17 Burst results for "Mike mass"

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

16:17 min | 1 year ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Mike mass Nick. So I'm adding this little intro, how onto this week's podcast is sort of heads up poorer, I guess, warning for the actual podcasts that follows, and so as not to mislead people about this particular podcast, this discussion is me talking with are increasingly irregular co host. And this Yang about his new experimentation with live streaming via twitch. And I want to say that this is not a conversation about twitch with an expert on the platform, or someone who has thought deeply about twitch and live streaming Alex plane. This a bit more during the podcast, but want to make sure people understood going in that I asked them talk about it, because I know that he's just sort of started experimenting with twitch. And I see a lot of folks dismissing live streaming or mocking it and I tend to hate when people just sort of mock new technologies without. Experience with them, and that's especially true of technologies that are being embraced by a younger generation has since Dennis was just starting to experiment with it. I thought it would be useful to get that particular perspective. The perspective of someone who is just starting to play around with a new technology and sort of figuring it out as we go. However, since most such discussions tend to bring on people who are a lot more experienced with it or considered experts, the nature of our discussion in the discussion that is in the rest of this podcast is likely to be very different than what you normally expect. And if you already know a lot about twitch and live, streaming, you might just want to skip, this particular podcast, as it may come across as to novices sort of bungling around trying to figure things out, which is kind of what the podcast is today. Civilly if you're listening to this to get an expert's view on streaming in twitch. This is. Not that whoever if you do want to hear the perspective of someone. Just getting started on twitch and understanding live streaming.

Nick Mike mass Yang Dennis
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Welcome to the podcast. I'm Mike mass. Nick. The world is it quickly. The doctor. So we have talk. Critical digital journalism thing in the pitch. Pulling the play. Cain to take. Up to the. From one of the tax. There are few topics that we regularly cover on that are familiar to most readers often focusing on how technology works, including sometimes how technology doesn't work out quite the way. It should. We also spend lots of time talking about civil liberties another popular related topic to this is about the police and frequently stories about police well doing bad things. I think would be the easy way to summarize it now some people have questioned why we talk so much about the police aside about technology, but so often the stories about police crossover into those other areas of focus, including both technology and civil liberties tragically with most of those stories being about violations of people's civil liberties on the tech side, we've had lots of stories about police use. Zing or potentially abusing certain technologies from tasers facial recognition to Stingray devices and more. Investigative reporter Matt Stroud has just released an excellent new book entitled the thin blue li- that really ties together a whole bunch of stories about the obsession of high-tech policing and how law enforcement regularly runs to embrace new technologies. Even though it rarely leads to the outcomes that they predict the book is externally extraordinarily well ridden an excellent read with the really engaging. If sometimes frustrating or infuriating stories, but the core message that becomes quite clear throughout the book is that law enforcement and often politicians as well run towards tech solutions to really systematic problems in how law enforcement works, and that is rather than facing the deeper issues as to why police keep killing people they shouldn't kill or interacting with communities in ways that keep leading to eruptions in violence. Police just seem to keep trying to apply some new technological band-aid and. That never seems to actually work. Indeed, it often makes the problems much much worse while I write about these issues. Sometimes Tim Cushing tends to be even more focused on these issues and the police beat on it. So I've asked Tim to join us today along with the author of the thin blue li-, Matt Stroud, welcome mat, welcome to the podcast actually having. So there've been a few other books written about the problem with law enforcement these days. What made you focus on the technology issue with this? I've had an interest in technology in policing for awhile. And actually, I was on staff at Bloomberg and on staff at the verge and in both of those roles ended up covering pretty closely taser international company that tasers then body cameras than I became fascinated by the idea that such a company which was publicly traded was able to make some much money off of this shelling this equipment and addressing some of the huge issues that surround policing such as police killings. And I wanted to write a story about that. You know, look at the police industrial complex who had done. Yeah. And I think a lot of the book, you know, a significant portion of the book definitely focuses on taser and its history much. I had no idea about before reading the book, and it was a little bit different than I expect. Do you wanna give a little bit of background? I mean, don't give away the book, but some of the background of tasers and international and how it came about. Yeah. It's a fascinating story. There's this guy named Jack Kover who air force veteran had been a business executive for most of his career in. Then when he was an executive with Hughes Aircraft in the nineteen sixties..

Matt Stroud executive Tim Cushing taser international Mike mass Nick Stingray devices Cain Jack Kover Investigative reporter Hughes Aircraft Bloomberg
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"The podcast. I'm Mike mass. Nick. The world is in quickly the doctor. To critical digital journalism. But the thing in the picture. Title. Mccain to take. Does sound up to the? From one. The tack. I also welcome back in the new year. I hope that everyone enjoyed the holidays and is diving into two thousand nineteen with at least some bit of optimism. We always try and be optimistic around here as per usual. My new year is starting off by heading to Las Vegas to attend. See ES, the massive technology show that takes over that entire city in early January every year, and as per usual probably a week or two after the show. We'll have our CAS wrap-up podcast once again with reporter, rob Pirot who's been going to see. Yes. Even longer than I have. But this year, we've got a special guest right now, this podcast will be released on the opening day of CAS, though, truth be told we're recording. This a few weeks prior to that this is before the new year. Welcome to behind the curtain. My guest today is Gary Shapiro, the long-term president and CEO of the consumer technology. So. Which of course, is the organization that puts on CAS every year. And we're not just having him on the show to talk about. Of course, Gary actually also has a new book that's just come out called ninja future secrets to success in the new world of innovation which is something of a follow up from his previous book from I think five years ago entitled ninja innovation. This book is excellent and having read it, I expect that this conversation will be actually a great follow up to the final podcast that we had before the break which was all about disruptive innovation and whether or not Silicon Valley had figured out the secrets of disruptive innovation yet. If you somehow missed that podcast. Well, you should go back and listen to it. But we came to the conclusion that no, well, some companies may have outrun disruptive innovation here. And there the idea that anyone's actually figured out how to regularly beat back disruptive. Innovation is unlikely to be true. And that's part of the reason why I enjoyed Carey's book so much. Covers a lot of ground. But right up front talks a lot about this very issue. How the biggest and most disruptive innovation innovations quite frequently take companies often big companies led by very innovative thinkers completely by surprise. It also talks a lot about the regulatory environment. Both good and the bad for enabling more innovation and also has a bunch of successions for both innovators policymakers which obviously fits in exactly what the kinds of things that we like to talk about on tech there. So Gary, welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me island. Congratulations and over twenty years of amazing coverage you one of the journalists is in the upper echelon the loves and covers the same things. We always talk about which is policy technology innovation and rapid change. And that's what the CS is about. And that's what this book is about cool. So let me start by by actually asking about the the ninja thing 'cause you're last book. It was an engine innovation. This one is an interview -ture. Why ninjas well ninjas were ancient Japanese warriors who won against extreme odds, and they had to change what they're doing. No matter how much they planned. They had to work as a team. They have people have diverse strengths. And I use as an algae because imperfect comparison but longtime ago, my family, and I studied taekwondo which is actually Korean. But our editors HarperCollins, something you could use the license and that taught me similar things about how to fight and survive and on our ways to black belts in karate, which we got. So we put those together and the ninja innovation book was so successful, and the ideas cut on so much, and we have focused on innovation frankly has association for over twelve years now as our primary mission is to encourage innovation that this. Unnatural? And plus as you know, these things work the publisher wanted it to be perfectly Frank they really love the ninja title. And when I almost withdrew my first book proposal Soviet years ago because a couple of my. Board members female said it was a failure. And didn't appeal to them the same day the publisher accepted? And quite frankly said I love ninja anything with the word ninja on it sells. So that's still true. Several years later my kids used to watch teenage mutant ninja turtles..

Gary Shapiro president and CEO Las Vegas Mike mass Nick publisher Mccain HarperCollins rob Pirot reporter Carey karate Frank twelve years twenty years five years
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"The podcast. I'm Mike mass. Nick. The world is in quickly the doctor. To critical digital journalism. But the thing in the picture. Title. Mccain to take. Does sound up to the? From one. The tack. I also welcome back in the new year. I hope that everyone enjoyed the holidays and is diving into two thousand nineteen with at least some bit of optimism. We always try and be optimistic around here as per usual. My new year is starting off by heading to Las Vegas to attend. See ES, the massive technology show that takes over that entire city in early January every year, and as per usual probably a week or two after the show. We'll have our CAS wrap-up podcast once again with reporter, rob Pirot who's been going to see. Yes. Even longer than I have. But this year, we've got a special guest right now, this podcast will be released on the opening day of CAS, though, truth be told we're recording. This a few weeks prior to that this is before the new year. Welcome to behind the curtain. My guest today is Gary Shapiro, the long-term president and CEO of the consumer technology. So. Which of course, is the organization that puts on CAS every year. And we're not just having him on the show to talk about. Of course, Gary actually also has a new book that's just come out called ninja future secrets to success in the new world of innovation which is something of a follow up from his previous book from I think five years ago entitled ninja innovation. This book is excellent and having read it, I expect that this conversation will be actually a great follow up to the final podcast that we had before the break which was all about disruptive innovation and whether or not Silicon Valley had figured out the secrets of disruptive innovation yet. If you somehow missed that podcast. Well, you should go back and listen to it. But we came to the conclusion that no, well, some companies may have outrun disruptive innovation here. And there the idea that anyone's actually figured out how to regularly beat back disruptive. Innovation is unlikely to be true. And that's part of the reason why I enjoyed Carey's book so much. Covers a lot of ground. But right up front talks a lot about this very issue. How the biggest and most disruptive innovation innovations quite frequently take companies often big companies led by very innovative thinkers completely by surprise. It also talks a lot about the regulatory environment. Both good and the bad for enabling more innovation and also has a bunch of successions for both innovators policymakers which obviously fits in exactly what the kinds of things that we like to talk about on tech there. So Gary, welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me island. Congratulations and over twenty years of amazing coverage you one of the journalists is in the upper echelon the loves and covers the same things. We always talk about which is policy technology innovation and rapid change. And that's what the CS is about. And that's what this book is about cool. So let me start by by actually asking about the the ninja thing 'cause you're last book. It was an engine innovation. This one is an interview -ture. Why ninjas well ninjas were ancient Japanese warriors who won against extreme odds, and they had to change what they're doing. No matter how much they planned. They had to work as a team. They have people have diverse strengths. And I use as an algae because imperfect comparison but longtime ago, my family, and I studied taekwondo which is actually Korean. But our editors HarperCollins, something you could use the license and that taught me similar things about how to fight and survive and on our ways to black belts in karate, which we got. So we put those together and the ninja innovation book was so successful, and the ideas cut on so much, and we have focused on innovation frankly has association for over twelve years now as our primary mission is to encourage innovation that this. Unnatural? And plus as you know, these things work the publisher wanted it to be perfectly Frank they really love the ninja title. And when I almost withdrew my first book proposal Soviet years ago because a couple of my. Board members female said it was a failure. And didn't appeal to them the same day the publisher accepted? And quite frankly said I love ninja anything with the word ninja on it sells. So that's still true. Several years later my kids used to watch teenage mutant ninja turtles..

Gary Shapiro president and CEO Las Vegas Mike mass Nick publisher Mccain HarperCollins rob Pirot reporter Carey karate Frank twelve years twenty years five years
"mike mass" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"We're back on, starts off for managed. I've got. I man who was the first man Neil Armstrong. The first man on the moon, our friend of star talk, Mike mass amino. He's been space twice. One of them to repair my whole space telescope. I love you. Thank you. You're welcome. Chuck. Nice. Co host Chuck. Yes. And I've been in space. I'm still in space. I'm still in space out in space to different things. I was asked back in two thousand nine to host to emcee the fortieth anniversary of the Apollo landing in sixty nine plus forty gets you to two thousand and I it was in the Space Museum. It was. I'm there and I forgot Mike. You what I did you told you just moonwalk well, I had every living moon-walker in the audience and interesting things. Remember I know you I know said some. you said some. You said something about being the fortieth. Saying how forty was an interesting number because, oh fifty, you might not. And we've lost so many of those guy then. And now. And you did the moonwalk which have I don't dance to the forty because that sounds a little you know provocative. So what I try to this is when I said forty is an interesting number because in many stories they don't track it beyond forty. So forty days and forty nights. Yeah, it's not fifty days fifty nine forty days and forty nights. Jesus got thirty nine lashes. Not forty forty. That's like infinite right. You got rain that in. Okay, you don't wanna kill him and I just wanna hurt him. Oh, that's the one last would have. Did it. What else is just a number forty shows up, especially Biblically? Yes. Okay. And it's a. So when you pass forty, it's like. More time than historically people reckoned. Okay. You sort of, you know, once you forty and then Infinity beyond that. And so beyond that, it's like, okay, is it still there for us to remember or do we have to be reminded of it? Whereas if was within forty, you can talk about it. People are alive. They conscious they were adults. They were so it makes sense. That's two generations basically beyond stepping into the next generation, and that makes perfect sense. Okay. I think that set the mood at the time that this was a really special night. Event afterwards. Star talk was in our first year, and I said, this is a target of opportunity for me to get a bunch of interviews and we can make a show out of this. So I waited till the event was over and we had a reception and all of this, and I got interviews with various key people in the space program at the time as well as some Alzheimer's, like Neil Armstrong and he never gives interviews. Yeah. Have you ever seen him interviewed on now? That's one of the things he's known for is not is not a big talker. Here's why. I think he granted me the interview. Because moonwalked. I, I met him when I was fourteen o on board the SS Ken Barra on route from New York City to the coast of north west Africa, Cal to observe a total solar eclipse the longest in the century. And he was one of the various sort of important people brought on board for stay would enjoy the eclipse, but also they were there for the rest of us to interact with. And this is nineteen Seventy-three teeth. Fourteen herself yet by myself. Yeah, I was gonna say, what. Did your parents know you going like wait. My parents didn't even let me take the subway back then by myself. Lanes. With Neil Armstrong seen clips. Fifty telescope with me from go to a ball game, and I was excited. Telescope, I had my camera and awesome. There were fifteen hundred people. They they took off all the shuffleboard lounge chairs, and it was a farce tripods on this whole ship is a scientific floating vessel. He was there when I is it has and various other sort of heroes. If you're g kid right in the day and that city you were, you were king geek okay gigs because yeah. Kid is just like, I can't believe I just got this new trading card. Going to northbound. For the clips..

Neil Armstrong Mike mass Space Museum New York City Chuck shuffleboard Alzheimer Ken Barra west Africa fifty nine forty days fifty days forty days
"mike mass" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"The grass in your personal astrophysicist, and today this is a star talk devoted to the first man. Adam. That was Chuck nice. On the first man, especially dishing of star talk. We're, of course talking about Neil Armstrong and his first steps on the moon and we're not gonna do unless we bring in an astronaut Lale Nicole, I, I got my Rolodex. I got some astronauts and one of my favorites actually is my favorite, but until that's nice. Mike mass amino my. Yeah, thanks. Thanks for having so glad I could short notice. We saw each other just the other night. Yeah, both we saw preview screening of the film. I man all about Neil Armstrong and I realize it's not about Neil Armstrong. It is Neil Armstrong's view. Yeah, right. As his peak point of view of who was who he was captured his personality, what he was about the way he approaches work. Yeah, it was thought it was fantastic. Let me finish introducing you. So your former NASA, astronaut, yes, you're mechanical engineer professor Columbia University and your senior space advisor to the intrepid sea, aerospace museum. Thank you for mentioning all those thing. Yeah, always good to see you guys especially with to talk about my boyhood hero. Did you guys know Neil Armstrong? Can I finish. Introductions, Ori, holy Moga veteran of spaceflights. S. t. s. which is NASA.

Neil Armstrong NASA Lale Nicole Chuck Adam Mike mass aerospace museum Columbia University advisor professor
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello, and welcome to the podcast. I'm Mike mass, Nick. Is it quickly the doctor. Pretended that critical digital thing in the pitch. Title. Cain to take control. Up to the. One, the. It does feel like questions about internet platform. Content moderation are going to be with us for a long, long time. We've had a few discussions around this topic over the past few years, but now that we have congress and even the president and large parts of the media suddenly commenting on the issue, it's no longer just a topic that a few of us obsessive cz are focused on, and it's not just a narrowly focused discussion among mainly academics and lawyers right now. And one of the things that has become a bundle clear in all the discussions about platforms and their moderation choices is unfortunately that most people have little to no understanding of how it actually works or perhaps how it doesn't work, nor do they understand what various companies are trying to do or. The really the scale of the challenge that they're facing. And unfortunately, this is made conversations about this topic, incredibly frustrating. People make an awful lot of assumptions, and many of those assumptions are really, really bad or unformed, and that makes it very difficult to have sort of thoughtful nuance discussion on a really challenging topic. And so some of the the confusion or mistakes that people make are saying, things like platform shouldn't moderate content at all, or that companies don't really care about moderating content. And I keep trying to get people to better wrap their heads around the fact that all of their sort of easy solutions to these questions generally are wrong because I don't think there are any easy solutions and to get people to have a better understanding of these things. People really need to understand how we got here. Companies have actually done and sort of the nature of the the. The challenges that these companies are facing. Thankfully, a few months back then yelp each student clinic polished a really incredible paper in the Harvard law review entitled the new governors, the people rules and processes governing online speech. And while I recognize that not many people may choose on their own to read a seventy three page law review article. I cannot recommend this paper more highly. If you really want to understand the issues behind the content moderation debates, it goes through the history of content moderation online, including the laws, the corporate culture and economic incentives, as well as how content moderation actually works and what impact it might have clinic is now in a system professor law at Saint John's university and his joining us on the podcast, discuss both her paper and the general questions around content moderation. So Kate, welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much, having me. Sure. So the paper was turned out to be really, really well, timed and important as this discussion is suddenly become front page news. Why did you choose this particular topic when you did. That's actually kind of very funny story. Well, I think that. Is part of my my work at Yale. I was working at internet law and issues a speech and online culture, and I actually started researching how things came down under the copyright provisions and notice and take down. And that actually didn't end up being interesting story, and people were very reticent to talk to me. But in the course of researching that, I found this, you know, found out all about content moderation and I have to credit. Jeff Rosen's Murli work on this in. I mean, he wasn't writing for nothing publications. He was writing for the New York Times magazine and for wired and stuff. Talking about this in twenty eleven in two thousand twelve and talking to a lot of the same people I talked to. So he was really on top of this. But for some reason it didn't have purchase. I don't think with people understanding what was fully going on, and part of that is because I don't think people understood in twenty ten twenty eleven, really the

Jeff Rosen Kate Harvard law review Mike mass yelp Cain Yale congress Nick president Saint John professor the New York Times magazine Murli
"mike mass" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have. Barry Weiss, we've been hearing from astronaut Mike Massimino about training for the spacewalk doing the spacewalk remarkable descriptions of what it really feels like anything you care to challenge from the astronaut. Okay. Well, one thing that I found out about the MAG. So the MAG dates to nineteen eighty eight and it actually replaced the dact which stands for disposable absorption containment trunk. Legitimate. And it was it was liike who leakier than the MAG. So it was just a bad diaper. I think diaper technology has really come a long way. Some people like Mike watt watch Neil Armstrong walk in the moon. I wanna go. I was always really interested in space food because it's really cool and weird. And I found out that when John Glenn orbited the earth. Do you know what he ate? I don't know what John Glenn as he ate applesauce and beef puree in toothpaste too. Have gotten much more sophisticated and there's one dish. That's the most popular. Yes. Yes. Shrimp. Cocktail. Reason apparently that people love it is that when you're in space to your palate changes because you like you have a cold. Correct. Fluid shifts people like three Rochester savvy and space to they like things with a really a big kick and this rim. Cocktail apparently has like a really good. It has very spicy horseradish sauce clears you up a little bit, you know, gravity works on our body, and we've evolved over all the time. Throw that everything works and one gravity, including the distribution of our fluid all the fluid in our body is held in place in part by gravity. So when you go to a zero gravity environment wearing space. It's doesn't have it that that force on it, and it tends to pool. So the fluid pools in your upper body, and it gives you a stuff feels like a head cold, Mike mass amino. Thank you so much for.

John Glenn the MAG Mike Massimino Mike watt Barry Weiss Cocktail Mike mass Neil Armstrong Rochester
"mike mass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Barry Weiss, we've been hearing from astronaut Mike Massimino about training for the spacewalk doing the spacewalk remarkable descriptions of what it really feels like anything you care to challenge from the astronaut. Okay. Well, one thing that I found out about the MAG. So the MAG dates to nineteen Eighty-eight and it actually replaced the dact which stands for disposable absorption containment trunk. Legitimate. And it was it was liike. The Dax was leakier than the MAG. So it was just a bad diaper. I think diaper technology has really come a long way. Dumpy people like Mike watt. Watch Neil Armstrong walk in the wanna go. I was always really interested in space food because it's really cool and weird. And I found out that when John Glenn orbited the earth. Do you know what he ate? I don't know what John Brennan. He ate applesauce and beef puree in this toothpaste. Things have gotten much more sophisticated and put there's one dish. That's the most popular guess. Yes. Shrimp. Cocktail. Reason apparently that people love it is that when you're in space your palate changes because you it's like you have a cold. Fluid shifts. So people like three Raja was in space to they like things with a really a big kick this rim. Cocktail apparently has a really good cat. It has a very spicy horseradish. She saw. So you clears you up a little bit, you know, gravity works on our body, and we've evolved over all the time. Throw that everything works one gravity, including the distribution of our fluid all the fluid in our body is held in place in part by gravity. So when you go to a zero gravity environment wearing space. It's doesn't have it that that force on it, and it tends to pool. So the fluid pools in your upper body, and it gives you a stuff feels like a head cold, Mike mass amino. Thank.

the MAG John Brennan Cocktail John Glenn Mike Massimino Mike watt Barry Weiss Mike mass Neil Armstrong
"mike mass" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Barry, Weiss. We've been hearing from astronaut Mike Massimino about training for the spacewalk doing the spacewalk remarkable descriptions of what it really feels like anything you care to challenge from the astronaut. Okay. Well, one thing that I found out about the MAG, so the MAG dates to nineteen eight and it actually replaced the dact which stands were disposable absorption containment trunk. Legitimate and it was it was liike the Dak was leakier than the MAG. So it was just a bad diaper diaper technology has really come a long what. And I think some people like Mike, what you know, watch Armstrong walk in the moon wanna go. I was always really interested in space food because they, it's really cool in weird. And I found out that when John Glenn orbited the earth, do you know what he ate? I don't know what John Glenn as he ate out bowl sauce and beef puree in toothpastes. Two things have gotten much more sophisticated and there's one dish that's the most popular? Yes, shrimp cocktail. He's an apparently that people love it is that when you're in space to your palate changes because you like you have a cold. Fluid shifts, three Raja and wha Sabi space to they like things with a really big kick. And this rim cocktail apparently has like a really good, very spicy horseradish. She saw. So you clears you up a little bit gravity works on our body and we've evolved over all the time so that everything works one gravity, including the distribution of fluid, all the fluid in our body is held in place in part by gravity. So when you go to zero gravity environment where space it's doesn't have it that that force on it and it tends to pool. So the fluid pools in your upper body and it gives you stuff feels like a head cold, Mike mass amino. Thank you playing. Playing out now..

John Glenn the MAG Mike Massimino Mike mass Mike Barry Weiss Armstrong
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello, and welcome to the podcast. I'm Mike mass, Nick. Does it quickly be locked. So we have a topic talk. Digital with this thing in the picture. The of pulling the ball. The placate they came to take control. Does someone get decrepit ship. The cat? Does. We'll get all the usual stuff out of the way very quickly. If you like the podcast, please tell someone about it and write a review on itunes. I know that not everyone uses. I tunes, I don't use. I tunes, but apparently unless you have lots of reviews at I tunes your podcast disappears or something weird like that. And if you really like the podcast, please back us on patriotic because, well, that's the only way we make any money from these podcasts. We've been doing it for almost three years now and we've never put any ads on them or anything. So you're not hearing us pushing mattresses or underwear or whatever else. Every other podcast is advertising, we're just doing this and he's report that we get on patriot and helps quite a bit. So thank you now onto today's topic, if you haven't noticed by now, we live in something of a surveillance state while the Snowden revelations revealed a bunch of details about how this is happening in what is going on. It's actually been. Going on well for a lot longer than since two thousand thirteen. When he showed up on the scene, but the combination of technology and surveillance has raised all sorts of legal issues and there ones that courts have struggled with massively in the past few years indeed. So much of what law enforcement and the intelligence community is able to access has to do with legal precedents that were decided decades ago based on maybe a single person or a single unique set of circumstances. And that rule, those rules that were written decades ago with very different technology. Now apply to basically everyone. So for example, have you ever wondered why the NSA can suck up every single phone record without a warrant. When the whole point of the fourth amendment was to prevent so called general warrants, that could collect all sorts of information. Well, actually has to do with the case involving police accessing phone records of a single robber. In the case, that few thought was all that important until it was realized that the entire bulk mass surveillance effort of the NSA was secretly based on it. There are all sorts of stories like these cases that were decided when technology was simpler and not nearly as widespread that are now being applied broadly to everyone and where that same technology is everywhere. Reporters Seru so far has written an incredible new book that comes out today as being this podcast is released on time called habeas data privacy versus the rise of surveillance tech, and the book digs deep into. A bunch of these different precedents and really tells the story behind them and how they now been transformed into the underpinnings of surveillance state. That would almost certainly flow mex- the framers of the constitution. We've written about most of these cases on texture it over the years, but but the book does two things amazingly. Well, I, it really tells the stories of not just the cases, but the various players involved in the cases and how everything happened and also how it plays into those sort of larger narrative of the book of of how. The surveillance state has come about. And while you might think that reading about lawsuits, often losses that are decades old may be dry or not that interesting. This book is exactly the opposite of that. It is the opposite of dry. The storytelling is incredibly compelling, and the book is is honestly very difficult to put down whether you know about these cases or whether you've just discovered this entire issue. It is a fascinating well in very enjoyable. I opening an enlightening book again, no matter where on the scale of knowledge you are on these things. And so today on the podcast, we have serious. Here to talk with us, so welcome to the podcast. Thank you so much. So there are all sorts of reasons why anyone might want to write

Mike mass Snowden Nick Seru three years
"mike mass" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on KOIL

"Of congress can have access to all the information so given the government bureaucracy in the high degree of compartmentalization exists within it it's conceivable that even the president himself is that fully briefed on matters classified is above top secret pledging to remember that when you'll hear that kind of racial allowing access soulier is by the strict this needtoknow basis not necessarily giving the senior elected officials who come and go so i mean when you're looking at president that are temporary why give all that information to a temporary person sitting in the white out and we've all been bombarded with the media they're clever way of telling the truth is out there but it's time marches on we're finding that the truth is right under our noses in the united states government has a tendency to use newspeak in order to continue their style of never ending giving never giving a straight answer and then when it comes to the question of ufos in the confirmation of some kind of alien life they balk at a nasa wants to control it nasa wants to say you know we're the ones that came up with it it's this stupid male more more is the perfect example of this interest about it even spilled over in embassies megan kelly she interviewed former astronaut mike mass amino about the rock igf guess scientists are still listening for signals that rock but today is a big day i think today is a big day because of what was reported the mainstream news over the weekend in what seems to be a big story that's making the rounds on the internet today the new york times reported but in the six hundred billion annual defense department budgets there is nester made it a twenty two million dollars spent on something called the advanced aerospace threat identification program that sounds like a big title bid vast aerospace threat identification program well this is a big title for the pentagon secret programme to investigate you f follows it's exactly what it is for years the programme investigating reports of unidentified flying objects according to defense department officials they've been studying ufos the new york times of got them in writing and and in quote saying that they've been investing in ufos even though they been denying it for some time now.

congress president nasa megan kelly mike mass new york times pentagon united states twenty two million dollars
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello and welcome to the tech podcast i'm mike massing the decree to the technological we have that get with mccaw with your presented the critical digital third elizabeth that to me in the picking up the modern my talk the other thing to take another look like document the way that they too tight control did not deny them like come to the the thought more no the court for civil than pick up the tech does does on today they want to keep up with no other take of tech as a reminder if you like listening to this podcast hopefully if you're listening to it it's because you like it up please subscribe to the feet if you haven't already and also please tell others about it and rated and review it i tunes or wherever else you listen to podcasts though it seems everybody seems he's items onto today show as many people probably know over the last decade or so the whole idea of board games and car games have i think made something of a giant comeback um i think some would probably argue that they never went out of style but there's really been something of a renaissance in board and card games recently many people i think probably tyler back to the success of games like settlers of tom which you know i i think uh but i but i actually think that that the newfound success may have more to do with the rise of the internet thanks to the internet there's been a much greater ability for people to learn about games but also to create new games themselves into to experiment with it and to share and and even sell those games in some cases these days if you look at kickstarter you can find dozens of different tabletop and card games available basically on on any day and while that alone is interesting what is really interesting to me at least is the way that these games are becoming useful tools for storytelling or for explaining difficult concepts and this isn't necessarily a new thing either there have been theme games for a while and i remember back in the early 2000s i actually got a card game called burn rate which is all about silicon valley startups from the dotcom bubble i.

mccaw mike massing
"mike mass" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The rotella most went away but they had to be another way to establish desolation without fake most give it a fake news fake moses worse please don't you cgi and tell you get it right animals moving you can always tell pretty good job on the uh i would say game of thrones and the dragons pretty good game of thrones and the wall in the north kind of a good sometimes but and i don't know if it's an age thing jimmy desist fake i want to believe i wanna suspend disbelief and i guess that has an old got old guy when i see see gee i cannot suspend disbelief whereas younger folks have been suspending disbelief using those kind of images for a long time so maybe it's okay with them i mean maybe this director was a younger person had enough a don't see gee i know photoshop man when it's a sunset if i see a picture of a sense that i wanna know that's the real sunset not some doctored photo the put in some wild colors six on 75 410 thirty that said take a break and get you on the weather gonna be cool today wbz cbs news special report there's been a late mike mass shooting along the las vegas strip at least two people had been killed about two those are more or confirmed dead or confirm heard at a local hospital some considered critical jason oldie was performing at an outdoor country music festival when the shots rang out the crowd reacted we were in this tower alpine top and it's like everyone said hit the floor so everyone was just like literally laying on top of each other trying to get out of the way much confusion i i thought it was fireworks or something somebody's playing around them then it got worse than saying that's guns is like machine guns going off and it just constant over and over at the nearby tropicana hotel michael worker the started seeing lots of people jumping are fences that red shot themselves harms somewhere shot by police just now report one shooter dare and they are searching for a female accomplice cbs news special report i'm trump that the new.

director jason oldie machine guns jimmy photoshop cbs mike mass las vegas tropicana hotel
"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Techdirt

"Hello and welcome to the tech podcast i'm mike mass mc so on this podcast we have a guest rob reid who is an author whose coming out with a new book and i'll do the regular intro in a second but i did want to note that there's an addendum at the end we recorded the original podcast a few weeks ago and we talk a little bit about some of the things that robs doing with the launch in particular in partnership with the website medium and some of the details happen to change between the time that we recorded the original podcast and now when the partnership with medium is actually launching so we talk about a little bit in the podcast and then we have an addendum where we clarify some of the details that have been worked out between the time recorded the original podcast and then now so after this you can listen to the regular podcast and then stick around at the very end and we'll come back and explain some of the more details and may be correct some of the what we thought initially was going to happen in then didn't happen so it's it thanks a lot of modern in to fight the white like the one with the peak of the politics of the hello and welcome to the tech podcast i'm mike mass nick let's start off with yet another reminder if you listen to the podcast and you're not subscribe to it in your podcast app go fix that fix it now and subscribe so you don't miss any episodes if your subscribed and you haven't reviewed the podcast fix that to a guy who in review it i do nhs or wherever else you can review it and finally if you've reviewed us and you haven't yet signed up to support us on patriarch you can also fix that now and go to pitch janda com slash tech dirt and back us and get access to bonus episodes and more anyways without out of the way five years ago untucked we wrote about in amusing science fiction novel about copyright yes a science fiction novel about copyright and also aliens called years zero written by rob reid who among other things head created listen dot com which launched the very first authorized music streaming service called rhapsody.

rob reid nhs five years
"mike mass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Been trying to recorded our poor trying to play or trying to write it or do anything i came to express it and have failed singularly every single time i've tried so for the first time for me to actually hear this paul's was just electrifying added know anybody else heard it added i i thought maybe he was a little nuts he on my part and um and voted only got up and just played it they just started playing it another that's what i be goodbye head so you can you can just imagine what it was like for grenadian cared house just where did this come from how did this happen this is fantastic uses the way life is you know it was a it was completely rearrange things for if that was a song that made you go wow when you i heard it aminat play a song now that will be a little less surprising in terms of a show oh the plays music this is from nineteen sixty five this is the first time most people saw your face and her the name mike mass meth and this was the song that was coming out of their television here we can his killing he funniest on the one lean the needs michael has met that's the theme song from the monkeys tv show it if he did now yeah so it it how's the experience of being in the monkeys different than you thought it would be when you sign known well i had had the idea i'm not sure where hatch that i it probably came from the advertisement that their tv show producers put in variety for a guys my age playing music wandering the sunset strip looking for work playing music and i didn't have any traction talking about music that played in my head none of the music that i was hearing being brought forward for the monkey show was any of the music goes here in in my head uh and i had gone down in ahead auditioned for the park in the television show but i didn't really understand how the music was supposed to fit a new that the the concept of the show was an out of work.

paul grenadian mike mass michael
"mike mass" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"mike mass" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"This is your last meal i'm your host rachel bell and every episode a interview celebrity about what they would choose to eat for their last meal then we or the history that food the culture and whatever else we can cram into thirty minutes today on the program astrophysicist author director of the hayden planetarium in new york city and host of the science pop culture and comedy radio program star talk who quite a title neil the grass tyson o'neil the grass heison wow you sound much deeper that was like a berry white right there on elo what will chat about his new book his love of melted butter and no big deal the time he almost became a stripper i also chat with former nasa astronaut mike mass semi now about what it's like to eat in outer space and little tip for me to you if you ever chat with mike massimino don't ever ever assume there's no stake in space further sturgeon spurs there is on the verge i don't know i just made it up i assume there was an stake in space how many times you eat stake in store renewals show this is phil paraggio plus the ragstoriches story of lobster you know it wasn't always the fancy shansi food it is today but i neil to grass tyson.

rachel bell director hayden planetarium elo mike massimino phil paraggio program astrophysicist new york nasa mike mass thirty minutes