19 Burst results for "Mike Self"

"mike self" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

07:29 min | 2 months ago

"mike self" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Visit triple a dot com for details and choose coverage confidence triple A outsmart life. Analyst coach joins me now on the show did happy happy holiday body? Absolutely, Bill. Happy Weekend of nothing but baseball, So I've been in the tournament all weekend. Play another big game. How'd you guys do victorious right now? My 10 new teams in the championship leading with think they got two hours ago. I got a 16 new games going to start in about 20 minutes. Life is good. And you get on the East Coast nine and eight year olds. 10 to 16. Oh, 10. I think that under 10 gotta gotta gotta gotta have no 10, 11, 12, 13 and 16 you all playing this weekend in my home pounds of all places that makes life easy. That's a nice way to to celebrate Independence Day. Oh, my God. No. My hometown bill, They don't really like himself. It's a lot of fun to beat them. We like we like you out here, dude. Be like out here. Hey, let me ask you a random question before we get to baseball. I Loathes the hot dog eating contest. I find it to be just disgusting. Am I am I missing something? I am? I am I am I swinging and missing here on on this yearly horrific tradition. Not for the competitors. I mean, if it was just like you would room trying to eat 76 hot dogs that would be gluttonous. What to them. Most of them are into shape. Most of them. This is what they do. I know there's a husband and wife team had this argument my wife yesterday because she's not some of that lights, red meat to the You want to look at a hot dog. So you know she was talking about The wife and the husband. They travel around the world. They make hundreds of thousands of dollars stuff on their face. So as far as a profession, it's kind of gross. But if that's what you're good at, I don't have a problem. Um, you know, saying that these people that can down 76 hot dogs in 10 minutes Don't have a place on the planet. I mean, I guess, make your money. I just I can't even like a buddy of mine does ultramarathons, right? I don't know what they are, but he runs a million miles. Do you run like 100? Miles crazy, And then he can't move for four days. Right? Like is there a similar physical Can't like. Is Joey Chestnut somewhere in a bed? Just moaning in pain, begging for water like that. Can't be good for you. Even if you can do well, it can't And honestly, I hope that they go and you know Get rid of it somewhere quick because I think they've got to hold it down for a certain amount of time. But there's no way I could stomach Even 10 hot dogs, much less 76. I don't know how that's humanly possible. But I get they stretch their stomachs and intestines out and all that kind of stuff. So, yeah, I mean, there's a message to that dinos, but no nothing that Had ever really once I could barely eat a hamburger both as little as I agreed Hamburger, but I could not eat. I could eat too hot dogs, but I could not E seven of them, let alone 75. Um Rob double here on the show, uh, gives the Yankees have been mediocre and Gerrit Cole and they're all Chapman have not pitched well since baseball clamp down on on these some of these substances. Do you think that's a coincidence? Or are these two guys who were who were getting as best you can guess over guessing But your speculation? You think these were two guys who were getting an unfair advantage? Possibly. But I don't I honestly think, turn their heads now. That you know, A lot of this stuff was basically you know, to get a better grip on the ball, but I think the spin right thing because listen, I work with the rap soda machine. And I've got kids that it's been below 4200 RPMs and they're 16 years old. Um, it's just gripping the ball properly. And the major league balls right now are so slick with no queens but, yeah, these guys, probably over the last few years were taught how to utilize these sticky substance is what I do Think Bill. Is that even what's happened? Lou Panella would lost his mind if I got beat right on the Alaba home run on a second or third best pitch. You lost his mind. Kid throws 102 miles an hour. But what happens is if you give up some hit and you're throwing like 96 1 night or 97 your ball straight and you give up a couple of rockets off the wall. You get away from that and in your head. Like trying to trick this guy with a slider or I'll try to go change efforts until in that fourth ball, and so well, they've adjusted to that. They know he has a nap before fall, so they're looking for the rotation and recognition and, honestly, the next We have not been hitting that well. Boots hosted the Yankees cushion. So you know for for most of these teams that are hitting below 2 40. I don't think that the sticky substance had anything to do with them Being four hitters. But I think right now, some of the best hitters in the game uh they're feasting on these guys that it's in their head that I can't broker curveball. I can't feel good change up. So, uh, for my money. If you're throwing a two seamer, you're throwing, uh, slower revolutions if you don't change up Lower revolution, so not everything is to increase the spin rate. Dibs. You think the Yankees are going to figure it out? Like I think a lot of us expected at least until it's continue this sort of level of now that they're awful. They're just very mediocre. You think they're going to figure it out and be one of the better teams in that division or baseball by the end of the year? No, no, I don't because I see teams like Toronto in Tampa and and the Red Sox, all hitting the ball the other way with two strikes, Uh, runners in scoring position, Putting the ball in play are not striking out the The Yankees are like, eighties real clean. They remind me of those American, including that waited for the three right home run to score the runs and Bunches. They don't have a lot of speed. Have a lot of guys that basically clogged up the base path. Um, and they're all built. Heavy, right handed power. They have no good left handed power, guys. And, you know, getting rid of, uh, outman and and getting rid of, uh, you know, uh huh. This guy's probably should have been with them, but you see them. There's anything well so the team because they put into that 2 50 type hitter to 85 better put the ball in play. When your analytics people are also hook, you know, sit back and swing as hard as you came from the heels for three strikes that that's a bad approach at the plate. It's great for pictures like Negro. I would love to line up every day. But as far as you know, we were able to, you know, manufacture runs play small ball when you have to. When the guy's pitching a great game, they they don't have that mindset. Their mindset is hit it as far as they can. And it doesn't matter if you strike out 180 times. You look at the on the percentage Hitting like 25 of the team with right around 300 on base percentage levels are not walking. All they do is strike out, and all you do is swing for home runs, So no, it's a poorly built Rob Rob Dibble here on the Jim Roam show. That's interesting. You just referenced a few teams that do things that I guess hitting the other way and playing some small ball and stealing some bases. I don't know it was an old school, but whatever it is, it's the former model. That's not the overwhelming model now. The Padres do that to another What? 4.5 games back, but that's a really good baseball team. But I think a pretty bright future. Do you think we're getting to a point where there's going to be a reversion back to that kind of baseball or a combination of analytics with that kind of baseball? 2345 years from now because it's working with a lot of these clubs. No, The analytics isn't working. And, you know, I mean, actually. Yeah. Mike Smith. Mike Self of the Cardinals just said they built he goes. We're going back and trying to, you know, you.

Mike Smith Lou Panella Gerrit Cole Red Sox Mike Self Joey Chestnut 180 times Cardinals Rob Rob Dibble Yankees 16 new games 25 10 minutes Independence Day nine 100 two guys yesterday 16 eight year
"mike self" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:11 min | 6 months ago

"mike self" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"These modern day Technopolis can pick presidential election winners Control Our national debates, decide whose voices heard whose voice is not heard. The Supreme Court no longer decides what the law of the First Amendment is in this great country. These tech executives do in practice. Big tech controls the country and they control the country by deciding what we see. Well, said Mr Travis. I mean, if this doesn't underscore why we need to remove the liability protection section, 2 30. I don't know what does Mr Greenwald makes me the same points in his written testimony. And then he says this about the specific question at hand of this committee hearing today, he says how Congress sets out to address Silicon Valley's immense and undemocratic power is a complicated question. Well, it is posing complex challenges. The proposal to best media companies with an anti trust exemption in order to allow them to negotiate as a consortium are cartel seeks to rectify a real and serious problem. Very true. But this is important. But empowering large media companies could easily end up creating more problems than it solves. He goes on to say this further empowering this already powerful media industry, which has demonstrated we use it's forced to silence competitors under the guise of quote Kali control runs the real risk of transferring abusive monopoly power from Silicon Valley to corporate media companies. This last clause is important or even worse, encouraging some sort of de facto merger in which these two industries pull their power to the mutual benefit of each. Where he saw that happen. We saw it last fall in last fall's election. Both Mr Travis and Mr Greenwald site this in the written testimony last fall when big media teamed up with big check to make sure the American people didn't hear about the Hunter Biden story. In the weeks leading up to a presidential election, so we've already seen him seen them team up against. We've, uh people, and now I have legislation that's going to give big media this consortium and cartel power the same time we're looking to use any trust law. You deal with big attack. We're going to give an antitrust exemption to big media. Maybe that's the right course. But I got up. I got real questions about that, whether we should move in that direction, So I look forward to hearing from our witnesses. I want to thank him again for coming particular, Mr Travis. He traveled here in person. I appreciate his good work, and we look forward to A chance to hear from each of our witness, Mr Chairman. With that I yield back. The gentleman yields back. It's now my pleasure to introduce. Today's witnesses are first witnesses. David should burn the president and CEO of the News Media Alliance, where he has served since 2000 and 15. Mister Davern spent 10 years of United States Chamber of Commerce and a number of executive roles, including executive vice president chief operating officer and Chief of staff is a member of the Board of Directive. Transamerica and Turns and serves on the board of trustees at the University of Pittsburgh, Mr Shiver and received his batch of arts degree from the University of Pittsburgh, his MBA from Georgetown University and his JD From Villanova University School of Law. I would now like to recognize my distinguished colleague and the vice chair of this subcommittee, Miss Giant Ball to introduce our second witness, and I know she does so with incredible pride is John Paul. You recognized Thank you so much, Mr Chairman and thank you for this opportunity. To welcome Mr Brad Smith, the president of Microsoft and a fellow Washingtonian who has done a tremendous amount for our region are state and, indeed our country. Mr. Smith is one of the leading global figures and the technology industry today and he's testified several times before the United States, Congress and other governments on policy issues. He joined Microsoft in 1993 spending three years leading the legal and corporate affairs team. In Europe in 2002, he was named Microsoft's general counsel and lead the company's work to resolve antitrust controversies. With governments around the world and companies across the tech sector. I believe that's given him a very unique and valuable perspective on the issues of tech and antitrust and the responsibility of the tech industry to work with government on smart regulation that protects competition, innovation and democracy, and Mr Chairman, I actually believed that that experience is very much part of the reason that Mike Self played such a productive role in Australia most recently and I know we're going to hear about that more today. Before joining Microsoft, Mr. Smith worked as an associate and then partner at the law firm Covington and Burling. He earned his BA from Princeton University, has J D from Columbia University Law School and studied international law and economics at the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland. Mr Smith I thank you for joining us, but also for the tremendous tremendous work you do in our state and in our country. I look forward to Your testimony today. This hearing is taking place before House Judiciary subcommittee chaired by David So Cellini of Rhode Island. Thank the General lady and I also wanted Bank was just missed for his assistance. During the course of our investigation. He provided a very valuable briefing to members of the subcommittee during the course of our 16 month investigation, And I can't thank you for that. Our third witnesses, Jonathan Plus who's the President? The News Gil Communications Workers of America Ah Union that represents more than 2, 20,000 journalists and media workers across the United States and Canada before being elected president. C W A. Mr. Strauss was a graphics and data journalist at the Los Angeles Times where he led They're unionization efforts in 2018. This marked the first time in the papers 135 year history that the newsroom had been organized. Mr. Schulz has also served as the online editor at the Northwest Arkansas Democrat because that and as a weekend host for a K you AF, a national Public radio affiliate based in Fayetteville, Arkansas, is also an adjunct professor at the U. S. C. Annenberg School of Communications and Journalism is just last received his bachelor's degree from the University of Arkansas. Our fourth witness, Emily Bars, president, CEO of Graham. Media group as CEO. His bar has overseen seven local media hubs all top 70 markets since 2012 under her leadership Grand Media Group was named the 2016.

David So Cellini Emily Bars Mike Self John Paul 2002 David Travis 2018 Brad Smith 1993 Europe United States Congress 16 month Covington Schulz Davern Shiver 10 years Canada
"mike self" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

05:07 min | 10 months ago

"mike self" Discussed on FanGraphs Fantasy Baseball

"I mean that's not where. I'm going to jump but i'm also not surprised i'm actually. I'm a bit surprised. He isn't going higher well as many as one forty. Yeah in is three forty seven. So there's a room that nobody was in on him and there was a room or somebody was very very robust because everybody is expecting bronco to be up with the team after he passes whatever the service time limited that by the way i diabetes. He's going up that quickly this here. I wouldn't be surprised if he is. I just have concerns about what his fantasy value is going to be. Something you said from sunday's episode started making around yesterday on twitter. When mike self brought it up. I had listened ers episode yet so i didn't know Enlighten us so. Yeah so i mean. I got some information from secondary source within the organization that said that wonder franco's Launch angle was one point two degrees. That's pretty good. Yeah so we're like that because for those that don't know about launch. Okay call for no horrendous by its yang di di as ask yes in for those who don't remember. The media's issues was due to strong as hal and you but doesn't hit home runs because he can't get his launch angle over like three degrees smashes divots into the ground. How hardy gets it but can find that lip. So that's where wanda franca this past year or as a minor. Yes okay so at the all site so this is this. Is you know their in house. That cast information from from the alternate site and that just doesn't project a lot of power which i mean. I don't know that people necessarily were projecting him to be a huge power hitter. But i mean we're talking about a guy who is fifteen fifteen ask with a average we i mean we expect him to hit a great average. We also expected gra junior degrade average and you know. I mean steamer projected him to win the batting title in his rookie year. I just think that this is just a guy. I'm not going to buy into the hype. Until i see him. Play at the major-league level. Same and miss out. Yeah but so. I am surprised that he's not going higher. Because typically when the top prospect of baseball in one franko is widely considered the top prospect in. Baseball is almost you know. Typically these guys are going inside the top fifty. I'm surprised he's not going higher. But i wouldn't take more that's tampa bay right there. Him obey effect of people understanding the jets. Be careful with that i. I'm still surprised. Because like i mean he was what the alternate for the world series like world series jersey made. He's gonna move up though if he starts here he could actually get to where. You're talking about with an offseason hype. Especially if they hint at all about about him being up relatively soon in the season or they make some maneuvers that make it clear that hey they're going to be able to fit him in here. I am not. I'm not in on wander front. Just because i'm not certain that he plays off this. So what are they going to get rid of. Willie adamas the second move. One of them is second and then put brandon allow aware outfield and then but randy arosa rain aware outfield and that but mark manual margot where platoon. I don't think so. I just don't see i don't see lau as a permit outfielder. I don't know. I think they want to be like a full-time player. Who's he tune with. They don't even have a lefty platoon. Meadows is d. h. In so yeah. But i mean when when sugo or choi are in the lineup. There the you know or you know it's the raise they're going to they every money so maneuver stuff quite a bit. I don't know. I don't you know could be a part of platoons this is i mean this is again this situation where it's like. Okay we start talking about which of these rays were willing to draft because while right now maybe doesn't seem like there's a huge unit. There's going to be huge platooning. There always is so they maneuver. They maneuver everything that said though i i don't see it. I don't see your.

mike self wanda franca bronco franco hal Baseball diabetes franko hardy twitter Willie adamas randy arosa mark manual margot tampa bay jets lau brandon choi
"mike self" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"mike self" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And they wanted to make it as simple as possible. They didn't want All of the Flores is of Facebook. The events, the group the news feed algorithm. They just wanted a simple place where people could post And the other people there were there weren't even any comments or hashtag anything back then. My guess is Sarah friar than in her book is no filter. The inside story of Instagram Justus a sidebar. I mean, I think Facebook is well known for India's and you know, if you even go inside, you have to sign an N D. A How were you able to report this story? Well, I think it's really about relationships. I've built my understanding of special media companies over the course of covering this. This sector of our economy for almost a decade of Bloomberg and And understanding that people when they're building these products. It is not just About uncovering what next or uncovering the thing that they're not supposed to talk about in their Enda but also about the emotion around what they're doing, and the motivations around what they're doing, and a book is an opportunity to delve into those questions. Why things happened the way they did. Getting people to talk. And that is, you know, as well as I do that that is really about establishing trust about understanding the context of what you're asking about. And trying to think of this story, not just a story about technology, but also is a story about that technology's impact. Line on the people who built it on the people who use it and on our culture at large, and so I think just really asking questions from people who I interviewed for this book. Had never spoken to a journalist about some of these things that happened at Instagram. And it was their first opportunity to discuss it in detail and it was almost therapeutic. So the interest in one of the interesting things is instagram is is almost an immediate success. Andi. I think it kind of caught that from reading a book. It sounds like they caught them off guard. In many ways, they were only about a dozen people working there when it started to grow into the B this huge app. So if you could explain for audience what would happen if, say some huge star? Some early adopter like Justin Bieber posted something. Oh, the entire thing would go down a Justin Bieber. Basically, they had to have an entire server are half there were dedicated his activity because whenever he would post an alarm and go off on my Krieger's phone Telling him that the server was needed to be reset. And and he brought along his entire audience. The app. That's really how Instagram grew in the beginning that there were people who joined who brought their audiences from other whether was other social platforms or pure celebrity. With them to instagram and then started using Instagram as a peer representation of what they were seeing. As they went about their lives became very irresistible. But, yes, Whenever Justin Bieber posted boom, it would go crash. So they were approached regularly by people who wanted to become involved invested, perhaps by uneven. Jack Dorsey was one of the first instagram users and ambassadors. Why didn't Kevin and Mike Self Initially they didn't want to didn't want Instagram Tio becomes subsumed by another company. Twitter initially offered to purchase the company, but they didn't make the most appealing offer. They said. Oh, you could come and maybe you could run Twitter product as well. And We could use Instagram is the best way to post Twitter and that wasn't really you have to understand that if you are an entrepreneur building something in Silicon Valley, there's a lot of A lot of vision and ego tied up into that choice. You you are our holding onto a rocket ship. And you think that you've brought some magic to the process. Until wasn't told Mark Zuckerberg in 2012 approach the founders and said, Listen If you join Facebook. Not only will I give you $1 billion, which no one had ever paid for a mobile application before. I'll let you remain founders. I'll let you be CEO. I'll let you run your company independently Within Facebook. I won't even bother you and you can have access to basic talent pool. You could have access to Facebook infrastructure. I know you're having problems with all those Justin Bieber posts. And And we can let you drive the way you want to thrive. And that was extremely appealing to the founders. They almost could you say no. It was like it was like you want to be the Do you want to still be in charge but have none of the risk But one of the things that's comes through loud and clear in the book is that there was this huge culture clash between Facebook and its goals and what was important to it and Instagram and its schools and its founders and its principles. How would you? How are they different? Facebook was So intent on growth at all costs. They they measure every aspect of our behavior. How we scroll what we click on what we like Even the things that we typing don't send, and they measure it all, and they tried to tweak their product ever so slightly. To increase Our activity on their platform. Where's Instagram has tried to appeal to us through their taste in curation. They've tried Tio circus things that we may not have otherwise discovered and make sure that we are able to find them. And very different growth loss of these instagram rejected. Ah lot of Facebook tactics like notification. The recommendation engine about who else you should follow. All of this personalization that face does because Instagram wanted YouTube discover new things on Instagram that maybe you weren't expecting And over time. That clash came to a head because incident was still able to grow into a dramatically powerful company doing it their way. On Facebook. Ended up getting into trouble for their size and power and influence over our society. The thing you're talking about Cambridge Analytica. Yeah, it was interesting in the book. How Instagrams, even though it was you know, owned by Facebook did not some of the bad press and some of the bad feelings about Facebook. Didn't seem to transfer onto Instagram. Why was that? I think it was the greatest benefit of the acquisition for them that they even though you know they were frustrated at that time about from a Facebook intention Teo to take control of their product and their audience. Days didn't have Kevin Systrom never had to testify in front of Congress. They never had the answer to the Senate questions about Russian influence on the election because Facebook could take all of that Facebook was a lightning rod for all of that criticism. And so I think that we really as a society have not held into the negative consequences of instagrams growth and The ways in which we talked about this artistic Holter creation that word. But Instagram has also had negative effects on our society. And though they're not Not widely explored by regulators or by us, for example, what would become of us Well, so there are little things that they've decided in the very beginning that then turned into Turned into problems. For example, the filters that I talked about Those were initially a way to make our photos looks better, but in it, but eventually they trained us to accept that everything on instagram have been polished or curated. Or made better than reality, and we scroll through our instagrams and we compare ourselves to other people, not understanding the extent to which they have changed. They're content or curated there content to help us perceived them in that way. That way, we have all become so strategic about our instagram presents to the extent that people are faking it till they naked on the APP. People are Are you buying? Comment? I don't know. If you know you could buy comments. You Khun by engagement. You can Just present yourself as more successful or interesting than you actually are. Furthermore, there are big issues with the continent. Instagram like The same kind of darkness that you see on Facebook, illegal drug sales, violent content, child trafficking, all of these things that are buried in hashtag communities and buried and In places..

Facebook instagram Justin Bieber Kevin Systrom Twitter India Sarah friar Bloomberg Jack Dorsey Mark Zuckerberg CEO Krieger Tio Khun Cambridge Analytica Instagrams Senate
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 1 year ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"The Panamanian children, finally on June nineteen Ninety-three bell tried for dickens. Murder found guilty given a seventy year sentence, five years later. He wrote his killing fields, confession letters, claiming to have murdered eleven Texas teenager. She called them the eleven in heaven, five nineteen seventy-one six more in the mid to late seventies. But because he wouldn't cooperate with authorities other than this initial confession because he was already in. Prison essentially for life. He wasn't put on trial. Also, his confession was full of some inconsistencies, and then after his initial confession. He said, so much weird crazy shit that he lost all credibility for the nineteen seventy-one murders. Bell left out Brenda Jones. But included the other murders that made headlines that year the dentist daughter Wilson the to Galveston girls, whose bodies were found in Turner by you Debbie Ackerman. Maria johnson. Sharon Shaw, Rhonda, Rene Johnson from Webster, who poor Mike self was convicted of murdering. And here's where the really crazy shit part comes in. Bell also said that he shouldn't be punished for the killings, because it was all part of what he called, quote unquote the program. Bell said he was a target slash victim of a government. Sponsored experiment that led to these girls deaths. I'm Tom making this up while he wouldn't discuss the killings after his initial letters, he would talk at length about the program to anyone who's willing to put up with his bat shit. Crazy talk bell said self like the purpose of the program. Was to take good kid. I e him. And then subject him to abuse manipulation for many years, toy with his busy allergy determine if he could be made bad. The first step in bells definition of turning to the dark side included becoming gay the final step centered on believing in a higher power is one of his quotes, they wanted me to become homosexual than homicidal. What comes after homicidal suicidal? Then crazy nuts paranoid schizophrenia. And finally, they wanted to turn me into a Jesus freak then they think I'll tell them what they want to know. And then report asked tell them what he said, why people do bad things. If bells reasoning made any sense to any of you, please seek psychological, help immediately this to try to claim that the government, I made him into a homosexual then made him homicidal than suicidal, then mentally ill, then religious all, so he could tell them why people do bad things to bad. The program didn't start with suicidal when he came to bell looking back bell also said he knew from early on that his sex drive was exceptional. That's why he was chosen for the program as a teenager. He masturbated five or six times a day, damn government testing office. Jerkin limits, a fifteen he claimed his father, an oilfield worker hired a hitman to kill him because he was having sex with animals in the families..

Bell bell dickens Murder Mike self Texas Maria johnson Brenda Jones Galveston Sharon Shaw Wilson Debbie Ackerman Rene Johnson Turner Webster seventy year five years
"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Skippy doolittle? Maybe they'll, they'll Stevie Tinkerbell. I checked your honor should the fuck. Savy. No, cares what you think tinker bell. Meetings meadows notice how Mike self appeared unable to defend himself instead look into his mom for guidance. He seemed week not guilty told us attorney signed the confessions because the police at told him, he wouldn't get to see his mom until he did. And he was scared officer Morris, by the way. Mike sell reminds me, a lot of Brendan Daffy for any net flicks making a murderer fans out there. If you've watched videos of that poor kid, obviously, not mentally in tiptop, shape being manipulated by by officers because of the coerced confession jury send self to prison for life, then a few years later in September nineteen seventy-five some guys get caught robbing the state national Bank in the little town of caddo mills northeast of Dallas, and who are these Bank robbers. Well, two of them were some of the Webster police officers, the worked on selves, case leader, the leader of the gang. Again, they've been robbing banks in the area since around the time of selfs arrest was none other than the former Webster police chief Donald Ray Moore's that piece of shit, Mr. Russian roulette, a crooked cop who bullied a mentally, handicap. Batman into an obviously coerced confession that sent him to prison for life. How was he not retried fucking immediately, this bite? More says arrests selves appeal didn't come up for review until nineteen seventy nine. When Morris was serving time in federal prison articles appeared in Texas, newspapers about the bizarre case of a man who confession may have been forced by police officers, who turned out to be Bank robbers. When Mike self explained to a Houston chronicle reporter nine hundred eighty nine that he'd signed the confessions or why he's added confessions. He said, then to keep chief Morris from blowing my brains out more said that, if I didn't sign the confession, he'd shoot me and see, I tried to escape self said he didn't blame the jurors who ruled on his fate and system that they were just doing their job based on what they heard, despite all of this, selves appeal is inexplicably rejected. Apparently they were just more than two crooked cops and local law enforcement in the area. At that time feel like there's some weird cover up happening here, then another thirteen years later, nineteen Ninety-two after self has now been imprisoned for almost twenty years for some bullshit. The US fifth circuit. Court of appeals rules at the federal district court could not overturn the state court's ruling despite evidence, of course, confession what the fuck. The fifth circuit noted that Mike self had his opportunity to make his case that the confessions had been coerced, the trial, and that the decision the state court made, you know, still should hold up against him. Well that decision ended Mike self appeals process and then he died of a heart attack in prison in two thousand after serving damn near thirty years for heinous crimes. He never committed such a tragedy. Such a bunch of bullshit. The Bank robbing conviction clearly points to the crooked character of the of the men who got a confession out of self. The jury didn't know that the dude who was the main guy behind getting this confession was out robbing banks when at the same time like it's fuck, again, echoes of making a murderer for those who've seen that bojangles are three legged one. I pit bull mascot his fucking furious. Right now we already know he hates communists. He also has a lot of love for cops good. Cops. Which means he really. Hates bad. Cops who give law enforcement officers, bad name. He just drew picture of what he thinks more face. Looks like on the sun sucked under floor, and he just took shit on it, and they pissed on it, which is unfortunate 'cause I know you won't clean it up. Because if I even think about telling him to clean up, he'll slap me out of this guy damn chair. Okay. Now that we know that it was highly unlikely, the Michael self killed those girls like, basically, not it didn't happen. Let's go back to nineteen Seventy-three the year after his arrest and the year the Texas killing fields murders. Continue right after a quick word from one of our sponsors time. They'll get brought to you today by quip time for spring cleaning.

Mike self bojangles Morris Mike Texas Skippy doolittle Stevie Tinkerbell tinker bell Mike sell national Bank US Webster Batman caddo mills Houston chronicle Brendan Daffy
"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Fifteen years of a fifty year cents then he died a Freeman in two thousand. And fourteen at the sixty six the fifth suspect the super unlucky. Michael Lloyd self twenty four years old. Nineteen seventy-two Michaels is a very tragic tale on June tenth nineteen seventy two was arrested on charges connected to the murders of the two Webster girls. Sharon, Shaw and Rhonda Rene Johnson when Rene Johnson and Sharon Shah's bodies were found, Michael Lloyd self is working at a gas station and Webster, he was obsessed with their Merce talk to customers and co workers about all the time who's also considered basically just to be an odd duck. Or is my mom would say a character by many locals adopted as a young child poor self at losses father and he's only ten is mom second grade schoolteacher became a single parent became unusually focused on him. And he became a shy mama's boy, he didn't ever do very well in school and actually a doctor who examined him in the fourth grade diagnosed him as suffering from minimal brain injuries. So basically, this poor guy is somewhat mentally handicapped, Mike? Self loved police officers making friends with the police chief frequenting the local police station. Excuse me. He liked to gossip about local crime in general was doing this long before the disappearances and Webster, there just wasn't that many interesting cases to talk about until the double homicide, and then self really wanted to talk about that talked about it all the time. And people started to get suspicious and then, then the local shady officers, and you go to find out how shade of the are here, soon turned him into an easy target just to kind of, you know, get easy credit for wrapping up, Adele murder investigation self, according to later depositions by other officers who ventured in and out of his interrogation room, when he was brought in as a suspect say that he was literally beat into a murder confession by the local police chief, Michael Morris, who tied self to a chair told him that he wouldn't untie him until he confessed kept him tied of the chair for hours beat him in the stomach and across the back of the Billy club, supposedly, even put pulled out a six shot revolver, put it against his head pretended to have a of the chamber and pull the trigger. Playing Russian roulette with him. Just spend the chamber a chamber put the gun against his head pull. The trigger one officer would later report the Saab Mike self looking to Morris to tell him what he needed to write. And this confession this officer who initially heard self adamantly claimed his innocence described self as being utterly terrified of Morse by the time, self defense lawyer Dewi meadows met with him Mike. It already signed confession describing in detail how he murdered the two girls yet, when meadows talked to self he insisted that he wasn't guilty that he'd never even met the girls. The confession was nonsense self wrote that he threw the girls bodies into not Taylor by you or the ditch where they were found, but into nearby tater lake. We should make sense. He wrote that he picked up one girl at her house, which wasn't even possible since when he did this supposedly occurred hours after her parents were already home and looking for after they reported her missing self wrote that he beat the girls on the head with a coke bottle knocking them out, which also made no sense because neither Shah's nor Johnson. Skulls were fractured in any way, which seemed highly unlikely if you'd hit them. Hard enough to knock them unconscious to fix these inconsistencies before the trial, began Webster. Police had self signed a second confession. We're now his account magically really resembled, the case facts, do we meadows. His lawyer was exasperated he'd never even been notified by the police as client was being interrogated was being asked to sign another confession. He had no idea that self signed the second confession until already done for DUI as well. What a fucking terrible. Name by the way for an attorney change your name, if you're doing meadows that inspires there's no way. I know it's ridiculous. No fucking way. I would have an attorney called Dewey meadows, especially represented you to murder trial fuck that, you know, Ben Matlock, a solid attorney name Perry. Mason alpha name Christine Sullivan hard constants. I like it. Do we meadows, LA soft weak? Why did you hire scooter pillow? Puncher..

meadows Mike Webster Sharon Shah Michael Morris Rhonda Rene Johnson Michael Lloyd murder officer Taylor Morse Michaels Dewi meadows attorney Freeman Dewey meadows Saab tater lake Christine Sullivan
How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

09:21 min | 2 years ago

How Coda Is Making Docs as Powerful As Apps

"Of apps Stokes and spreadsheets that still run. Absolutely everything. Do you ever wonder if things could possibly change? Well about a year ago, a company called coda came out of stealth with the promise that anyone could make a document as powerful as an app, and now they're making good on that promise. And since the beta phase tens of thousands of people across thousands of teams are using coda every month and we've got some big companies involved here to such as cheddar, Spotify, an Uber as well as small businesses just the Hudson baking company of all being building coda docs, to create solutions to that. Very real problems. If you go by the coda website, whilst you listening to this podcast, check out that gallery to say some of those coda documents. So a couple of weeks ago coded and then new type of dog released code at one dollars. Zero and with it. That was a new mobile experience available on both mobile web and oil s so the concept of a dog being as powerful as an app, captured my attention. But when I also learned the as a rich tech history working at Google, and Microsoft, I had to get him on the show to learn more. So book elope, and hold until it, so I can be me is all the way to California, so we can speak with Shishir have Roger CEO and co founder of coda. So massive warm, welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Labatt who you are, and what you do or thanks for having me Neil? Notre, I run a startup called Kuda that I've been working on for the past four, five years before that I spent about six years at Google, I most of that working on YouTube. I ran the tech side of YouTube, and before, though, it's been about six years. Microsoft, worked on office windows and sequel server and before that I started a another startup colts and Trotta. I quite a while ago. Now. On the tech podcast. I love hearing about how techies transforming every industry, but also often, more importantly, the story behind the solutions slowly changing the world. So can I ask that you share your journey that began with an observation the world still runs on documents and spreadsheets for us four years? Okay. Tell me about that and the inspiration behind what you're doing. Yeah. Sure. So KOTA where we're building. A new type of document it blends the best of documents spreadsheets presentations, applications into one new surface. And we like to say that it allows anyone to make a doctor's, powerful an app and the, the idea for the company came out of two primary observations of the world. The first is that we think that docks not apps around the world. And so we look around and look at our teammates or collie or you know, what people do at home or school, and you ask people, what they used to keep themselves productive or or management system. And so on, they'll often name some packaged applications that they've that they've bought or things they built in the across all sorts of different examples. But the if you actually observe them and you walked what they're doing. You'll see them in documents and spreadsheets all day long. And this is something when I worked on the office team it was something we used to talk about as we saw in our user base. But when I got to Google particular when I got to YouTube, it, this is became very start for me. This is right, when Google doc. She's coming out, and we basically ran the entire company on, on Google docs and sheets. And, you know, things like the way we did go planning or the way we did performance management. Or you know, one of the fun stories was at when I joined YouTube back in two thousand eight if you hit flag on a YouTube video on the website, it would show up as a row in a spreadsheet on an ops person's desk. And that's how that's how he managed thing. So, you know, so there's a sort of first division, that, that even though there's all these applications out there. Everything still seems to Ronin documents. Spreadsheets. And then the second observation is if you look at those documents and spreadsheets, they haven't really fundamentally changed in over forty years. And we have this running joke at the company that if Austin powers to pop out of his freezing chamber, he wouldn't know close to where or what musical listen to, but he would absolutely know how to work document spreadsheet and a presentation. And it's a pretty simple reason all the metaphor for those tools for set in the nineteen seventies Wordstar and Harvard graphics and visit Cal, you know, gave us all the metaphors that were still using today. How pages are laid out in the document house. Lives related presentation spreadsheet everything, like how you do a one b to see three that we've all gotten used to we like to pull up battleship all those metaphors have state, exactly the same forty years and you put these two observations together, and it sort of interesting. You know the the this surface that what are the use cases fundamentally changed. And we're, we're now using this not just for digitizing, you know, paper documents and slide decks, and so on. But we're actually using it to run our teams and our families and our. Businesses we we use it all day long. We stare at it at all of our productivity done out of it. And yet, we're using metaphors that are forty years old every other piece of software in the world has has changed in that time period, you know. So what about what about documents? And so that's how we started. We said what, what if we were what if you were to backup ignore history and start from scratch, what would we build that, and that's what we've been building? A new type of document fun. Fantastic, especially because if you'll buy ground being at YouTube, and Mike self and seeing firsthand, the heart of the tech industry. But you tell me well about how that moment that you realized that if you're going to build a new type of dog, you really were going to have to start right from scratch. I mean, it must be quite daunting. Yeah. I think it's one of those ideas that, you know, I always like to say the, you know, the sort of two questions, I ask people when they come to me and say, should I start this company and always ask them? Do you have an idea? You can't imagine not working on and do have a person, you can't imagine not working with and is rarely the case that the answer to both those questions are. Yes. But when they are, it's, it's sort of inevitable. You can just you can see the gleam in and entrepreneurs is they, they can't help it started and, and it almost becomes an obsession. So, so when we were getting started myself, my co founder, Alex tonight, you know, he was actually working on another startup at the time that, you know, thankfully wasn't going that while, and so I was helping them brainstorm other ideas, and, you know, one of us one of us wrote the sentence on the board and said, you know what, if what if you can make apps easily as you can, as, as you can make dogs and once that showed up on the board. All of a sudden, we had this whole list of ideas, it just kind of snapped into place and we. You know, we could just sort of picture the product, we could picture all little elements what we need to get done. And it was it quickly became clear that none of those elements are things where you could just slightly twist, one of the existing surfaces and, and have it just worked that you had to sort of fundamentally we start with a different type of information model and you know, everything from very fundamental concepts. Like, for example, we don't we don't differentiate between documents spreadsheets presentations, all in one surface down to like very specific. Details of the ways that, you know, the way our tables were presented as a lot closer to a database into a spreadsheet, and we have an interaction model people. Call buttons or week all buttons. And people, people really like that people use to setup actions in workflows, and so on that are all these, you know. New types of building blocks reframed in a way that, that have to have to fit together perfectly and that point, we can picture the product. It was really clear that no, we weren't going

Youtube Google Microsoft Co Founder Spotify Stokes Labatt California Colts Notre Wordstar Ronin Neil Austin Shishir Mike Self Roger Ceo Alex
"mike self" Discussed on Tara Brach

Tara Brach

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Tara Brach

"So when I give a share a story that is for me a powerful stray tion of both the our our need to fill nurtured and the complexity of it. This woman writes, my mother was always assured me that unspeakable punishments were bound to befall any child is Nadia's. I was if I were you. She said I'd be afraid to go to sleep at night for fear. God, which strike me dead. She would speak these words softly, regrettably, as if saddened by her errant daughter's fate, and I thought myself unloved and unlovable. In addition to threatening me with thoughts of eternal damnation mother. Also, gave me fear of strangers germs disease and food poisoning precocious in imagine of child, I added to the list some bizarre fears of my own falling into the fifth dimension spontaneous. Human combustion when I was suspended from my private school at the age of fifteen for harmless prank, the headmistress referred to my behavior as damnable. This is no big news to my mother may what was news was I had the highest I q end the lowest grades in the entire student body. I took pride in the fact that although I was dysfunctional and an underachiever at least I wasn't stupid. The most devastating where it's my mother ever spoke to me came when I asked her if she loved me, I just been escorted home by the police after one of my many attempts to run away. So it was bad timing on my part, she answered how could anyone ever love you? It took me almost fifty years to heal the damage from all her ugly remarks recently discussing eating disorders with my therapist are related to childhood ritual of mine, intending it to be an amusing an. Anecdote to Ella street. How far back might eating problems went even laugh to say spoke poking gentle fun at myself. It was only when I noticed she was watching me with sympathy rather than amusement that I became aware of the tears on my own cheeks. This is what I told her. From the age of five or six until well into my teens whenever I had trouble sleeping. I would slip out from under my covers and steel into the kitchen for bread or cheese. Carry back to bed with me. And they're pretend my hands belonged to someone else. A comforting reassuring being without a name an angel perhaps the right hand would feud may little bites cheese or bread as the left hand stroke might cheeks in my hair, my eyes closed. I would whisper softly to myself there there. Go to sleep you're safe now. Everything will be all right. I love you. So we see here the intelligence that saying in some way, nurture nurture, and we also see how gets kind of marble because when there's unmet needs. We can often turn to substitutes to nurture. So nurturing needs to be wise. Many people say will couldn't Mike self compassion, be indulgent or pitting needs to be wise compassion, and what allows compassion to be wise. Is if we have contacted directly wake fully the vulnerability. That's usually what's missing we try to nurture. It's kind of a way of getting away from the vulnerability not coming out of the contact with it does that make sense sale. Little more. One of the little mythic stories. I like us of of a sage who is known to be very, very wise and people would travel long distances through the wilderness and over mountains and cross raging rivers to get to him when he'd come. They'd you know, they'd have to meditate for awhile. And then he'd swear them to secrecy. And finally when they tell them what was going on. And then he'd say I have one question for you. What are you unwilling to feel? What are you unwilling to feel? And if we're really honest with ourself, we'll start noticing how we pull away from directly feeling discomfort all the time. How we stay busy during our day in daily life..

Nadia Mike fifty years
"mike self" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"But the library. They they went and turned it into as I say, Microsoft is full of amazing software engineers and a few of them. Learnt python didn't necessarily know it to begin with and created a what was eventually rejected out into this library knack. That is a highly scalable command line Pozo, the amount of work. It takes to get started is higher than pause. But the result that you get is much much better. How interesting I'd never heard of Nak. Actually, that's cool. I hadn't actually heard of it either until I was going to the team saying, hey, there are people who would love your command line library. Have you thought about referring out, and they just sent me a good hub repo back said here it is beautiful. But yeah, I've I've had really interesting performance discussions with that team. They've put a lot of tricks to make python Stott up foster and to give some. Context between you know, how Mike self thinks about it software and kind of the community. Does this other conversation about thirty forty fifty sub commands starting up under a second? Who has? Yeah. That's that's acceptable. Meanwhile, one of the engineers from the UCLA team is desperately trying to reduce the up time on the two hundred fifty milliseconds with thousands of sub commands while and I don't actually know that he realizes how much of an achievement. He's already made to get down that far with something. So big that is so cool. I mean, it's projects like that that kind of pushed the boundaries and make it better for everyone. If that gets pushed back in the seat by then I hope so. Yeah, let's talk about the early days. I guess the the very first recollection I have of python and maybe similarly ruby making its way around Microsoft is I I heard of iron ruby and then iron python. I think that. Or they're created. And then maybe shortly after that was python tools.

Mike self Microsoft Pozo Stott UCLA
"mike self" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on TechFan

"The next one is nine thousand nine hundred five and then this hasn't the MP's on the running windows one and. Mike paints, and all of that Seoul stuff that the next box in that. So thank so, they're incentivizing. Why they've come from a win looking guy. I'm one of the stalls down in the actual NYNEX area had on this strikes away because a lights on the from it. It has a I'm sure it's original one of his Klein at basically an old saying ata hundred micro computer has a long because original was a big box. And this is just a flat thing. Yeah. I I guess I'm not all my sometimes I think the ones with the Muslim Klein she can disconnect the front in the guts of it. And anyway, whatever it's the switch bold for the for the hundred and they have instructions from the thing is running the basic that Mike self develops full the outset hundred which Roenick because you know, we just lost Paul Ellen could go, and that this was how Microsoft got started in when he wakes to somebody else and bought an operating system to run the al-tair. Well, that was for IBM that was the IBM PC. All the all tear that wouldn't convinced Bill Gates to drop out of college. And do this computer thing. That's right. So they haven't and they actually have some basic instructions in front of it to she tell you how this program something on definitely gonna Sean tomorrow. It was a bit busy today is the show notes pitcher. It's kind of funny that the machine right behind. It's MAC pro. Interesting. She mocks coference. How many max you say this quite a few them? Well, then the frustration that apple took so long to upgrade the MAC book air knowing how many people use their, laptops. Yep. I don't I don't get it. Yeah. But this this this devices, they thing that started much softer than much will not exist tonight announce it it was pretty cool to see that. And I am going to have gun it because I've always wanted. How you ask you program? The thing bearing Monday doesn't have cable or scrape. Switches. Yeah. Seis which is but the mechanics about jihadi that outpour is still at an area of mystery semi on. Yes. No. Yes. No. No. Yes. No. No. Yes. Yes. No guests that that must be it. Yeah. It's pretty much. What it is. If either commit you can get up to that runs. Word easily. It can you can definitely have. No, there might probably. So that we're going to wrap up this episode of tech fan. David fun. Thank you very much speak to say.

Mike paints Klein Paul Ellen Seoul Bill Gates IBM apple Roenick Sean Microsoft David
"mike self" Discussed on What the Tech

What the Tech

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on What the Tech

"And i use this my kids run iphones and they use snapchat with their friends but when they want to communicate with us we use text messaging so i want to move on to xbox really quickly because this mike self no longer plans to bring vr xbox one and that's the kids screaming maybe you should go there's like a cougar so did you hear they're gonna get the emails now then no longer bringing anyone ever raise that issue i know i know so on professional sound professional there you have a family i know you jerk i know it's miserable so vr is not coming to xbox one yeah this story by the way is actually about eight days old it's kind of weird like it was in it was in game it's called game industry biz or whatever and they interviewed a not phil spencer but some other guy from microsoft and about a bunch of different things in the course of the interview they ask them hey you know you never announced anything about the our empire again what's going on there and whoever this guy was says oh yeah we're not doing that and it's like okay because when the xbox one lines i think they it's this bugs me 'cause i just wrote a thing about xbox strategy and how their real focus going forward is on the on the cloud service not on hardware and yeah they're talking up next gen xbox console i think it's important because it's a it's kind of a migration it's something happens over time and you need something that's going to be another jump before you drop the first person hard world together the first party hard for yeah i mean videos frozen by the way it's frozen frozen you're back you're back to know it came back so anyway but i hardwares especially with xbox hargrove role i would say you know the surface stuff would be included in this as well hall ends whatever they've never made money on it right and now that they are absolutely gonna lose three generations of consoles in a row and have the capability to move forward with the cloud service stuff and kinda take the hardware out of the equation which makes it better for the service overall over time i realized right away it's not like a game streaming to a phone is going to be as good as an xbox one i know that but i mean over time this is the right thing for gamers it's the right thing for them for sure it's something they're set up to do and they could make money at you kind of have to look at the other stuff you doing in the hardware front and say we'll this make any sense so here they are with the least popular video game console in the market today they're going to spend the time in the money and the effort to bring vr m are whatever you wanna call it to this platform no one is going to buy this thing i mean i don't mean literally but i mean it's going to be so unpopular they've already have the have the experience with connect and how badly that did this thing they have to be looking at it thinking look look this is going to be a sub connect level of success developers are not going to support it because why on earth would you bother bringing games that support vr to apply from that no one's going to play those games on and i think it's just pragmatic they can't say it that way i mean they won't but i think that's why and i think it makes sense i just vr gaming is kind of a niche inside of a niche you know i know that sony has sold some i don't a million or till whatever.

eight days
"mike self" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on The Changelog

"Is it every friday email me very clear line right yeah and if you email me about microsoft work on that day you're not going to get a response on that day because i'm not doing that work yeah and that's you know it's it's very individually managed comes down to how you manage a feels about it and what value is is coming back out of that for either the community as a whole microsoft and how that's how you'd i don't think anyone's really breathing over your shoulder at microsoft anyways you know in watching what you do every day but you have with brett i've definitely tried to be with him on friday and he goes no no not talking doing my work on friday that's pretty cool so we've seen we track a lot of the sustainable side of open source and you know like you said like pythons way too important to be just donations base especially when you when you see the donations coming in your thinking how many corporations are you know doing very well because of this completely free to them programming language we've seen some companies pick up actually higher or pay fulltime salary people whose entire purposes to work on a specific open source project is there anybody doing that inside of microsoft is that a conversation that's being had like wow i mean maybe just makes in cases where it makes sense hypothetically steve if it made sense for you to just like poor all your time into c python would that be a conversation that would be had in the fight of microsoft or not i the yeah that would be a conversation to have at various points in time you know maybe more or less feasible so they went i started contributing that that was never going to happen at this point her nose like the mole that mike self comes to depend on python the easier it is to say this this is important to us we we should have someone on fulltime cruise like not even doing microsoft work anymore because indirectly this is we don't currently have any of those we i don't know.

microsoft brett steve mike self
"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"Something common these companies have been saying to man was translates into real pricing power and each case the story is still in its early and he's not the first inning but no later the third or fourth honestly just like we're microsoft until were in nineteen ninetythree right when the pc and the internet converts the story was just getting started yet at the time many it was totally played out ninth inning these investors are making the same mistake with the cloud yeah looks like we've been bracing cloud forever but it's really like when intel i introduced opinion twenty five years ago and suddenly every household needs a computer at the same time intel stock is already doubled based on its previous line of chips in the forty six with its share price going from a dollar fifty three bucks take a look old chart in the nineties everyone thought the big move at a kurt after that that the large gains dollar had come and gone seven years later intel stock pizzas seventy to know that kind of move on happen again the copies have gotten way too lords but just as the forty six to pentium stock move was totally unexpected in fact it was written off as a desperate bid by entel to force people upgrade i think the next leg of the cloud story we'll take a lot of people by surprise to of course the trade stuff has to get out of the way the tariffs because that's what's really driving things now when intel's then ceo any grove told you that we were in the early innings at that time he sounded foolish turns out he was too negative we weren't just nearly innings we only reached the end of the first inning don't let the bears fool you the cloud cycle still a long way to go and intel mike self remain fabulous ways player even as amazon after the remarkable run eight so bad stick with kramer.

intel kurt mike self amazon kramer microsoft ceo twenty five years
"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Something common these companies have been saying to man was translates into real pricing power and each case the story is still in its early and he's not the first inning but no later the third or fourth honestly just like we're microsoft until were in nineteen ninetythree right when the pc and the internet converts the story was just getting started yet at the time many it was totally played out ninth inning these investors are making the same mistake with the cloud yeah looks like we've been bracing cloud forever but it's really like when intel i introduced opinion twenty five years ago and suddenly every household needs a computer at the same time intel stock is already doubled based on its previous line of chips in the forty six with its share price going from a dollar fifty three bucks take a look old chart in the nineties everyone thought the big move at a kurt after that that the large gains dollar had come and gone seven years later intel stock pizzas seventy to know that kind of move on happen again the copies have gotten way too lords but just as the forty six to pentium stock move was totally unexpected in fact it was written off as a desperate bid by entel to force people upgrade i think the next leg of the cloud story we'll take a lot of people by surprise to of course the trade stuff has to get out of the way the tariffs because that's what's really driving things now when intel's then ceo any grove told you that we were in the early innings at that time he sounded foolish turns out he was too negative we weren't just nearly innings we only reached the end of the first inning don't let the bears fool you the cloud cycle still a long way to go and intel mike self remain fabulous ways player even as amazon after the remarkable run eight so bad stick with kramer.

intel kurt mike self amazon kramer microsoft ceo twenty five years
"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"And they're all yet it's a racist the first trillion dollar company and the handicapped he's begin to show a very close contest right now there are four companies running on this track i you got the pin favorite apple with an eight hundred seventy seven billion dollar market capitalization but apple's followed by three companies that are bunch extraordinarily close together alphabet seven fifty seven billion amazon at seven fifty four and microsoft at seven forty four disclosure i oh the whole concept of the race to a trillion a morgan stanley which just published a piece recommending mike self title three q preview milepost along the path to one trillion the analysts incredibly good keith weiss put their in my head even didn't speculate about the other three horses who've crossed the finish line first that's neat going the race when the horses was still in the paddock apple seem by such favorite that well it wasn't even worth betting on two bucks gets to ten shirt off when it came out of the gate a month ago the handicappers didn't even think it'd be close that's how big elite apple had on field jockey tim cook look like it was going to be winning going away but then we started to hear about cracks in the story around the first turn that apple's new iphone ten had tepid sales so it could possibly may be made up by the lucre service revenue stream like so much or the possibility of gigantic turn to capital perhaps one hundred billion dollars in the form of buybacks and dividends and that is kept apple lean at what i now regard is the racist midpoint but this one that a piece of research from an ethical zulu that shortened apples distance from the pack rather dramatically i'd say a ten furlong cut about five this story masuda says that it's just not the act of the ten i'm sorry that's tempted it's the eight and the eight plus might miss two from gaza step further says that whatever money apple turns shores well that's already baked into the stock can apple fade perhaps more important the other horses are coming on strong last night.

apple microsoft keith weiss masuda mike tim cook gaza eight hundred seventy seven bi one hundred billion dollars trillion dollar ten furlong
"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"And they're all yet it's a racist the first trillion dollar company and the handicapped he's begin to show a very close contest right now there are four companies running on this track i you got the pin favorite apple with an eight hundred seventy seven billion dollar market capitalization but apple's followed by three companies that are bunch extraordinarily close together alphabet seven fifty seven billion amazon at seven fifty four and microsoft at seven forty four disclosure i oh the whole concept of the race to a trillion a morgan stanley which just published a piece recommending mike self title three q preview milepost along the path to one trillion the analysts incredibly good keith weiss put their in my head even didn't speculate about the other three horses who've crossed the finish line first that's neat going the race when the horses was still in the paddock apple seem by such favorite that well it wasn't even worth betting on two bucks gets to ten shirt off when it came out of the gate a month ago the handicappers didn't even think it'd be close that's how big elite apple had on field jockey tim cook look like it was going to be winning going away but then we started to hear about cracks in the story around the first turn that apple's new iphone ten had tepid sales so it could possibly may be made up by the lucre service revenue stream like so much or the possibility of gigantic turn to capital perhaps one hundred billion dollars in the form of buybacks and dividends and that is kept apple lean at what i now regard is the racist midpoint but this one that a piece of research from an ethical zulu that shortened apples distance from the pack rather dramatically i'd say a ten furlong cut about five this story masuda says that it's just not the act of the ten i'm sorry that's tempted it's the eight and the eight plus might miss two from gaza step further says that whatever money apple turns shores well that's already baked into the stock can apple fade perhaps more important the other horses are coming on strong last night.

apple microsoft keith weiss masuda mike tim cook gaza eight hundred seventy seven bi one hundred billion dollars trillion dollar ten furlong
"mike self" Discussed on Cortex

Cortex

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"mike self" Discussed on Cortex

"Granstand time again what time is a mic it's an episode out of time ohno where are we when are we mike nobody knows nobody knows so i guess we should welcome our listeners to an episode out time three the time strikes pack spent a lot of time thinking now about what these episodes can be coal you know the rule with movies is now we get to an episode out of time for it just has to be something like an episode out of time revolution praises the move to something with an are we find a way to put the number into the text however i feel at number five we could put like ep i5 od e episode dry and then we read it for six i like that you got the reboot already lined up you're you're in charge of this siege me granting cuba joining me today i have a very important question of way before which start the rest of our conversation here i would like to know where do you see yourself from fifa does your performance review now i was this little performance hariri yeah i don't do performance reviews mike self employed the reason i bring us up with that time into all is that you have been selfemployed four or five years yeah now that was a surprise this one pop off on your expectedly it totally did i would not have known or noticed were it not for the memories function in apple photos i took some photos of my last day on the job and and they popped up in memories of that's awesome what a great way to find that out it's really felt like i do have a habit of taking like uh what i think of his memory shots which are voter they're not intended to be good photos but their photos that are just intended to provoke memory in the future assets of a bunch of voters they're like that that just seemed like they're totally meaningless photos but i i see them i remember i oh yes this is why i took this photograph this day.

fifa cuba hariri mike self employed apple five years