12 Burst results for "Mike Norton"

"mike norton" Discussed on NFL explained.

NFL explained.

08:29 min | 7 months ago

"mike norton" Discussed on NFL explained.

"Here with his pistachio nuts and stared at it. So this looks a lot like that. It's the same colors. It's the same grid. It's the same columns in the same rows. This piece of software was built by a company out of Western Canada called optimal planning solutions. So we write the rules in the software, and then the software from optimal planning uses an optimizer called goro B, optimization, which takes all the rules and really tries to figure out, okay, if this is an infinite solution space, and these are all the rules I have to follow, where do I even start? When we ask the computer to go off and search through the infinite space, not only does it need to know which of these games are eligible for which of these time slots and certainly which of these stadiums are not available for various conflicts and what are our travel considerations and all the stuff that we're asking it to consider in that consideration list is competitive fairness. So the way we do that is with a negative based scoring system where we put a penalty on all the things we don't want to see. That's both team wise and television wise. So for instance, three game road trips and road after road Mondays and early buys and two way to start and two way to finish and all the things that we know the coaches and general managers don't like. If I had a three game road trip last year, then the penalty for me having a three game road trip again this year should be significantly higher than for someone else who probably hasn't had a three game road trip since 2003. We're also writing rules about a strong Sunday Night football schedule, a strong Monday Night Football schedule a strong Thursday Night Football schedule if we can't deliver all those things at our network partners are looking for. That should bring a penalty as well. The lower the score, hopefully, the less disappointed the clubs in the television partners are going to be. The ability for our software can't be underestimated in the sense that being able to access hundreds, if not thousands of machines on a daily nightly hourly basis and just the computing power that's involved in there allows us to turn around scenarios and changes how we are able to think bigger analyze more, but also react to things. We can go in and we can look at it. These are four separate clusters. There's between 203 hundred computers in each one of these clusters, and each one of these clusters is looking at a slightly different part of the beach. This one might have Green Bay Kansas City on Sunday Night football and week 7. This one might have Green Bay Kansas City on Sunday Night football and week 9. This one might not have Green Bay Kansas City on Sunday Night football at all. It might be on Monday Night Football, and this one might have Green Bay Kansas City as a fox double header. So it will run on this one seed schedule, that one computer for as long as it takes. And so every single day we have thousands of computers all with slightly different seed schedules, all searching through this infinite space, trying to find a better score. They can do a lot of aim high steering for us that we could never do when we were building this schedule by hand. All right, so I get it. Your head is spinning. I think if I said to Mike and we actually have the interview with Mike north coming up in just a bit. So maybe we'll ask him this question. But the process that Mike just sort of laid out. Val essentially did the job of thousands of computers, which Mike said he's a savant and he is because it's remarkable. So now that the computers have actually done their thing, what happens next? Well, Howard Katz and the team actually have to present the strongest schedule to the commissioner. Roger Goodell. Now the schedule has got to feature the best teams and player matchups every single week. But what happens at the end of March when free agency hits or team trades, its star quarterback? I don't know, like Russell Wilson, all of a sudden is a member of the Denver Broncos. And the rest of the AFC west goes on a free agent spending spree that we have maybe never seen before. Well, when we return on NFL explain, I get the chance to talk to Mike north about how free agency blockbuster deals and how other small details could possibly affect the schedule right before the release date. With our newest unlimited plan, everyone's welcome. Introducing welcome unlimited from Verizon for just $30 a line per month for four lines. With auto pay plus taxes and fees. Our best priced unlimited plan ever. Did he say $30? Yep, $30 a line for the whole family. The network you want. The price you love. Switch to Verizon today. Pay for free billing required. Unlimited 5G nationwide four G LTE. In times of congestion, your data may be temporarily slower than other traffic. All smartphone lines on the account must be unwelcome unlimited. And are eligible only for select promotions, includes domestic talk text and data usage only data running at two G speeds. What up? It's dramas. You may know me from the recap on LA TV. Now I've got my own podcast, life as a gringo come at you every Tuesday and Thursday. We'll be talking real and unapologetic about all things life, Latin culture, and everything in between from someone who's never quite fit in. Listen to life as a gringo and the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Brought to you by State Farm, like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. Hi, I'm Mikey Amy, welcome back to NFL explained. Now, this week we're breaking down how the NFL schedule is created, but before the break, we got into the history and how technology has made this almost an impossible job. Just a little bit easier, but each year during the off season, they're a little things that pop up or massive things that will arise like a player switching teams, that suddenly changes the algorithms in the computers that are running to create the best possible schedule. So this off season, which has been filled with major personnel changes around the league. I've been calling it, I know people around the office have been calling it the craziest off season that the league has ever seen. That probably created a little bit of issues for the algorithm or algorithms. I should say plural, because with thousands of computers, there's a lot going on here. So I got an opportunity to sit down with Mike Norton to see how challenging it actually is to create this season schedule. Mike, I think every single year it's pretty clear that there are inherent challenges that are unique to the schedule. What's the biggest challenge for this year? Well, there's a few of them. One of them was all the uncertainty as we started the process. Generally speaking, you walk into that room for the day after the Super Bowl and Howard Katz and ani Bose and the team already have a feel for this is must see TV. This is the biggest game or the top three biggest games of the year. Here's a couple of teams we think are on the rise. Let's make sure we showcase them properly. I'm not sure we had that when we walked into the room right after the Super Bowl. Obviously Tom Brady was retired at the time, so as I've talked about lots of times, you know, we try to treat each one of these 272 games as an asset and they're all worth something whether you give it a score or a metric or a rating or a grade. However it is you delineate between the value of this game versus that game. Every game has got to score to it. And the Tampa Bay games were worth something when Tom Brady was their quarterback. They were worth something different when Tom Brady was retired. And they were suddenly worth something different again when Tom Brady decided that he had enough. So we had to be kind of flexible, you know, even as we started this process, knowing that there were still some dominoes to fall, obviously Russell Wilson changing teams like he did makes you look immediately for a game like Denver at Seattle. You know, our job here is to tell the biggest stories and the biggest windows and make sure that the fans that want to watch the biggest games have an opportunity to, you know, the Denver at Seattle game Russell Wilson's return after 20 years and all those all pro nods and a Super Bowl ring, you know, we're not doing our jobs if that game falls at one O 5 Pacific time with two other games going on. Opposite a big double header game on Fox that day. I mean, that's not good use of the Denver at Seattle asset. So how do you find the right home for that game? You know, like we said, Tom Brady coming back. The Buccaneers have an incredible schedule this year. They play Green Day. They play Dallas, they play the Super Bowl champion rams, they play Cincinnati. They play Kansas City. I mean, it's amazing all the good Tampa Bay games this year. They were going to be assets, even if Tom Brady had decided to remain retired. There were obviously worth a lot more with him back under center. So we kind of had to shift like we always do and we joke, you know, the project changes, not only every year, but really every day. And this year was no different. And in fact, maybe

Mike north Kansas City football Howard Katz Football Mike Green Bay Russell Wilson Western Canada NFL LA TV Tom Brady Verizon Mikey Amy Roger Goodell Mike Norton Denver Broncos Val AFC
"mike norton" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"But you didn't. Nobody. Nobody should. Nobody should ever give up a theory. Just because there's a good knock down argument against it. Because there's a good knockdown argument against anything. Any proposal you could come up with, some smart person. I could give you ten reasons why it's wrong. And so in the end, we sometimes have to go the weight of the evidence. We have to say, I can't explain a way that. I can't answer that question. I'm just going to plug ahead. Unfortunately, you're right, your book, and someone else wrote a book saying the opposite thing. And then, you know, the world will be richer as a result. I love that attitude. And I also love the idea of you being my dad and governor. Is it okay if we send you a draft of our intro? I would love it. To pieces. And then that process will cause me to have growth. We'll both grow as a result. That's a medical post traumatic growth. That's when you're writing a book about it. No, but I mean, and then there's. And then there's another debate lurking behind all of this, which is I know you talk to page harden recently. And as you more than more than most, I think you're very sophisticated about the extent to which heredity plays some degree in determining what we are. And there's sort of a real complex dance between heredity and environment. And we're sort of at a stage where somebody says, well, you know, early childhood events have a profound effect on personality, because it seems that way. That's what Freud taught us. That's what most people believe. It's just not clear. It does get tricky when you talk about genetics. What happens when you make that claim? And you see the empirical evidence for it. But then you control for genes and the effect goes away. It's in those cases where it's like holy cow. What do we do with that finding? And a lot of people don't want to talk about some of those kind of findings like in criminology, field and sociology. They would rather you never even control for genetics because we don't want to know. But that does raise some interesting questions as page and I discussed in terms of where the implications for helping vulnerable people. You know, what are the implications there for making the world a better place as opposed to just talking about those findings? As some people do in a kind of almost a mean spirited way. Do you know what I mean Paul? Some people might raise the point of genes and be like, well, look, just deal with the truth. I'm capital T truth. Parents don't matter. And it's like, well, look, there's more to the story than just that. They matter it in a way that might be a little bit different, but they still matter. They gave you their genes. Kind of matters. That kind of matters. If you want to blame your parents, you have plenty of room to do so. Right, right. I mean, they still are to blame for that. Yes, yes. They brought you into the world. You could always be like, why did you bring me into this? Shitty world. They are constantly responsible for our existence. And what's a more weighty act? And also the way that and the actions they do onto you do matter in various ways as well. In terms of your personality, the discussion on that has always been a little bit weird. There's a point at people like Judith Harris and Steve thinker make repeatedly. And always seem to be very true, which is some people can read into the genetic stuff, the idea, all parents don't matter. And then they say, either happily or derisively. Does this mean it doesn't matter how I treat my kids? But you, as a parent or have enormous responsibility for the happiness and flourishing of your kid, a cruel parent could make a kid's life, how? And a wonderful parent can make their kids like as good as it could possibly be. And even if this doesn't end up fixing their IQ and some direction or another or personality, it's still an enormous responsibility. In some ways, like saying, if you tell me, look, how I treat my partner won't change her personality. And then I respond so I could treat her horribly. You'd say this is ridiculous. You treat her kindly because you love her. You wanted to be happy. Yeah. I mean, I couldn't agree more with that. It does get tricky because some could say, well, yes, I love the spirit of what you're saying. However, I can show you data showing that whether they treat you horribly or good doesn't officially change their long eternal big 5 score. That's right. And you almost I almost want to respond sometimes like, okay, okay, mister robot, let's have a human point discussion, which is like maybe it didn't budge the big 5 too much, but there is still a moral implication of making someone's life a living hell. It's like that's still matters. Do you see I'm saying? Exactly. No sane parent, you know, takes their kid for a really fun day, doing something to kid loves to do. And then says, well, I'm doing this because this will change the kiss personality. If it doesn't. I want to budge. I want to budget a big fight. Yeah. I want to lower neuroticism. You know, I think sometimes we actually part of the problem is we forget children are people and that some of our moral obligations to them are the same as with people. I do not necessarily are things to be molded. Yeah, I'm like, we're in complete a guess on that. Yes. Just trying to some of the ideas in your very interesting new book. You'd argue there are multiple independent drives that normal humans possess. So we already talked a little bit about the hedonic drive that Daniel Gilbert spouses so much. There are moral drives as you talk about in your book. And then there's meaning and purpose. Let me add one. Can I add one? You can add one. I think I know what you're going to say, but go for it. Okay, I'm going to say it and then tell me if this is what you thought I was going to say. I think the exploration drive is a unique drive that contributes to what researchers are calling the psychologically rich life, which has been distinguished in recent years from the pleasure end meaning and I would say morality as well. So if I could add a candidate one of the list, it would be the psychological rich life. And is that the way you thought I was thinking? It's related. I like that. There's a recent paper by I think oishi and westgate. That's the one I'm referring to. Yes. And I think the paper opens up this other alternative. And I think that that's true. I think that I think it was Mike Norton who talked about emo diversity, which is, you know, we want to have a diversity of feelings. And then there's just broadly you want to, you want to explore. Yeah. I definitely think so. I think that's the one you thought I was going to say. I would have guessed some version actually more of self actualizing and personal growth. Would that be when you put on your list as an independent one? Or do you think it falls from the others? Falls from the others, I think. You know, in fact, I would say that self actualization is really bringing your whole self to the table in a really integrative sort of way. I would actually make the case self actualization is the real harmonious integration of all those multiple independent drives that you talk about in your book. That would be the emergent property of the deep integration of that in your life in a way where neither one is so outsized, where you're not a pure hedonist, but you're also not a pure mean in this. Meaning. Yes. I invented that word. I didn't know anything that's I think that's clever..

Judith Harris Steve thinker harden Freud Paul Daniel Gilbert Mike Norton oishi westgate
"mike norton" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

08:44 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on Krypton Report: The Supergirl Podcast

"By tom. King art by hollow riviera sun farmers written by d'arcy little badger or by. Steve put you ali written by rex. Allies gives me written by rex. Ogle art by mike norton are. We ready and so the art right off. The bat is just like blue sketching. Yeah it's all blue blitz and they're supergirl superman he's got a They're moving stuff and we see him with boxes of streaky toys. And he's got hit. The cat kennel. Streaky is just read any any incinerates. the cat. the cat carried vision in takes off out the cave. They go after me. Wise through a ship and destroys cargo. Care like this is a massive ship like this cat is causing like an economic crisis by destroying something like this is why i don't like cats and then superman flies the ship The catch the cat that the heat visions superman can see the marks on a space that the flying space to get it. The interesting makeshift craft with robot arms. And they're back in the fortress. Streaky comes walking back and and then we see him smiling and petting streaky. Yeah there is no dialogue in this entirely our work and it's just comical canyon upset. i like the artwork. it was okay it was okay scoop cuticle artwork. The the cover. Their of the issue is Soup blowing out. Bowling is out of the bullet rocket. So this is your fleischer. Basically pleasure issue. Yes even that crest right there. The called the bubble of him talking where it says i became an investigative journalist further micro sade to defend the ideals. I was taught to hold sacred truth injustice but it seems my best efforts to expose the real stories behind any primer corruption. Never really take second seats in my other effort at irving such disasters. Yeah the story's really interesting mark is were interested in in how these out. These were able to do what they did. Rocket scientists build robots. Get a it a train going out of all these berry ocular and the gorilla. The of poaching All of these display hurt. Now are the ones by the glacier brothers before the switch studios which we learn when reviewed for series once upon a time. It's really you know in in the show. All we get to see a superman. Oops thing and lois lane. It's the gets byline an just like other other day and while this we actually get cart story of im- wanting to write articles exposing p done wrong at article about soup and he's upset of time out hits is stories are landing on page nine h. Thirteen i'll soup ban on eight. Yeah it's kind of. It's it's interesting just as he is mad at himself. Yeah yeah but i like the fact that you know you said he's mad like look this is happening at nobody seems to care. Nobody is out there really understand how these things are happening. And lois how she's gonna get the real story on. Superman is the number one hit age. Someday i'm going to it. That real good on him. The whole story of brother when i do obviously stupidest century the whole story and then it's funny how easily you can sometimes overlook the obvious. The exposes me right in front of me staring back from amir. I like shot. Clark staring in the mirror you know with. His shirt unbuttoned his glasses arm. But the cbo superman symbol. Even though you'll have to remain secret untold years yet for prosperity. Say into set the record straight on now relies necessity of a one report that i only but i can right. You see him loading a typewriter. My birth name is cal. I am a child. She worlds the first civilization from beyond the stars. That might seem like an apostle a fantasy as long since tragedy. Tragic in the second is a homespun section of as real as it gets strategy. American jury is his by store. Yeah that's nice where we get. Clark gets the The expose on superfan will it is name a little bigger honestly Draw more attention to stories that he's writing because of his name I do like though calls p. Back out there often Shady military intelligence and a gone. Been working on that. Same ears talking about scientists death-ray He says i know. I always matter where you know. Some people some people do get there it that yes little cryptos trying to escape the front porch outside and play with. solomon. I like the next issue a special. Yeah so he starts off a starts off with like black and white like more black shading and we had a crash in some cuss words. It's a waitress. His first day and she apologizes to the cancer out. There baby and martha's like don't worry about that. Hun he understand. Then it cuts to a panel. That shows will make found the baby. She says he's just getting started to the jonathan's here let me help you with that and it cuts in its clark. It's all in color when he does these cuts. That's clark like am i different. You know it's the rocket then. We're back to the diner with jonathan and clarkin clark older. They're talking and time how he's different. He's alien that lady's still works there. And she's given their milkshakes. And then it goes and we see. She still works there. And it's lana. And clark and clark's telling one at how he has to leave smallville.

mike norton rex Ogle ali lois lane tom Steve Bowling Clark lois amir cbo mark solomon ray clark Hun jonathan clarkin clark martha
"mike norton" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Why you're concerned about that? I mean, I would be more concerned about LSU right now than I would Georgia. Yeah, you're right. You're right. I just heard that. And I was like, he ain't giving us no chance. That's a fair that may be a fair statement when we do our show two weeks from now in Jacksonville, but it's not a fair statement completely yet. Could be one, though. Let's talk to big B in Shelby North Carolina. Hello big B hey, Paul, how are you doing today? We are doing well. Thank you. I just got a comment to make about our man. I enjoy listening to Jim call into you. And climb to agree with him and moron. And but I got another quick question. How many players were drafted off of Alabama squad last year by the NFL? I think there were 6 in the first round I'll double check that number, but that was pretty it was pretty enormous. Thanks, big beat. Talk soon, let's try to grab one more here, bumper is up next. Hey, bumper. Hey, Paul, how are you doing today? Really well. Thank you. Well, thank you for letting me call it a show. I just wanted to talk to you about will must champion about what you see for him in the future, you know, because he's a South Carolina right now. He's stepped down from some fairly big roles. And you know, he's not going to be the Georgia, my apologies. But my friend over here thinks that he'd be a good coach at Florida state. And I in my opinion, I want to hear what you think about that. Well, I mean, what my champ has had two head coaching opportunities and I think they are both ended in similar fashion. So I don't know why, first of all, I don't think large state is about to make a change, yeah. I hope he finds success. I think he's a superb defensive coordinator and a very average head coach. I'd have to agree with you there. And if I could ask one more thing, I would ask this, you know, do you really see Mike Norton for his day past one more year two more years or do you see him, you know, just getting it's hard to call. He's off to a really rocky start, but if he can stop.

Georgia LSU Paul Shelby Jacksonville North Carolina Alabama Jim NFL South Carolina Florida Mike Norton
"mike norton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Is time for the odd couple Presented by prop swap with Mike Norton, Carmen DeFalco and what a weekend we have week two of college week one in the NFL, and things started with a bang last night. The Bears are in prime time and week one. And it also happens to be my partner's birthday. Mike North Happy Birthday. You and Sylvia Sharing a birthday silver turns 50 today. How old are you today, Mikey? I'm 69th 69. Exactly. Bless. And you know, I know everybody makes cracks about that number. You know, Like rank. Yeah, exactly. You know the whole ball of wax I You know, I'm not going to say I never tried it, but it's not fake. Bottom line. So all I'm saying I'm happy to be 69. It's sort of like the comedian that comes on before Elvis. You know, 17 years. All right. So you know what this is like an intermediate. This is the one where the kid runs between the two parked cars and you hope to make it across the street. 70 you start doing 70 years to granddaddy of them all. No doubt about it. Well, I love that. Your birthday is on a Friday going into a big weekend of football. It's fabulous. Um, you know, last night couldn't have been any better. Mike. It was entertaining. When I saw that line. Keep going up and up. Everybody's on Tom Brady in the Bucks. So it's ring night and know they're going to crush them. And it goes from eight they and a half to 9 to 9.5. I said This is too good to be true. I I got to go the other way. So I'm glad I grabbed a piece of the Cowboys at 9.5. It was a very fun game last. Yeah, and you know what? To me. I had no read. So I say at the game out, basically. Which I can do with Tom Brady. Uh and and Dick Prescott. It was a heck of a show. I don't want to hear how you need a running game, at least temporarily because nobody ran worth a damn. Zeke Elliott is usual. I mean, lately, so to speak, couldn't get it done. But you know Dick Prescott went on his arm. I heard somebody today on the NFL network say, Boy, you know my my projection for M v p Deck. Prescott er he got off to a good start last night. Don't confuse activity for accomplishment. Tom Brady shouldn't have had any interceptions. He had four nuts got to catch the ball would agree. Bottom line is Brady once again for four TDs and you've got clocked with two catches. Big catches in this game, so it's an entertaining game. But it was all passing. It really was. There was nothing that was mysterious about the game. I never thought that even though Tampa had to come back, I never thought they're going to lose that game. Did you know? I mean, you're just when he when he had the body right to have an article. My God, That's true. You had all that time left. You're like he's going to go right down. Look at it, like 48 or 49 of those last Minute when he drives. He's unbelievable, you know, but it was fun. And you're right about the running game. I mean, 60, some 600.60 points in the game. Nobody could run the well, because defense now is so easy with the passing game involved. You got 34 guys out there. I remember. I mean, here. We're talking about my birthday. I remember when Johnny Morris was a running back before the flanker position was even invented, which was the third receiver back in the day. So I mean, now they got receivers. You got empty sets. I know most of the time. They're not even trying to fool you anymore. I know everybody's a nickel and dime all games. So the Bears play in Primetime and Week one here they've got the second to fight second last game of the weekend. It'll be Sunday night football. Against the Rams at that beautiful new stadium. Sean McVeigh is four and O straight up and against the spread in season openers. How about that? And his Rams offenses have come out blazing Mike. They averaged 32.3 points per game in week one under McVeigh in this line has gone out north of a touchdown. Now for just the second time under Matt Nagy, the Bears are getting more than seven. They're getting 7.5 points Sunday night and reading about discipline. I've talked about this We've talked about you and I card Bottom line is I'm going to sit this one out. Hope the bears show up. I I think for any bear fan that wants to talk and do bad so you can get your preconceived wish of getting another guy in it may not even be field. You're nuts. You want what you want The bears the one you want them. To be, you know, on the right page here at least starting things out. But don't tell me you're a bear friend. You want to see him lose? Because they're not starting your quarterback. You've been in quarterback roulette. Uh, 34 different times. And you haven't fared well, so let's see what happens. 20 times It feels like right in the story of our lives and everybody all Clemens this and then those is this. And then this guy is that and this guy is this. Hey, You know what? Let's see what happens. Let's hope for the best. I mean, I know it's going to be a tough ball game. But you know the ramps can't be beat and Matthew Stanford to me once again. Give me the big games he's ever won. He's under more pressure now than he was ever under in Detroit. I would agree. Well, I mean, would they go to the playoffs? Twice with Stafford? Right? I think two times now James is a wild card he could have played in Detroit forever. Uh, you know, God is, you know close to 500 record. You know what? This is a different ball game for him. Do you have a whole organization resting on his shoulders? Let's see what he'll do. Yeah, I know. It's like you're the hunted. Now. You know what? It's not a familiar spot. Really? And Mitch troop whiskey once again. I and I don't beat a dead horse here. But I gotta get home. You love it. I beat in the next sense. I don't think he lost the Stanford. I don't think he did. Well, who know I think they blew that game against the lines right? Last year. They were one in nine between one and 10 between Minnesota Detroit. Robiskie was one in 91 to 10. So so, yeah, you're right time. I think the bear that Stanford beat the Bears. One time in the last six hours. I think that's right under nag. I think Maggie only lost it was in. You know, the Bears offense did enough that they the defense choked late lutely. They did? Yeah, That was the problem with that game last year when they lost it late. Stanford couldn't beat our guy Mitch and couldn't beat Maggie. Okay, but he's going to go out to Los Angeles now. Carried away to the world on his shoulders will see you think all three t All four teams. Excuse me and that conference that division. Excuse me might have a shot at the playoffs. What do you think of the NFC West? It's gonna be a good division. Absolutely..

Mike Norton Matt Nagy Carmen DeFalco Sean McVeigh James Johnny Morris Dick Prescott McVeigh Matthew Stanford Mike Last year Mike North Robiskie 7.5 points 70 years Rams 69th Elvis 17 years 60
"mike norton" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

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Just go to ziprecruiter dot com slash happiness getting cash back rewards for money. You're already spending. Who doesn't love that would discover you earn cashback on every purchase including your dinner for date night new pajamas and in the past year. Probably that new streaming service. Personally i love the idea of getting free cash for money that you already spending and these days. We might be spending more than usual. Maybe you're spending more on groceries during the past year. Or maybe you wanna spend a little money on a loved one. The cashback you earn will be matched by discover automatically. Having a credit card that matches the rewards. You already earn is one small thing you can do to stress less about your finances and discover makes it even easier because discover card is accepted at ninety nine percent of places that accept credit cards so when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash match limitations apply 2021 nelson report so one of the biggest points in life all humans across cultures. Perform rituals is when they're called on to perform so. For example tennis star serena williams bounces the ball exactly five times before i served and chew times before second serve. This is mike norton. And francesca gino a pair of harvard business school psychologists you may remember from a past episode of the happiness lab that mike and francesca study the psychology of rituals including all the superstitious behaviors. That people engage in head a stressful event. Think interviewing for a job going on a first date or stepping out at fenway park former third baseman for the boston. Red sox name is wade. Boggs used to eat chicken before each game and also used to right. The ibra word chai which means life in the dirt every time you went to bat there a ton of sporting examples. Just like this. My favorite one is used by british cyclist. Laura kenny legend has it. She was trailing at a big meat when she accidentally stepped on a damp towel between races even though her sock got all wet she went on to win the championship now. She ritualistically wets her sock before every competition and this is not just about sports. You can find this type of rituals across other type of performances. So for example before every show by rina suzanne farrell pins as mall toy mouse insider leotard crosses the south exactly twice and pinch or self exactly twice before going on stage singer beyond say. Listen to the same playlist of song. Say's appraiser with every member of her band completes a specific set of stretches and spend exactly one hour meditating. Why do so many successful people create these odd rituals before high stress performances. Mike and francesca hypothesized. that practices. Like these may help performers calm. Their pre-event jitters the worst thing you can do is tell yourself to calm down because when you tell yourself calm down. You can't because that's not how humans work and then not only are you're anxious about the performance but now you're anxious that you can't come down and then it's even worse. It's one thing to hypothesize that wade boggs eats a chicken before a game because it calms his nerves and makes him play better but it's also pretty hard to test that empirically so mike and francesca decided to use an experiment with ordinary folks. They figured out. A way to simulate high stress performance situation under laboratory conditions. They recruited some test subjects and had them sing. Don't stop believing by journey which is not only a terrible song but incredibly difficult song to sing and they had to sing in front of other people. Here's how the study worked. Okay welcome to the study. So in this experiment. You're going to sing. Don't stop believing and we're going to track. How well you do. All the subjects had to sing into a computer which marked exactly how good they were hitting the different notes and to make the situation. Even more nerve wracking subjects were faced with an unforgiving audience. A stern looking scientist watched them throughout the entire performance. But before the scary karaoke experience half the subjects took part in a ritual. Okay i want you to do the following drop picture of how you're feeling right now now sprinkle salt on your drawing count up to five out loud one two three four five crinkle up your paper. Okay now throw the paper into the trash. So what happened. The midnights rain singers. Who didn't participate in a ritual scored around sixty six out of one hundred for accuracy. They signed born and raised in south but participants who drawn a picture put saw on it counted to five and up scored higher. They averaged seventy eight percent accuracy. That's like jumping from a d. to a c. Plus now our rituals magic and you're an amazing singer not at all but they do seem to help people a little bit. They're kind of one tool that we have to help any situations. But what really explains the performance gap between the ritual and the no ritual subjects to figure out how mike and francesca monitored the singers heart rates. And ask them to describe their emotions anxiety levels and what we also found is that that level of anxiety was low were when they engaged in ritual. And that's why they ended up performing better on a seven point scale. The ritual participants rated their anxiety around a four out of seven. But those who had to sing without a fake ceremony to calm their nerves were significantly more scared. They reported anxiety levels of six out of seven. That's a pretty major shift. Mike and francesca had discovered that rituals allow us to feel better and do better. It's almost like getting a performance. Enhancing drug but the effective rituals isn't limited to quelling stagefright or pre-game nerves rituals can also help us when tackling challenges. The take place away from the public eye one interesting aspect of rituals that we discovered in our research. Is that rituals can also be quite helpful as we are trying to have self control. There are lots of things we want to do that. Take commitment and effort think habits related to our health and fitness or a desire to learn a new skill to succeed. We need to show discipline and persistence. And that's not always easy. So could a ritual help us with these tough private habits to four one or studies. We recruited people who were interested in losing some weight. Also jets were asked to cut their calories by ten percent but half were also asked to do a ritual before every meal. They had to cut their food into.

francesca mike norton francesca gino Laura kenny rina suzanne farrell mike serena williams harvard business school fenway park Boggs wade boggs Red sox nelson wade tennis boston Mike
"mike norton" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on Against the Rules with Michael Lewis

"So one of the biggest points in life when all humans across cultures perform rituals is win. They're called on to perform so. For example tennis star serena williams bounces the ball exactly five times before i deserve and two times before second serve. This is mike norton and franchesca. Gino appear of harvard business school psychologists. You may remember from the past episode of the happiness lab that mike infringe huska study the psychology of rituals including all the superstitious behaviors. That people engage in head of a stressful event. Think interviewing for a job going on a first date or stepping out at fenway park former third baseman for the boston. Red sox is name is wade. Boggs used to eat chicken each game and you also used right. The ebro word chai which means life in the dirt every time you went to bat there ton of sporting examples. Just like this. My favorite one is used by british cyclist. Laura kenny legend has it that she was trailing at a big meat when she accidentally stepped on a damp towel between races even though her sock got all wet she went on to win the championship now. She ritualistically wets her sock before every competition and this is not just about sports. You can find this type of rituals across other type of performances. So for example before every show ballerina susannah. Farrell pins as mall toy mouse. Insider leotard crosses the south exactly twice an pinch herself exactly twice before going onstage singer beyond said listen to the same playlist of song. Say's a prayer with every member of her band complete specific set of stretches and spend exactly one hour meditating. Why do so many successful people create these odd rituals before high stress performances. Mike and francesca hypothesized. that practices. Like these may help performers calm their pre event jitters the worst thing you can do is tell yourself to calm down because when you tell yourself to calm down. You can't because that's not how humans work and then not only are you're anxious about the performance but now you're anxious that you can't come down and then it's even worse. It's one thing to hypothesize that wade boggs eat a chicken before a game because it calms his nerves and makes him play better but it's also pretty hard to test that empirically so mike and francesca decided to use an experiment with ordinary folks. They figured out. A way to simulate high stress performance situation under laboratory conditions the recruits test subjects in had them sing. Don't stop believing by journey which is not only a terrible song but it incredibly difficult song to sing and they had to sing in front of other people. Here's how the study worked. Okay welcome to the study. So in this experiment you are going to sing. Don't stop believing and we're going to track. How well you do. All the subjects had to sink into a computer which marked exactly how good they were hitting the different notes and to make the situation. Even more nerve wracking subjects were faced with an unforgiving audience. A stern looking. Scientists watched them throughout the entire performance. But before the scary kariuki experience half the subjects took part in a ritual. Okay i want you to do the following drop picture of how you're feeling right now now sprinkle salt on your drawing count up to five out loud one two three four five crinkle up your paper. Okay throw the paper into the trash. So what happened. It's the midnight train. New seems who didn't participate in a ritual scored around sixty six out of one hundred for accuracy. They signed i born and raised in south of but participants who drawn a picture. Put salt on. It counted to five involved. It up scored higher. They averaged seventy eight percent. Accuracy that's like jumping from a d. To asleep sleepless now our rituals magic. And you're an amazing singer not at all but they do seem to help people a little bit there kind of one tool that we have to help in these situations but what really explains the performance gap between the ritual and the no ritual subjects to figure out mike and francesca monitored the singers heart rates. And ask them to describe their emotions anxiety levels and what we also found is that that level of anxiety was low were when they engaged individual. And that's why ended up performing better on a seven point scale. The ritual participants rated their anxiety around a four out of seven. But those who had to sing without a fake ceremony to calm their nerves were significantly more scared. They reported anxiety levels of six out of seven. That's a pretty major shift. Mike and francesca had discovered that rituals allow us to feel better and do better. It's almost like getting a performance. Enhancing drug but the effective rituals isn't limited to quelling stage. Bright or pre-game nerves rituals can also help us when tackling challenges the take place away from the public eye one interesting aspect of rituals that we discovered in our research is that reaches can also be quite helpful as we are trying to have self control there. Lots of things. We wanna do that. Take commitment and effort think habits related to our health and fitness or a desire to learn a new skill to succeed. We need to show discipline persistence. And that's not always easy. So could a ritual help us with these tough private habits to four one or studies. We recruited people who were interested in losing some weight. All subjects were asked to cut their calories by ten percent but half were also asked to do a ritual before every meal. They had to cut their food into tiny pieces. Arranged the pieces so that they were perfectly symmetrical and press. They're utensils on top of the food pieces three times. What happened on average participants in the ritual condition. A around two hundred calories less than the people in the know ritual condition. They were in fact better able to keep their weight under control simply because they add this routine of engaging in ritual on a day to day basis so once again ritual is shown to have a powerful effect. Mike and francesca are quick to point out that there are better in worse ways to pick a ritual. It seems like the key thing that makes rituals work is that you have imbued it with some sense of symbolic value or meaning. This is one of the reasons that religious rituals are so common. Lots of people have faith backgrounds. Give meaning to. Ritualistic acts like saying a prayer before a challenging or scary event but scientists like david steno found that our personal rituals also worked better when we're really convinced they're going to work belief really matters especially when we're talking about situations where there is uncertainty uncertainty in. Life is one of the major causes of stress that we have. Dave has found that there are a few ways that people come to really believe in the weird rituals they use one comes from rituals rich history like cosmonauts following in the footsteps of eureka. Garin we tend to believe rituals more when they worked in the past especially when they worked for us personally in the past take cyclists. Laura kenny's wet sock ritual her own experience of wet socks before a major victory convinced her that wedding. Her socks was the way to go for every subsequent race. Those accidental connections can have a big effect on our beliefs. You know it worked. Let's keep doing it. But dave has also found that in authority figure telling you what to do can boost rituals believability. Mike and francesca's weight loss subjects probably bought the food shopping practice in part because they had an official looking scientist implying that this pre eating ritual might help. You have to believe that this works in person who's giving it to you and it works better if you feel comfortable and connected to the person who's giving it to you and once a belief about a ritual in its effectiveness in place. Our bodies have a clear mechanism to start behaving differently. One of the ways by which rituals.

francesca Laura kenny mike norton franchesca mike infringe huska ballerina susannah kariuki serena williams Gino fenway park harvard business school Boggs wade boggs Mike leotard Red sox Farrell wade mike
"mike norton" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Caregiving is never easy. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute he meant a garcia terada assistant professor of marketing at texas a. and m. university determined that products to ease. The burden aren't always welcomed many products and services can make caregiving easier from pre. Made meals that help. Feed hungry family to rubber grips that automatically rock a crime baby to sleep. Although effort reducing products my seem like the perfect solution to help consumers juggle their responsibilities. My recent research with mary staffel. Eleanor williams and mike norton suggests that using these products who take care of loved ones may come with a cost consumers feel. They have not exerted enough effort across nine experiments we saw that consumers preferred putting more effort into caregiving they also avoided products that were designed to make caregiving easier for example we found. The consumers felt like better caregivers when they sent an elderly relative a handmade card rather than a premium one. We also found that people prefer making cookies for their partner that they makes by hand rather than one stay made from frozen dough and we found that parents responded better to facebook out for this new rubber crib when the ad acknowledged the effort that parents put into helping their babies sleep soundly rather than to at emphasizing. How this new could make bedtime easier. This happens because people believe that putting in effort is unimportant way of showing how much they care even when taking a shortcut do an equally good job of meeting the recipients needs a research also suggests how to make people feel better about using these products marketers can make effort reducing products more appealing by acknowledging caregivers efforts rather than emphasizing how these products simplify caregiving. Most of all caregivers should keep in mind. That is the love that you put into caregiving. And now the effort that matters that was humana garcia. Rhonda of texas am university. You can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot. Org production support for the academic. Minute comes from a and you advancing liberal learning and research for the public good..

"mike norton" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"It wasn't abortion. It wasn't guns. It wasn't then ten commandments. In the classroom it was three positive things that swing voters wanted but democrats won't support. Owens had a grueling primary that toughened him up for an even tougher general election but the contest wasn't destructive. in fact. He made his primary opponent. Mike norton his very capable head of the department of transportation with his three things a clean primary and a likable personality. Owens became the first republican governor of colorado in twenty four years and as an aside. He made good on all three promises. It has been fifteen years since he left office. If they don't want bill owens to be to be at historic anomaly. Republicans need to find their magic three things for twenty twenty two all offer up mine caldera says hey if you elect me i will put criminals back behind bars and take vagrants off your streets. I will lower taxes. And i will get the woke culture out of our schools. All three draw clear distinctions from the progressive now in full power of colorado seven. Fifty seven sherry in gal while the whole sports story in northern colorado the state in the country tune into the whole show weekdays noon to two thirteen ten kfi k. Hey the day's headlines podcast mornings with gail and more and schedule upcoming sports. Broadcasters find them at thirteen ten kfi k. a. dot com do not forget the rule of threes. I will lower taxes under democrats massive increases and rip away their regulatory punishment of small employers. So we can bring back. The jobs chased way. I'll make sure only public schools teach how to think not what to think. We'll get funding to our schools will be places of learning not indoctrinations camman republicans break caldera's first axiom idea thirteen ten. Kfi greeley loveland fort collins.

Mike norton Owens colorado bill owens department of transportation caldera gail Kfi greeley loveland fort coll
"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

After Hours

06:14 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

"Okay pegues. I am going to go first because i want to recommend an app. The app is called peak. Mike this is your ad. Yes you created an f. So i wanted to recommend this app called peak. It's spelled p. i q. u. e. it's a self-improvement app. I don't know a lot of people who can say. Hey that's my app but you created an app. Don't you teach mba students literally every single one of them says hey that this is my first sure but having said that you need to talk about this app mike so peak. The idea of the app came from. This is a something we've developed with beck weeks. Who was a harvard and the student and central mullen often economist at the university of chicago. The initial idea was just that people are not very curious about the world and it's not their fault. It's because we're not good at designing things that prompt curiosity. We're good at designing things that you can listen to or watch passively that are super interesting like for example podcast and things like that and they're great because they do spark thoughts and you know learning and us especially this one especially not this episode of this podcast. Good general is unbelievable. Just skip to the next. And that's all we wanted to do was just design things to make people curious again about things and idea honestly came from with little kids. You have been apparent or hung out with little kids. They find a stick and four hours later. They're still just fascinated with all the things you can do with a single stick so they have this amazing ability to get so deeply curious about things and test them and play with them and try different things and we never do that. Grownups we just never ever have that mindset. So that was the goal is to design things for people that you can do quickly but that a little bit get you back in that mindset of curiosity. It's super cool. Does it make people more curious from reports. I think it does for example super simple one is you are having lunch with your spouse or partner. Let's say and what we ask you. Is we pop up. bubbles with emotion words in them like angry board. Happy all sorts of emotions. And all we do. Is we say guests how your partner is feeling right now and they do it for you and then you also just press how you are feeling okay so you can compare. Just turn your phone right away. It's like really. I didn't know you were feeling whatever so things like that. We're trying to get you to sink a little bit like. I wonder how the person is actually field. My right wrong about the kind of things we just want to kind of. Yeah yeah so. The app is called peak. Everybody check it out. That's my recommendation felix. But you bring when. I speak with friends about their plans are posted. Democ ghozi sports his way up on the list. Everybody's dying to be back in the stadium and see some live sports events and in that context i came across a really interesting episode of this podcast. Called the uncertain. Our the episode is called inside baseball and he talks about baseball careers. How'd it actually happens. How particular antitrust exemptions for baseball then have profound implications. How sport is organized. Who makes money with this careers. Look lying it was. It was a real eye opener. How i didn't that particular episode but i think you mentioned that podcast in general before so i listened to a few there really interesting. They have a knack for thinking off jobs and professions. You know they exist. You know someone does that work but you have no idea what it's like. Can you have no idea what the experiences with our work. So when i listen to went deep into the office cleaning industry. Oh my god. That was the one you recommend. Great great recommendation. There was a study a few years ago where they asked people to list all the jobs. Just like that's the only one percent of all the jobs are we aware of just have no idea what the job at all the job is it. More like a vocation ritual for me. It's guy did you bring a recommendation. I did my friend and colleague katie milkman. Has a book that's called how to change And it is amazing so among the cool things that katy studies. I'll just say one of them. She came up with this idea of temptation. Bundling and the way that it works is like if you wanna go exercise at the gym you leave your ipad there with the trashy shows that you really wanna watch and then you can only watch the trashing shows when you're at the gym. Yes this idea that you bundle attempt with the thing you're supposed to do and with a research showed that actually can help you follow through. But she just is such a genius on understanding humans and then designing in ways that actually impact us emotionally and can get us to change our behavior so pre pandemic. Whenever i knew ahead a long haul flight coming up i would reserve something. I really really wanted to watch for that long haul flight and it made it better. It made it to the point where. I almost look forward to having alcohol flight where i could really dig into this show that i hadn't been able to see or something so okay so the book is called how to change how to change. Okay so mike. Thank you so much for coming on the show. This was fine right. Di- did think both of you had fun. Yeah it was fun. Thank you all right so thanks everyone for listening. Shoutout to our audio engineer. Peter name this is after hours from the hp our podcast network..

ipad Mike katie milkman Peter both harvard one percent mike hp first one four hours later Di university of chicago katy few years ago a single stick pegues peak single one
"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

After Hours

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

"With the stress of interacting with customers and taking on health risks which is obviously a enormous amount of stress other people who were in a sense lucky enough to be able to just stay home and work from home although that is lucky. It still comes with its own challenges. You think of a couple with two kids. Let's say now. Suddenly we lost all any possibility of everyone going their separate ways. We're in the house all the time. That's number one number. Two is were also trying to work. Even as we're all stuck in our house and the blurring of those lines got very very difficult for a lot of people because we used to be able to. You know if you had a commute you could leave your house in the morning. And maybe on the train and you've read or you took a bus and you listen to music that you liked or you drove. You know you have this time transition where you could switch from like dad self to work self whatever that might mean to you and then at the end of the day to you could do the reverse thing well so by the time he got home. You're back to home self and you love work self behind and a lot of research shows. Actually those transitions are really important for helping us move from being one person to the other person so if you think of high stress jobs like correctional officers turns out. Correctional officers are really really likely to have rituals before and after work much more likely than people in lower stress jobs and you can see exactly why which is their jobs. Incredibly incredibly stressed. That's a silly word. Stressful doesn't even begin to describe their job. They need to do things on their way between work and home to kind of leave work behind in the new covid world. You're doing work facing one way in the room and then work is over and you shift ninety degrees to the left and now you're ready to be your other self. Do you remember a few years ago. Bbc dad 'member bbc dad was on that zoom in he was being interviewed and then his kids came into the and that video that went viral and it was hill hurt and you fast forward a few years and we are all living that life all the time now. That was so hilarious back then. It's just because we're so good at separating working home so when one intrudes on the other. It's remarkable that video was remarkable at the time. Because it's like oh my god. The sanctum has been penetrated by the other life. You know what. I mean like shocking that that would ever happen which shows how much we keep them separate like. Sometimes if you go to some work function and then you're you know spouses you chatting with colleagues. Who are you. You act like that at work. You know you got all this insight into your partner but now we got it twenty four seven all day because you see your partner or spouse your roommates whoever at work four feet from you and you get a whole new sense of what they're like it'll be really interesting to see if the design of apartments and homes changes over the longer term. You know how say an open kitchen and as few walls and barriers as possible. That was sort of a desirable way to think about the best place to live in. And then all of a sudden you go no. I need much more separation. I need walls need a room. Where don't hear anyone else. Crawlspace would be so wonderful times. I have been in the past year on his zoom with people. And i'm looking at them and i realize they're in o'clock so true i would imagine that there's a part of this as also kind of cool though right this idea that we don't have to be so buttoned up in our presentation to the world and that it's okay to give our colleagues a little window into our larger context that's gotta be a positive development right for sure if you think about the pressure to never let anything from your real life. Interfere with your work is just an incredibly foolish thing that we all decided was the way to do things at some point in human history. And it's obviously not good for anybody well being or anybody's performance at work to say just whatever's going on at home just leave it behind and come to work and be like perfect person says not how we work so for sure there's benefits of kind of opening and blurring the boundaries. I think some people still experienced the tension of they want to be fully one and then fully the other. Yeah so. I want to be professor person for this amount of time and then not at all for the next amount of time. I want to be dad for the entire time. Just fully dad right. So i'm torn between what i want to be doing right now. And what the other thing is. That's where i think it can be costly when we can't insert the barriers when we want them but i think it can be very beneficial when we say look humans. Do not work that way and we should help. People be okay with that because it's much better for their mental health. You know you started us off by giving us a really poor grade as a society. And i know you were half joking about that but i do think that at the end of the day when we come through this as we look back on this year many people will view this as having been a lost year. Yeah i think there's a tendency that people have post trauma to kind of try to compartmentalize the trauma and to sort of box. It in there as a lost year is sort of a classic case of that. Typically that's not incredibly effective because you're not figuring out what happened and what the impact was on you so the hope is that people won't just kind of write it off because there is learning about yourself about your relationships you know about what you love and what you hate in the world that you can take forward with you. I think the second thing is that you know compared to which year i mean. All of us have things that happen in our lives. They're incredibly difficult and those years. We don't typically write off. You know family members elves all sorts of things. That happen to us there. I think we do try to get meaning and cope and deal event and seek social support and all the other things that are good for us so my hope that people will do more of that and less of the like. Let's burn the calendar. Actually that might feel good. It's okay we can all burner. Calendars i take that back but only burn them and not like try to wipe it from our memory and never think about it because suppressing thoughts is not typically a great way to deal with anything. That's happened to you. So i wasn't corentin for a while. During the pandemic spending ten days in the same without contact with basically anyone is definitely not an experience that i want to have back tomorrow but is it likely that i think back a few years from now and think. Oh my god. I never knew what that would be like. If you're confined in that same space and that my memory of it would not be of a nice experience sort of. Maybe grateful that i experienced something like that. Two things that come to mind one is absolutely negative. Things over time can become an a healthy way things that we learn from so like the teacher that you hated the most sometimes later in life you think you know he or she was really the teacher. Got me to focus and got me. You know so. There are these cases. I don't mean to equate of harsh teacher with a pandemic. Obviously but you can just think even at a local scale negative things later we can come to think. I'm glad actually. I had that very difficult experience because it made me who i am today but the other thing that happens with not necessarily extremely negative experiences. But let's say ordinary negative experiences. Is that the mind is built. To kind of forget the negative parts and remember the positive parts so like the word nostalgia exists. Because we're like oh it was amazing. Fifteen years ago there's a great study on honeymoons where they ask people during their honeymoon. Like how well is it going. And then they ask them a week later. How good was your honeymoon. But then they ask them like a year later. How good was your honeymoon. Five years later ten years later. How good in better. Yeah so. On the honeymoon people were like. The hotel isn't as nice as we thought. And you know. I just learned about an axe that i hadn't heard about all kinds of stuff happens a week later. Same the yeah yeah. It was okay but a year five years ten years twenty years later. Oh my god. Our honeymoon was so beautiful sunsets golfing jumping in the ocean. And things like that and this is one thing that annoys young people about old people so much right. Is there like oh treasure. Those years when you're that age itself and you're like why it's hard modest this conversation. This idea that there will come. A time will look back. We'll begin to appreciate some of what we went through even as challenging as it might have been.

two kids Fifteen years ago a year later tomorrow ten days today a week later Bbc Five years later ninety degrees four feet bbc second thing Two ten years later past year one thing few years ago Two things couple
"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

After Hours

07:07 min | 1 year ago

"mike norton" Discussed on After Hours

"The term ritual. I love that word by the way. So when i think of a ritual my mind immediately goes to a routine is behavior that could be regarded as a habit that because we imbue so much meaning into it and its significance grows for us. So i guess my question is why do you use that word and why are rituals part of the way you think about our mental health our happiness and all the other things she steady you know. Most rituals are one of the definitions is the behaviors are engaged in are not instrumental meaning. You're not actually getting anything done with the thing that you're doing so when you sit and stand kneel in church. You're not like exercising at that moment. You're using those motions to mean something else But if you look at the motions themselves you could say. Isn't that interesting. That people are standing sitting kneeling at these different times. So in a way it means that even the deepest rituals the behaviors themselves underlie them. You can think a little bit sometimes as random that we start to do some things and then we invite them with meaning then they become like really meaningful to us so the good news is i think that even meaningless behaviors that are random we can build them into rituals in our lives. Now we don't only have to use the five thousand year old one. Do you know what i mean. Or even the hundred year old ones we can come up with our own that are meaningful like going on the balcony and clapping. We can decide. We're going to do that so and it's going to be incredibly meaningful for all of us to do that. We didn't need permission from the ancient past to do that. So that's really nice. But i think the you know i love this question which is in the morning when you get ready for work. Whatever in the morning shower first and then brush your teeth or brush your teeth and then shower shower. I brush your teeth of course of course of course so in the world despite your strong beliefs about the rectitude of the behavior it's basically fifty fifty so behalf of people shower suspected half of humanity. Yes and both sides like there's something wrong with the other side except we are right but then the second question is if i asked you to do it the other way tomorrow morning. Whatever way you do shower. I brush teeth. Let's say if. I said tomorrow. Will you do brush and then shower would bug you or is it fine. You were talking about. How one of the differences between ritual and something to do that. It's not a purely instrumental act. And i think for a lot of people you are in the shower for much longer than is required to actually cleanse yourself. You're in the shower for however long it takes to be ready to emerge into the world and so for people like that. I think reversing the order is non trivial and it turns out about half of people. It bothers them to change the order. And half of people say. I don't understand why they'd even matter. So this is the difference between a habit in ritual exactly so the habit is the things itself like i need to brush my teeth and shower and i have a habit or running or you know have a habit of doing that. The ritual apart is the other stuff like the hoarder matters. Yeah when i do it matters when you add the other elements that aren't technically necessary to accomplish the goal of like cleaning your teeth and washing your body. That's when you start moving in a little bit more toward a ritual when it matters to you emotionally that you do it in a certain way and i don't mean ritual like people in robes chanting. I mean on the continuum of ritual closer with your morning ritual than it is to just kind of like a morning routine or habit. It's related to this idea of mindfulness. Right i mean the extent to which you're trying to create meaning even out of mundane behaviors in your daily life. I think there's a richness that goes along with that. Yeah i always hope. There's so many books on how to develop better habits and we need them. We don't need them. We all definitely need to have better habits and the habit is successful when it's become automatic So like you don't even think about brushing your teeth in in the morning you just do it. And then the dentists have one you know like they built it into a habit. They lost as a business. But that's true right big toothpaste one. I guess Yeah but i think we want more than you know. Would we considered a win as a human. If our whole day became automated with healthy habits. I don't think so to your point. Young me i think we want something richer and deeper than just automatically doing good rational things thing. We need like emotions and emotional experience and emotional variety and we can get an all kinds of ways. But i do think rituals are one way that we sort of ourselves to having richer deeper different more interesting experiences. That's an interesting point about emotional variety because we live with the same number of people for such a long time during the pandemic in pretty close quarters that also has just as dramatic impact on the kinds of emotions and the kind of emotional variety that you experience. Now you're really admitting a lot about your side. We only really good to have breaks from people so that you can start to miss them. You know what i mean. It means you really care about someone enough that when you're not with them for a while you really wish you could be with them however that does not mean that you want or need to be with them all the time. This was one of the emotional paradoxes. Pandemic on the one hand it made you appreciate your loved ones more than ever right when you just look at the loss of around the world. And what corona virus was doing to families instead so it made you appreciate them more than ever on the other hand. You're with them all the time in the same apartment in the same house it just made me think about like what is your absolute favorite food in the world that you love more than any other food and then eat that every day all day free year. Not gonna be so after all that appeal. It's what is your favorite food apples. Oh my god. It's a lot of apples. A lot of apples. Apples have a substance that starts to upset your stomach. We're gonna take a break before it is definitely deteriorate. 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tomorrow tomorrow morning fifty fifty second question both sides one hundred percent one way five thousand year old corona virus harvard business school Harvard business school one hundred year old half of people books humanity half