17 Burst results for "Mike Stanton"

"mike stanton" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Telecast, Mike Stanton speculated that he probably through a half dozen such games in his career that seemed absurdly high to me as I assume this feet would be quite rare given that bringing in a new pitcher with only one out needed is not common off the top of my head. I would think it only happens if a non save situation gets dicey. Or if you're maneuvering specific matchup against tough left handed hitter. I suppose if we expand the search to one pitch outings that didn't end the game a lube might have. Plenty of opportunities to log one pitch outing. How many such games did Stanton? Throw. What is the MLB record for such games? So I will answer the question of the MLB record for most games. This is of course, going back to nineteen eighty eight because we don't have pitch counts reliably before that the guy with the most one pitch outings at anytime is hover. Lopez the former Lougee he had thirty four such games. And then the next guys are Randy chote and. Jesse Roscoe at the top of the list, lots of Luque's here as when would expect. So these outings will not be seen very much anymore. We were talking about rules changes and the change about pitcher usage. This will be one casualty not a complete extinction, but close so the question about how many of these we've seen to end the game ten is the record of those Tony Fossas had ten and tied for second place with Mark -ception ski Dan police AC and Trevor Hoffman is Mike Stanton with six. So he estimated half a dozen and he was exactly right. The rare case where a player was perfectly accurate when recounting something from his own career. Thanks to the baseball reference play index and Sam for entering that one one other note just wanted to plug a piece written by my pal and friend of the show Steve Goldman, he wrote this for deadspin. It's called baseball's unwritten rules are the vestiges of drunken violent sport. Megan. I talk to Danny now Burr week ago about unwritten rules as they exist today, but Steve traces their origins all the way back to the nine. Eighteenth century, and he points out that in that era. Baseball was extremely violent and alcohol soaked, and that some of these rules may have evolved just to prevent actual fights. So there's a reason that they exist, but that doesn't mean they still need to exist. Because fortunately things have gotten less violent over the years. It's a fun informative piece though. So I will put it in the show notes. And I implore you to check it out. You can't support the podcast.

Mike Stanton Randy chote MLB baseball Steve Goldman Jesse Roscoe Tony Fossas Lopez Luque Trevor Hoffman Megan Danny Sam one pitch
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"He becomes the underworld Commissioner buffing. He's pulling the strings behind the scenes. He's, you know, getting Jake lamotta to take a dive so that he can have a shot at the title a year later, and he controls how while. Rockies manager. And so you know, there's an incident where rocky is coming out of a restaurant in New York, and while says, oh, Frankie's over there, go making feel good. And so you know, he was the underworld Commissioner, boxing, and he would, you know, fixed fights. He would, you know, have people post. That's for him. There was one fight manager named Hymie. The mink wallman who was a three year and he would go place messenger for cargo on fixed by and he would clean up. Everybody had a nickname back then how might. The great ones in Philadelphia. One Frankie's rain hasn't been a blinky Palermo blinky Palermo numbers king blinky Palermo he was the numbers Philadelphia, and he was behind jersey, Joe Alcott when they fought rocky him for the title in Philadelphia in nineteen fifty two. And the reason if I was in Philadelphia was because Walcott's manager who is also a guy connected to blinky couldn't get a manager's license in New York today, the fight right elsia idiot, brotherly love, and they might have fixed tried to fix the fight. When you talk to Rocky's family. And obviously. You know back then it's it's much harder to to to go find records, but but. How much money that rocky make in his in his career will would guesstimate. Well, his biggest purse was about half a million dollars which of course you you get half of. He probably made one or two million dollars, which you know multiply it by the, you know what it was worth then versus today. So he, you know, he made us Stansell amount of money and you know he was a commodity in terms of marketing, you know, heavyweight champion was the most man in the world. He could get all kinds of deals business and loved him. One of his early financial advisers I spent I was Charlie Finley, the insurance managed Chicago who later. Yeah, the owner of the open date. And so he had a lot of, you know, he never wanted for money, but he was. He was, you know that depression era upbringing and then seeing a while steal from him, made him very paranoid about money and e only Bill with cash in retirement, and he stashed it and all kinds of weird places, you know, carry it around and paper bags and stashing toilet bowls curtain rods. And he had a wealthy businessman friend in Florida who had a bomb. Shelter on his estate, and it was a luxurious bomb shelter with carpets pictures on the wall and fast a lot of money down there and tragically when he died young in a plane crash, you know, because he didn't trust Bank. His family could never track down. Most is might. Yeah. There's another great line by sports writer in in Los Angeles. You know when when he found out about the crash and jeopardize that Jim Murray, legendary legendary writer in l. a. what was his line. Well, Rockies plane crash in in Iowa in almost with year will be fifty years ago next year, an August thirty and Jim Murray wrote start the count, he'll get up. A lot of us are wishing today that there were an honest referee in a cornfield in Iowa. And yes, three Iraqi made international headlines pallbearers included, Muhammad Ali, and Joe Louis who he has become pretty good friends with both of them after he retired from the ring and some interesting stories about their relationships that I kind of shed light on. You know his tolerance about race and you know his affinity for black fighters, even though he was kind of cast as the great white hope in the nineteen fifties. And you know he was, I white champions and you know, Joe Louis it knocked out Braddock in nineteen thirty seven, but he had a real tentative for black fighters. You know, Mohammed ALI'S wife at the time told me that the only time she ever saw him, I'll e cry was when he heard that rocky had died. Yeah, I spend a lot of time studying Lee in and he was a great student of the game, the history of the game. Yeah. What he loved to watch it. He loved the history of it. Yeah. And his wife told me that, you know, he would grow up, you know, use the kid in Louisville who got his bike stolen..

Commissioner blinky Palermo Joe Louis Rocky Philadelphia Jake lamotta New York Lee Rockies writer Jim Murray Charlie Finley Iowa Joe Alcott Mohammed ALI Louisville Chicago Bill Los Angeles Muhammad Ali
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"He could get you to the garden and you did what he told you. He ran your life. He owns you, you know, he would tell you where to eat, what the eat, where sweep you know where to go, who you could date when you could marry. You know, rocky was dating his future wife, you know, Barbara for a few years and they wanted to get married and they had to wait for blessing. And then at their wedding l. gives this toast any basically reminds rocky in front of, you know, a few hundred people that you know, you belong to me and Barbara, you need to, you know, let me. We haven't, and I'll get you to the title. So rocky was very humiliated by that kind of treatment, but he's also shrewd enough to know that needed out while to get to the title. And as he became more successful and started to certain self more and become more confident in the world, he saw some of the things that I'll doing now was getting money off the top always taking half earning officially. But before they would divvy up, you know, they were deduct expenses. Our put all these bogus expenses are, and there was one fight in San Francisco. The second to last fight, and there was an investigation of boxing, and they discovered a ten thousand dollar check that while pinned off the top of the purse. So that was also, I mean that two things to rocky that heightened his paranoia about money and dealing only in cash, which really, you know, dominates his life in retirement, and it also prompts him to walk away from boxing when he's still has placed him. How. How pervasive you obviously have touched on it, and it's a big part of the the essence of the book. Just how crooked. Also, you know, everybody saw raging bull. Everybody knows about Jake lamotta and you know, you know, talk a little bit about guys are being told you have to throw this fight in order to get the next fight. How how did the how did the fight game work back then? Well, the mob has always been around. I mean, it's shadowing characters. There's the action, the lifestyle, gambling. You know, in early fighter who Rockies trainers hung out with out rocky camps was able to tell who the bag man for the nineteen nineteen World Series paying off the Chicago black socks. So you know when Jack Dempsey face gene Tunney in Chicago in the nineteen twenty Al Capone is rooting for Dempsey and the Philadelphia mob is rooting for Tunney. So you've always had the moderate boxing, but what happens when rocky becomes fighting for the title after World War Two, the country change it, and everybody gets. Television set and the two big things that are selling TV's early on our boxing, and I love Lucy and suddenly you know, the mob go there like water, they'd go where the money goes flow in that direction. And you know, after the war there flowing to the waterfront and docks with all the shipping, you know the story of on the waterfront and they're flowing to boxing because suddenly go river TV money. And so- boxing kind of take systematic control of, I mean, the mob, Texas medical troll of boxing and Frankie carbo and the Torius mobster whose implicated in at least five murders with a hitman for murder, Inc. Bugsy Siegel, you know, was prank fellows leading hitman work with Meyer Lansky leeann gangster..

boxing Barbara Bugsy Siegel gene Tunney Jake lamotta Meyer Lansky Jack Dempsey Frankie carbo Chicago San Francisco Rockies Lucy Texas Al Capone murder Philadelphia ten thousand dollar
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"And sometimes they did the son of an old, boxing referee and fighter from providence who rest a lot of Rockies bite his son you've been on, oh, another great providence name. But Sharkey son also named Sharkey who of course works for buddies, Nancy providence, city hall inspector of weights and measures. He gave me a photo of a fighter that was lying, you know, flat on the ring on his stomach and the doctors attending him, and you could see the, you know, black and white photo. You can see the black splotches of blood on the canvas, and that man died. And you know, the other thing that really fascinates me about rocky is he was very. He was more complex guy than people realize Layton his life. You know, he's been retired for over a dozen years and he's holding court and his how tell Sweden London. And he starts to say that, you know, I'm worried about my kids and grandkids, watching the fight film fight of me and thinking of a brutal ruffian. And he says, you know, forty fifty years from now, boxing gonna fade away. It's just too violent and you know, it's gotta go away and all his friends say, oh, no, Rocco and he's like, no, that's the way it is. But he, he had this vision, I think. And to me, the other thing about boxing is it's a window into the immigrant struggle. Because when you look at boxing through its history, it's always the people on the lower Rhone who are fighting because you know one of their only opportunities and then the working class. And then you've got the Jewish fighters in the Irish Italian, the black and the Tino's, and now you're eastern European heavily involved, and they're all looking for a way. And then there people are going to the fights. And there's this. It's a source of ethnic. Pride, it's a way for working class people to assimilate into America and to feel the sense of pride and individuality. And this increasingly industrialized world where you're chain to a factory. But talk a little bit about the the, the fractured relationship that that rocky had with his trainer, Charlie Goldman and his for lack of a better word. His owner. The guy that you know you talk about two. Yeah. You talk about today. You know. Pro athletes getting half of the half of the gate. You know, meaning, you know the, the NBA signs it, you know, a billion dollar deal, the the NBA players. Again, fifty percent only players who get screwed in major league sports or or NFL players. The ones died, the ones that die every Sunday. Today, exact dirty guys that get screwed in the baseball and basketball players have have a pretty good, but talk about the relationship that rocky had at that. He didn't really appreciate that he he had to put up with, but. These guys didn't always do what's always they hardly ever was best for rocky. No. And that that was the other balancing hack has with his manager. Al Weill. When rocky was, you know, starting to fight in some amateur fights around Brockton, Massachusetts. He, you know, his father and his uncles, and there was an old retired boxer Joe Monte who had fought max Schmeling and knew the fight game and said, look, if you wanna have a career in boxing, you've gotta go to New York. You gotta get a manager. You gotta get a big time guy. New York is the capital boxing, and so he goes down to New York and he meets l. wile and l. wile is kind of the preeminent to manager. He's also going to become the matchmaker for Madison Square Garden and the International Boxing club, which is the cartel that controls boxing, and he's gonna. He's a puppet of the mob. You know, the mob has its fingers in boxing, really deep and so l. is a guy who you know he's an immigrant from, you know, I'll say speech in France, Germany. He comes up as a ballroom dancer competing against George raft in, you know, New York, and then he gets into boxing great, you know, making Nassar's, but he's also really ruthless and he controlling and you're right fighters were pieces of meat, and one writer wrote a profile of out calling. He Hitler Mussalini Stalin and silent agree all rolled into one and this is a complimentary profile, but he's you fight..

boxing rocky International Boxing club Nancy providence New York Rocco Sharkey George raft Hitler Mussalini Stalin NBA l. wile Al Weill Layton Madison Square Garden NFL lower Rhone Sweden London America Charlie Goldman Massachusetts
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"It's kind of black and white. Yeah, film the warrior era. Yeah, just great. Great pictures. When. When he when he really really hurt. The other Italian fighter? I think karma and bingo. Yeah. When he really heard him and sentiment hospital and he might die and rocky went over to the hospital and sat with him. I think that speaks to what you were saying about what a gentle, caring guy he was after he tried to tried to kill you in the ring. Exactly. And that was a really big fight. And that was one of his earlier bites that didn't get as much attention and I spent whole chapter on it because I was so fascinated by it, and I thought it was such a critical Lincoln in Rockies history and and turning point because he and bingo, we're both young, you know, relatively unknown but hard hitting unbeaten, Italian heavyweight. You know, rocky from Brockton bingo from the Bronx. They each other big Italian following and they were fighting at Madison Square Garden, their first fight in Madison Square Garden, and it was the night before New Year's Eve nineteen forty nine. And these two guys came out and they fought at the, you know, the speed of a couple of lightweight. New York Times writer said team that they, they went on until human endurance could stand no more and rocky said that it was the hardest he ever was hit when bingo hit him in the chest in an early round in rocky blacked out, but stayed on his feet and fell into a clinch and recovered. And he eventually knocks thing go out. And then bingo's head kinda snaps and things on the canvas and rocky celebrating this big win, and then they have to carry then go to the hospital and he puts into a coma and there was a really, you know, gripping story that things will later wrote for the Saturday Evening Post where he recounted, what it's like to be a boxer and you're in the ring with a guy who's your friend and then suddenly you're just pummeling it and you got the blood loss, and then the fights over and then he's your friend again and you worry about it. And this is an era that just like today, people talk about the damage of NFL football and whether it's worth it and the same debates. We're going around boxing at that time, and there were people being killed in the ring. There were few dozen people killed in the ring that year nineteen forty nine and nineteen fifty. And these guys, all these great dreams of being the champion having wealth and fame. And then the flip side is, you know, being carried out on a stretcher and bingo did recover, but he never thought again, he was blind in one. And he walked the length and he had a pretty pretty tough life. You know, he worked on the docks as a night watchman, but and he doesn't remember the fight to his desk. Never never fight. You remembered walking up the steps to the ring and the garden. And then he remembered waking up. Being mother was down at a hospital. You know, I remember my one of my earliest recollections grown up in Norristown which is kind of like a city like Brockton factory town, and you know, both of my parents worked in factories, but I remember going into barbershop and there'd be boxing pictures all over the walls and was always taken back by the one picture of it was rocky Graziano who killed a guy in ring. It might have been. Yeah, I am trying to think. I mean, he had some great fights with what was it Tony sale. Yeah, but there was a there was a picture of a guy laying on the campus and and the guy told me, you know, see that guy there he died, you know, in the ring and I thought, wow, and you heard about that and and to be a boxer in those days, the the duress, they weren't so quick stop fights where. No. And that was well, here's the problem. If you stop the fight too quickly, you are suspected of being in the tank. You were being paid off by mob guys gamblers to fix the writing. So there was almost like this hands off approach, and then there'd be criticism and there'd be times that you know people would be screaming at the rest of stop the fight..

rocky Graziano Madison Square Garden boxing New York Times NFL Brockton coma Norristown writer
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"It's fight for perfection, crooked world because he goes on to histories only unbeaten heavyweight champion. You know, he's like the New England Patriots. I mean, and and your team. I mean as many titles as you've all one, you know, wasn't always easy, and there were some squeakers and he has some real close calls. And so those things all surprise me and amusement. But one of the things that really struck me was maybe it goes back to how we idolize their sports heroes back in that kind of golden age of the nineteen fifties when he was camping. But I was getting his military service record because he served in an army engineer unit during World War Two. And I covered the, he'd been court martialed for along with another TI for salting and robbing to British civilians in England when they were supposed to be on base, getting ready to go to Normandy for the. Invasion in the spring of nineteen forty four. And you know what really struck me, not that it makes rocky a bad person, but he's a flawed complex interesting person. And you know, he made a mistake and it was kind of swept under the rug. And I was getting his files from the national archives and the librarian said, well, we also have this other file. It's not digitized. It's his court martial transcript if he's like that. And I said, what? And you know, I had heard he'd had some problems, but then I got the file and there's mugshots and fingerprints and a and a whole trial transcript, but not only illuminates what happened, but also kind of, you know, there's a lot of details about his early life than struggles. While it. It's an interesting part in the book. Where where you see rocky as not so much this heavyweight boxer whose destined for stardom, but just a regular street kid who's now in the army, and you know he's doing what normal street kids in your your. He's trying to find a way to get. You know hustle this also that get an advantage in this and you know, and it, it kind of really humanized them even more I thought than you think. Yeah, it did me and it also you know, if you look at, you know how the domino theory of life. It really to me, led him into boxing because he was sentenced to two ultimate originally seven years in prison. It was reduced to. And so he stayed in the army after the war ended. So he could come out with an honorable discharge. And after he served his military prison time, he goes out the fort Lewis in Washington state, and he serves the through nineteen forty six. And when he's there, he starts the box on the prison, boxing team. I mean, not prison the army boxing team, and that's his first real formal boxing experience, and he makes it to the finals of the national junior AAU championship in Portland, Oregon, and he's obviously very raw, very clumsy fighter. And in the semi's he punches a guy awkwardly on the top of his head, and he shatters knuckle, and this is a career potential career ending injury, and he goes. Back to the army hospital, and there's a Japanese American surgeon who performs an experimental operation on him and saves his career. And when interesting about this union, you know, talk about your immigrant stories. This man family was, you know, Japanese American tour interns in those camps during World War Two, as you know suspected enemy, and he was spared that this back your Thomas Takeda because he was in medical school at the time. And then later when he wants to serve his country, they won't let him go overseas. So he's at fort Lewis. And in fact, if you months before he operates on rocky, Dwight Eisenhower comes through in the family, shared a photo, Dr Takeda Dwight Eisenhower and several months later, he saving Rockies career. You know few years after that rocky will be in the White House and Dwight Eisenhower, there's famous photo, Joe DiMaggio standing watching our measuring Rockies fift-, the one that repaired in basketball accuracy can be the difference between winning. And losing. And.

Dr Takeda Dwight Eisenhower Thomas Takeda fort Lewis New England Patriots boxing army hospital England engineer Joe DiMaggio White House AAU Rockies basketball Oregon Portland Washington seven years
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"Yeah, the whole thing going on the cover shot is him putting in a Venetian gondola that he brought in from Italy, why the rivers of the providence river during water fire hire the gun, you can't make you can't make this up. You know this. I think you're white part. Even today. You could hire a gondola, get a picnic and debt or out yet. Part. Parts of Prantoso part wise guys. Yeah, park goodfellas. It's yet. It's all true. True to life. Yeah. And he had to be people, the city hall aids at nickname, like buckles and blackjack and Bobo, and they went to prison. They were stealing manhole covers off the streets and city garbage trucks, and it was just a it was the wild west, and buddy was they were all sitting at that dinner I was at, I think they were all sitting in front of me, say, might have been. That's right. Wallet. I found myself underneath one of those manhole covers if I kept talking. So Mike latest book on beaten. The rocky Marciano story, call them beaten. Rocky Marciano is fight for perfection in a crooked world about three quarters of the way through the book. I don't. I don't want to. I mean, obviously, I know the ending, but I, I want to go and take my time with it. You know, being in the talian immigrant and coming over from, you know, from Italy and growing up, you know where my mother and father spoke hardly any English throughout their their lives, and my father passed away. My mother still alive. She's eighty seven, you know, the way we ate at home and the way we dress and the way things were expected of you reading Rockies early childhood. It just brings back so many memories, and it's funny that we were talking about providence which is big part of your life. But providence played a big role in Rockies life, didn't it? It did, and that's how I got onto that. It was really buddy. CNC leading need a rocky Marciano because when buddy was a boy growing up in providence, his father was a doctor and he used to take into fights at the old, Rhode Island, auditory him on north main street. And this was an arena, the Boston Celtics and Bob Cousy played. Their icecapades came in ROY Rogers and trigger to Rhode Island reds, hockey team. And the big attraction was Monday night fight night and providence was the biggest fight city in wingless figure that Boston and in the early in the late nineteen forties rocky a headliner there because he was from Brockton about thirty five miles away. And he was just knocking people out and the local, especially with his talent heritage, loved him. They loved the night, the knockout punch. You know, they had this ritual where he would hit a guy and a guy would stand there. Poise and then collapsed and everybody in the crowd with yell timber. So, yeah, so rocky fought twenty eight times in his professional career, there of his forty nine fight, and it really launched him on the past to the title. Well, as you're doing, you're doing your background on on rocky. You know what, what struck you as. That moment where you know you're like, wow, I would have never guessed that. And people won't believe it. But this is what happened or this, you know, this is how it was there a moment when. As much already knew about rocky. Well, there were three. I mean, the one just understanding how vicious boxing was and just getting really in depth about reconstructing these fight and what it was like and what it reflected about our society at the time for working class people, and then the celebrity nature being the heavyweight champion fifty years ago, you were household name, boxing baseball, where the two big sports in America, and I really wanted to reflect that as well as you know, it's not aimed at a hardcore boxing fan audience, but you know rocky was and what struck me was I learned about his friendships with a lot of celebrities like Frank Sinatra, Jackie Gleason, Jerry Lewis, Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio, and I get some great stories from his nephews about encounters he had with them. But the other thing was the mafias entrenched control, boxing, and how this kinda hero immigrant on his only way out. You know, the cliche Horatio Alger story is through the ring. But he has to contend with all the corrupt forces run boxing and ultimately help do it in as a mainstream American sport. And that's why I called it..

Rocky Marciano providence ROY Rogers providence river Italy Joe DiMaggio Horatio Alger Venetian Boston Celtics Rockies talian Bob Cousy Bobo Rhode Island Prantoso Mike Frank Sinatra Brockton Boston
"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Holding Court with Geno Auriemma

"This is Gino Auriemma and this is holding court near to. You're more famous in China than liangelo ball. I mean, and he just became famous you away. We're famous than we were on runs. Undefeated runs, who was I call it? If you don't want to know how do I keep the. Your mom. Hello, I gotta tell you, you know, she's still watches you on TV, but she said that she said, Charles, I like you. I like you a lot and you were so, but then she said, but I love the shack. Yeah. Okay. Welcome. Ladies and gentlemen, sports fans, non sports fans, boxing fans, non boxing fans are in for a little bit of a treat today's guest on holding court with Gino Auriemma this Agena worry. Emma. Today's guest is Mike Stanton professor of journalism and investigative reporting at the university of Connecticut and author of two books. One is called the prince of providence. The rise and fall of buddy CNC America's most notorious mayor, which is New York Times bestseller and his latest book. Unbeaten. Rocky Marciano is fight for perfection in a crooked world, those of you that may or may not know the story. Rocky Marciano, the only undefeated unbeaten heavyweight champion of the world. Forty nine. Oh, great story. Some interesting tidbits. Mike, Scott, a lot of lot of history in the New England area, Connecticut, and working for the Providence Journal in Providence, Rhode Island, hope you like your involvement with because I'm I'm fascinated by your involvement with. Providence, the city of providence. You know, a lot of people may not know, but you know, providence at one time. He's been through a whole lot. You can tell me more than I know. But I think the people in Hartford now, envy providence, you know, they, they don't want to say they don't want to admit to it, but. T- tell me how long you spent their what it was like and the transformation that you saw the city go through during your time living and working there? Well, I have a good perspective on this Gino because I grew up in Lynch law and you know we'd go. My parents would take me into downtown Hartford to g box and go shopping, and you know one of the real vibrant city. And then you know, I went to Syracuse and journalism major in a reporter, and I went to work for the Providence Journal in nineteen eighty six or eight nineteen eighty five sports writer. I covered the big and. You know, it was a theme park for journalists in about five years after my sports writing career started, I got transferred over to the investigative team, and then I went to covering what was really Rhode Island leading sport at the time, which was political corruption. And we also were the center place of the New England mafia and just a very rich interesting, historic city, you know, as a real interesting place in American history, it was founded by Roger Williams on this, you know, tenant of religious freedom when he was cast out of Massachusetts by the puritan and he's found to displace he called divine providence, and that really became model for America developed with in terms of religious freedom. And then the industrial revolution really began in Rhode Island. And if I backtrack, Rhode Island was also a hotbed of the flake trade, you know, leading shipping port providence in Newport, the Brown family that gave Brown University, it's name or a big slave. Traders and then the two brothers done and Moses Brown had had a falling out. Moses wife died and became a Quaker and renounce slavery and actually had got his brother who was a congressman prosecute per continuing to trade and flav. And then he took his money and he poured it into the first factory. Textile Mellon took Rhode Island. So the industrial revolution was born there..

providence Gino Auriemma Rhode Island Providence Journal Scott Rocky Marciano Moses Brown New England Mike Stanton Hartford boxing China Brown University university of Connecticut New York Times professor of journalism CNC America Emma Charles
"mike stanton" Discussed on Fantasy Throwdown Podcast

Fantasy Throwdown Podcast

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on Fantasy Throwdown Podcast

"Know, I, I would say, you know, stash cod if you can, if he's available in in the league and then you can make your decision from there. Otherwise, Westbrook would be the play for straight up waiver wires. If you're if you're doing a mid week, so that does it for the waiver wire picks get into the rest of the predictions of during later on during the week, get the Yankees, a game tomorrow night against the as the as announced their starter is actually going to be a relief pitcher. So the as are going to go by maybe bullpen by committee and then maybe used Mike fires as long guy. That should be interesting just because of the fires assist with Mike Stanton, but the as are literally treating this as trying to throw as many different arms of the Yankees. Make sure that they're not comfortable at the plate. So that should be interesting. Than amick because really haven't seen teams go with his bullpen Pam by committee approach to start a game in quite some time. So it'll be interesting. The cubs and Rockies are playing to surprising. Pitcher's duel here. I don't know. I don't know how that comes rocky skins, plain out the cubs offense just looks lifeless, and you know, I know the love. The backstory of this was coming into the amount of games cups have played in the last month and a half with only one off day. I, I don't know. I don't know what major league baseball can do about rain outs early on the season, but you can. You can tell like this cups theme definitely seems tire because their mental mistakes being made in the field. So I think there's a lot going on with the cubs overall as a team. I still think they're going to win this game just because of the fact that the Rockies. Bullpen has blown the most saves in the National League this year. But you know, I definitely feel that this is a case where you got one team in the Rockies that's drinking hot. The cubs have played well down the stretch, give me wrong. They were literally battling walkie for homefield and play offs in in the NFL just yesterday. But you know, I just don't like the signs I'm seeing from the cubs. I think there's a team that's kind of on the ropes at so to speak in terms of health and willpower to kinda get through these matchup. So very curious to see how this one ends, but that's going to do for the show. But hope hopefully you guys get some insight on the waiver wires base off his Intel and gluco with ear matchups the rest of the week, take it easy folks..

cubs Yankees Rockies Mike Stanton Westbrook Intel National League NFL
"mike stanton" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Biography of him in about four decades. Meanwhile, I feel like I get a biography every day in the mail. Some skewer baseball player from the era. Why? Why has a rocky up until this point been neglected to the extent that he has been. The fact is that boxing has faded from the national consciousness. I mean, it's still there. They're still people who follow it certainly, and there's some great fighters, but it's not front and center American life like it was back then, and I really wanted to go back and recreate that era of the great spectacle than Yankee Stadium and the smoke filled Madison Square Garden and the the fight crowded to shore and and all the characters who hung around it and that lost era in America. And so I think as boxing faded away and Rockies, you know, crooked world that existed in eventually crumbled a couple of things that the golden goose of television that brought all this money and that attracted the mob killed all the local fight clubs in the neighborhood. You know, boxing matches that's fueled the sport and then disillusionment that the public had with the congressional investigations and the FBI probes. And then there was also a lot of concern about the violence rocky nearly killed a man, Carmine bingo, and particularly dramatic fight. In the garden. And even back then people like today with the NFL were debating about wisdom of boxing and rocky. At the end of his life actually said to somebody, you know, I think I'm going to be one of the last of the gladiators, you know, fifty years from now. People aren't gonna follow boxing, the way they did because it's just too brutal and savage and and I worry that my children going to watch films of my fights and consider me a brutal ruffian what alternate lease rocky Marciano legacy on the sports landscape. Well, he was the histories only unbeaten heavyweight champion, forty, nine zero. And that's something you can't take away from him. I think his will to win, you know, to overcome adversity. His relentless training and dedication is can be an inspiration to athletes today in any sport. And I think you know, he's, he represents an era that's kind of been forgotten in American history. And you know, I thought by bringing him back, I would kind of bring back that era that kind of greatest Jenner. Ration- in America and a country that really changed after World War Two. And you know, boxing with seen is, you know a place that the individual and the immigrant and the people on the bottom of the social ladder could could achieve in a world that was becoming increasingly industrialized and urbanized, and you know, in human, I always like to say the boxing is the hardest sport in a requires the most of those who participate in it. And certainly in rocky Marciano time when the sports still attracted athletes, the top kind of athletes, which argue is not the case now because of the tally of the sport he was. He was one of the greats of all time and that can't that can't be taken away from rocky Marciano. And he was an icon in a way that people today don't really understand how big it was. You know, Jerry Lewis told him, you know, you're the boss of the world rock. I mean, he was friends with Frank Sinatra, and you know, Rockies nephew told me a story that kind of Illustre. Rates, rocky stature, in American culture when Rockies nephew was in college, his uncle brought him to Las Vegas to see Frank Sinatra and concert, and afterwards, Frank invited them up to his hotel suite and had ordered stakes from room service, but not for Rockies driver. When rocky pointed this out to Frank Frank threw him a twenty dollar Bill and said, tell your gopher to go by himself. A hamburger and rocky, grab Frank Sinatra steak gave it to his driver and said, if you Frank, you go buy your own hamburger and Frank Sinatra just laughed and ordered another steak and Rockies nephew told me that's when I knew that my own CLE was larger than life. Great story about a bygone era, and they're plenty of such stories in the new book. New biography of rocky Marciano by Mike Stanton eighties unbeaten rocky Marciano, fight for perfection in a crooked world. Thank you for writing this book and adding to the literature of the heavyweight division. Thank you so much, Jeremy. It's nice to talk. Two, I'm Jeremy shop and you can listen to new additions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time..

rocky Marciano Frank Sinatra Frank Frank Madison Square Garden rocky America baseball Jeremy shop FBI Rockies ESPN Yankee Stadium NFL Jenner Jerry Lewis Las Vegas Illustre Mike Stanton
"mike stanton" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

"Well, he couldn't have gotten there without them. I mean, the the mob, as you know, the mob is always been around boxing, but what happens after World War Two is television comes in and transforms the sport and the mob gravitates to the big money. And they kind of there's a Torius mobster named Frankie carbo. He's a hitman and murder Inc with Bugsy Siegel, and he becomes the underworld Commissioner of boxing, and he kinda pulls the strings behind the scenes and he controlled the managers and through them the fighters, you controls the big arenas and or. Denies boxing known by that. Then as the octopus and his Rockies manager at Weill was one of the more prominent managers and he was controlled by Frankie carbo when we think about the great the stillness of the period of the harder they fall, and there are a lot of dramatization that tension between organized crime and boxing in the compromises is their school start that rocky won some fights because other guys were thrown them? Well, I think there was more school thought that he got the fights that maybe worthier fighters didn't get because you know he had the connections and you had to have the connections, you know, black, white, whatever your race, you know, to get the good fights. And you know, it certainly benefited rocky to have l. while his manager, but he also chafed under it. You know, he didn't like that negative image that the mob put on his his Italian American heritage. He didn't like it as manager took half his earnings and skimmed money off to. Top. He didn't like the fact that when congress than the FBI started to investigate the corrupt boxing sport, they, they would then choose Rocky's opponents to kind of pacify investigators instead of necessarily what was best for Rockies career. So they kind of delayed him on his past to the title to match them up with some other, you know, politically expedient fights. So it was a real tension there. We're with Mike STAN about just new biography of rocky Marciano, unbeaten. And as I said, at the beginning the interview, if there was a time when you'll Marciano was a real icon. I mean, you know an undefeated heavyweight champion forty nine in our in. Certainly when I was a kid and Larry Holmes was getting close to that record. People were talking about Marciano and his legacy died very young. I guess he wasn't even quite forty six when he died in that that plane crash, woah. To what extent has has time kind of stolen from rocky the significance in the the respect that he held at that time when he was still fighting or you know, it's funny, Jeremy. When he was fighting the there were constant debates among the sports writers in the fans about how worthy champion or a contender. He was, they talked about how crude he was how awkward he was, how clumsy he was, how he came. You know, to the fight game pretty late, you know his his trainer said, you know, I got a guy with the stoop shouldered and balding and two left feet, and you don't look so good with the move, but his opponents don't look so good. We're on the when they're on the canvas. So what rocky head that you can't take away from him is he fought the best fighters, the Aira he had an honorable will overcome some really bloody battles and come out on top. He had incredible endurance and stamina through as you know, monk like training and he had the punch, the Suzie q.. That was one of the most. Powerful punches in heavyweight history. They once did a measurement of it and said it had the force of a bullet fired from gun a right cross, right. Yeah, it was a big looping, right? And again, that's not a very natural punch for most boxers. It opens you up to abuse and he was only five foot ten one hundred eighty five pounds. And yes, heavyweights where smaller in that era, but he was still usually outweighed and facing fighters with longer arms. And so he had to get inside of them and he had to really open himself up to abuse. And you know, he kinda fought from a catcher's crouch which kinda back to his first love of baseball and his, you know, failed tryout with the Chicago Cubs that then led him to pursue the only option he had left, which was boxing about big figures in sports, mid twentieth century. Rocky Marciano is right at the top, but yours is the first real biography..

rocky Marciano Frankie carbo boxing Bugsy Siegel Rockies murder Inc Jeremy Larry Holmes Commissioner Mike STAN Chicago Cubs Suzie q Weill l. baseball crouch FBI congress ten one hundred eighty five po
"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The way just looking back on a game it was twonothing yankees in the bottom of the eighth inning douse the situation was the bottom of the eighth inning and david wells started the inning and roberto alamar started with a leadoff double then mike piazza reached on an error so they were first and third nobody out anka mets down to and well stayed in the game the face move on hold on at home run and then stayed in the game the face j peyton we walked and then he finally came out of the game in the yankees ended abusing mike stanton and ramiro mendoza at to get through that anything and that's how the mets came back so it was a bottom of the eighth inning rally down to nothing they scored three in the bottom of the eighth win three two two and that was one of those days 'cause i mentioned it was living in europe but i came in for a cause of the subway series was a sunday night game from our mistakes i remember when moe is the home run i gave that old naumova loans and met line he's he's now he's a met this was his moment because hey it's a gamewinning home run against the yankees when the subway series was still somewhat special somewhat somewhat would be the key somewhat f troop if you're not familiar with ken bury it larry store chart believe what are your were the stars of the show what it was like they were like a goal back into the late 1880s or wherever it was that doesn't interest me at all and they were to watch the very dysfunctional you know try obviously it's after civil war but very gladbach scheudled troop you'll yoga general costas type drew group with the indians i think they call them the head cowboys with i think that's what it was interesting the n and knees were like anything but the kind of in that you would think they were you know wasn't wasn't sitting bowl like crazy will catch you or i did that i'm intrigued and they'd be a check in an ally gold along it was a comet when was it 70s 80s i guess it was a 70s we've probably was say might have been late '60s hinted alka something like that and i'll check that out thank you are last caller china point pleasant john our you what's up a recovery met.

yankees david wells mike stanton mets europe moe roberto alamar mike piazza ramiro mendoza ken
"mike stanton" Discussed on The Dave Portnoy Show

The Dave Portnoy Show

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on The Dave Portnoy Show

"Jared cowardice for assent hits as put his his flag in the ground giancarlo by the way i'm just gonna on carlo carlos stance all mike mike is in blocking mike stanton mike stanton that's jared's thing to blog i don't know who wrote a hubs in in caveney and kevin i'm looking like whereas cabras blunting this it has got nowhere to be found that i see a tweet 985 the sports up like jr cameras will be coming on at eleven twenty eight eleven twenty am the talk about mike stanton it was what ten thirty one this house annoy the tweeted the screen shot your text by a hey 1050 in 1020 of sought morale on my corona i'd love to get the full time barstool implore jarque harbas are baseball guys are nine on our blog before he goes on station not affiliate with borstal talked law so i i sent a little tweet said maybe you can blowing in a barstool first now to remind there are already too blogs about sir mike stanton on barstools and you took exception to that yeah so um manipu by the way uh dave there there is no one on this earth more committed to uh covering baseball for barcelona sports the me you will find anyone else so by though i hope so you're are fulltime but i am saying ali's landed early as it up it's a it's a big deal the planet or so the night before the reports that i not that big of a state can i get my fucking turn to talk now yeah but i mean you just made that saw you know zlotys bowl do my job a borstal better than mitt i generally one higher to do a barstool yes anyway so eleven pm is when the reports started and then they went until four thirty in the fucking morning i was covering the reports until above five o'clock in the morning and i went to sleep woke up at nine and start to blog because the news broke around like eight o'clock in the morning kevin his out because he has kids hubs is up because he clearly is a fucking loser and it was a saturday as a saturday morning i still look up at nine i started to write the blog and you're like oh can you fucking post a blog on barstool before you go on sports up.

carlo carlos mike mike mike stanton caveney baseball kevin Jared jr borstal barcelona ali
"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The to all tonight the sanchez batting cleanup dh so what joe is says i'm gonna give sanchez they off behind the plate and i'm gonna dh him because the aama get anything out of the i'm not getting anything under the age anyways up with scientists at the age of what rome on it so here we go gardner judge didi sanchez de h bird castro hicks frazier rome aren't so rome i gets a game because they'd be get nothing out of the bh anyway got one single last night it was an infield single will see and i bounce and more them all to bury that drove in a run by heavily the only hit they've had the thai year at the eight so roma and gets a swing and it gives sanchez a day behind it off behind the plate for this a game i don't have the astro lineup yet with mccullough's against the gray in the game number four love mike stanton on the astro pitching i want to get us going put on mukalla's who was in and out a lot in in august and september pitcher august at all pitch limited was up temper has attempted pitch well did pitcher the red sox series and limited pichler i think three innings in the red sox series that's it so there's the yankee lineup as we speak the one change sanchez is that the h and roll mine is the starting catcher right now let me give you a chance first one of three for the day yogi fancy go yankees and astros meet the fifth game could be the pivotal game of the afc has tomorrow at 505 and we've got your tickets right now seven waller eight six six five four zero wfan eight six six five four zero wfan's before calling grief make sure you could pick up tickets.

joe aama rome mccullough mike stanton mukalla yankees afc wfan gardner didi sanchez astros
"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And mike stanford and that's wrong don't you buy your tristate four dealers in the car outside the astros clubhouse i am says that while man i'm talking to someone who knows this astra steam as well as anybody also knows what it like to be a champion for the new york yankees and that as our friend mike stanton kind of exciting having these two teams go at it you know you know these teams so well it really is i mean you have two teams canam different places you know the astros seem that came in with big expectations and you have the yankees on the other side that maybe a year early but they're playing very well when you look at what went on yesterday dallas sky call said after the game that that he sign a faltered in the fourth and fifth innings in west saying they're going really what is orders that leanings but one of the things i saw i didn't use this change apple i use different things so you couldn't really prepare for what he was doing well he's had a little issue over the last several starts of kind of losing his concentration little bit and i think that's what he was talking about we saw some fastballs in the dirt and usually he's got impeccable command but it didn't really make any mistakes up in the zone and that was view i think you could really tell what his game plan and going into the that star was really stayed out really try and keep the ball down uses offspeed stuff and it worked pretty well and when you looked at tanaka last night he didn't use a splitter i asked him why didn't he said well i had i just thought i'd go with something else so it was like both teams didn't want to be prepared for what they did the last time out that meal that people have videotape foreign that's the cat and mouse game the the astros have seen tanaka several different times out they know the split they saw his last start and how good that split was that they were prepared for it so he decided to put that in his back pocket and i didn't think he was over leash sharp but he was.

astros yankees mike stanford new york mike stanton dallas
"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"We're back live from minute maid park in houston game two of the alcs coming up in just over an hour john and susan standing by pregame show this would begins at three twenty five go here from joe girardi for mike stanton the former yankee now astros tv analysts this well and look it to set for game two severino against berlin remember tomorrow's an off day than gained three monday back of new york that's an 8 o'clock start but then games poured five or five o'clock starts at yankee stadium as the cubs them dodgers move in the prime time and the nlcs so while there the only 2 series left and a lot of exciting baseball postal ahead three four and five wide if necessary in new york monday tuesday and wednesday it was gets up for here for game two a let you hear a couple of comments from astros catcher brian can obviously spent the last few years with the new york yankees before being traded over the winter and here they are meeting he got pushed out of new york because gary cinchez emerged last year and here they are the starting catchers in the al cs mccann does of upon this for sanchez and you'll hear what he talks about here about what he told sanchez last year as he was coming up and also some comments from a cat about how hardest staff this is the catch as gary learns to get better behind the plate it's not all about of hamed is also some of the difficulties in getting these pitchers in particular let's hear brian mechanic who spoke a little while ago hearing houston to a year ago and in july when the yankees your trader bug guys and and then they brought up gary to be in line of what was that like for you because i would imagine it's the first time you know in your career maybe not your entire playing baseball were you know you were either explicitly told her was implied that you aren't going to be the everyday guy you know we've gary coming up and do what.

new york yankees hamed al cs mccann berlin susan john houston sanchez gary cinchez joe girardi brian astros baseball cubs yankee stadium new york mike stanton
"mike stanton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"mike stanton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Tell you the day they want that irritant not be talked about they wanted to be shoved away we don't want to recognize barry bonds with hall of fame we don't want to recognize roger clemens in the hall of fame we don't wanna recognize mark mcgwire in the hall of fame we don't wanna recognize rafael palmeiro in the hall of fame we want to forget that era except when it's convenient mike stanton are giancarlo stand has made a convenient for a lot of people to bring up an era that they otherwise say they one or forgets why why like forget what do you think the 73 which which is the home run market is you might not like it but it's the officially recognised all time singleseason home run record by major league baseball you can't do your own math 73 greater than sixty one any 3s greater than seventy seventy three is greater than any other singleseason home run total that anyone's put up you might not like it but that's us that's a statistical mathematical fact if it bothers you that 73 is the number okay celebrate what stanton is doing because regardless of how you feel about 73 versus sixty one fifty one homers before september the first is pretty awesome is pretty incredible should be celebrated should be documented should be followed you can do that regardless of how you feel about barry bonds you can do that regardless of how you feel about mark mcgwire you could do that regardless of how you feel about pds or the lack of testing the baseball head in place in the nineties or the fact that because there was no tried and true punishment for pd used that basically it was allowed if that if that era of those accomplish accomplishment still bother you.

barry bonds roger clemens mark mcgwire rafael palmeiro mike stanton