first purchase. Tell everybody about no are a and Where they can go to find more information short? Sure so you. And I founded no are a with a great group of creating a large group of activists immediately following the Parkland Parkland shooting in twenty eighteen. And we are a group that is dedicated to ending the grip of the NRA on our the government and allowing a government that can function freely to keep us safe and work in the public interest. And we do that through both activism through lobbying being congress through participating in the drafting of legislation but also in that work towards changing the culture. You know you came up with the term of this for for us as a culture hack and we are actively trying to do that changing the way we talk about guns through art through music through literature through social media and social media you can find us on twitter at new. Ra for USA. That's also who we are on Instagram Graham and on facebook and you can find us each of those places. Twitter is where we were most active. We exist in all of them also on our website no are now dot org.

NRA twitter facebook Louis Farrakhan Republican Party Israel Michael Bloomberg Ted nugent American government New York City Michael Bloomberg Berg Lash Steve King Florida Dana Ilan Omar Parkland Parkland Deodorant Dot Com Bob Barr
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

08:42 min | 9 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"How can you tell everyone how we met? Can I love this story so much. Yes so we met two years ago when my daughter Emma was in the hospital for about six months and on the one hundredth day of that hospital stay. I saw a tweet from you looking for videos us about the importance of the affordable. Care Act. And what that meant to us when the the Senate was trying to kill the affordable care act and I made a quick thirty second video about what it meant to me and how important it was to me and my daughter and through the magic of the Internet that got to you and the next thing I knew it was on Bill Maher. MSNBC and I went from this dude who was kind of hiding in a hospital room trying to pretend that the world was ending politically to. Ah that people came to four some opinions and through that you reach out to me after and we became friends and found out that we think a lot of like most of the time. And so we've done and we found a lot together since and I love the story so much I think because mostly it really proves the point everybody has a platform and and also what it means to be responsible for having a platform yourself and this idea of like handing over the megaphone to people that have more important things to say than I do and that fight I think was the first real battle that we faced with the trump presidency. Not The first obviously of many battles and the country. I felt like really came together in a bipartisan way. That I don't know would necessarily early exists now because of everyone's fear of having their health care taken away and the other big issue that is slightly lately more partisan that you and I do a lot of work together and when I say slightly I mean like a lot more partisan as the issue of guns the right and where we are as a country with the gun issue so so tell me where you think we are right now and do you think that. We've we've made any progress so I think that we are in as we are in much of the country. We are in a place where what the majority of Americans want is not particularly relevant to what our government wants and. I think that we've made a lot of progress in changing that. But I think if you look at what all of the data tells us about guns is that most of us want to keep guns away from people who shouldn't have them most of us want some restrictions John's on the types of guns that people can have or how many they can have or things that can be done to keep us safe. Most of us don't want them in schools but because the current structure of our government and the way that our our states and our congressional districts have been gerrymandered and because of the influence of the NRA what the people want and what the government want. Don't align and I think that you know we how can that be isn't the government strictly in place to help us sir. What people want? Well you'd think that I mean you'd think that there would be some repercussion to elected officials who don't I meet the needs of their constituency but the reality is that's not how our government works. Y that we well because I think that there are huge advantages incumbency. That getting elected once almost guarantees that you're getting elected twice or three times that power in the state legislatures is to dictate the demographics of individual congressional districts has shifted far away to one side and I think that politicians are more concerned about broadly That that politicians are more concerned about the financial gains that they can make while in and then leader out of office than they are about serving the needs of their constituencies because at the end of the day receiving the money for their campaigns combined with the power of the incumbency makes it so that they have a job for life and the accountability is not to the constituents even though it should be it's to the election and whoever can get them elected and where does dark money play into that. When I say dark money I would like people to understand on that when when well why? Don't you explain what dark money means for our listeners. Short that when we talk about dark money we're talking about money where we don't know the source of it this. This is something that we started. See in in spades following the citizens united case that allowed super PACs basically to give unlimited amounts of financial support directly or indirectly to campaigns without revealing the sources of their fundraising so that somebody could give a corporation could give hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars to these super PACs. Who can then spend that money politically without accounting for who those people are and and this gives the wealthy it gives corporations associations like the NRA huge amounts of power in controlling trolling political messaging political speech and ultimately political thought because of that so having the stark money having these influences over our electorate that we cannot see and who have no accountability to us or really even any motivation to tell the truth other than their marketing campaign completely subverts our ability to have honest elections and honest political conversation in America in eighteen? Seventy one union officers concerned by the poor marksmanship they had witnessed in battle formed the NRA to train young men how to shoot better by ninety three the NRA promoted shooting as a sport at colleges and universities and later created a summer youth camp before World War One the NRA helped arm and train civilians before World War Two the NRA offered its ranges to the military for marksmanship courses during the Inter war years after the repeal of prohibition the NRA became active in politics in one thousand nine hundred four Congress moved to regulate guns for the first time particularly those gangsters like Al Capone the NRA through its new Legislative Affairs Division new magazine. The the American rifleman spurred a letter writing campaign to limit proposed gun restrictions the final bill band machine guns and sawed off shotguns after the assassination nation President Kennedy by Lee Harvey Oswald who bought his gun through an ad in the American rifleman. Congress tried to end mail order gun. Sales the bill languished until Nineteen Sixty eight after the killings of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy the Gun Control Act of nineteen sixty eight put new limits on firearms sales regulating who could buy and sell them. The NRA's leadership expressed expressed ambivalence support for the bill but in the nineteen seventies with crime on the rise a rift developed within the organization between those who wanted to focus on training hunting and outdoors manship ship and members who wanted to take a hardline on second amendment rights the hardliners one in one thousand nine hundred the NRA endorsed for the first time. A presidential candidate Ronald Reagan again. Reagan was nearly killed in assassination attempt in nineteen ninety-one his press secretary. James Brady who was also shot became permanently disabled in Nineteen ninety-three Reagan became. I'm the first American President to address the NRA. It's a nasty truth. But those who seek to inflict harm are not fazed by gun control laws in the mid nineteen eighties. The organization organization aggressively courted new members. You can become a part of this great heritage simply by calling now but despite their growing power in nineteen ninety-three Congress passed over. NRA objections objections. The Brady Act requiring federal background checks on firearm purchases. The group also opposed the assault weapons ban which the president signed the following year in two thousand thousand. NRA President and former actor Charlton Heston vowed then presidential candidate. Al Gore could only take his second amendment rights from my cold dead in two thousand and one in a Fortune magazine survey lawmakers and Congressional staffers considered NRA. America's most influential lobbying group and with President Bush taking power. No new federal challenges to gun rights emerged in two thousand and four. The assault weapons ban expired and wasn't renewed in the last decade number of guns in America swelled to three hundred million an NRA countered its membership total four million..

NRA government Congress America Bill Maher James Brady MSNBC Nineteen Sixty Emma President Bush Senate Ronald Reagan assault Al Gore President Kennedy Charlton Heston
"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:04 min | 9 months ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Hi Melissa Milano and Mrs Sorry not sorry where we tackle social political and cultural issues from the perspective respective of unapologetic guests while highlighting citizen activists doing amazing things throughout the country Every day one hundred Americans are killed with guns and hundreds hundreds more shot and injured.

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"milano" Discussed on Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

"Full of liars but nothing lies more than a mirror we look into her election and see laws that are invisible visible to the world but larger than life in that glass a tiny pocket of cellulite on the back of our. Thi- A scar from a black head head dotted are phased in nineteen ninety two a slight chip in a tooth or an extra pound. Look like you can see them from space and if we don't fit perfectly into the preordained and unachievable standard of beauty those things we perceive as flaws can bury us under the weight of that reflection we do not see ourselves as others see us if beauty is in the eye of the beholder so many of us are unable to be hold ourselves accurately we men and women are pushed by unrealistic expectations into a never ever ending pursuit not even perfection but of some bizarre computer enhanced unattainable plastic and Lipstick Perfection Shen that just does not exist bigger in the right places smaller in the right places we talk about Bee Stung Lips as if that is something to achieve instead of your body swelling to fight a poison injected into it by a six legged monster with a spear on it's ass us we get penile extensions because of Internet porn and inject pounds of silicone into our butts because because we are told that men get sprung listened to me this is not normal and it matters it really matters satyrs in a recent survey only twelve percent of women who responded. We're happy with their body. While it's worse for women it exists for men to will only twenty eight percent of men were happy with their looks in another survey and while it's hard to find good surveys on the matter medical literature reports similar the difficulties for Trans Non Binary people. We hate the way we look because the standard we set for ourselves is not the way we look as normal healthy humans. It's very true in my industry where women over a certain age cannot get work so we perpetuate this problem going too often often unhealthy limits to try and look young enough to play women who are exactly as old as we are. I recently read a quote by uh-huh woman named Hannah Brent Scher and it stuck with me the best gift you are ever going to give someone is the permission mission to feel safe in their own skin. I would add that. We can give this gift to ourselves. I give you permission Shen. You should give you permission. Your skin is the right skin for you. My skin is the right scan for me. Now somebody tell that to casting directors. Please sorry not sorry sorry not sorry is executive executive produced by Sims Arnett in Milano. That's me our supervising producer is Alison Bresnik. It's edited by Josh Windisch Music by Josh Cooke and Alicia Eagle. Oh please subscribe on Apple Podcast spotify or wherever you get your podcast and if you like the show please rate review and spread the word. Sorry not sorry..

Hannah Brent Scher Sims Arnett Josh Windisch executive Josh Cooke Bee Apple Alison Bresnik supervising producer Alicia Eagle Milano twenty eight percent twelve percent
"milano" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"milano" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Here. It's slow too slow fade that America is going through with that. We recently. We haven't really talked since then, but break Cavanaugh was confirmed to the United States Supreme court best. We can tell some of his previous rulings. This is a good thing. We've got another another pro second amendment just Justice on spring court. So hopefully at some of these gun laws as they come become challenged and make it to the supreme court will start getting some positive positive results in regards to that. Which brings me to this point. What happened to Eliza Milano? Well, somebody please tell me what happened to her. It all came to a head with her. Anyway, with his Brett Cavanaugh thing. She really showed her craziness. I grew up in the eighties. And I remember her as Samantha on who's the boss, and she's a big crush of mine. I had a poster on the wall. She was in new New Jersey, Red Devil. Jersey Red Devil, hockey jersey and watch who's the boss all the time. I love Sam from who's the boss, Alyssa Milano? And I know for a while she's been vocal with her, liberalism and her crazy. I mean crazed most people would even consider crazy. But just with this whole break Cavanaugh thing, she had just gone off the deep end, and it it hurts me on a personal level. Because I always I always like Sam. She was always always a great. But she's gone off deepened. So if you Mike explain to me what's happened there. I would appreciate that as well. Triggered a range of say dot com. Please Email me if I knows. Listen Molinos, contact information to I'd love to get in touch with her and ask her why. She's so crazy. But I guess you listen to six hundred every WNYC ninety two point one we left you minutes left on the show. We full of couple. Listener emails here..

Brett Cavanaugh Sam Eliza Milano Alyssa Milano New Jersey WNYC United States America hockey Samantha Mike
"milano" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on KTOK

"They have waters coffees breathable. So if you like to do the do the vaping thing. But I think one of the more popular items is the lotions CBD is in these lotions that look great, smell great and feel. Great. And when you put them on sore, joints or muscles. When you put this on their it soaks in immediately and the CBD anti inflammatory properties. Immediately begin lovely wife uses it on her neuropathy, and then I have the sub audibles which come in a little eyedropper, and you just put some drops under your tongue. And I you know, what I use it for a mainly. I'm using it because I'm I'm back to running again, and it helps with my recovery time. It also helps with muscle pain. My muscles. Don't I don't get the build up of the lactic acid that I used to. And so I don't have as much pain the rest of the day. Because the CBD gets rid of that inflammation. See what it can do for you. It's safe. It's natural. Depending on what you're paying level is will depend upon what type of CBD you need. But you can talk it over with Jason here. He's army guy at the Norman location, and again mentioned my name when you come in. And we'll get you the five hundred milligram bottle for just nineteen ninety nine CBD plus USA come on you have nothing to lose. But pain, I wondered about this. When I was watching the cavenaugh hearing yesterday. I kept seeing what look to be a familiar face poke around the right shoulder of judge cavenaugh as he was giving his testimony. As does that that books is that? I can't and sure enough. It was Alyssa Milano was there. She was said to have been there to show her solidarity for Dr Christine blassie Ford during the committee hearing, the charmed actress was present as the professor gave her testimony following the accusations. She said she felt like she needed to be there to show her solidarity to Dr Ford she said in the hearing room on this day that'll be very difficult for her. Dr Ford who doesn't know Alyssa Milano, and I don't think has the gumption to even look up who listen Milano is didn't seem to notice alyssum Alana's presence. So I'm not sure the who's the boss stars presence. There. Did anybody any good other than make her Elissa Milano feel better about herself and being there? Oh, and also that accusations are enough to convict somebody. She said when she was sexually assaulted she wasn't much older than Christine blassie Ford at the time that she explained who. Now has bub-bubba, blah, blah, blah. She says I watched horrified as politicians and pundits refuse to believe to take her seriously these allegations. Well, Elissa is that why they had her there is that why they had her at the hearing because they weren't taking her seriously. Is that why they had almost begged her to be there and even postponed the hearing? So that she could make it there because they weren't taking her seriously. Despite the alleged actions of bread Kavanagh, despite the words of the president despite the silence of so many of our lawmakers, you are valuable you are human. You are important. She said, and no one not the supreme court nominee. Not a president can take that away from you. And nobody's saying that Alyssa Milano. But congratulations for grandstanding and. Trying to capture the camera while your career remains irrelevant Leigh Matthews NewsRadio one thousand K. Okay. Live at CBD plus USA on in Norman Lindsay. We're going to talk to Mark Vigo. He is a reporter for G Q and for playboy. And he's written a book about Aretha Franklin the Queen of soul. Actually, he's revised the book the book came out several years ago, but he's gonna join us and tell us about his final conversation with the Retha actually it was in her house, and that's next on NewsRadio coming up this weekend. Life.

Elissa Milano Alyssa Milano Christine blassie Ford Dr Christine blassie Ford Mark Vigo USA Norman Lindsay Leigh Matthews Aretha Franklin Jason president playboy Kavanagh Alana G Q professor one thousand K
"milano" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"And happy new year yeah good morning at we've made it a happy two thousand eighteen yeah to you as well uh yeah we made it right there was a lot of gloom and doom before before the end of the year and there was a lot of gloom and doom at the beginning of the year i should say yeah yeah there was two and look at this week column attaf anxious we're thinking about look at state fair to look at who won two thousand seventeen and that with the president i need that last year started uh with the the well the deep state uh liberal hollywood uh if the establishment general look puts really i think trying to get the president he'd quit uh or or or bay family to abandon him or something and at the end of the year there is one sign that i saw that indicated who won and it was uh and uh everybody stay with me here it was a tweet by actress elissa milano bob that she's the is this if you are member from charmed uh she she now does its them infomercials but he's out there is a feminist in she tweeted um uh uh this is on the 30th of december just made the mistake of reading all of donald trump's tweets from the last few days i now curled up in the fetal position with us cinderella tiara on my had also my feet are cold so very cold now she's serious bright normally you'd think that'd be coming from the on yet but one that tells you is they have and reduced to uh infants i mean this is it it is he's literally a publicly tweeting this and at the same time i would thought what is it that she wrecked that made this adult woman have to say this in public and he was tweeting about um uh uh the iran and supporting the a raw demonstration about and also about the good economy and about how ms thirteen is on the run by its cetera but i thought what did a chest position for me is the feminists.

president donald trump iran elissa milano
"milano" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"milano" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"Tied to be amazing i michael in black young ins young ines listening to this i'm gonna i'm gonna i'm gonna go back i'm gonna go way back into the deep mists of time now this is pre netflixing this is pre amazon pride yesterday this is a time when television what is sort of a different beast than it is right now and if one was on television particularly want if one was on a successful television sitcom one may have difficulty afterwards because producers and directors would look at one and go oh that person is from that thing and they would they wouldn't hire you because they thought you were just sort of tainted by your success in a weird way and low it was especially difficult for the child actor my guest today is based on what was a child television star who managed to survive the perils of childhood start a which grow up and thrive as an adult actor writer entrepreneur and philanthropist elissa milano first came onto the national spotlight on the well loved sitcom who's the boss which ran for eight years she start and a bunch of other things including charmed which also ran for eight years she's been in oh movies have a million tv show she's the current host of project way allstars entries on the new season of wet on american summer ten years later where i got to know her she is also the founder of touch by elissa that's correct right that the clinton in a line of team branded sporting apparel for women and serves as a unicef ambassador and it is my pleasure to welcome elicit milano to have be amazing.

founder clinton amazon writer elissa milano unicef eight years ten years