17 Burst results for "Mike Hayes"

"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

01:41 min | 2 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"And leadership and it's been a great honor really. Yeah have a lot of fun doing it. I hope we can meet in person soon. Mark i Like i said always looked up to you. You're such an inspiration and incredible person and thanks for all the impact you've had on people you've met and people you haven't met. It's it's really wonderful to spend time with you. And like you said. I i could go on for another hour or two but i think we might get in trouble. I agree who asked all thank you very much and we'll talk to you my friend all right. All right folks Mike as go. Check out the book never enough like i said i mean. I can't say enough. Good things about this book. The the writing that humility. The stories if you're A leader or on a team or just interested in even interested in military spec ops. It is just really really well written books and you won't be disappointed. Never enough navy seal commander living a life of excellence agility in meeting my case who. Yeah mike mike. Do you have a social media handle or anything like that. How can people find out if they want to reach out to you and say hey come speak to my organization or or i want to buy a thousand bucks or something like that. Absolutely twitter is at. This is my case one big word. Instagram is this is dot mikey's guy and then linked in is just mike hayes and seal or something like that will pull me up. It's not too hard to find on there but Totally appreciate that. Love the just looking to give back in whatever way i can. Thank you that moore who. Yeah all right my friend. all right. we'll see you soon and everybody out there. Thanks again for your support really appreciate it can do it without you so until next time remember. It's never enough and stay focused and be unbeatable who are..

mike mike Mark mike hayes Mike navy Instagram mikey twitter moore
"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

05:28 min | 2 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"To loop internally right on everything you do. Every decision every action and then let that inform you know kind of how you bring the next set of words or choices or opportunities to the team or to the situation. I love that yes in the way it translates in the business world now. Is that like we don't have a we see things where people say. Hey i had a playbook for that you know and if something went wrong and they have a playbook to take off the shelf and go follow the playbook we know from the seals that the only thing. That's good about a playbook is that you know you have a place to start from a playbook. That matters is what i describe as the meta playbook which is that playbook for creating the playbook in the moment and so the crisis is defined the outcome. You're trying to achieve. What are all the strategies that you can use to get there. How do you mitigate risk on each of those paths so that you can then make a resource decision and say are the resources we need to achieve the outcome worth the risk that we're gonna assume only assume the least amount of risk is we have to in order to achieve the goal and those like that rigorous a systematic way of thinking is what ultimately drives success whether it's seals or business terrific. I love that. That's that's your next book meta planning right planning out a plan on the fly. Well i think i'm not. I don't have the corner market on that. Just to everybody in special operations or even the even. Dod understands what what's the saying plans. Plans never survive. First contact with the enemy would just the seals we were. We were always thinking three steps ahead whenever we could write. I love the term fast which iteration of speaks to that. The plan is to figure out the plan in the moment when you get punched in the face or you know things. Don't go go as well as you thought they would. I wanna come back to you know. Just draw some distinctions about going accepting hard accepting hard things whether it's training or or whatever you wanna do that's going to challenge you getting comfortable with the discomfort of that but also not conflicting that with being hard or a hard ass right or thinking everything in your life is going to be hard because what my experience was if you try to be the mighty oak all the time right and you put out the image that you're invincible or invulnerable eventually you know you're gonna smackdown right and you're not gonna be able to get back up. It's gonna be tough so you need to learn to project the mighty oak when it's appropriate but also you need to learn to be the read that can bend over. You know the sought the yen and the young hard and the soft need to go hand in hand in glove. And i think some of our teams kind of forget that right and even some of our teammates in the public is just do it. You know i'm thinking of my friend. You know our our our buddy goggin rights like great. You know it's it's tough to go all one speed and especially if you're heading toward a wall you know. This is not going to go so wealthy. Hit that wall. So you need to be able to find the softness find the recovery find the be the read instead of the time a million in particular that well. Yeah no i it resonates a lot with me the In nineteen ninety six as a three year old seal when my first time overseas in in south america and got held at gunpoint in ultimately threatened with execution and torture and a bunch of bad things. And you know if i would have been tried to be the oak tree in that situation and bill toughened and beat my chest. I wouldn't be here today. There's no question about it myself. Me and my buddy lived through it and and we had to be the read that that bent in go into the story in the book never enough but but Through life there are so many different times where that that facile being facile and being nimble and agile is really. What gives you more tools in the tool kit. So you can figure out that fastest or easiest path to achieve the goal and again. It's just setting ego aside into put it in career terms that third phase of career. That i think a lot of people. Don't get you in might. These are my words but first phase of a career really learning foundationally. Something whether it's a seal a doctor a lawyer accountant. Whatever it is number two. The second phase is trying to prove the world that you're really great at whatever you you know it. We go through that phase of. Hey i really want the world know what. I'm doing number on that second platoon that you're on in this yields and you're like hey i'm not a new anymore. I really know my way around a little bit but but that third phases with when you no longer have anything to prove that anybody match when you're really liberated to go even be better because you don't need the credit you're not you don't. You're not scared about blame. You can stand in front of a room. And say i'm not embarrassed to say that i have no friggin clue but you know what i know a lot of smart people who do and so. That's what really In my view that third phase of a career is really would accelerate To your point more. I love my last book staring down the wolf. All about that coming up from a different angle. And how leaders are i was gonna say often but pretty much always the limiting factor in their own teams ends because the Haven't learned to get out of their own way. They.

Dod goggin south america
"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

06:53 min | 2 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"For sure you know. I was a reservist after nine. Eleven i served active duty for a couple recalls and everything but i. I didn't experience that that is acutely as you did. And is my other teammates. Did who were active duty that whole time. I have been to a few funerals. But you know i wasn't commanding officer like you or i had to attend as their boss and i'm curious on this point. How did that change you. You not just one thing to deal that once or twice but to deal with it forty times. What do you think that what affected that having you. How did it make you more humble or more whole as a human or or more fractured and you know desensitize. Possibly yeah you know markets have. It's a wonderful question. And i appreciate the question because just a really run wide open. It unquestionably fractures. You however comma you know it also drives the give back and help those less fortunate. You know today's july six sixth. I lost a jason lewis in two other nonce seals that were in equal if not more part of our task unit in in baghdad in two thousand seven. And so you know. We're all reminded of days like today when when there are anniversary season in its What it does for me is it drives me and gives me energy of i can either look at my feet or i can stay. You know shoulders back chest outlook at the horizon and keep driving forward and try to do great things on the planet and look. I have my hard days just like everybody does. But but you know i just try to really send her in in focus on giving back in in helping those less fortunate. We've been through a real hard year and a half even with this pandemic. Let me draw a parallel there and as you know in a seals. We don't think in absolutes. We think in relative terms and so while the whole team or the whole nation. Both metaphorically the same. You know we're all gonna have absolute bad days but what matters is do the people to the teammates who are relatively up. Go help the teammates who are relatively down. And that's what life's about is we pull people up on our good days and we're the person who's down not not. Surprisingly we have a whole group of people whose energy arabia help pull us up. Because that's what we've been doing the other the other time so that's how we live. I love that that's speaks to one of the things i loved about the seals. They really taught me how to willingly receive help and support right because in the teams like you said everything is hard and you can't be great at everything and there's going to be times or moments that either you're the weak link or you know there's a there's just something not going right and you have to be able to accept and receive help. That's actually a tough skill for a lot of people learn in leadership and it kind of ties to this idea of being ready to lead ready to follow right. People think i'm a leader. I'm ready to leave. But that following part now on the left that behind long ago right yeah totally. I think it does tie back to ego. Well i'll tell you i though is look. I'm six four to twenty five or two thirty. When i went through through buds man alive. I was not god's gift the pull up bar we did not get in. A bar did not get along but just like everybody. We've got our weaknesses. You know but then i was going to draw the parallel As as we think about forward how do we lean into those weaknesses in know them. And then say. I've got a bunch of other friends who can do the things that i'm less good at. And how do. I not need the credit or the ego of being the person who does the thing. It looked leaders. Don't need to make the best decision leaders. Need to make sure the best decision gets made and there's a big difference as a mindset as elite as a commanding officer. If you would have asked me when i was second in charge of a team in iraq and said you know what's it gonna be. Do you know what it's gonna be like when your overall in charge. I would have said absolutely i totally get it now. Then the truth is In retrospect once i was in command and running the whole special operations task force multiple thousands of people in an two thousand people in afghanistan. I i there was an extra weight on me. That's a little bit hard to describe in. It really is important to like you said no what help you need Nyse that asking for help is a sign of strength. Not we've us agree so much we could just dig out of that one. But i wanna go back to something. You said one of the reasons that you and i are. Teammates are excited to go get our asses kicked in the hardest training in the military. You know and. I think there's something inside of us to just recognize. That hard equals growth. Right if you don't go for hard if you don't challenge yourself you kind of don't grow you get stuck you're stagnant. I figured that out early on through my endurance sports and then through my martial arts. And i really loved the suck fess right and so there was nothing besides the seals that i was going to do in the military i had zero interest in the military until i learned to the seals and i said that's it. That's where i'm supposed to be. Because that's the that's the place i can do them. Horse thing possible. So i could grow the most. Was that your experience. Or what your thoughts on this absolutely. I'm not sure. I was as mature as you were. When you made the decision i was I mean we might have been detained is probably you know developmentally or mentally or something like eons Behind you but through but through time unquestionably. That's how i feel and a really just said. Don't be afraid to aim high and and miss be afraid to aim low and hit and it and so that like that go for the hardest thing you possibly can but then i think mark what's what often gets missed is. Don't just try the hard thing but be objective reflective afterward and say when be really true to say what could i have done better you know when things go sideways. I've experienced almost a proclivity a natural tendency for people to point the finger externally. And maybe maybe they appointed at themselves eventually. Or maybe don't pointed themselves at all and say what could i have done better. And i in seals one trait or habit that i picked up. I think really drove whatever success. I've had which is that. I might be only one. I might be one hundred percent wrong or i might just be one percent wrong but even when i'm wondering percent wrong i start with myself and i said could i have done better. Could i have communicated more clearly. Could i have thought more critically or more logical or done something different. And then you never miss the opportunity to say what i've done better and feed that back into you know the rest of your career bat that rigorous self assessment. You know where you're always starting with your own mind and looking at you know how. What did i learn. How did i grow. What were my weaknesses could better. I think that's a great lesson for all leaders right. Just start there in. It's almost supplying to loop internally right on everything you do. Every decision every action and then let that inform you know kind of how you.

jason lewis baghdad arabia Nyse iraq afghanistan
"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

08:49 min | 5 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"It threatens everybody so the gulf of aden can seem very far away from us right now but we're also interconnected in today's global world that it's really essential for us to make sure that that we're not gonna you know impede the ability to freely navigate the seas according to the rule of the international rule of c. so carlos. I think it's really important that that that until we're certain that there's not not real legitimate of material risk to the freedom of navigating will have to be doing that shelley from san bernardino. What mindset is best. When approaching people from very different and possibly hostile culture the mindset is is simultaneously two things number. One is first and foremost caution and and awareness. It's a heightened sense of keeping your your purse your radar your antennas up for perceiving both threats or or or or ways where your group could be harmed. And i'm speaking very much from a seal who has dropped into many foreign countries and try to your life out the but at the same time was going to say that because i was wondering i heard her question a different way and you answered it in seal way which is fascinating. Keep that up. But i do wonder if she's asking about hostile. Differing opinions within the us within our neighbors are wondering star. Always taking the team. I've literally been you know the far corners of ghanistan and given speeches two hundred or a thousand or five thousand villagers that of which the taliban is unquestionably present in talked about their how to how to think about You rejoining their government and uniting so on the one hand you're those antennas and the perceptions are up but at the same time you're you're really working to To drive toward a common goal and a common vision of unity in achieving the the outcomes. You're trying now for the stateside part. I think that Again it goes clay the empathy. The understanding and living in understanding other people's stories are the single most important path in my mind to having tolerance in the ability to live next to around or within and among people who don't think like us aren't like us differences need to be celebrated not not chastised. And get the hell off twitter. Except for if you're sending us questions like vaughn from knoxville tennessee. Who asked a question that i really excited to. Have you answer. What of the most important skill sets to take with you as you move between industries. It's the foundational elements of character integrity judgment and ultimately investing in other people and building building teams. There's so many key things to to building that winning team but it starts with articulating the common goal that people are trying to achieve understanding. What motivates people were all like. I said different motivated by different things. Some people are motivated by by compensation or public recognition or education quality of life. And look when we meet people who are motivated by things different than us. That's okay on the same team and we're trying to achieve the same thing for our our own organizations. So i really. It boils down to creating a single team made up of whoever whomever we who the point we said earlier. Claire around differences and having different skill sets within the team. Okay last one from the listeners. Know ause from boulder colorado. I love this question was should things ever calm down. Would you recommend visiting afghanistan. Was there something about the country that stayed with you. Know ause i think. Afghanistan is one of the most beautiful countries in the world physically. It is beautiful to be in a helicopter flying over you know just everything from the desert to the the the the river and then the green lush vegetation for you know a couple hundred meters or so off those rivers and then to see the mountains in the field that crisp absolutely fresh air. Nothing better nothing nicer. I really look forward to the day where i can take my daughter back to iraq or afghanistan because it's a safe and be just Pro prosperous and in really Contributing to the contributing to the world. I love that was your answer. I was hoping you'd say that ba afghanistan after seven with unicef and went to kabul and found those charming and beautiful at the time. I was lucky in that small little window where things had been had had calmed down a little bit and had not yet ramp back up to to be more dangerous. And i've always said if i could have bought we bomb you and spent a lotta time in bombing on which is in the center of the country and has traditionally been a little bit more peaceful also but the hindu kush when these beautiful valleys and rivers and lush green areas. And i used to say god. If i could buy a vacation home somewhere here in bomb. Yon doing it. I don't think i'd be able to get in and out very easily but you can still buy low. You could definitely i. actually i bought. I still wear around my neck all the time. I have a while i was in kabul. I've got you can't see it from here. They were little merchant who is selling handmade jewelry and had taken lapis lazuli. The blue stone that is abundant there and had it was burning it or soldering soldering it on a different metals in different items and i was looking around and lo and behold there was one that he had made out of. Us quarter. i noticed on the front. That was a us quarter. And i thought that was interesting. He had put this little. You probably can't see all he had put this little piece of lapis on the front of the us quarter. And i could tell it was you. And i flipped it over and it was an. It's a north carolina quarter. So i bought it. I thought you know what this is. And i have worn. It got probably stinks worn it for thirteen fourteen years now because it's it's a reminder of how what we can do what we do in one place america. North carolina can make its way all the way around to a place like afghanistan that north carolina. Quarter which. I didn't bring no one ended up there and found by someone and turned into this. Not really pretty but but jewelry period and it's just a reminder to me all the time of how what we do here affects people everywhere and we need to be mindful of that all the time. The book is never enough. It's got along subtitle but never enough by mike as the subtitle is. Let me fly. Navy seal commander on living a life of excellence agility and meaning But folks look up. Never enough by mike as this. It's kind of crazy. It would be crazy. We'd been crazy for me to say this. At the beginning of this podcast people would have scoffed. But i think after hearing you for for the past hour. I think people will understand and see where i'm coming from when i say there are books about leadership from folks like jack welch who who read ran. Ge for years for decades and lee iacocca who are considered to be these incredible minds when it comes to leadership and mark my words right here. Whoever's listening mike hayes is gonna come back and talk to us as soon as soon as richard blumenthal finds a camera that's not on and decides to retire because he can't get on tv anymore. My case is going to run for senate in connecticut. I'm telling you right now and you'll know you heard him here. I and and you need to pick up. You need to pick up this book. Never enough by him. Because it's i think will sit up there along the alongside of those books. Lee iacocca and jack welch when it comes to talking about leadership and your experiences in the military how they shaped you not in just in the military and not just as a navy seal commander in two white house administrations and then beyond in the business world as well so i really recommend you grabbing this book never enough by my case mike..

Lee iacocca North carolina iraq richard blumenthal lee iacocca twitter thirteen fourteen years afghanistan Claire jack welch america north carolina ghanistan Afghanistan kabul san bernardino mike hayes One today mike
"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

07:29 min | 5 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"The navy seals your experience in afghanistan. You're one of maybe out of fifty nine episodes. We've done a small handful. Not even a full handful of people who've actually worked in both parties administrations which is very rare and refreshing. So thank you for that. It's it's sort of a dying breed of people who want to serve Do you have any idea of why using that is that we don't really have as last week's episode was about selflessness with richard louis who wrote a book about selflessness and we talked a lot about how we've sort of become more selfish society in ways any thoughts on why well it's it is a great question and it's the right question and ultimately you know it's it's funny because the the the first question i usually get answered off. The street is like never enough. Isn't that about you know. That's pro fame and fortune. And it's so provocative and in really the title meaning is about meaning impact in purpose in it. Is you know my real goal is how do we help. People understand that serving others is what What it's all about. It's the name of the game and so you know when when you aspire to live a life of giving more than taking than than that's the magic that makes the you know our our institutions are cities are states our country the globe really strong in. It's what's missing today. So i think to answer your question. A little more directly do the question to me would be. Do we celebrate the public servants enough. Whether it's certainly healthcare workers you know you are educators. Our historically somewhat underpaid public servants across the entire spectrum of of service you know holding them up and saying a lot of people say. Hey mike thank you for your service and and you know i the way i always answer that clay is hey thank you for your service because we all have different gifts and different abilities and different interests and so how we tap into that and say you know what i served as a seal but you you've served as an entertainer and inspiration provocateur on on podcasts. In so many different ways and we all bring good to the world in the ways that make the most sense for us. And that's what i think is missing is that is that acceptance april fifteenth. Twenty twenty. one. I i've ever been called a provocateur and actually usually so boring because we'd rather people just get along. Do you say that. It an absolute. I'm totally can diga. Tired of people saying thank you for your service. Does it feel empty to you when someone says that to you. It does not feel empty. Because i know that coming from a great place in someone's head and in their heart and it's like i try to judge people by their by their intent. Not their actions. You know so many times. We make mistakes because we judge people for their actions. It's kind of like at work. No matter where we work how many people get out of bed and say what can i go. Screw up today. You know it's it's a small number now just me. What will ask grew up today. So so the question is is it does it. Does it never feels empty. Because i know where people are coming from personally. Like i kind of alluded to before i cringe a little bit because i really i wanna be recognizing the service of others and i don't you know i don't. I don't enjoy the spotlight on myself per se. You know i'd much rather you know you when your commanding officer for seal team or helping run a big business to me. Success really to me is seeing others succeed. You know when i applied for a program called the white house fellowship. I was a white house. Fellow in two thousand eight. It's this program where you Right tennis as and the hardest essays. Because it's two hundred words you know the the classic down right. I can't do that and so But the questions like why. Do you want to be a white house fellow and i remember one of my answers back in two thousand. You know seven. When i was writing was i don't want just positively influence people. I want to positively influence people to positively influence others. Because then you get that positive that you get at. Non linear effective it out in the world. Why don't you. Why did you want to go in the navy. Well we're in the service in general so to to a theoretical practical answer. The theoretical answer is. I grew up watching my grandfather and father with great values both serve the nation in the navy and my grandfather was at pearl harbor on that day of infamy on december seven forty one and just continue to serve as a pilot in world. War two My father was a sub mariner in during the cold war and so none of them. Neither of them either ever said. Hey mike you've gotta go in the service you've got to go do this. It was just a living a life of of of service to others in in so when it became time for college. They made me aware of this. Rotc program that would pay for school as the oldest of four clay. I just felt like you know. I should apply for the program. You know i'll do for years and get out. And i got one of the scholarships and so it's hard to turn down at the time you know what was a full four year college education at a private institution so That that was nine hundred ninety three. I just turned fifty years old. You know in ninety three. We were what eight years before nine eleven. It wasn't like when you made a made that that decision to go be a seal at age twenty one. It wasn't like oh. I'm going to go into this world of combat and ten years twenty years of really hard situations. Of course we all knew what we were getting into but it was theory not practice. Did you so did you go. Did you go into combat zones in the nineties. There was there was mogadishu. There was some stuff in eastern europe. Did you go into combat. It all your first several years in the service so i did serve in bosnia and in kosovo so that was those missions were much enforcing what was called the dayton. Peace accords was much more around special reconnaissance. And making sure that you know. Two sides were were separating and obeying the the agreements in order to have less conflict so a much different situation. Now you know what was i on a mission here. Their shot at in ninety seven. Yes but nothing compared to the post. Nine eleven era that all seals have been through. I don't wanna say i'm special. I'm not all seals. In many many special operations in service men and women have have served in different ways. I like every seal of my era buried way too. Many friends is something like forty forty friends. In in clay candidly. I've been shot at rocketed. But i've also cut one of my teammates legs off on that deployment. And i've been run over by a carnival cruise liner. I've been held at gunpoint in peru ninety six and so these are all things back in college..

richard louis april fifteenth kosovo bosnia afghanistan ten years two hundred words mike eastern europe last week december seven forty one four year forty forty friends fifty nine episodes today both Two sides first question two thousand fifty years old
"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

06:16 min | 5 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along

"Months after the end of the trump administration we remain as divided as ever with recent shootings and the fallout around him. Sort of reminding us that our country's wounds still haven't fully healed. Is there anyone who can lead us back to being one country healthy and united president biden is giving it a try and he might make some progress by the troops home from afghanistan this year. But is that the key to furthering the cause of peace or will it be giving up our hard fought gains. I'm klay can and this week. Politic con welcomes guest who can speak to both leadership and what we should be doing with it when we have it joining us a veteran of the bush and obama administrations former seal team to commander mike hayes. Mike is now a leader in business. And he's the author of a new book on leadership called never enough a navy seal commander on living a life of excellence agility and meaning true his mission of giving back the proceeds of his book all go to the eleven sixty two foundation which is an organization that serves to pay off the mortgages of gold star families. I'm going to ask mike. What leadership strategies. He wishes more of our politicians employed today. How does he feel about the biden. Administration's approach to afghanistan iran and russia. And how can we pick our battles better and of course how the heck are we going to get along. Hello hello hello. Hello how are you good. How are you you. You clearly have done this a few times. Because you have to. Setup setup also warned a half. Oh yeah do you. I mean have you been. Where are you. i'm in westport connecticut. Oh got it so you have you been stuck at home a lot for the pandemic or if you've been working from home or working from home and the end up my work set me. I help run a large technology company and they sent me lights and green screens and all kinds of more stuff that i needed. So well there you got. That's everybody i feel like i'm a little worried about people. Maybe never coming back out of these. These cubicle these house cubbies right now. I know i know especially with with the news because the news networks. They're never gonna pay for a satellite uplink again. No it's it's all coming home now. Does your is your company that you has the company that you work for. Been everybody working from home also hundred percent. What's going to happen when people like our office buildings out of luck now. Yeah well we're gonna we're gonna go hybrid so like i'm in westport but i'm the first senior. Hire outside of palo alto. I worked for a company called. Vm-ware does it's like the nation's third largest software company and you know it's really tough because there's so much real estate but the company wants to just give people flexible choice. Which is the right thing to do. And we'll figure it out over time. Is that is that. How do to the economy when everyone's at home and nobody's renting office space. Does that worry you at all. You know it's it's i think you know in the one thousand nine hundred nineteen forties and fifties when you know all the knitting and knitting mills left america and went somewhere else. I'm sure that worried people then to you know it's like on the one hand it's like it's got to be some sort of progress. You gotta find the good in it right. Well listen that nice way to put it. I do appreciate that mentality though because not many people do that anymore. Ninety something clay. I've had a couple has done a couple of podcasts and stuff and i love your premise of. It's just what i read. What background and stuff. It's just how we make the world a better place you know. How do we get along. Except you know everybody's different in. I certainly am. And how do we just make it all work to have an answer. Because i'm gonna ask you if you have an answer. Our to hear. I mean i know your book is about that. Have the lowest number of of what the smallest audience ever if my wisdom is zero. Listen we've been doing this now. I think this is fifty ninth episode. So we've done this. We actually started two weeks. Prior to the shutdown. We thought we were going to be doing this. Love and here. We are a year later still in the same room still wearing the same underwear and we have been trying to figure that out. But i've told people who listened regularly know this. We attempted to do this show with panel and we wanted to have people from across the political spectrum discussing and we discovered. That's not possible or at least it's not easy because some of the some of the debates and some of the arguments that people had nobody wants to. Nobody wants to get along. It seems nobody wants to do anything except for argue. Have you found that it's terrible. It's like a love talk about that a little bit but the the hollowing the anyways. Yeah what's the saying. You wanna make god laugh. Tell them your plan right. Well god feel like he's laughing a whole hell of a lot now because we got three hundred thirty million people here and they all have three hundred and thirty different million but different we. I are lena's closets of all time. Hopefully you know that was true for awhile and home depot was like really knocking it out of the park with business. I think most people have totally given the hell up. They don't care anymore. Have you have stopped cleaning. I'm just like you know what i'll live in squalor. I don't care at all your book never enough a navy seal commanders on living a life of excellent agility and is really sort of about what we were just sort of talking about here how how to live we inadvertently started talking about the topic already so i love that. That's what you wrote about. It's about.

mike three hundred thirty million Mike mike hayes afghanistan trump two weeks hundred percent palo alto this week a year later westport both fifty ninth episode this year america westport connecticut first senior Ninety one country
"mike hayes" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

06:27 min | 8 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Key leaders and collectively align around the vision like we just talk about and what are they are trying to achieve in when you when you have a great organization you can talk at that high level in then let people who are closer to the various problems that they see on their own back backwards or you know it their own arenas if you will let them figure out how to think about the outcome we're trying to achieve and then figure out what you actually do. Because if i'm as a leader telling people way down in the organization what to do. Yeah i have completely failed. Yeah it's like painting this like your job is is defining the sandbox and i don't think people truly appreciate how difficult and how time consuming defining that sandbox can be right because it the easy thing to do is insert yourself lower and lower in the organization because it's fun to do the tactics on the how but you've got to fight and stay at that higher level and and paint the define the sandbox. Make sure you've got the right resources in the sandbox. That's a lot of work and it's a it's a. It's mainly a communication function right. I mean it's almost all about communication. Seems like you know it well. Communication is just a motive. Come up thinking right. Any communication starts with thinking. And so i think that in this situation i believe that the natural whole is what you said which is how do i go. Turn the wrench myself or or plot the course on the map mice but what we should do. That's way more fun. Trust me in many ways. It is so much less fun to be the commander of team than to be a twenty four year old sealed going mission by. They'll give you wrong. It's also incredibly funded awesome empowering to to be a meter schiphol's in in both are wonderful but the the the point i'm trying to make is that it takes a discipline in internal discipline to keep yourself away from over from migra managing from or from or from getting too much in the weeds. Yeah i remember when the i worked with the seals in between the two gulf wars. We just working with them. You and you guys met up with us in kuwait and we were going to do some halo drops and i'm doing the brief right there on the airfield ali ali maher base. I remember we kept having challenge this that and there were a lot of challenges involved. Get all the details but it was just like and i remember my aircraft commander. I was co-pilot the time he's like sorry about all and we don't have this. Don't have that kind of this. And i remember the team lead. That was there doing the job. He said aiming we got embrace the suck. That was the first time. I heard that he goes. Let's just embrace the suck man. We'll get this done and so i love that term. Because it's you talk a little bit about in your book like knbr building the comfort with discomfort. That's how i kind of taking that kind of my experience marine corps was like we always seem like we're always doing more with less. We always had you know. We never had enough whatever finances resources time. We're always shorthanded on something. But we always got it done and it was that embraced that suck mentality of or comfortable with being uncomfortable. Comfortable with dealing with the uncertainty comfortable with making decisions with partial information like. That was the first time i heard the seventy five percent. Rule in the marine corps rightly he. Let's get comfortable making decisions with partial information house. Al resonating with you with everything that was saying saying right there deeply is the answer your question and in seal training. That's exactly what we do. You don't realize when you're eighteen or twenty one years old going through training. What's actually happening. The the community is smart and knows how to teach things without seeming. Like you're teaching. And so the the thing is you know my class started with one hundred twenty guys in nineteen graduated in what happened to the hundred one who didn't graduate great human beings incredibly talented in different ways being wasn't meant for them. No problem the thing with the the nineteen had in common. Is that as you get stretched out of that comfort zone that you get a little bit wobbly whether it's a fifty meter underwater swam aura. Five and a half nautical miles swim or being awake for a week straight in. Hell hell week. Those are the kinds of things that put you out of your comfort zone in candidly. You think to yourself ahead of time. Like whoa what's this going to be like in as you get out of that comfort zone. Sure there's a lot of learning there but what happens when you after that evolution or after that day you had a rest recover again the next you just get stretch even further so you're old limits become the new normal in so through time. You keep stretching people's limits further and further and further but the most important thing a lot of people here and there is that there are limits get stretched further and further. That's true and important but the most important thing. Richard is learning how to be when you are in that uncomfortable wobbly edge in and so what you do. Is you build a muscle memories and pattern matching and inabilities to say okay. I'm in a situation. I've never been in before in in. You can remain calm. calm breeds. Calm be hyper logical. You can be quit. You can still be quick in in a lot of people look at the discomfort as a as a reason to deviate from their morals or ethics or or talk poorly to somebody else in india. Giving you an excuse like life is really hard. I haven't excuse of why i can be something bad. That's couldn't be further from the truth. Those are the opportunities to really proved yourself into others who you are and it's not even about proving who you are. It's about having impact in having a positive leadership effect on others in. That's what i'm no different in every seat. Any seal like every single seal has that makes it through the training has the the the the attributes that striving and so that being that composed force thing that and. That's what i heard you say that the key is getting comfortable with that discomfort and remaining that compose force in that chaotic situation whether it be internal or external that's the moneymaking piece of it. That's where you start to get really the bang for the buck is what i'm hearing and i agree with one hundred percent is like it's not a i see so many people spending a ton of time energy and resources and try to make things as smooth as possible. I'm all for things being smooth. But the reality is they get kinda freaked out when something disrupts that kind of smoothness or that calmness. Yeah and i think that if you can spend if you can dedicate your time. I'm all for planning keeping things smooth and trying to avoid dragons if you need to but dragons gonna rear its head at some point no matter how hard i try.

Richard eighteen india nineteen kuwait seventy five percent fifty meter Five and a half nautical miles hundred one hundred percent twenty four year old twenty one years old two gulf wars both one hundred twenty guys first time a week a ton of time ali ali maher base single seal
"mike hayes" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:29 min | 8 months ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Hey welcome the show so happy tuning in a dose of leadership. Great guest today. Mike hayes is on the show. He is the former commanding officer of seal team to where he led a two thousand per special ops task force in southeast ghanistan in addition to his twenty year career as a seal he was a white house fellow serving under president. George w bush and barack obama got a new book out. They're coming out. February ninth called never enough a navy seal commander on living life of excellence agility in meaning. Great book. I love having seals on my show as you will know in fact if you haven't listened the jason redmond episode i encourage you that because jason and mike our guest today have a connection. They knew each other have worked served together so it was fun. Having that connection the book is great. Has all the stuff you would expect in a book from a former navy seal. He's got a ton of lifetime. Once in a lifetime experiences in their held a gun pointsman threaten alexa. Curation jumped out of the building break explode health amputated teammates leg etcetera etcetera split second life and death decisions. All of those dramatic stories are in the book. Say well how would this apply to. You will obviously in those streams etc circumstances you can glean some common experience common commonsense leadership lessons that can affect our everyday lives in it's highlighting those key lessons in leadership authority and service both in our personal and professional lives. It's a great book. We don't talk about so much. The dramatic stuff in the in this episode. We do talk about those everyday lessons that we can apply our lives and make you better leave the great conversation i really appreciate. It might mic on the show. I want you to get the book because he did a great thing with this book. All the proceeds of this book are going to his eleven. Sixty two foundation is what mike founded. It's an organization that was named after the date. President kennedy commissioned the seals and the whole purpose of his eleven sixty. Two foundation is to help families in the special ops community who've lost loved ones. Now mike has personally pledged to donate a minimum of two hundred. Fifty thousand dollars from the book's royalties in it helps gold star families already. They have paid off several mortgages for several goldstar widows just a fantastic foundation and by buying the book we can take it well above and beyond the two hundred fifty k. So it's a great 'cause it's a great book something to add your arsenal inner leadership journey. Hey wanna tell you before. We jump into the conversation with mike a special offer that i'm excited about for twenty twenty one a year ago this month i opened up my dosage leadership university. I was looking for thirty founding members. I found that thirty. Founding members reached out. Just like i am right now on this on a podcast episode and i got the thirty founding members in the doors and i started doing life with these. Thirty people in the whole idea was behind. The university was to create this hub. This hub of leadership knowledge and support and i wanted to see if i could create this impactful interactive community of like minded leaders who are searching for significance. And that's what we did. And i've been so impressed and so surprised by this interaction of this unique community. It's created this level of accountability both for myself and for the founding members that allow has allowed us to grow into the kind of leaders that we were called to be it exceeded. My expectations will now out of these thirty founding members. I got what. I call the hardcore fifteen fifteen members that have agreed to be mentors within dose of leadership university. Now it's time to expand the group. But i can't do it by myself. So that's why i of these hardcore fifteen members to help me expand these mentors if you will some opening up the doors and i'm looking for fifty.

Mike hayes fifty jason Fifty thousand dollars mike twenty year Thirty people thirty February ninth eleven today thirty founding members two hundred jason redmond southeast ghanistan a year ago eleven sixty President kennedy Sixty both
"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

09:22 min | 1 year ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

"It's like winning the Oscar winning the lottery the big the goal to be Oscar and for to happen to me from Beginnings Chipping Fifteen. Let's say ten but the people who also have won previously these people of world world finds. And it's it's very humbling to be mentioned in the same paragraph as they previous winners. What kind of things were people saying after? It was announced that you ah Queensland had one this type there was disbelief that for a start or think. It was a bit of a shock but once fanned out about why and how. I had thanks from all over the country from Tasmania to waste. Drive to victorious. People were very very happy in place in genuinely placed. Yes and it was unbelievable. Feeling what was it like walking down the main straight standpoints. He went back home normally about twelve minutes and took me. I have a two and a half elves. If missing credible people were pulling up I would very generally very happy for me and now shaking hands and people who didn't even that obviously now in made from from a bit of media reports. It was a lovely feeling that Montana behind me visit that you went on to Europe as part of Your Churchill. Award where you find this holy growl the ancient gripe in in Portugal. You're also wanting to look at climate change and how winemakers there adapting. What did you learn from what's happening in Europe? And how what we might take from that he will sir. It's very important that if we don't change as farmers we will perish. It doesn't matter whether it's anthropogenic charged or if it's naturally occurring and as climate has in the past and will in the future it is changing and if we're not prepared we are in for big troubles what my trip was in particular and for the Vignette of the futures for the University of southern Queensland and what happens is that we came. I came back and I wanted to put a collection of varieties that we could souls material from and going forward as climates China. Well what does a the factors of climate change drier and hotter and more extreme weather events? What does that mean for the varieties? We grow currently strategy. What's the particular problem with that? Initially we were founded boy a majority of French varieties and offense. I wonder what would have happened if we were fan. Boy Spaniard or Portuguese where at one industry would be at prison. Be Quite profoundly different. The French authorities continued to have a very thin-skinned a very thick Bunch SEVERI COMPACTED BUNCH. Which will result in disease so as we can handle hate the Portuguese and the Spanish. It's my goodness. It's down like walking through the fields of Portugal. Fifty fifty one degrees in any of the grape varieties two sitting up and because I adapted over Millennia to those temperatures and for us to survive. I believe the ant the answers to have one industry are Italy Spain Portugal. What varieties in particular event will some of the varieties will contain? I like enjoying myself to nunes. That's a that's a beautiful one and his nerd Allah From Italy for ought he's like if you're gonNA from Italy which is a white variety. Lebron is another one maybe all of which is a red variety and they produce very different tasting wines like is there also then a process of having to reeducate pallets? If you say the varieties being used not really Queensland is a very smart people and and what they're doing at the rest of the country will McLaren is catching up to us. But I thought a lot of pleasure in telling people that wheeled upon of emerging varieties around Estrada. The rest of the world is starting to take notice what we're doing weren't calvin by. We have to Russia. Is We have to draw cabinet. We have to grow and we could open up their minds and because of options to trawling anything and everything. This is where we've developed. Our nation market is climate. Change a conversation that that winemakers that you speak to having. Is it something that produces a talking about now? Yeah so often. Falling climate change for about thirty years and even longer and just recently a lot of people getting contact with me because my findings off to Churchill Fellowship. I had warned people that we need to take action now with different routes stocks and the way we grow grapes and in the current situation. We've just been presented with the worst drought people's bring up and they've said jeeze bit right. They might wish I was wrong. I wish I was wrong because this is a frightening thing. We're witnessing at the present talk if we don't change and if we don't become new farmers we will simply perish. Which regions in Australia do you think? A most at risk look all the ones in the valleys unfortunately the ones that are very low down not the coastal once. I will remind Ikea because they'll get the influence of the sea breezes the regions that will often be the regents like the Greenwich Belt. Orange Tumba the New England. I light hills those regions that have got the elevation because capturing a different flow of climatic conditions. How have you seen people's attitudes to wine? Drinking change over the decades have been working in wine Look and quite honest with you. He Queensland is used to treetops food fish and chips and two types of music country and western Queensland Red Coins Lamb born and bred now seeing all the young people knew millennial and they're enjoying Turkish food with petty mon some wine and and it's fantastic. They write up their minds. And we're growing up as a nation and in particular the Queensland One and food scene is is just exploding g think that anyone can learn to appreciate one Mike or is it like music you know not. Everyone has an now. Everybody can appreciate and it's it's a very challenging to He people say one. I try one months now dialogue and well. It's a challenge to me then to get these people to drink if someone that. Ta previously what? I've been very successful. And it's an amazing thing you take people through the AROMAS and you start assimilating it to everyday like I talked to people about. Can you smell the blackberry jam? Can you smell chocolates like? Oh can you smell the roses oil? I can smell rises. But it's an amazing feeling when I finally the light switch goes on my go off got it and you beauty your own journey away you go. There's another one is it. A Journey are there are only rich. People can take is is one restricted in in. Who can actually feasibly take it on as a as a Hobby Yours. An an experience. Now it's Ivan to all papal from all forms of life and in particular if you find a one out there that is dollars Baldwin. You absolutely love it who've trinket it doesn't have to be expensive for you to enjoy it. But the beauty often cited people now. There's eight thousand varieties gary up and let your mind run. Wild is the more expensive one wise better wine. Nice era of actually seeing in wine shows where eleven dollars bottle of one is one champion one of the show and it's a bit embarrassing for some of the judge said whoops who okay and what gets those big price tags that can be astronomical really exclusively availability and attention to detail in the Vena and you saw this very profound steitz out there that have been going for centuries and families for generations. And I've been making these wines for generations and they become popular around the world so united style ability that pushes process up your now at serum may want. It's a big wine right. Bigger than the ones that you've worked with what's different about working look suddenly two years now that sermon wines and I been very very respectful of Terry Morrison. The Mars family what they have brought to the coins. I'm one industry. Like sit to Terry and this is where I want to go and all of a sudden a fan this affinity between both. We both had the same design with the ones coins lane being able to come there and bring some of my philosophies in wine growing in particular where we planting lots of new varieties on the vineyards on the Greenwich Belt will be steering away from a lot of our traditional varieties and looking at emerging varieties and also with the depth of knowledge that we do have available for us within the company. The scars on. It's been fascinating to hear about your journey with lines as you say it's a long way from chipping weights as a fifteen year old. Thank you so much. Thank you sir. You've been listening to a podcast of conversations with Sarah can ski for more conversations interviews head to the website. I they say dot net dot. Au slash conversations discover more great ABC? Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the ABC listen APP..

Queensland Portugal Chipping Greenwich Belt Oscar Europe ABC Italy University of southern Queensl Terry Morrison Tasmania Italy Spain Portugal Queensland One Churchill Fellowship Ikea Australia nunes Lebron
"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

13:54 min | 1 year ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

"They tend to have soil with lots of rocks That is a characteristic across the welding. Good winegrowing in some regions and others. Cli- is another good area but Cli- has award hauling capacity of one kilo to one liter water with saying would decompose Greenwich in five kilos to Hawaii later water. So we don't have any problems with wet food certainly not stand maybe a little bit in Stanford just at the moment is the ideal ways that you wanting soil and elevations to let you grow as many grapes on the vine as you possibly can no really totally one reflects back to a balance on the von. So it's a little bit like if you WanNa try and get a nine year. Old Child decline a ladder with an elephant on his shoulder by IVA crossing the vines. Well if you have too much fruit on the vine can't handle it and it's just like saying to an on your all chocolate elephant on your shoulder and Troncon Aleta so it's a bad getting that natural balance of the fruit to leaf ratio. What happens if there's too much fruit on the vine? Well when they went robin fully you'll get lower alcohol content. The flavors will be diluted and eventually it's a very lower class and lower quality one so is one of the things that you're doing vineyard is what handpicking off gripes if there's if there's too many exactly and I mean how delicate is a grapevine. Is that something you've got to be careful with when you look around picking of Grapes for years? I don't know capital as the biggest threat. We went through that. This country's ever seen I just couldn't believe the resilience of a gripe foreign toughest on the planet We did lose a couple of Owens but we went into drought control and drought survival. And they've kicked back and dumbfounded. Just how tough layer? I many animals living out there and it's what snakes lizards kangaroos pigs. He d a piece of the biggest problem. We broke the present tawny coming in. They particularly chai seeing the worms on the roots. So then they put snouts in and dig older roots up and then of course the rich get exposed to the and I draw out so they are caught a nasty pissed. How do you go about trying to manage those well? Unfortunately we have to remove them with traps so we kept your trap them and move them on. Have you had any bad encounters with snakes while you've gotten opinion? We'll use but strangely enough. Not on the GRANDPAP. Just South Brisbane here at a Harrisville Vignon once holes giving a demonstration on canopy management and I went to grab the canopy which was the leaves and shoots had a green snake and so I just turned around and said to the people who I was talking to us. And you want to watch out for these guys to those a scatter of the people. So how does your day to day work in the vineyards change? Depending on the season the vineyard is a distinctive. Full season crop. You do need the foil elements of the year calendar so in the wintertime we prune in Subzero temperatures and spring is when it comes to life then of course some where we're looking at the fruit trying to keep the clean from disease and the natural. You have the autumn when we start to pick. How do you know when the time is right? Is that very clear? No look it's been taught to me over the years of mother. Nature is the best form all of determining when the right time to pick we have parameters in the vinod observing the seeds when the dock and the seed must be detached from the pope completely detached from the pulse of sage copy. Great and if you think about opinions been going right thousand years ahead technology. I tells knees guy so the people growing vines way back in Georgia the birthplace of Warren. This is have I used to go out and determine when to pick them and have you had the experience of of missing the right time. What's that like. You think all hang on. Hang on hang on to mode is two MoD is Ryan comes in and does the flavors of Mr. Recover from something like that when you put so much work in silos across. You never recover. And it's it's quite a challenge because from year to year in and that's one thing we cannot and thank goodness. We can't we can't control the weather and if we could be a very sorry will but so. This is one of the challenges. I do believe that the true winemaker is a wind grow winegrower. What's the difference between the bank on the GAR and that emphasis? We don't really want Mike is we've the yeast is the one maker. So you know when you when you really think about it. But the interaction of Mother Nature and only elements all the climatic conditions. That's what determines the quality of your lawn so we are me gatekeepers and we have to respond at the right time. Now you've got the soil. Hardly there aren't too many snakes around. You've got mother nature on side with the weather. You've peaked at the right moment. What's determining whether those gripes go into what make Waddell red wine? What's the difference purely and simply Mike? What one from white gripes? Naturally you can make white one from red grapes and particularly with the sparkling wine Pinot Noir. Unshod nine is to read in what grabs cowing together but there are always on the planet so then variety is II tatum. Wow that's choices senate. Two different things happen. I said there's the difference color color of the gripes but then the process is different. Once you deciding to make wide allred more word. What ONCE. It's all about eliminating mice. Tom's eliminating oxygen transmission to the ones keeping the one an note environment away from in oxidative affects. What do you keep them in to make sure that happens? Stainless steel takes and the knees together. I used to use casks and why before that they use coverage which was done Amphoras might have Stein. Clai and red wine is kept in in what kind of containers? It's edging. Photography prices can go in barrel or in stainless steel. And it's probably a good idea to get oxygen into your Edwin. Mikey barrel allows more oxygen to dose and then a guy will release any of them. The off live is that you can sometimes get with red wines. We have a thing called reductive missile hydrogen sulfide which is a little bit. Rotten like Rodney. Guess and by the direction of air through deferment it can release is compounds into the is the goal as a as a one grow a winemaker. Mike to be able to find that spot. That makes a beautiful on and produce that same taste year after year after consistency like is there is that part of the goal. Look the major companies. The commercial companies are after consistency. But the smaller boutique ones know. This part of the whole life of being involved in the wine industry is the climatic diversity from year to year. The the difference in temperatures difference in Ryan falls and nine two are alike and I think that's the chime in the beauty that attracts many people to the warning destroys things. You can't control you can't control. I think you've compared being working with wine to being an astronomer in what in what sort of is there a limit to you. Is there a limit to look? I always say I'd love to live three lifetimes. Don't because some you know grief the for the living the life. I just want more knowledge. I want to learn more and I think astronomy when the more and more you look at a stormy pits the sign this infinite mass out there and find that the sign with the one industry particularly varieties and then some of emerging variety nuton searching for the holy grail in varieties when you not out in the yard. Where are you spending your your workday? Either in the winery. And it's a very hard job because my role as director of culture and the tree foreign make I'll have to try and split my rawls so thirty percent one week in a seventy another waco fifty fifty and because of announcer on the Greenwich Belt. And winery here is in MT cotton. It's quite challenging trailing up and down the highway but went on not involved in working on involving rating on more than twenty four hours in your work office. Or You workspace at the winery. What does it look? What's the Room Ike? Man Santus Room has been referred to by many people. We have dog names up on walls. Ms Tisch chewed and despoiled entideas. Running around and water cooling systems. What are you doing in a way? What do you needle that full? What we test the Ph which is the acidity. And it's the actual hard lines of the wine and as people would be aware of anything below seven is the city can anything above seven his alkaline. So we want to try and an acid is also one of the catalysts of making sure that a wind has longevity so the lower the. Ph the more titans. The wine is any you constantly tasting wines yourself as part of that yes. That's where it comes back to. You know. Often people say while you spending one APP because that's what you get used to because you're working with one day and naturally if you started drinking one very early in the morning you wouldn't police mica well. How many mines might you have on the go at one time that you're monitoring the acidity oven tasting Sarah? I think one year had one hundred and thirty two on the goat. Once from four thousand nine varieties and came from knowing wine regions across Australia and fifteen produces and I remember walking into work one morning and there was seventy two wines at once and I just sat down and cry. Let's say we're going to get through this? Because they felt the whelming truly Wyoming. A few minutes going you making rose as you making sparkling wine you making our medic. Wards medium bodied watts. Full bodied reds lied ribs. You know you're trying to add a little. Bit of flare. An an untouchable ingenuity to each ferment. And just to get your heads around there but now it's I'm still get through that season head of the Weinstein out. The ones turned up amazingly. Well it was one of our most successful. Suzy edited additive of Salty. Is that added? Extra history flavor choices that you went to Europe as as the recipient search L. Award. Tell me about Portugal. What did he say when you're in Portugal? The Holy Grail Silvester which is the old Gripe von the original gripe foreign for many many thousands of years ago. It's delicious plant which means you need male and female components to fertilize vines and down in southern Allen Taizhou with a research and he took me and showed me these fallen growing naturally along the banks and it was very emotional for me because this is something I've been reading about for twenty five thirty years and never thought I'd get to say it. What do they look like? They're not they not enrolls. Then like the classic of Alberton. That's how they they growing up trees and they use the trees as. Trillo us and I just hang there and it was just an lying along the banks of the river and it was incredible. And if they need male and female plants to germinate how hard is that to do they need a lot of management or designed to take its course nature takes its course pretty well much and quite often a month or the trees the mile and on the other sorts of FEMA incredible incredible. And what does the one taste line? Look it's very strange. Wants very dock and Dane Swan. I did actually try some of the one from Vaudeville vistas and the berries a very small and can take a lot to get a quantity of wine but it was a was a intriguing taste. It was it was almost like historical. Like you can actually taste taste history. And that's one of the earliest one varieties anywhere in the world varieties all started from bodice overstress and then Varda's for different is the one bearing von which has adapted and adopted. And why was that so moving to do you think Mike? What was it about about being faced with those winds that had such impact? It was just the beginning of creation for me in the industry. Like this is where it started from and to actually observe these volunteers to living in the wild it was. It's essentially the holy grail and on that trip. Did it give you the opportunity to reflect on your own trajectory as well on your own journey as a as a winemaker? I learned a lot on that trip. I grew up. I became a new winemaker on that trip and I also became very respectful of the will of one in what.

Mike Portugal Stanford Cli Troncon Aleta Owens Greenwich Hawaii South Brisbane Europe vinod titans Ryan Mikey barrel Alberton Dane Swan Waddell Harrisville Vignon Varda
"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. My guest today is my case. Mike is a winemaker or is he prefers to describe himself a one grower. A few years ago he wanted Churchill Award and travel to Europe to stand in all before the world's oldest grapevines and to see how winemakers there are responding to a future of climate change. Mike's decades of experience and skills were recognized in twenty seventeen when he was named Australian winemaker of the year but that accolade felt a little bit embarrassing to Mike. It somehow still didn't feel right. That a man with his background. A rugby league playing Queensland should be considered Australia's most outstanding winemaker our Mike. Hi Sarah when you pour yourself a wine at the end of the day. What are you most likely to reach for the moment? Probably Vermin Tina. It's variety that comes from Sardinia and Sicily. It's lovely refreshing zippy's Zisti. It's what I call more interesting type of seven block. So these words that get used to describe wine like like interesting and always hear what winds praised for being complex. What does that actually mean to let arts like me? The word complex is a combination of aroma and flavor compounds that Zeroing in and combining several complexity of the one so it's really a combination of the factory senses and that means the space mel and the taste of the wine and when it's quite complex. It's doing lots of busy. Things is lots of AROMAS and flavors going and fuel Sicilian wine that you like having the end of the day. Why is it interesting? I think this is where we need to be going in the future but with the Sicilian varieties will said the southern Italian varieties but a prison is just a lovely refreshing delicious slurpy drink that just love user sort of sit back and enjoy it and you're able to just have one. Yes is that. Is that a sort of a limit that you have to set for yourself as a winemaker but now but you can't just have one glass. Tell me about that moment my back when you were a teenager when you knew all right I wanna make wine but actually thought before my brother day and was working on a winery and Vignon up the road and I'll get a part time job there on weekends. No starting to warn barrels in the seller. What does that mean? Will they get all each so as the hate starts? Interacting with the the one is joining to the planks so then the volume inside is lowered. So then you need to top it off because if you don't keep it with a complete oxygen free the oxygen move to in the want of Inigo so I would Iran pull Obiang's often poor warning and then it will of course at the edge of town office depot stemming right bonds in Vignon. I'd like to West Guy to the show and my neighbor. The hindmarsh is they would give me a job there to stem the violence would have pocket money to go to the local show. So you'd grown up around in yards but when you were topping these these wine what what struck you about that. Why was that such a significant thing to be doing? I mean could just be another agricultural tasks that kids doing the aromas thinkers what I think the smell in today. I still as a matter of fact the recent one show that I was involved with. Oh actually smell. The Kevin is that took me right back to nineteen seventy nine in one thousand nine hundred and it was quite an Iky cabinet and I can remember talking the barrels and smelling those same aromas and that smell and that experience as a teenager was enough to make you think this is the the world I want to get involved in office very fortunate at the age of fifteen did Mike One with my father and but as always side the true Nike's Savannah so your dad was helping to teach you about the vineyard and about one. How did he feel about you? Leaving school thorough to work in they were not happy. They were not happy at all because of doing quite well at school was doing very well and but I just wanted to get out there and work as Lauda. Young people in that era did and experiences gained previously. I just loved working on the lane and being involved in smelling the elements of nature and the one industry fascinated me because of the depth of knowledge is required. So if you dad wasn't so happy about you. Trading books for vineyards. How did he try to dissuade you? What jobs did he get you to do? First off we're fifteen or went on Thursday running around with four hundred students and they're on the Saturday. I got a kick in the bid about five o'clock in the morning. He said up. You put the dog on the line. So the changes printing. Your dog couldn't type dog. And I had a chipping. How sitting on the tractor. I went right up the back of a thirty five Acre Vineyard and he said I'll pick you up later on this afternoon. So I was chipping. Wade's for the next seven months months. Seven months how had was added to the day that I die. Realize in that Hard work is very hard line down that naught and my body was trembling. And why couldn't you don't come on or he was. He was trying to break my spirit. Get me to go back to school. Did it work now? Now I didn't. What was the first wine that you made Mike when you graduated from digging? Outweigh shrouds. Kevin I at Vignon Dan on the Greenwich Bill and it was quite extraordinary. Actually pick up a gold medal with it. Which was it was an amazing feeling. How old were you when that WanNa gold? Medal was seventeen when it won the gold medal. But I was fifteen when I was involved in making the UN actually legally allowed to drink. Did you taste this one of those bottles lead from into one bottle? And you're gonNA crack that one. I don't know I'm not quite sure probably. After I finish noise doctorate. Well it still tastes good. I mean you guarantee on not guaranteed. No I'm not because you're not. Wine can be quite majestic up to twenty twenty five years but beyond that it can become a bit tricky. Well make sure. That's a good motivation to get you. Phd done without taking too much tags can't afford any extra years on that you then follow the the wine trials south into South Australia and Victoria and spend some time on the Mornington peninsula. What was it like living there? Resp- fantastic in the early days. Mornington was a pioneering frontier for that part of the world and just working looking at Port Phillip by going swimming in the afternoon a pedal in is saying the dolphins and down of type shank working in the finance and just the people in General. Just lovely lovely people now. It's become quite a big tourist destination. Still very lovely but also being involved in those early days with the war installs and seeing how being accepted by the general public. What was happening with wind back in the mid eighties the nineties. We will stake in three vegetables and very stapled of wines. Kevin is your is shot. A Ni- riesling and semion and thankfully down the track. We started getting into emerging varieties. Now so what were the winemakers in Mornington peninsula starting to get interested in Pinot Noir and shot in particular which were tool the stifle gripe for autism from Bobigny? And if you were wanting to to learn more about those I mean even I know that New Zealand is a is a home of those kind of varieties. Did you spend time across the ditch? Certainly did in the light. I went over and worked in New Zealand on the workday for nearly fourteen months in particular looking at seven and a variety which is no longer very popular in New Zealand. Komala together which is German variety. And what did you learn about the approach to winemaking? Was it a different soda? Culture around wine wine making New Zealand here at the time yes it was but more importantly that will very interested in experimental forms of winemaking and learning a little. Bit More from your mistakes if anything so you really setting yourself up brilliantly. In this Korean I won this gold medal. When you still seventeen getting these these wine gigs impressive. Wineries in in the what it conceded the the prestigious one areas of strategy Victoria and South Australia. Why did you decide to come back to Queensland Mafele ill and eventually pass away so then I came back and as they say met the local girl and stole my art history? Were you concerned about the feasability of making the career? You wanted in Queensland as a winemaker no not at all is new. York comeback was very fortunate. I've worked in four states and UCLA as well as Australia and always knew. I'd come back home. I have a lot of thoughts about taking and being him a part of the Queensland one success and so that was an alluring incoming. Yes what's the most important element d think in making wine sought selection wrought from the word? Go you've gotta find that piece of dirt which is the best pace of dirt on the planet. And then you marry that up with a variety and the parameters of trellis design the aspect which why you'd the bonds Feis whether it's no southeast waste so all parts of winemaking oh comes run back to one thing. Mother Nature Seeing Direction. Tell me more about site selection. What makes a good side? Elevation is that important. The higher up you go per one hundred. Mehta's you have a content analysis which is the temperature of the year. You have a drop off point six of a degree so fuel three hundred meters hough the new neither will then an actual fact you nearly two degrees cooler across the whole year so the longer takes the gripe to ripen the more elegant and profound flavors and the skins resulting in more more interaction so that the high elevation of the land important and what about the soil itself. What kind of soil quality for up to eight soil? Sorry is why again. Yes on the phone believer in tasting swore or actually have raised a few eyebrows around the world with my soiling you pick up just some dirt put it in your mouth and have a munch exactly and what does that tell you. More importantly mice important thing that tells me is the organic matter containing the soil. And I believe organic matter is where we do it so much getting the I. Biotic factors which is the wind and the coolness of the soul. They will have an influence on the flight and the thick of the organic matter the more water content in the soil the cooler the soil. The better the one. So if you're having a good chewy mouthful of soil that's a good sign on what what about the the rocks or not in insole because Stanford that's on the granite belt on imagining. There's a lot of granite in the soil. The air is that good or bad for wall fantastic. Why decomposed granite is two hundred and fifty million years old? The Greenwich built and telling the BURLESON DOWN IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA. That there are only two hundred million years old but what it does give you. It gives you a depth of soil where you want waterlogging and it reflects back into the one you get this incredible mineralogy in the wine and length a natural acidity so we don't have to add as much as a two the one as we might get in the winemaking. Tarik as which is An attitude to the Wallin. So you're actually growing a natural product in the Greenwich Belt is an exceptional. It's not just sighing world assign is one of the most profound warren growing regions in the world now and we think about this famous wine regions in France or in the state of.

Mike One gold medal Queensland Australia New Zealand Kevin I Mornington peninsula Vignon South Australia ABC chipping Europe Sarah Churchill Greenwich Sardinia Sicily UN Greenwich Belt
"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"After a big comeback win win three straight scored three straight goals over the Montreal Canadians the to looking to continue their winning ways they can with the night before they even play again two days from now as well I want diamondback fans to know that we have put every ounce of the last four months into improving our roster top to bottom starting pitching bull pen position players as the dime basically ready to kick off spring training with pitchers and catchers report a first down manager Mike Hayes and join the Duggar will show on a sister station ninety seven F. M. as in this war station talking about though could season all the team's offseason moves some of those improvements his invention of the sun is starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner to trade route builders star the my tae and just yesterday extending shortstop Nick I'm at the four more years for more sports make sure to visit as a sports dot com so now repeating our top story today six years that's how long the judge sentenced Stephen Jones is to present he is the man who pled guilty to manslaughter charges after a twenty fifteen shooting that left one dead and three injured on the campus of in a you Colin Brough was killed his father died Bruce speaking to the court this morning one thing that's been very shocking to me there's there's been no remorse from the shooter or shooters family Jones played guilty to manslaughter after his trial ended in a deadlocked jury before Jones was sentenced to tell the judge if you could trade places with Peru he would and it is six fifty four now leave you with this tonight her story is being made maybe maybe three years after the Smithsonian opened its landmark museum of African American history and culture it appears coming soon will be the creation of a museum.

Mike Hayes Duggar F. M. Madison Bumgarner Stephen Jones Colin Brough Bruce Peru Montreal diamondback Nick I museum of African American
"mike hayes" Discussed on Daily Grace

Daily Grace

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Daily Grace

"No God communicates to us primarily through his word through scripture and that's true no matter where we are in our journey of faith and I think we can experience peace when we do make decisions when they're you know align with the word of God and we're not saying you're ever going to feel the sense of peace right or like. Don't expect that like I do believe if that when we make decisions that we feel are informed by scripture like we are going to feel that pieces <hes> and then we're gonNA feel confident. Were walking out in faith knowing that you know what God's got the final outcome and we're we're doing our best to make decisions that honour and glorify him so we can we can leave the results up to him right and yeah. I think that the difference is when we are expecting piece to be the determining factor between green like non moral decision yeah right like I really like these two houses when I'm house hunting but I need to wait to see which one I feel a piece about like that's not a moral decision we can use wisdom that got skin as right right and we also have to realize that hey sometimes making a good and right decision can be scary. Sometimes it's a little bit scary to to step out and walk in obedience. Maybe it means like man I really I feel like based on the principles that I've learned in scripture based on maybe what I know about my own kids for example that based on where I live and what their needs are that they need to go to this type of school but maybe that's a little bit scary because it's going to take more of your effort or you remember of your resources or it's going to be a change and so I think that's what I want to distinguish between the idea of peace in knowing that you are walking in obedience to God versus thinking if I feel feel any uneasiness about something that it can't be in God's will does that make sense that difference. Oh Yeah I feel like I'm in that right now with this pursuit of Home Educating Mike Hayes and realizing that they would be just us fine going to private school but in this moment I feel like the Lord wants me to homeschool and that's just for our family in this season and do I know if it's GonNa work out in the end and it's going to be pretty no. Is it going to be <hes> a hard on my end. Yeah it is but it's okay yeah exactly so yeah. I think that if we are only looking for the answers if we're only looking for the what should I do instead of who should I be. We never develop wisdom but if we seek sanctification we know that we are sanctified largely by seeking God and his word right as we look at his character and His Holiness Holiness and as we imitate that in our lives as we seek to walk in obedience to who he has called us to be who he has called all believers to be then wisdom's going to be a natural outpouring of that that those decisions is that we have to make are going to be informed by the type of people that we are becoming by the grace of God and the power of the Holy Spirit and so we just want to say to all of you listeners you have freedom in making decisions in your life as long as you are walking in obedience of who God calls us to be as believers as long as we are walking in holiness and so you can know God's will for Your Life Jeff God's will for your life is your sanctification and you don't have to know all the little details along the way nope while we just want to say. Thank you so much for joining us today you know I know this is a topic like you set Stephanie. I wish I had known this in in high school or College. I think I would have saved myself a lot of anxiety so if you know somebody who could benefit from this maybe you want to share this with a high school student. Who's struggling with what they want to do for the rest of their your life or in college someone who's struggling because they haven't figured out there major or you know any season of life someone who's struggling with the idea of family planning or getting married or taking a job or moving? We just like to invite you to share this conversation..

Jeff God Stephanie Mike Hayes
"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Gentleman only forty degrees. I definitely needed match coat. I had further north and see if I can get a colder outside. Okay. Do that do that? No. Mike and Mike Hayes. No, I learned in college. When the weather doesn't come to. You you go to the weather. It will be an ABC from D weather action day. All right. I think that's hilarious. I cannot believe he took my jacket. He took my raincoat. The guys just went in the office to see if if he did actually do it. He put it on Twitter. I see it on Twitter, and they said, that's my jacket. They said he'd jerk in all honesty coming in today on the one on one. I don't care about that. Jackie. All right. So he's got my case. He wears it. Better than you do and now go. Yeah. Stinking it all up with his bodily sweating and all that kind of. Gonna smell like you're going to smell like, you gotta go home and give the kids a hug swear say where you smell like uncle lie. The nine year olds going to go. Why is it smell like Lloyd salicylic liverwurst throws? Why does this feel like liberal arts and onions? I was screw it. Yeah. The roads are really bad though there. There's there's. It's drizzling though. Well earlier today, it was raining, really hard. Okay. It was it was foggy. And then you got people driving like morons. Welcome to the welcome to the valley. Really? Yes. All right. Thanks again to weather bunny, Lloyd, banks account in the middle of everything. He loses my keys or makes my jackets. It will be an ABC from dean weather action day. I love weather action days MAC. It's raining. It's pouring. There's snow, and we have sent MAC and Gaydos, weather bunny, Lloyd, banks out into the valley trying to find snow. Let me get his theme music. Hold on a minute..

Mike Hayes Lloyd ABC Twitter Jackie forty degrees nine year
"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"In the news center with more. That's right. Becky, the facility has hired benchmark human services of Fort, Wayne, Indiana. The third party manager says benchmark will be overseeing the facility and conducting a thorough assessment. In a statement sent to KTAR they say benchmark has extensive experience in both consulting with facilities and organizations that serve people with disabilities. The facility was forced to hire third party manager to oversee the day today operations by today. Live any center nylon, KTAR news. And of course, this came after an incapacitated woman was sexually assaulted and gave birth at hacienda last month Tempe. Police say they're trying to remain open and transparent as the investigation continues into the officer involved shooting that killed a fourteen year old suspect KTAR Taylor Kiner up is one of just a handful. All of reporters who was able to see the unedited body camera footage from three of the officers who were there. She joins us. Now live. I was able to see the body camera footage from officers, John. Hi, Joseph hind rather the officer who shot and killed the suspect as well as officers Anaconda and David Lewis who I who are the first on the scene. Police say they wanted to extinguish any questions about the air soft gun down on the suspect which prompted hind to shoot in Konno's video. You can see her approach the boys unmoving unmoving body lying face down in between the street and the sidewalk as she approaches. I got my first glimpse of the weapon poking out from under his right shoulder. The orange tip of the gun was sticking out just under his armpit. This was when the officers I realize it was a fake gun. The boy's family had not yet seen these unedited videos when they were shown to the media, but Tempe police Lieutenant Mike Hayes says they will be given the option to view them later today. Live in the news center, Taylor Kiner up. KTAR news a man's dead. After an officer involved shooting in Phoenix near seven. Street and northern police say the man was wanted for an early morning burglary in the west valley, we received an emergency.

KTAR Taylor Kiner officer Joseph hind Tempe Indiana Becky burglary Wayne David Lewis Phoenix Konno Mike Hayes John fourteen year
"mike hayes" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Penalty dismissal probation but allowed to be allowed to stay on the force ray kelly who was the nypd top commissioner at the time decided that his conduct was so agree gis he should be pushed off the force even though he was just a year away from being able to retire with a much better pension ray kelly nine months later decided that an officer who beat a man with a baton an lied to internal affairs investigators about a separate incident shouldn't be fired in should stay on the force so it seems that there's just a huge array of offenses that kim land an officer in trouble with the nypd and not a lot of consistency at least from the outside were all sitting about how they do it in what do you think the system does to the police themselves of there are tens of thousands of officers in new york oh what is your reporting reflect about how they think this affects their ability to do their jobs because most of them the vast majority of them are not lawbreakers right i think it really brings that public questions about the entire department whereas transparency would allow the public to tell the difference between officers who are getting in trouble in the officers who aren't but as it stands now we really don't know whether the cop whose arresting me today or arresting you tomorrow is someone who um who we shouldn't trust it is there any pressure in the state of new york to get rid of the secrecy and have a public reporting system where people can know when an f officers are disciplined there is pressure there's a bell right now in the state legislature to try and bring more transparency to police misconduct records but bills like this have faced a lot of opposition in new york the biggest union in new york city has fought against them the department itself has said it's supportive of changes that would allow it to share more information but has also taken steps to reduce transparency in recent years so i think it's really unclear what's going to happen and whether or not this is going to change any time soon cuddle taggart investigative reporter for buzzfeed news reported the story along with mike hayes.

ray kelly commissioner officer nypd new york investigative reporter buzzfeed news mike hayes nine months
"mike hayes" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"mike hayes" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"Um yeah i think i'm going to be open to any possibilities that they have in los angeles i didn't get traded antarctica i'm in los angeles on the best team in baseball with a manager whose ridiculously relatable with an organization that seems flush with cash uh yeah i'm open and by the way i laboured oh and we won again life is good right now yeah if they win just half of their remaining games are going to have a hundred and five wins this year so he's in a good spot guys thanks for doing this a great weekend both radio in it but we'll be back in a moment we diamondbacks vice president mike hayes but before that josh she got something yeah every friday bust we'd like to reward the people who have reviewed us on apple podcast we continue to ask you to do so when we want to recognize that effort notes sometimes a little bit inconvenient to hop on there and rid us but we appreciate it when you do so like dan rice did he gave us five stars he says i love the podcast i listen to it every day but really keeps me up to date with baseball across the league i'm a yankees in cardinals fan can you say fair weather and josh is a sox fan and buster they both to a really good job not to show bias and cover every team will thanks for that dan we appreciate you rating us we also got this one from tim at valenzuela he gave us five stars he said a listening to this podcast along with the scoreboard and call to their legends along with the rotating band of guess is great for the diehard baseball fan oh by the way josh in buster more sterling calls please uh and the old dissenting opinion there and of course where there are five star reviews you'll also find one two and three star reviews like this one from c rob seven crew is this i really like buster and his guests are really solid but josh is really annoying in he's just produce the show and not inject himself into the show all the time except of course to read these phenomenal reviews i listen to hear the opinions of baseball experts not you.

los angeles baseball mike hayes josh dan rice yankees tim valenzuela buster vice president apple cardinals sox