35 Burst results for "Migraines"

All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

The Ultimate Health Podcast

01:59 min | Last week

All Disease Begins In the 'Leaky Gut'

"We know that diseases are inflammatory diseases. Practically every disease is a disease of inflammation at the cellular level. The cell is on fire. So it just depends. Is it a brain cell or a kidney. Cell is a gasoline or kerosene. But it's always a fire. So that's inflammation so. The goal is to live in anti-inflammatory life with all of what that means and it takes a long time to really dial that down completely for an individual but you just get started. Professor fasano and his team published this year. He said and this is the quote on the the title of the article. These guys don't exaggerate. You know because people would love to take him down and say look with this guy cena but he's so careful. in his language. The title of his article all disease begins in the parentheses leaky gut. All disease begins in the leaky gut. Well what about alzheimer's all disease. What about rheumatoid arthritis all dizzy. What m s ought psoriasis eczema. Migraines all disease begins in the leaky gut and this is what they're teaching our cutting edge physicians at the top medical school in the country. Right now is that there are five pillars in the development of all chronic inflammatory diseases and if your listeners understand that there are five picture that this is the big kahuna concept. If you understand this concept than all of the information that you pick up in podcast like yours or in books that you read like mine or in summits and things you're able to compartmentalize that information into one of the five pillars so that you can hold it because there's so much information our world today we get overwhelmed really easily

Professor Fasano Alzheimer's Psoriasis Eczema Cena Rheumatoid Arthritis Migraines
Author Of 'Mastering Migraine' Discusses the Causes Of Migraines

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Author Of 'Mastering Migraine' Discusses the Causes Of Migraines

"We're talking to dr adam hartford. We're gonna talk a little headache Dot harcourt has a book. Mastering migraine and is yes. That's the book mastery migraine. We're talking about some of the means to go after it darker welcome. Thanks so much for having me. So let's talk about the multiple causes of migraine. What a what a mess it can be for people. It's sure can where do we start. what what i can say is By book is kind of based around in in my program is based upon the reality. That migraine is ultimately genetic. Which means you either have or you don't and you're prone to it forever and the interesting thing. Though is the fact that it can be tons of different genes which is why we haven't nailed it down to one thing. So for example the on the extreme end something like hemiplegic migraine which mimic stroke and things like that has three distinct genes that we know that that causes it but for everything else. We know that it has to do with ionic transport which is basically saying that is the healthy Healthiness of neuron is impacted on migraine. And depending on which area of the brain it affects. That determines your symptoms so the most common head pain but it can also be dizziness. It can be stroke like symptoms. It can be ocular. Symptoms all that kind of

Migraine Dr Adam Hartford Mimic Stroke Dizziness
CIA to Expand Havana Syndrome Inquiry

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | Last month

CIA to Expand Havana Syndrome Inquiry

"Says it's established a task force to look into the so called Havana syndrome, the mystery ailment that's had dozens of U. S officials abroad in recent years. NPR's Greg Marie explains. Officials have suffered chronic migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The CIA said the task force will work with other government agencies to further investigate the cause of ailments so severe they forced some officers to retire. A report commissioned by the State Department said last December that microwave radiation is the most plausible cause. More than 40. Diplomats and a smaller number of intelligence officers have suffered symptoms in Cuba, China and Russia and suspected foreign spy agency is to blame. President Biden's nominee to lead the CIA. William Burns said it is confirmation hearing last week that he would make it a priority to find out who was responsible. Greg my RE NPR NEWS Washington

Greg Marie Havana NPR CIA U. Migraines Dizziness State Department President Biden Cuba William Burns Russia China Greg Washington
Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

Dishing Up Nutrition

17:07 min | 2 months ago

Avoiding Weight Gain During Stressful Times

"If you're worried that you have gained or are gaining way during the stressful time. We're definitely so stressful brittany with this pandemic and the ongoing at home and working from home and you're not the only one i'm hearing it more and more in clinic in fact a survey of eight thousand. Us adults published in the journal of obesity. Found at least a third of adults in the us reported. The corona virus pandemic has led to dramatic changes in their good health habits. Today we want to talk about some of these behaviors and ways that you can avoid weight gain during the pandemic or during any other highly stressful time in your life. Now that you know what we're going to be discussing this morning. I want to myself and our co host. I'm melanie beasley and have been a registered dietitian for the past thirty years one of the joys of my life is sharing the benefits of eating real food with as many of you as possible. I can speak to the benefits of eating real food both professionally and of course personally as well if you read my bio on weight and wellness dot com. You'll see that. I've had some very serious health problems over the years myself. So i truly know the value of eating real food for my own health at nutritional weight and wellness. We all believe health is so much more than the number on the scale does so true. It's so much more we have to feel good. You have to feel good. Everywhere had shoulders knees and totally. It's sad to say but is true. That many people just focus on their weight and now their overall health. Well i know that for me for years and years. This was really important. So i was always looking at what was the scale. What was on the scale now. What was going on internally. Well joining me this morning as you can hear. A voice is brittany. Vincent who's also a registered dietitian britney. You also have had some health problems that went away when you switch eating real food. Yes very transformative. I understand so share with us. Some of your pass health struggles with the listeners and how you overcame them well good morning everybody. You know I was in my early twenties and after finishing while towards the tail end. Finishing school to become a dietitian started having insomnia migraines. I was really tired. i will never forget. I was at a bar with a group of friends. And i like conked out in the in the booth because i was so tired. Oh no and i. It was not from partying. It was just ringing so tired. Exactly as like oh i know. That's when there's something going on. And i always say i saw the light finally an eating real food. I was looking at what i was eating and it was really just processed low fat. I mean everything that i was taught in two and so i made an overhaul of eating more fats Real vegetables purchasing better quality foods and then all of a sudden. My energy got better. I was sleeping better Eliminated gluten as well. My magazines basically disappeared and hers. Feeling great feeling as you should as a young adult and i think that a huge huge Switch that. I made was really the fat really because i was not eating those healthy fats. So making sure and getting that tablespoon of butter or olive oil avocado oil. Some not some avocado. I think really made made a huge difference for me. Plus just tastes delicious. Oh right so much. Easier to eat your veggies with some delicious fat on it and you know i think that For everybody listening that you can definitely be touched in many different ways of just changing changing your diet. Some just curious did you have anxiety that is sort of resolved. I did not do not while the insomnia would be racing thoughts but other than that. No no no. But i'm happy. That's that's over. That is not fun So you know. Understanding the science of nutrition to help to solve a personal problem is so powerful. I think that Experiencing these things ourselves just allows us to better help. Our clients visits us mercy and compassion for everyone who's walking through door or through zoom. Yeah right so you know britney when you were talking about that. I got to thinking. Let's discuss getting back to our topic. We're discussing ways to avoid weight gain during stressful times and certainly living in the midst of the pandemic has its own unique and unpredictable. Stressors right but many of us have had other times in our lives that we have also had highly stressful times so when i was going through cancer and treatments and all surgeries. I was stressed and my family was stressed. In lots of scenarios we can have tremendous stress. I think the most important thing that we can learn during these stressful times is how we manage our stress so true that we have some. We can develop some tools today. We wanna focus not on the stress but on how how each of us can increase our stress management skills. I want us all to focus on the foods and behaviors that increase our stress management skills. The first step is to to see that we have the ability to improve our bodies ma- how it manages that stress. Think of it as adding some tools to your tool box that you can pull from that. You have some control in how your body manages stress. Yeah and i hear that from clients who really are dedicated to eating real food throughout a stressful time and they comment. I am handling this a lot better than i. otherwise would be. It really is about chemistry. And i know people's character. It is in our survey reported in the journal of obesity included peop- people from different counties but also from different states in the in the us in the study found that the corona virus pandemic for many adults has led to a major decrease in their healthy habits and that they had that they had practiced prior to the pandemic and the study found two thirds of people eight more junk food well only a third eight healthier meals cooked at home again about two-thirds exercise less because gyms were closed but many rescue dogs and consistently walked their new dock. Some have more anxiety slept less where others were able to sleep longer to to less commuting time some people viewed the pandemic as a time to cook more healthy meals at home sleep longer also to have time for a pet. The sussex study also broke down the results by the different bmi classification such as normal weight overweight and obese ir that study in the study i noted to the study found the stay at home. Order had the most negative impact on the individuals in the obese category actually found. They found the anxiety. Scores increased most dramatically in people with obesity. The people with obesity also gained the most weight during the stay at home order so from results of the study. There are many different questions we could ask now number one do people of normal weight. In general practice better healthy habits for number two d normal weight people have fewer cravings. Find it easier to maintain a healthier eating plan number three to overweight and obese. People have more stress in their lives. Very good questions. Yeah do you have the answers necessarily but we're gonna talk. We're gonna right so to answer some of those questions. We want to share some basic lifestyle and eating habits to help you avoid weight gain during stressful times. Because i am seeing in clinic. I do see clients who've gained weight who've had a weight problems stressful and if it's a chemical chemical process and perhaps another way to live at this time is to find ways you can increase your stress management skills those tools in your toolbox that may be a new thought for you and yes you can learn and practice certain tricks to manage your stress whether it's during the pandemic or taken high school or college exam whether you're going through health crisis and i think time to dig into a demystify these tricks and the first trick to come out of the magical hat is eat breakfast every day. Not a sundays days. Breakfast is in spat especially important if you have stressful meeting or Chemistry exam or presentation or you studied all night absolutely. We're going to get back to eating breakfast but we have to take a break. I you are listening to dishing up nutrition and we are discussing how you can avoid weight gain during stressful. Times will be right back. Welcome back for dishing other for many of our clients. Tell us they need healthy new snack ideas so we decided to share a couple with you today. Make an egg. Salad with celery and expel or pressed. Safflower may or avocado mail. Then place a scoop of the egg salad and a half of a red pepper love I love deviled eggs as well. So my favorite is our salmon patty recipe that's in the weight and wellness way. Cookbook and nutrition guide. It's also on our website weight and wellness dot com ad and variety of raw vegetables. The vegetables to and you can Dip in some mayo at that. And then you've got this nice balanced out snacks so stay tuned and we will give you additional snack. Ideas have to say i love that I never tried it until pre pandemic one of our front desk staff gals was eating it. And i thought oh. I want to try this and she goes. Oh get a fork. I tried it. I was like it so delicious but when looking at the ingredients. I thought me when i wanted to make now i make it. You just plop it. Cook it and then take those patties and freeze them. They freeze great. Yeah so easy. It's awesome so stay tuned because we're going to have more of these ideas we are and i think it's time to dig into and demystify these tricks that we have the first trick to come out of the magical hat was eat breakfast every day. So fringy have for breakfast. I had leftover hamburger patty at six thirty. This morning did in samantha's and For something quick. I had part of an apple. Yeah wonderful e you got a gun. It wasn't gone. My husband always makes a eggs for me. He always gets up. When i have the radio show and So a couple eggs. And i also do half of an apple with sunbutter easy. Yeah got it done early in the morning forest feeling good for the radio show feeling over the radio show and you don't take out your energy you know and i always tell my clients breakfast really Tone for the day. You are going to feel better having a balanced breakfast. And then you're naturally going to make healthier choices because you're starting the day with a balanced blood sugar. It really makes the world of difference. And i the key to that balanced blood sugars like i had the eggs the protein and you had the hamburger patty protein and that kind of anchors not only your blood sugar but also begins the process of making those rain chemicals. The neural transmitters us that helps us with our day. Yeah yeah. I have absolutely recognized. I need enough protein in the morning just to feel good the entire day so i need at least three ounces. Good to to get me started. And i think that you know. A lot of people aren't in the habit of taking the time to make breakfast Your after something easy so you might sit down. Pour your favorite dry cereal in a bowl until the bolas fall. Always you know not a cup of cereal. Several cups of syria but that may be inviting obesity earnings -iety to come visit. There's been many studies. Demonstrating that high carb. High sugar diets often lead to anxiety and obesity. So what could be happening when you eat a big bowl of breakfast cereal which could easily have eighty one grams of carbs. When you consider how high carb that is in how high sugar foods affect your brain chemistry. It's very likely this unhealthy breakfast is causing a reduction in your serotonin. Level and serotonin is one of our. Most important are transmitters. You can think of neurotransmitters feel brain chemicals and serotonin helps to make us happy calm. Less anxious more focused all things that we that we need right. If you could just have a cup of serotonin But the next step we can just buy a coupla. Serotonin is that protein xactly so importantly we know a diet. High in processed carbs raise blood sugar level above normal and then the pancreas produces excess. Insulin leading to people being overweight or obese So when we say process carbs pathetic of the foods that come from a factory versus a farm Cereal is one. there is no serial bush. No there's not another interesting fact. Is obesity associated with having more anxiety one study found at the obesity. People have a twenty five percent increased risk of suffering from mood and anxiety disorders. Additionally chronic stress can also increase the fat stored in the abdominal area. And around our organs it is also an increased risk for type two diabetes heart attacks. High blood pressure so many risk factors we want our clients to avoid absolutely. And that's often a question i ask A new client. If weight loss's one of their goals asking them whereas there where they have gained weight where they're storing it can indicate to us. Hormonally what could be going on. And i'm sure you can agree. But i'm hearing more and more. People are starring in their abdomen that stress. And then also you know. Eating more processed carbs increases insulin resistance so can really be twofold mentioned earlier. We talked about if you have that bullet cereal and maybe skim milk. Possibly sugar sprinkled on. Tom It raises that blood sugar. And when your blood sugar goes higher than the body once it to It really is a stressful event entirely. Yup and when we have that stressful event internally we're increasing our stress levels yep so that's a simple tool really it is and you know. Our body doesn't know the difference between that stressor of eating cereal or the stress from covid. No good point. We respond to it the same way So keeping that in mind and again we have control of everything. We're putting in her mouth. So if that can impact stress that much We really need to take control of that is that is to have control over few things and that is one of i

Obesity Melanie Beasley Insomnia Migraines Britney United States Vincent Insomnia Hamburger Patty Cancer Apple Samantha Diabetes Heart Attacks Syria Anxiety Anxiety Disorders Bush TOM
CIA Analyst Turned Reiki Energy Healer With Jessica Brodkin

Merkaba Chakras

04:23 min | 2 months ago

CIA Analyst Turned Reiki Energy Healer With Jessica Brodkin

"Well can to another podcast episode of macabre charge russia's two day we learn a little bit about reiki energy healing as modality for wellness and to connect to source hands on energy healing is an ancient healing modality. Gone as far back to end. Yeshua ben yosef was taught how to do it by his teachers in his childhood buddhist monastery. It was rediscovered in the twentieth century by japanese buddhist monk dr macau you sui whom taught it to the world today i bring former. Cia analysts jessica. Brought ken who made a career change into being a successful reiki energy healing practitioner. and with that jessica. welcome to merkava chaka's inky for having me. Oh you look real. Yes you'll live babar's you have fabulous marian hair there. We'll talk about that a little bit later so before we discuss your work and it's fascinating by the way. Can you tell us your story for how you got into this. In the first place you started off in cia. I did yes. I started off I started working there. When i was twenty two so right out of college and then i when i was twenty six. I had debilitating migraines where i would have And would have debilitating migraines and sort of pseudo seizures regularly. And i was not able to work and i passed out in front of a friend and He waved his hands over me. And i woke up and my pain was gone and i was like what are you doing. And he's like. I'm doing reiki and i'm like i have no idea what that is not see work with you at the in the cia. Okay just a friend from From high school from growing up and And i went back to this was in new york and went back to washington dc. Where i was living. I found a practitioner. And i started going to healings all the time and And that's how that's how. I became a recipient and then around nine years ago around the age of thirty. I i kind of had a breakdown again and my sister had chronic illness and she motivated me to to heal her. I sent i I sent she lived in my house. She lives in miami. So she's in miami and i I sent my healer to distance on her. And it didn't work. And i was like let me try and then i was able to do it over the phone and I found out that i was able to help her nice. And then it got all the training in the certifications but But really. When i learned i really was just And then later years later found that this that my relatives have been doing this for generations. And i had no idea what are you. Let's unpack some of this. So your sister had what was the ailment that she was having ulcerative colitis. Okay what is that again. it's It's a the colon that has shared a lot of pain so i felt motivated by her. Now she and then i just started practicing my friends who were interested. And where did you learn when i initially learned. I initially channelled which. I don't tell a lot of people that but i initially channelled and then i went. And how did you learn to channel is just come naturally. Okay so I had a mental breakdown. When i was thirty years old and i started seeing spirits in the woods where it was living and i thought it was schizophrenic and i went to the doctor and i said am i schizophrenic. And she said no She's like you're having a spiritual awakening. This is what my psychiatrist told

Yeshua Ben Yosef CIA Dr Macau Merkava Chaka Jessica Pseudo Seizures Migraines Babar SUI Marian Russia KEN Miami Washington Dc New York Ulcerative Colitis
"migraines" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

06:17 min | 3 months ago

"migraines" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Molly. Hey i've got a riddle for you. Okay what does susan olsen who played sydney on the brady bunch and joan gideon in common okay. So we've got the knee brady adorable pigtails and joan did you. Not as adorable. That's harsh author of the magical thinking An essay collections from the nineteen. Seventy yup. why do they have in common. I'm going to go with fashion sense and love of asparagus. You're wrong. They both were pretty fashionable. Did he end. Olson both had problems with chronic migraines. Yikes they are. But they're not alone not alone they are two of many women who have problems with chronic migraines because the fact of the matter is women have far more migraines than men so real quick before we examine why that might be Let's talk about. What am i. Grain is because i think the first time i first time i had a migraine for a long time. I thought it was some other kind of headache headache or something but to have a migraine here you got it. Have some of these Moderate to severe pain often described just pounding or throbbing pain That affects the whole head or ships from one side of the head sensitive sensitivity to light noise or odors yep blurred vision nausea or vomiting stomach upset domino pain loss of appetite Sensation of being very warm or cold. Pale nece fatigue dizziness. Either and you might have an aura. Which is bright flashing dots are lights. That appear to you in this list of symptoms kersee a web. Md which also notes that. No migraine is really ever the same from person to person. Yeah i always had teeth pain pain in my teeth i am. I really a few migrants have had were always preceded by auras. So you were an aura suffer. I was an aura sufferer. And i think one thing also about about migrants is that if you haven't had a migraine you cannot understand or relate to what it is. Oh no i remember. When i had my first one i was trying to describe it to the co worker of mine. She like gave me a hug when she realized they like someone else understood that she was going through Well maybe she gave you a hug too. Because you're a fellow woman who said migraine problems. Seventeen percent of women. According to the mayo clinic have migraine. Pain will only six percent of men do so it begs the question. Why do women have more migraines than men. Well maybe i. we should talk about triggers. Okay just environmental triggers. That might cause migraines. We've got things like stress. Bright lights weird smells changes in season. Medication alcohol aged cheese. I mean pretty much anything can can bring on a migraine. It's actually kind of frustrating. Because some of these things you really just can't avoid so it doesn't seem like the triggers would really be gender specific. I mean men. Women both encounter aged cheese and alcohol some point but what you have to remember is that people might respond to triggers in different ways like. Let's say there's a cup of coffee and you have a has. This caffeine that might trigger. Migraine is probably gonna hit you a little harder as a woman than it's going to hit a man just because men are bigger and that's one thought maybe maybe just these triggers affect people differently. We also have to take family history into account for instance identical twins Who are more likely to have both have migraine sand fraternal twins. The closer you are to a family member who has migraines the more likely you are to have migraines like my mom had terrible migraines. I remember when i was growing up and so you know i have migraines and i know that at least one of my sisters also suffers from migraines sometimes so the fact that you knew this family history was there probably led you to understanding what was going on when you had your first migraine history. We've got some environmental things. The way we produce our bodies processing different for men and then they're the hormones The h word hormones. Women seem to get screwed with hormones. I gotta say. I'd have many articles on our site about all the things that hormones to screw up for us. The big one is estrogen. Why was going to talk about how we just have more migraines but talk about the role of estrogen and migraine. Okay well there's a pattern between the levels of estrogen and women's body and frequency of migraines and we can trace all this to the menstrual cycle whenever our periods comrade before during our periods are estrogen levels. Drop and it's also during those times that estrogen levels drop migraine levels rise so the more estrogen. The we have surging through our blood means fewer migraines that we have and if you want like some backup for this up until the time that girls go through puberty they have the same number migraines as boring if you are a childhood suffer of migraines. It's it's all about the same until you hit puberty. Yeah and as many as sixty to seventy percent of women who get migraines report that their monthly cycle is related to when they get migraines so in that that estrogen level drops than than the headaches. Come so if you're on let's say a hormonal contraceptive is your form of birth control. That might be helping it. Because it's getting your hormones a little bit more level it can even worse in it But the positive side is that you know it can be one of the things that you work with your doctor. To kind of regulate so that you can find a form of birth control that both relieves the migraines and serves as an effective contraceptive. yeah And then there's also a chance that could be triggered by an underlying central nervous system disorder on basically when that happens the disorder would cause a release of neuro peptides or chemicals which would excite your brain too much and then cause migraines so those could be a couple of other underlying reasons for it but i think so the newest research come out about migraines and why we get them has to do with something called cortisol spreading depression or see us d. and c. d. is sort of a fancy term for brain excitability or literal brainstorm. If you will yeah it's like your brain is just too much going on in your brain. And maybe that's why women have.

susan olsen Olson Seventeen percent six percent joan gideon Molly first one sixty one two first migraine both first time joan Seventy seventy percent nineteen one thought one thing one side
Farabee has 4-point game, Flyers beat Penguins 6-3

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Farabee has 4-point game, Flyers beat Penguins 6-3

"Joel Farabee had a goal and three assists in the flyer six three decision over the penguins the game was tied three three until Michael Raffl tallied five thirty seven into the third period to begin a flurry of scoring for Philadelphia Oskar Lindblom Kevin Hayes scored twenty seconds apart to turn it into a rout flyers forward Travis connect me like how they closed out the win I definitely think that you know when we got those chances we made sure we capitalized and you know I think the couple quick ones they're kind of put him back on their heels no one Patrick also scored in his first game since April two thousand nineteen the twenty two year old center and number two overall pick in the twenty seventeen draft was stricken with debilitating migraines are caused him to miss all of last season I'm Dave Ferrie

Joel Farabee Michael Raffl Oskar Lindblom Kevin Hayes Penguins Flyers Philadelphia Travis Patrick Migraines Dave Ferrie
Terminate Toxins with Aimee Carlson

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:01 min | 4 months ago

Terminate Toxins with Aimee Carlson

"Welcome everybody to another wonderful episode of wellness warriors. Today i have a very interesting speaker. Her name is a may in french. May carlson maine's loved the beloved. And i'll call you because that's how people know you so so. Amy has a very interesting story to share. She's known as the toxin terminator. She's the host of the toxin terminator podcast bestselling author. She has been featured in lots of other podcasts and summits she spent the last seven years removing hidden toxins from her own home to be free of chronic disease in. It's helped hundreds of people do the same. So as you all know. Essential number two to reduce your toxic exposure. So i am very interested to hear what it may or amy has to say. So thank you for joining us. Dr. what a pleasure and an honor to be here with you today. Share with your audience and i know they're astute already if they're following you and and what they're learning so if we can add just a little piece that they can take away and implement into their life than we've done our job today absolutely. There's always new things to learn. I have seen that in my forty plus years in the wellness industry. Alright yes it is absolutely so go ahead. And i always like to start our podcast with the pain passion. There was a trigger point of pain which you know really drove you down this path of being the toxin toxin terminators. So let's hear about that. Amy does so honestly. I had a lot of things going on in my life in harris. Maybe where your audience. My this might be the point right that we're going to talk about. I really wasn't looking for any solutions. In my life. I was not. I had no idea how poorly i felt you know. Have you heard that before you know. We really think we're pretty okay. I knew i had issues going on with my health. I worked in the automotive field for thirty years. I was exposed to a lot Within that industry it also had my mindset in a certain way. And i'll get into that. But then i had things happening in my body like headaches headaches every single day i went to lots of doctors in fact i started at as time went on i started developing migraines headaches to begin with and then they said into migraines and then as time continued to go on what happened is i lost vision on the left side from my migraines and i was seen by so many different specialists given so many different medications and nothing was helping and i just felt like this was this was it i. I wasn't getting any solutions. And i didn't know there were as another option available to me i also had a whole lot of reproductive issues I was diagnosed in menopause at the age of thirty six. The uterus age of thirty seven because that's what the solution was and so i was thrown into beyond the menopause. I was experiencing before it was really really bad. Afterwards in fact My husband and i for many winters travel by motor coach and the bedroom door and i would walk out to get coffee with him in the morning and he would just look at me really strange and one morning i said. Honey what are you doing. And he's he said. I'm trying to figure out which aim years is coming out this morning. We know and so realizing you know when you're in the throes of those emotional ups and downs and and almost felt like i was out of body.

Carlson Maine AMY Migraines Headaches Chronic Disease Harris
Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

"Study concludes illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S. Diplomats in Cuba and China in recent years was likely caused by microwave radiation. NPR's Greg Meyer E has details more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China had reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that something real And significant clinically happened to these people. The study did not address who is responsible or what the motive might have been.

Greg Meyer Cuba China National Academies Of Sciences Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

"Radiation is thought to be the likeliest cause of illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S. Diplomats in Cuba and China in recent years. NPR's Greg Marie has more more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China have reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that something real And significant clinically happened to these people. The study did not address who is responsible for what the motive might have been.

Greg Marie Cuba National Academies Of Sciences China Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
Report finds microwave energy likely made US diplomats ill

Aaron Byrd

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Report finds microwave energy likely made US diplomats ill

"A new report says microwave radiation is the most likely cause of illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S diplomats stationed in Cuba and China in recent years. The report was produced by the National Academy of Sciences. NPR's Greg Marie, has more more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China have reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that Something real and significant clinically happened to these people study did not address who is responsible or what the motive might have

Greg Marie National Academies Of Sciences Cuba China U. Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
Judge: Detained immigrants must see a judge within 10 days

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Judge: Detained immigrants must see a judge within 10 days

"Civil rights groups are applauding a ruling by a New York federal judge that newly detained immigrants must be presented in court within ten days of being apprehended not months immigration advocates say judge Alison Nathan's ruling is the first time U. S. immigrations and customs enforcement has been ordered to provide prompt access to a judge more important because of covert nineteen spreading in detention facilities judge Nathan said while detainees may not have a fundamental right to be released during removal proceedings the government does not have an unfettered right to detain them in twenty fourteen the average wait to see a judge was eleven days more recently it's been around three months one migraine Shemar Michelle said ice officers told him he'd be home by dinnertime when they took him from his children but it was six weeks before he got to see a judge I'm Jackie Quinn

Alison Nathan U. S. Immigrations And Customs New York Nathan Shemar Michelle Migraine ICE Jackie Quinn
Amazon Pharmacy Aims To Conquer Another Huge Retail Sector

Techmeme Ride Home

02:54 min | 5 months ago

Amazon Pharmacy Aims To Conquer Another Huge Retail Sector

"Not exactly tack but this news from a major tech company will probably have the biggest lasting impact on the broader business world and our entire society generally than just about anything else. We could talk about this month. Amazon has officially launched amazon pharmacy letting customers in the us order prescription. Medications for home delivery. And if you're a prime member that even includes free delivery quoting cnbc customers over the age of eighteen. We'll have access to the pharmacy service at this week. And forty five states not including hawaii illinois kentucky louisiana and minnesota amazon expects to serve those states over time. Amazon pharmacy will accept most forms of insurance but could offer savings for people without insurance as well. Customers can also use flexible spending accounts or health savings accounts to buy prescriptions on the service before customers order medication. For the first time the site might ask them questions such as whether they're pregnant their date of birth and their gender as it was assigned at birth. That information is required by law to provide pharmacy care and it helps pharmacists. Do things like confirmed prescriptions. Doctors can send prescriptions directly to amazon pharmacy or patients can request transfer from an existing retailer. Like cvs or walgreens amazon says it has tools to verify that a physician legitimately ordered each prescription to tamp down on potential fraud amazon. Prime customers get free two day delivery although shipping might take up to five days the first time a customer orders as it takes time to transfer a medication customers who don't have prime can get free delivery within five days or they can pay five dollars ninety nine cents to two two day delivery. The medicines on offer include a mix of generic and brand name drugs. Customers can get access to birth control as well as commonly prescribed drugs like insulin. Steroid creams met for men for controlling blood. Sugar and suma tripton for migraines amazon will not deliver schedule. Two controlled medications including most opioids. And it won't be replacing the health and personal care store by offering vitamins and supplements customers. Who have questions about their medications can reach a pharmacist or pharmacy technician at anytime through online self service or phone amazon will also screen for potentially problematic drug interactions for customers who are taking multiple medications at once pharmacy. Stocks tumbled following the launch of amazon pharmacy. Cvs shares fell seven and a half percent in morning. Trading tuesday walgreens boots alliance dropped more than eight percent shares of rite aid slip by more than sixteen percent. Good are x. Which helps consumers find discounts on prescription. Drugs fell more than eighteen percent and quote quitting sean debris phd on twitter. This has been a long time coming. Imagine one day being able to order the necks covid vaccine through alexa and quote. But as jim. Roberts tweeted quote perhaps. This is old fashioned. But i'm not looking forward to amazon pushing the neighborhood right aide. Out of business and quote.

Amazon Cnbc CVS Louisiana Kentucky Hawaii Minnesota Walgreens Illinois Migraines Walgreens Boots Alliance United States Twitter
Migraines (MM #3524)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 months ago

Migraines (MM #3524)

"The with kevin mason sadly. I'm one of those. Who gets migraines from time to time i would say i'm lucky because i have friends who get them on a regular basis sometimes once or twice a month and for them. The migrants can last for a couple of days. At a time. I get periodic migraines and the doctors really don't know what they are. They don't know if they're sinus headaches. But migraines are different combination for a lot of people of course when the news came through the other day. That nashville is one of america's top migraine spots across america. I'll be honest with you. I wasn't surprised. A lot of it has to do with the climate here in nashville with the heat and humidity we get and with varying temperature changes and the various barometric pressure changes that can bring on migraines those the ones i get their weather related. I've been dealing with weather related. Headaches for years of course national is only number six in america for migraines they call it top ten list but really. It's the bottom ten list you want to be on this list. Don't know why people get them and if you don't count yourself among the lucky ones migraines are no fun and well living in a hot spot. I don't know how to celebrate. I guess you don't celebrate do you.

Migraines Kevin Mason Nashville Headaches America
Migraines (MM #3524)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 months ago

Migraines (MM #3524)

"The with kevin mason sadly. I'm one of those. Who gets migraines from time to time i would say i'm lucky because i have friends who get them on a regular basis sometimes once or twice a month and for them. The migrants can last for a couple of days. At a time. I get periodic migraines and the doctors really don't know what they are. They don't know if they're sinus headaches. But migraines are different combination for a lot of people of course when the news came through the other day. That nashville is one of america's top migraine spots across america. I'll be honest with you. I wasn't surprised. A lot of it has to do with the climate here in nashville with the heat and humidity we get and with varying temperature changes and the various barometric pressure changes that can bring on migraines those the ones i get their weather related. I've been dealing with weather related. Headaches for years of course national is only number six in america for migraines they call it top ten list but really. It's the bottom ten list you want to be on this list. Don't know why people get them and if you don't count yourself among the lucky ones migraines are no fun and well living in a hot spot. I don't know how to celebrate. I guess you don't celebrate do you.

Migraines Kevin Mason Nashville Headaches America
Solutions for Menopause Symptoms

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:09 min | 5 months ago

Solutions for Menopause Symptoms

"Well. Let's get started on today's topic. And i. i want to clear up a misconception. That many women still believe in the past. Many women were told that as we age and reach menopausal years we become deficient in the hormone estrogen. Now the truth is most women have too much estrogen. The excess estrogen. Let's just call it. Estrogen dominance and joanne is gonna talk more about that as well. That's right. I think a better way to explain. Estrogen dominance is if we compare the amount of the hormone progesterone that we have to the amount of estrogen that we have so. It's really we really want to be in balance and when we have too much estrogen and not enough progesterone. That is where we get the term. Estrogen dominance right and when we taught her popular menopause survival seminar in house. Most women were very surprised to hear they did not need more estrogen from hormone replacement therapy or hr t which has a lot of what they had heard from Their from their doctors And to be honest these women actually needed to detox. The excess toxic estrogens for their health. Now some of you might be wondering what are the symptoms of access toxic estrogen. So i want to share some information before. I answer that question because i find that women. Even when they're younger you know in their thirties or forties they can also experience those symptoms of estrogen dominance or excess estrogen and so again too much estrogen. That's the of what we've always been told her. That the misconception that we need more men right. here's just a couple of the symptoms that can occur from this. Estrogen dominance and so many women will experience. They'll notice a decrease in sex drive decrease in libido irregular menstrual periods swelling of the breasts breast tenderness. Even fibro cystic breasts. Disease and uterine fibroids sign of too much estrogen right. You had mentioned earlier Headaches or migraines the ones that come before the menstrual cycle. That's right irritability. Depression problems sleeping insomnia and of course weight gain is another one favorite topic right exactly. Oh in joanne You and i were talking before the show about how we have both had clients in the past who had come in and they would talk about. Oh i used to get headaches and migraines but they would be coming to us postmenopausal and they say oh my headaches and migraines no longer bother me right. So that's just an example of someone who was getting headaches and migraines due to likely s excess estrogen right and then with you know with menopause. The hormones all shift right and then the headaches and migraines style and that's not the only caused migraines but it definitely plays in because yachts of women have come in and say i used to get migraines but now don't anymore so we know that's true and there are also more Other more serious symptoms that have been linked to excess estrogen or estrogen dominance and there are certainly links to estrogen dominance and breast cancer. There's also links to uterine cancer. There are links between excessive estrogen and autoimmune diseases especially comes to mind the hypo hypothyroid shimoda thyroiditis. There is a link between excess. Estrogen and excessive. Blood clotting that can lead to heart disease so those symptoms can be very serious.

Migraines Headaches Joanne Irritability Insomnia Depression Menopause Uterine Cancer Shimoda Thyroiditis Breast Cancer Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease
5 Easy Steps to Better Health Using Essential Oils

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:24 min | 6 months ago

5 Easy Steps to Better Health Using Essential Oils

"Today we have Jodi stern off Coen joining us, and for those that don't know, jody she has a bestselling author, an award winning journalist, functional practitioner and founder of Vibrant Blue Oils where she has combined her training in nutritional therapy and aromatherapy to create unique proprietary blends organic and wild crafted essential oils she's helped over fifty thousand clients heal from brain related challenges including anxiety insomnia, an auto immunity for the past ten. Years she has lectured at wellness centers been seen in the New York Times Wellness Mama Elephant Journal. An has become a top resource for essential oils education on the Internet today Jodi it is just fantastic to have you here with us today. How're you doing great and it's nice to connect with other essential ill people always yes. So Jodie, how did you come into the world of essential oils and specifically breen related issues? While I had kind of started my life as a journalist and then I started working business had my first kid who was easy had a second one twenty two months later less easy and it turned out it was nutrition that was really throwing off his little system, and so I spent so much time banging my head against the wall until I figured that out the one that I realized how important food was in. Terms of your mood, your energy, your ability to focus I went back and got a degree in nutrition was helping other people a Lotta MOMS but you know Kinzer squirmy and it's hard to keep them still the test them. So I learned this technique called missile testing that allowed they could deliver. It was still really an easy way to identify remedies which was helpful when my bottom fellow my man has been was bipolar. Antonio suicide and had to be moved to a residential treatment facility and the kids were five and seven, and once we got him all Seta. I collapsed my adrenals have been running a ten year marathon and it just it had taken a toll on me but that wasn't very sustainable because I was suddenly a single parent I had a job and. It no matter how exhausted I wear they still needed to be fed the laundry John need to be cleaned exactly. So it was then that a friend actually gifted me a box of essential hills because I had been trying everything I could think of all the things that have worked in the past really failed me and I was so desperate and and really so fatigued both physically, and mentally that I just muscled. Tested you know as anything in here, going to be helpful for measuring all's and my experience muscle testing is if something works, it's almost like it's a very loud signal and it was such a strong signalise league felt optimistic and I was like Oh you know identified five oils and then it occurred to me like what do I do this? I normally get one and I realized that I can combine them so i. Each oil and kind of combine them in the right amounts, put them on my adrenals on my lower back and for the first time in a month felt like myself again felt like Oh my God I go running. Do you have to remember what those five oils were by chance? Yeah. It's actually the combination that I now have in my adrenal gland it's time Rosemary Rosemary Stimulatory Manuka cinnamon and. Gabum in as you know oils ever powerful in their own but when you combine them, there's synergy that occurs. amplifies Fairfax, and so they're stimulatory oils but they seem to be adapted genetic Yeah. So you re rub them on the on your lower back over the dreams. Yeah. Man I just recently had this. Huge moment with oils. Again, you know you have them all the time you know you just keep having them and you're like Oh my God big things really do work and it was when I was cutting out coffee. Drinking how day in the morning which verdon normal person is probably fine. But for me, it was like really recognize system and so I just cut it out cold Turkey and I was. I. Was just I had Migraines I was just miserable and so yeah I. Busted out some oils and rub them on major knowles and then put like hot pack over top. And it really Mike would bring me back to life. It was it was an amazing feeling. So That's interesting that that was sort of your in for oils was it anyways it was so quick and I thought this is amazing. You know and also I had been working as a practitioner and you know someone's deficient in vitamin B wants an easy fix ray if you're trying to trigger your pineal gland or at least Melatonin were balanced hypo film, it's get into areas of the brain. That's tricky. There all these kind of low hanging fruit, easy things and then harder things and so once I had that experience of wow, is work then. I kind of was reverse engineering witched do right Oh. My Gut is really compromised I league. So makes sense that no matter what I'm taking three my digestion pathway isn't really getting a simulated but something I can topically apply that could sue the skin into the bloodstream immediately. So okay. That makes sense why the other remedies were working in while this worked really quickly right? Just sort of bypasses the gut there and that it makes total sense to me when I hear that that explanation of getting the oils into your bloodstream, which is gonNa then go to all these parts of your body really get in deepen in my mind it seems very. Pretty straightforward just like you would use any form of planned medicine or any sort of you're getting good stuff into your body and letting it do its job. But for a lot of people they just they can't look past essential oils is just things that smell good. You know. Later Cat Are concentrated plants and guess what plants and the derivative of plants are fifty percent of pharmaceutical drugs. That's really the basis for all of our Madison are just concentrated in somehow they've been diminished or kind of relegated to this weird around when they're really the core

Vibrant Blue Oils Jodi Stern Rosemary Rosemary Jodie New York Times Breen Kinzer Founder Turkey Elephant Journal Antonio Verdon Coen Fairfax John Madison Melatonin Mike
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
"migraines" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"migraines" Discussed on Science Friday

"Yes it's all over to even increase our fun with galaxies. We're having this hour wanNA bring on another guest who studies some of the earliest galaxies that were formed just six hundred million years. Six hundred eighty million years after the Big Bang Sangita Mojo Tra is a research astrophysicist at Goddard space flight center in Greenbelt. I think that's the oldest NASA site. Walk up the Science Friday thank you. It's great to be here now. You were able to observe one of the oldest galaxies that formed right after the Big Bang. Tell us what did that galaxy look like. What features did it have such a young galaxy? It's not just one galaxy. It's three free ater so it's a group of galaxies and what's amazing unique about this This group that it's a disruptive group of galaxies. It's it's what we see is actively disrupting the gas around those group of galaxies and these are the sort of signatures we were looking for. Because because we're looking for this. This cosmic change called realization. Where most of the gas? That's in between galaxies gets disrupted opted by Like particles coming from within the galaxies. And what what does it look is. It looked like a galaxy lexi or these groups of galaxy to they look like something we would recognize in older galaxies like our own Milky Way. They're tiny and they're so far away that Ed tiny I wish I could tell you. There was a huge wave. No but we see three small dots and then We confirm those dots and and then because we see this special light called Lyman Alpha which is a hydrogen light and then we are able to seat from all of that. It's like seeing specs and inferring any everything we inferred that the gas around these galaxies has been ionized and this is the signature. We've been looking for for one. You know I want to bring all of my guests in the. Let me let me bring back elicit and Catherine y'All seem very very excited. About studying galaxies astrophysicists Sangita. You share that excitement that yes why. Why is so exciting? You Know I. I spoke to Vera Rubin many years ago when she was still here and she talked about her excitement in studying studying galaxies. Do you share that kind of excitement. Sangita oh absolutely yes I I. I gave a talk but Reuben's institute once about this these. He's very sort of searches. We are doing and she was like afterwards. She told me Sankey that. You're going to be studying these galaxies all of your life and I was like okay no problem. We'll let me let me bring in one of my favorite topics. Which is I won't talk about dark energy? I'm going to talk about bad dark matter. Because it was Vera Rubin who sort of right got all the data that sort of dark matter in all these galaxies the stuff jeff. You're discovering does it give us anymore hint even the the wave does that. Tell us anything more about dark matter. It could someday so there's yet at another student at Harvard. is named Gus being who while he was an undergraduate did some work Simulating the collision of the Sagittarius Dwarf. Tiny little galaxy colliding with the Milky Way and it makes sense. Big Waves The wavelength of what. He published his a little bit too long. So it's it's the wrong magnitude but it's kind of the right sort of phenomenon and so I I am not saying that it definitely is something having to do with dark matter but if we have the amount of dark matter during the halo or the disk of the galaxy wrong or the distribution bution of it the cow clumpy is that could ultimately have something to do with the explanation so there are hints that this probably has something to do with a collision. There are not not that we definitely need dark matter to make everything work out. mathematically but it's not nuts to think that that might have something to do with it but it's a big might I'm Gonna I'm GonNa get very geeky now and go to the phones because a lot of astrophysics geeks or see if we can understand all my audience. I can understand what they're asking Star with Line welcome to Robert in Nevada city. Let's go to yes. Yeah Hello I have a question about the harmonic series and that we experience in our everyday life especially if we're musicians yes but Does that apply to this. Wave and also do they have an idea of where the origin of the harmonic series. Good Question Crowe actually made some really good question Gus The student who I mentioned who did that. Simulation of the collision. He's mentioned already that a higher order Monica. And for those of you don't know what that means if you if you pluck a string There's one sort of major sine wave that's given by that pluck but then there's a lot of smaller vibrations. That are these so called higher order or monarchs that would also happen and so. It's possible that there's a phenomenon that happens on many scales at once. That has these harmonic in that. We're just seem one that happens to manifest in the dust in the in the gas to could be something else going on different timescales or in the stars and we're looking for all of that so the next release released from guy at Catherine maybe can talk a little bit more about that will come later this year and we'll have even more information about the velocities of stars so this this wave is seen in the gas in the dust but we don't know exactly not for all of the stars anyway. They're doing and so it's a really good question. And yes. The reason. We're so interested in collision is because that might be like plucking looking up a string like thing that was the and I don't mean superstring I don't mean that kind of strain life and now he g. string you know something that was sort of was this region of the galaxy scene had kind of an clucking. It away on the ask you. This question from our caller or caller was talking about harmonica which in music or different frequencies right. If you have found this big wave does that mean there are monarchs of it. Other smaller waves are different frequency waves. Somewhere else or maybe we haven't found them. Yeah very possibly one of the other papers in the in the meeting of meeting this week was actually talking about a much larger scale waves In the stars from guy. And so what. I'm saying that this could be could be a harmonic of something. Even barger or smaller than other. There could be a whole set of waves at different frequencies and this is just one of them. But we don't know and so we think this happened because of a collision that what you're saying the majority opinion. Catherine what would you say. Yeah I I would say. That's my favorite scenario. But it's not the only scenario so that's we need to bring all these therapist together from all over the world to figure out exactly how you form the structure and then we can start taints those questions. I have another question if I want to go to Justin in San Antonio Hi Justin. Hey how's it going. Hey there welcome I was actually just ah ask about that. Hey whether that was a structure that maybe we ran into and then charge along with us with our gravity from the the galaxy or if it was something maybe leftover you're no-man's-land material that hasn't formed into stars yet. Yes so that's a great question and so what we do know about. This structure is that it's three million solar masses three million times. The mass of our Sun and gas and about one percent of that mass is in young star so tens of thousands of young stars across the structure and so this material is a lot younger then the type of material that formed our son which is a lot older my replacer this is science. It's Friday from WNYC Studios Sangita when you study these very young stars. Do you expect to find a wave going through. Am Yet I. Visually could see that wave but more B. C. actually is one small Galaxy Alexey and These galaxies are typically one hundred the size of the Milky Way they haven't fully fledged yet and the stars at extremely young. We are looking at a few million years young stars and a whole lot of star formation star burst. He even going on in this very small small size van stars in the Universe Star that with a lot of hydrogen right. It's still the most abundant element in the universe. How how have you figured out in these young galaxies how that hydrogen sort of turned into galaxies? Well that's a very good question and that's why we serving them. I mean any any doubt. It's important to point out to your listeners that there are many many generations of stars in the universe and so the process of star formation ongoing all the time and so some stars do live for billions of years but a lot of young stars. Like the ones you really liked. The Ryan only lived for millions five years since there's been many generations of those so early galaxies have maybe the first stars but our galaxy has hundreds thousands of generations of stars while we're talking talking about Iran. I want you to weigh in on beetlejuice where do you stand in. It's going to become a Supernova or not passing that okay saying you're you're you've got the spotlight on you who you gonNA passenger. Oh I I wish it would explode. I'd love to see that in my lifetime would be. It would be as bright as the moon is that right there would be hanging thank be something during the daylight time that would be bright in the sky or only in the evening. Yes yes yes I want to see that to the little uncertainties you know but the little uncertainties when you multiply a small percentage by a really big number that turns out to be a large number of years that I'm not sure about something so unless it's some process that has to do with a gravity at extremely high masses like the black hole at the Galactic Center where the timescales those involved years. It's really hard. When the bills could be used could be tens of years hundreds of years? We're not really sure so. That's why I'm not in request such a party pooper but this this is great. I mean these as as as Some mention their stellar birth and death and all of this happens in galaxies and and the dark matter that you mentioned maintains the sort of stable place where all of this stuff the heavy elements that come out of stellar cadets. This the stick around because dot matter makes this stable place for galaxies and these guests to stick around and then they get into the next generation of does so. It's it's a lot of recycling. It's a lot of exciting stuff happening real. We have to put a little pause on her excitement. Because we've run out of time but we're talking about my one of my favorite subjects. I don't WanNa thank you. Offer delighting today. Sangita Mellow TR- As a research physicist at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Alissa Goodman professor of astronomy at Harvard Catherine Zuckerberg astronomy. PhD Student also at Harvard. Thank you all for talking about Astrophysics Levitt. Thank you for having us. You're welcome. They have a good weekend. If you missed any part of our program you can you know hear it again. Subscribe to our podcast. You can ask your smart.

Catherine Zuckerberg Vera Rubin Goddard Space Flight Center Harvard. NASA Greenbelt Lyman Alpha Ed Sankey Reuben Astrophysics Levitt Crowe PhD Student Monica Gus barger Robert WNYC Studios Justin
"migraines" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"migraines" Discussed on Science Friday

"It this is science Friday. I'm IRA flato a few weeks ago. I was sitting here at my desk in the radio studio reading something off a page and all of the sudden some of the words on the paper at the end of the sentence on the left side got a little fuzzy and gray and the effect lasted just about five minutes and then everything everything went back to normal. But it got me worried so I went to my neurologist. Who said he suspected what I had experienced was actually a type of my Green Green Migraine? I didn't have any pain. How could this have been a migraine? It was only my vision that was impacted in lasted just a few minutes. Well it sounded sounded a lot like what David from Anchorage called in about on our science. Friday vox pop APP. I have a form of Migraine that does not lead to a massive headache attic but to a visual aura that grows over my visual field. It appears as lines and triangles that rapidly shift between black and white And that's what my doctor called an ocular migraine. Something that happens in your eye. And if you're a migraine sufferers or a migraine Rainer as we are called your experience could be totally different from mine or David's you may be sensitive to light or to sound you you may have a pain at sharp like knife or Dahlan pulsating migraine triggers. Run the gamut from eating too many sweets to drinking red wine not getting enough sleep. MIGRAINES will speak of all kinds of triggers. So I can each person's Migraine be so different and can there ever be a treatment at that cures all migrants well the FDA recently approved a new drug for treating acute migraine attacks. Called you bro Japan. It's it's one in a new class of medications. That targets a critical receptor in the migraine path between the brain. And could it be the miracle. Drug migraine sufferers well. Well we've been waiting for well we've got a lot of questions about Migraine and if you experience them You probably do if you do want to hear from you. Eight four four seven two four eight two who five five or you can tweet us at Scifi. Tell us what your migraine feels like. Have you had any success in treating them yourself. We can't really prescribe. Describe anything for you. Personally it's just unethical and we really don't know who you are so we will try to answer as many questions about the different symptoms of Migraine whether a universal treatment horizon and to answer this questions are my two guests like do PD goat. Speed professor of neurology at the University of California San Francisco and King's College London. Welcome Dr Goats are thank you for having me welcome Dr Elizabeth loader Professor of Neurology at Harvard Med and chief of the division of headache in the Department of Neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital. She's here in New York Studios. Welcome thanks for having let me begin with your doctor loader. The very basic question. What exactly is a Migraine? There's so many different symptoms. Is there a universal definition for There there are widely accepted criteria for or making the diagnosis of Migraine and features that we look for in order to diagnose migraine. It's a common costly and longlasting illness where people bull are susceptible to repeated attacks of head pain that can be severe and some of the things we look forward to make the diagnosis include head pain. That is predominantly predominantly on one side of the head pain that is moderate to severe intensity pain that is usually lasting four to seventy two hours makes it impossible to be physically active And is throbbing in intensity not everybody has all of those features but most people in addition to that head pain and we'll also have nausea vomiting sensitivity to light or sound. So those are some of the things we ask about when we're trying to make diagnosis and then there's my kind that I had. There's your kind as well about twenty to thirty percent of people who have migraine also experience migraine Aura They don't necessarily have it with every headache. And they don't necessarily Sarah have a headache with the AURA It's very noticeable. And so when it happens as in your case people typically will go to the doctor or to the the emergency department and get a diagnosis. I've been told that it. That migraine runs on the female side of families. Is that correct. I'm not so sure that's true. It's not not entirely clear. The genetics of Migraine our focus of intense. Study Right now. It is true that about half of people with Migraine have a family member with the illness in. Its very clearly something. something that is genetically influenced some very rare single gene types of migraine exist but for the majority of people who have common garden. Variety righty migraine at. It's almost certainly apologetic disorder where there are a number of genes contributing to risk. A doctor goes beyond mentioned in the introduction. How many people talked about all the triggers? I that there are from migraine. Some people say they're triggered by light. Some people can be triggered by eating sweet things not getting enough sleep A. Why are these triggers? Doug it got to be so different one of the things we learning about trig firstly that variable because humans are variable and migraine manifesto migraine manifestations while there's a very clear coal that Dr Load just pointed out there is considerable variability in the individual manifestation of the disorder. Same thing applies to triggers. An important thing we've found. I think we've understood bettering. The price elastic is it not all triggers visit triggers Of what I mean by that is that there's a phase of the attack before the pain comes the so-called premonitory phase when and someone might sought to feel a brain fog concentration problems. Some mood changed. I feel sleepy tied Yawn. Oddly die might pass. It's more urine or they might crave sweet or savory things and this may go on for hours or days before the paint starts. It's clear that some of the soak some things are being attributed to triggers. Or actually the premonitory Faisal the attack starting so for example. If you're sensitive to light in the premonitory FIS and that happens hundreds of times you might come to the conclusion that off the light exposure. Because you sensitive in you notice it then you'll headache develops what's actually what's going on. Biologically is the tech already started. And that's why you sensitive to light so some of these triggers out triggers a toll their invitation title to understand the disorder. Better you know when I when I was talking about this on twitter is tweeting about this people. The the number of reactions you get you. You don't don't realize how many people have migraines until you start talking about it and then people will come up with all different things that they've tried that they've done A lot of people said that once once they've had migraines their whole lives once they got menopause. They went away. Dr Laura well we hear all kinds of things And no one thinks seems to be true for absolutely everybody. We tend to hear about it when people have sudden remission of their attacks and if it happens in association with something that's very noticeable like menopause It often is attributed to that whether that's true in any individual cases somewhat difficult. Tell you're you're absolutely right. Though about the number of people who have migraine and it's it's interesting that you got so many reactions on twitter. You should try being a headache specialist in going to a party Any sort of gathering we hear a lot about it and and the reason is it's it's so incredibly common. It is by conservative estimates something that affects thirty eight million people in the United States. It's long lasting and the majority of people who have it have onset before the age of thirty five you exception. That's amazing a doctor goes. Do we know what is happening. In the brain that causes or when a migraine takes over we not quite a bit about it it's It is a Brian Diseases. You've said it's what you'd call a network Brian Disease. So there were Areas in the Brian that are interacting with each other and they start interacting Patton. That's abnormal dysfunctional. Much of it starts from a deep part of the brain some apart. Cooled the hypothe- lamas that's involved in very primitive driving very primitive things are Wanting to eat wanting to sleep Wanting to pass year and for example these areas dysfunction and the patent with which the dysfunction determines much about the manifestation of the Tuesday say yes. Brian Imaging helped us a lot in nailing down beginning to now down some of the important biology and dispelling any meath. That migraine is anything other than serious. And Biologically determined problem and Dr Gadsby. Let's talk about this new class of FDA approved drugs that have. I've been coming out to tell us what they are. And how are they different from. Earlier generations of migraine drugs getting you classier referring to a cold died g pencil so get pants. It depends which side of the Atlantic Really WanNa sit on on any pronunciation at the moments fine they're called. CGIP as you said. Calcitonin gene related related PIP. Todd to it's closer friends receptor antagonists. I block that receptor a- As you said they being the being developed because CGIP's is involved Importantly in parts of the signaling process the the network abnormality that's going on in Migraine a nice. Stop the effect of of sage. Ip can they can. They be used both for treatment and prevention. Like what you. Yeah yeah you specifically about you bro. Japan which is being developed a product libel reliable in the FBI liable for acute treatment. It has a cousin Gold Toe Japan that is being developed. full prevention one of the probably most disruptive things that's happening now now thinking is is that as one understands the biology better. You can manipulate the medicine. He might say to suit the patient. Hi Sean needs rather than trying to squeeze patient into the boxes that we have full them so far. Let's be clear that you brought Japan noted preventive but the the concept being evolved. Hi Dr Loader is it working. I mean I've heard miraculous stories about these drugs. Well I I haven't used Yugo Japan. It's been recently approved by the FDA FDA. So I haven't had a chance to use it but in the clinical trials. I think you link on your website to an article that reports on some of the clinical trials. And if you look at how many people who take the medicine have improvement of their pain at two hours. Forty nine percent of people who took placebo had improvement compared with sixty one percent of the drug so so clearly. It's more effective than placebo. It doesn't work for everybody but nothing we have does It's wonderful to have medicines that work in new ways because every a new treatment provides a a an additional option that we can offer to patients and some of them have Important attributes fewer side effects and so on and so forth. Well well we're GONNA take a break and as you can imagine when I mentioned before when you start talking about we have. We don't have you at a dinner party. Where have you here right in the seat to answer all these questions number? Eight four four seven two four eight two five five talking with Dr Elizabeth Loader of a Harvard Med school.

migraine pain FDA David Japan Dr Elizabeth Loader Dr Laura Brigham and Women's Hospital Anchorage twitter Harvard Med menopause Dr Elizabeth nausea United States New York Dr Gadsby Sarah
"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"If you have any questions call us and we'll be happy to investigate again that for you. Also I'd like to mention that next week. Join Kara and Leah as they discuss. How food can help nope? Add ADHD symptoms so we are talking about migraine headaches today. And I'd like to start off right after after break with an example of a client that I worked with about five years ago so I worked with a young man who came in a teen. He was only thirteen at the time which was kind of remarkable that a thirteen year old would come in but you know how how in trouble he. He was with migraines because he was missing. Twenty Days of school twenty days every ninety days a month so mike there the big problems with Migraines so in his family was on board really wanted to be helpful in that way too so I worked with him for about two and a half three years But he had he went from twenty migraines a month he was very serious about this program. I guess yes. He had even gotten behind in school with missing that much class time. He changed his food plan drastically. He eliminated gluten and dairy. He eliminated processed foods Put a halt on restaurant eating for a while Within a few months as migrants were gone. Oh my good. It was a very quick turnaround for him and then as I kept working with him and you know he'd it come in once in a while gradually afterwards but he would get an occasional headache. He knew he would always know exactly. Why Oh one was? When he was on vacation one was when he was you know went into a restaurant but he would always know why but It was very interesting and I saw his dad about a month ago. He came into the office office to pick up some supplies and it was interesting that he had he was still doing very well now. Eighteen in his senior year of high school but great very very well so that made it very motivated in had some amazing changes. Even you know his grades just picked up big time once he lost the migraines boy. We need that guy for testimonial Ya isn't. That isn't that great. Yeah it is great story. Joanna can help people like that exactly. So when I'm working with a client who is experiencing migraines I I suggest eliminating MSG eliminating aspartame. Also those gluten grains. Because I'm gluten sensitive. I WANNA dig into. Why Gluten can cause those migraines and I know if I ate a little bread from the bread basket when we're out to eat the next day my back or my knees are going to let me know that I eight an inflammatory food? Gluten may be a trigger for Migraines and some people in a recent study found. There's a link between migraines and hand the genetic gluten sensitivity called CEAC disease. So wow that's really interesting So gluten can also so affect the nervous system in people who are gluten sensitive so gluten is actually considered a neuro toxin that can cause nerve damage and Dan an inflammatory response in the body. So I think to myself if gluten is a neuro toxin for gluten sensitive people then it makes total sense dance that people with neuropathy M ASS or even in carpal tunnel should try to give up gluten altogether together to see if some of their symptoms. Don't subside right. So a few signs of a gluten sensitivity are having some of those irritable Bowel Syndrome also known as IBS erm or other types of gastrointestinal problems. It could just be diarrhea every every once in a while. I suppose or it could even be constipation. Even having joint pain or fatigue can be signs of gluten sensitivity tippety so I suggest eliminating gluten from your diet for at least three months and see how you feel and actually when people go gluten free some of them and you don't feel the full effects for a whole year you know but they do see some effects positive affects pretty pretty quickly but definitely bully because it takes nine months right out so if you have any questions about going gluten free you maybe you WanNa take one of our online classes..

Migraines gluten sensitivity ADHD diarrhea Kara Leah Dan Joanna thirteen year three months Twenty Days nine months ninety days three years twenty days five years
"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"To headaches and Migraines so if you're struggling with frequent headaches or migraines come on in to nutritional weight and wellness and get some help during our first appointment with you we spend two hours listening to you and asking questions questions to determine what your headache or Migraine triggers are and how we can help you..

"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"migraines" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Have a simple food plan. Eat real food inbalance. Education is a powerful change agent. Yeah I just love it when we have like these light bulbs go off you know in our last when we're doing our one on one counseling you know then like Oh really what. That's so interesting or that's all I have to do. Who is yeah exactly so getting back to our topic about headaches and Migraines Many of my clients are sensitive to M. MSG or monosodium glutamate so MSG is a flavor enhancer And it's commonly added to Chinese food Or Mark it's a in a lot of canned soups flavored chips or snacks. Fast Food and processed meat you know so many people for many people that MSG triggers rigors a headache or a migraine. It also makes many people hungry. Wow yeah so they WANNA eat more. You're you're sensitive to this chemical you need to be constantly kind of on the lookout because MSG even though. It's actually been ban. Dan here I think what nine hundred ninety eight maybe was it it was a longtime awhile ago but it's hidden And in many different into words so some of the words that are for MSG that I often see labels are sodium case in auto lies Yeast Yeast extract soy extract. Gourmet powder. Chinese AMIS seasoning. And then whenever those the word hydrolysed you need to say. Oh that's like MSG that acts all those things act like MSG in your body and can trigger that headaches so all of these and actually there's many other words in there that are used right as you were listing. Those off I was thinking about natural flavors natural flavors can't in not necessarily thoroughly but it can be just kind of cover up for all kinds of things that could include. MSG right right so we we have to be on the lookout. We tell tell all our clients who read those ingredients read the lately. I always tell my mom that. Stop Reading the advertising on the front of the package yeah flip it over and read the back right exactly. So how do I avoid getting exposed to MSG. It's really hard you really. We have to watch closely In I eat real food. Cook my own food. That's so important. I want to you know what ingredients are in my food so I make my own. I avoid processed foods or fast foods and if MSG is a flavor enhancer enhancer. Do I want to eat that food. That needs a chemical to make it taste better not really know and you just use you know salt and pepper and some herbs and other spices easy to do that so when you eat organic vegetables and fruit. Don't you find that it needs does not need a flavor enhancer. It's the same with one hundred percent grass fed meat that real food especially organic real food tastes so oh good on its own without any chemical flavour enhancers and I've noticed that I accidentally eating MSG in a restaurant. One one one note thing that happens to me as I have trouble sleeping. Oh Wow will affect me in the middle of the night where I've got my you know brains. A little revved served up and it was just like Oh there must be some MSG in the food aid in the restaurant tonight. Um 'cause we don't know what seasoning food eating out. Yeah definitely not. And they're. They're using a lot of packaged things in restaurants. They are now so we have to really be cautious when we're eating out especially if we're sensitive to some of those Chemicals that's right. My mom actually has heart. Palpitations Oh she eat Hainanese food and I've had her tell me before why I forgot to ask for no MSG has kinda get Haitian washed and so I'm always really really careful so another chemical that often sets off a migraine headache Is that those artificial sweeteners. You know and aspartame is one of those uh-huh though if you look on a grocery shelf grocery store shelves you're GonNa fine aspartame in so many of those low calorie diet et low fat you know and all those those you know no sugar foods. Yeah in fact. ASPARTAME is founded over six thousand and food products as well as diet soft drinks diet. Sports Drinks ICED tea. Fruit Drinks And it's also in gum. Yeah and breath mints yeah again. I am shocked sometimes. People don't don't know that right so so I remember drinking Kool aid. You know and little did I know there was a link to Migraines And those Those aspartame name sweetened Kool AIDS. I do know that Diet Soda. Macaws is an increase in blood. Sugar levels isn't that interesting people don't really realize either that's right and of course then what happens. We're going to have some weight gain going on there for many many people. So those Diet Soda Drinkers. If you're trying to lose weight really need to cut that habit out I had a client. Actually who stopped drinking king her three cans of Soda Day Joanne. Drop ten pounds in one month. That's really great success and just to put an exclamation point on the breath mints and the Gum that you talked about. I have so many people say well I never Diet Soda. Yeah so I'm not I'm not getting ASPARTAME. Yeah I don't do. Those artificial sweetener some flavor drops in in their water Some some people don't realize that has aspartame and then also the breath the gum in the breath mints Lewis are just not realizing yeah so we have after be really carefully do yeah. So how does aspartame cause Migraines ASPARTAME can elevate the levels of fennel rallying an aspiring acid in the brain so these compounds can reduce the production and release of some of the key neurotransmitters. Those brain chemicals Dopamine Norepinephrine Serotonin. These neurotransmitters are necessarily early. F- necessary for a well-functioning and pain-free brain so people that are deficient in dopamine often. Have a low pay intolerance dopamine norepinephrine. Help US focus. They give us energy and the desire to accomplish tasks and be productive. Have the neurotransmitter. Serotonin helps us feel calm. Happy and peaceful so our brain needs all three of these neurotransmitters to function. Well and ASPARTAME can interfere with the production of these brain chemicals or neurotransmitters so wait. We may end end up experiencing depression low mental energy lack of focus and Migraines so aspartame. ASPARTAME is also a chemical stressor on our adrenal glands and that's going to result in higher cortisol levels and when people have that elevated cortisol levels again they ended up gaining weight so cortisol is like That stress indicator right right so one near Cortisol level goes up your body's in some kind of UH stress that's right and we have had. I've had clients go in and have some of those hormone hormone levels tested including cortisol in our various Surprise very surprised to see those cortisol levels raising. Yeah they often come in and say well and then what's that about of course are gaining me. So it's all it's time for our another one another break so you are listening to dishing up nutrition. Our topic today has been the food connection.

Migraines cortisol headaches dopamine ASPARTAME US Dan Lewis headache one hundred percent ten pounds one month
"migraines" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"Chapter three a historic remedy. Most migraine drugs. Don't actually stop migraines. They help prevent them or reduce the severity of the symptoms for a long time. They weren't even specifically for migraines. They were drugs designed to treat high blood pressure, epilepsy or depression, see, you can probably guess that. They were not a perfect solution. Here's an I take beta blockers. Beta blockers are an old school blood pressure medication that help reduce the number of migraines for some people and doctors aren't sure why. But they come with some undesirable side effects. Some of the ones I've experienced have been depression, weight gain a slower heart rate and an overall sense of moving more slowly. So I started wondering if there wasn't something better out there something without so many side effects. Maybe something unconventional one idea that I started hearing about a lot seemed really promising. The only problem was that it was a legal or at least exists in a legal gray area. That's right. I'm talking about pot Ganga. We'd Malta refir- cannabis. Through friend of a friend. I met a woman who works in the cannabis industry in California. Her name is Erica Kelly. Erica suffered from terrible migraines. And she was kid. She told me the story of her first one she was ten years old and her family was moving. I couldn't even do simple things like get little bags out from the car and take them into the house at all. I was completely debilitated. I'm revealing so bad 'cause my brother's move my stuff around Kelly's family got her the best possible care. She went to the mayo clinic she was in my green studies. She was even put on trip tans until recently. Those were the only drugs that were just for migraines. But nothing helped Erica long-term. And when she turned twenty five her migrants star getting worse. She started getting cyclic vomiting syndrome, her migraine spread her abdomen. She threw up every twenty minutes until she was so depleted. She had to go to the hospital. Then someone gave her a cannabis tincture for anxiety associated for that. But I didn't even realize just after a while I noticed that my headaches gone. I just wasn't getting them. It was like a month went by. And then two months, and then six months, and then a year and then two years, and you know, up until our I I do not get headaches anymore. Erica story made cannabis seem like a miracle drug, and she wasn't the only one talking about it this way. I started thinking maybe I should try to. When I was talking to an McGregor the headaches specialist we heard from earlier tentatively asked her about medical cannabis for migraines and contrary to my expectations. She didn't shut me down. She told me that it could be promising either to prevent them or stop them after they've started. But then she explained big caveat. Marijuana is a schedule one drug in the US it's in the same category as heroin which makes it really hard to study here. And the US is were most clinical trials happen to wanna Kempner told me the same thing. The restrictions on clinical trials from marijuana are such that research has been essentially squashed, and this is made it very challenging for people who want to use cannabis for migraine treatment in headache medicine. There's a growing consensus bat cannabis is a very useful drug for migraine. But we just need more research. And in fact, I think the federal government would be doing everyone a great service if they would loosen these regulations and fund that research, particularly since it's going to be difficult to get from sickle industries, very interested in funding research on drugs that have existed for a long time. Hey, guys, Alexis here. I just wanna cut in for a moment and say that we could do a whole episode just about medical marijuana. Frankly, we could do a whole series. We could devote an entire podcast in perpetuity to Justice subject, but for this episode. Here's what you need to know, the cannabis plant is complicated. It contains hundreds of chemicals, and they all do different things. Maybe we actually don't even know yet before the story. We're going to focus on two main chemical compounds CBD and THC delta nine tetrahydrocannabinol or THC is the main psychoactive compound in cannabis while it has therapeutic uses its best known as the part of the plant that gets you high Canepa dial or CBD is the second most prominent compound found in the cannabis plant, and it's all the rage right now, you've probably seen it on store shelves in the forms of oil. Nls tinctures were CBD gummy bears even in places where it's not quite legal people are excited because it seems like it may be an anti inflammatory. And it's now being touted as a way to treat chronic pain, anxiety in a whole lot of other things back to an. Harvard Medical School says the strongest scientific evidence for CBD's effectiveness lies with treating what they say are some of the cruelest childhood epilepsy syndromes, which typically don't respond to anti-seizure meds. Joanna Kempner says epilepsy and migraines or close to a logical cousins. So I wondered if the fact that CBD can help with seizures means it might be able to help with migraines. I was hopeful. And there have been a few small studies looking into cannabis for migraine 's in Italian study found that after giving a small group of migraine patients CBD oil with a little THC. They reported slightly fewer migraines than the group who took an antidepressant. Another small study in Colorado found that among one hundred twenty one patients the frequency of migraine headaches decreased with regular cannabis use. There's a lot of talk right now about CD in its medicinal potential. And since I was pinning my hopes on it for my migraines. I wanted to understand how it worked. Scientifically, and I was surprised to learn that it's not the only therapeutic part of the cannabis plant. It turns out THC does more than just get you high THC gets you high, and it also reduces pain. Margaret Haney is a cannabis researcher. She teaches neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and CBD. You know, it's not it's not morphine by any stretch. But it does you know, it does reduce pain. She says that will see has pain relieving potential what people are buying dispensaries. And in stores might not be strong enough. You know, so what's being sold is often at a much much much lower dose than what any of us think is going to be medically effective plus many marijuana marketers claim to have CB only products. But the reality is often, very different. And so some things will say CBD end have THC in them and very little CBD, or it's you know, there's people making money, and it's an unregulated marketplace. So it's it's not surprising, anybody that things are not going to be with what you think they are scientists know how THC works in the body, but they're still trying to figure out exactly what's going on with CBD.

cannabis migraines Erica Kelly CBD medical cannabis marijuana headaches Joanna Kempner Columbia University Medical Ce pot Ganga Marijuana mayo clinic Harvard Medical School US Malta morphine epilepsy Margaret Haney
"migraines" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

Distillations: Science + Culture + History

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Distillations: Science + Culture + History

"Frequency. Chapter two the medical history of migraines. Also sexism. Ancient Egyptian scripture is from twelve hundred BC this painful migraine like headaches, the ancient Greek doctor mockeries, you know, the guy who's called the father of modern medicine and the one who actually wrote the Hippocratic oath, he talked about headaches visual disturbances, aka Auras around four hundred BC, but it wasn't until the second century AD that migraines were officially discovered by the Greek doctor ARTAS of capita. She now he described them as effective one side of the head description that still rings true and this led to the term migraine which comes from the Greek word hemmitt cranial or half skull after a few thousand years, you'd think we might know more about migrants than we do and McGregor is a doctor who specializes in women's health and headaches and London, and she gets migraines herself the very first make an attack hut. I was at I was a medical student to the. Time. And I was actually in hospital at the time I've been unwell, and I could suddenly see this very bright lights zigzagging across my field division. It started just this. This white bright bright spot. And I thought I had a stroke. A ready did not know what was wrong with me. And I spoke to the the medical team about to the doctors. And they said were they didn't really know what it was as well and thinks suggestions for how to treat. Migraines can be unhelpful at best and harmful at worst. If you went to the listen to everything where you read everything about managing headaches. You'd never be to live too. Because people be telling you the county cheesy Conti chocolate you can't drink any alcohol. You can't do this. You can't do that. It's already really negative in popular imagination migrants have become a woman's illness. Even though we know that migraines affect men to we know that doctors underestimate female pain, and that could explain why we just know less about migraines. They aren't studied as much as other chronic illnesses throughout history the causes and treatment of migraines have been linked to superstition. In the middle ages Hildegard von Bing in thought her migrant or as revisions messages from God. She called them reflections of the living light these mysteries. One does which I reveal to you what previously unknown. But I show and give them to you now. So that you may make them known to the burning hearts of the faithful. Around this time migrants also became associated with witchcraft in the eighteenth century migrants were tied to race and class. Wealthier people were thought to have more delicate nervous systems, you might be with your you might be more creative more musical more literary. But it came with the stone side that you might get sick more often, you might be more fragile. Joanna Kempner is a sociologist who wrote a book about migraines called not tonight migraine and the politics of gender and health and she lives with migraines herself. In contrast, people who were working class would have thought to have more rope year thicker nerves like actually physiologically rope your nerves, and those nurse made people sturdier, and it meant that they didn't feel pain as much, but it also meant that they weren't they were like slower in thinking. And if you were a person who was from Africa and perhaps asleep in the new world, the belief was that your nerves were so thick and ropy that you can feel pain at all. And of course, that would mean that you wouldn't have very quick thoughts. So this whole notion of of what nervous systems Jide and how they transmit a pain was the kind of basis for this race race. Class hierarchy in the scientific notions of race. And this idea grows in the nineteenth century, so people with nervous temperament who have migraine like the the leat an intellectuals, particularly men are people who if you've never permit. You might be creative. You might be able to think really quickly, but you might get struck by migraine if you do too much of that work like if you're doing too much writing you might need to take a break because that will bring on a migraine today me that migrants mostly affect women, but one of the most influential migraine, researchers focus mostly on men his name was Harold wolf. And he's considered the father of headache medicine in the nineteen thirties and forties. He developed a concept known as the migraine personality. And that's an idea that still around today. The reason why he is revered in headache medicine now because he was very scientific about understanding migraine he did a lot of experiments demonstrating that migraine was actually by logical and. Linked to changes in cranial vascular wolf suffered from migrants himself. And it seems like he projected his own personality onto the disease. He worked at Cornell Medical school on New York's upper east side. So he saw mostly wealthy people people who were highly successful and hardworking people like him. And so he started to think about people with migraine as ambitious successful perfectionist and officiant he thought they were good people good moral character. And he thought they were linked to the cranial vascular because these people get stressed out and their cranial vascular would kinda get a tight. And then when they finally were able to relax cranial vascular would get too big it would expand. And that would be the migraine. And so he would suggest to them that they should go play some squash every afternoon, he was mostly talking about his male patients, which I found interesting. I thought that he was going to be talking completely about women, but a medicine people. I found physicians mostly talked about their men male patients, and I think that this was fairly typical. But here's where things could even weirder. He theorized that women with migraines were inadequate wives and mothers. He saw them as chronically unsatisfied housewives aim capable of completing socially conscripted wifely duties. That's right. I'm talking about sex. He talked about them as frigid when he talked about his male patients with migraine and their sex lives. He also fought that they were sexually unsatisfied. But of course, he thought that was because they had wives who wouldn't have sex with them. So one of the things that I see throughout migraine medicine is that this very gendered and really incredibly sexist way of saying that people with migraine when they have problems, the Ben it's always about, you know, they're using their brain or studying too hard. They're writing things that are like two brilliant and the women like they should not be thinking at all. And you know, there's something wrong with their. The way they have sex. In the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies were panels full of physicians who openly talked about putting their migraine. Patients in psychiatric facilities women with migraines became women with mental illness. So it's not surprising that in our current era. Kempter herself was amazed to be treated with respect by doctors ITO menus ago. When I was first getting into the field, I had been come. So accustomed to having my pain dismissed, by physicians, and so a customer to be treating to to having been treated like neurotic woman that when I went to my first headache conference. I was shocked to see that. There were pictures of brains everywhere. I couldn't believe that all of these headache doctors were taking migraine. So seriously. I don't know what I expected like maybe I thought that they would all just be laughing at me like I was. So I was like, wow. Look at all these people taking this pain. I have. Seriously. It felt great. But at the same time Kempner notice that doctors talked about how people with migraines were different. They said the brains couldn't handle things like changes in weather or estrogen. I was like, oh, I see what they're trying to do. They're trying to be helpful. But I was worried about that. And I didn't think that actually sounded that much different than the things I was reading through history. It's always still about the person with migraine trying to protect themselves against these external forces. You gotta protect your brain against everything malevolent that's happening around it. And the thing about putting the causes of migraine on the individual is that it also puts the responsibility for solution or belief on the individual migraine medication is advertise much like many other Masud goal ads usually almost always it's white women. And they're done up in such a way that you think maybe they're much richer than you are migraines aren't just bad headaches steal moments from my life. This is an advertisement for. Excedrin? There's a white woman lying in bed. She's rubbing her temples and the room is dark her cell phone beeps, and it shows a photo of her husband child it works fast and lasts for hours. Excedrin specializes in treating migraines. Which is why moments lost? Migraines are moments gained with excedrin by showing all of these women not doing the thing. They're supposed to do like taking care of children or being there for their family or being at work. The really ignoring the fact that most people with migraine or most people's chronic pain are actually showing up all the time and doing their work and taking care of what they need to care for as best. They can maybe it's not always pretty, and maybe it doesn't always look great. And maybe it's not the best of the way they want to do it. But people in pain are warriors. migrants play on the sense of guild where women are supposed to be devoted wives. Mothers and employee's migraine robs them of this migraine medication is the answer. Even though we know that no medication is perfect. Not even remotely.

migraines headaches Joanna Kempner visual disturbances Africa Hildegard von Bing McGregor Cornell Medical school London Kempter Harold wolf New York Masud thousand years
"migraines" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Two dollars a month and So even the best up to find sue's process Mitchelson gluten take people. I get I actually billionaires comes from you and they have a Arne cannibalisms, either right up against the harder down in the family, and and, within, ninety days and go, away Cain the body will repair itself even right raw materials and stop the ongoing damage incriminatory sits This Email in dock from someone? Who says they have cyclical vomiting syndrome, is there anything that they, can do about this condition I've ever heard of. That before Yeah No doctors give names the things that are pretty simple and usually cyclical, vinyl. Vomiting we're. Talking you need to answer some questions and they have x. men German Thais rises to the bowel, disease and they have a tendency history dance didn't have ringing in their nears and. Migraines migraines ringing in the ears or, migraines osteoporosis in this call and the eighth cranial nerve get squeezed as the comes from inside, the there's going to be outside and you. Get Vertigo you feel like you have motion sickness along with the. Nausea and vomiting and it used to, be called them in years is easily renamed wallich's vertigo 'cause I figured out what is still, say you gotta pharmacy your inner ear no Honesty poses in the skull and. So here's a case where again they wanna, get rid of all the bad? Prizes I wanna take the one hell hard packed one hundred pounds. Bodyweight, these EM crane stigler and a half. A teaspoon of the same cream in, the morning when they wake up again it's repot You have to put down nature. Of the q tip like they're trying to get out of there I think uses him cream and the Trump oil on their temple to help with that they can, take the ultimate enzymes are enzymes can take to those say Tunas where, he's, down to the water and we'll help with. Nausea and don't forget that TVD oil that comes out maybe available. Now but certainly a couple of weeks and you call the office and say hey I won't be one of the, first one Just to, rub it on your tummy and it's one of those miracles is rubbing, your, tummy quiets everything down all on the inside That's a, great, idea to do, that to dock it shows that you're on, the cutting edge west of the Rockies Sean is in Santa Barbara California go ahead Sean you Four, months ago asked. Me to speak to. As Parkinson's shy the. Parkinson's, right right at. One time you said you wanted to speak to. This gentleman and I was trying to but I couldn't so now I can't I've now you, can, okay so, I, have I I thought this. Was genetic. Is the doctor doesn't believe. No medic okay but my mother had Parkinson's. And what age to mcelwain generation. Which I have I'm blind like one I she was blind Parkinson's my mother. At is, okay, she. Was blind my only my aunt adequate doc hold on let him finish this up go ahead, so they all. Had had this so. I'm fighting this thing. Differently. What I'm eating Like I. Love my eggs I put what I, eat is I eat the, I drink the egg yolk and then I cooked. The really soft the scramble I put. It in a corn tortilla I don't have gluten and I put Gaba sour cream on then I put a little hot sauce on there. And then I eat it and then I. Have with my refried beans and then what I have also help my food is I. Have him seeds Chia, seeds I have pumpkin seeds I, have almond milk black. Strap molasses breaks nutritional us, put that all in now one, guy on your show said don't put it in a neutral because, it gets rid of all. Like, does something to it well if you do it the other way and, you look at your. Bow you know, your stool.

Parkinson Vomiting Nausea vomiting syndrome Migraines Sean Arne cannibalisms sue Cain wallich Santa Barbara California one hundred pounds Two dollars ninety days milk
"migraines" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on WTVN

"You may get the tiniest amounts actually show up in your spinal cord fluid there's never been any studies showing that that can actually cause a danger although it does concern me when i think wow spinal fluid technically as long as you're not getting blackmarket bo talks they're not injecting incredible amounts even though it is the most powerful toxins in the universe that we know of when we injected in the ways we do it appears to be actually very safe what about bo talks use to fight my migraines that's something that's fda approved now and there are health insurance companies that will actually pay for that so if you've got any listeners and you've got history of migraines have get these frequent headaches u n j there are neurologists who are injecting bo talks all the various tiny muscles around your scalp and it can really help with migraines that's amazing now there's some there's some fat reducing treatments have you heard about silken life oh so this is a very interesting new treatment that is the first at home fda cleared fat reduction treatment so their lasers that we use called low light lasers and i was one of the first doctors to show it on national tv gosh it was probably almost ten years ago and it was a product called is around and it literally looked like doctor octopus it had a number of different lasers that would target the body and it's called a cold laser where like a laser pointer or laser you can't feel it you know it doesn't burn your anything and somehow what happens with these lasers they caused the fat cells to open up and to basically regurgitate their contents and if you exercise if you drink a lot of water this fat can then be cleared from the body now so can life oh is the first one that's a low light laser therapy you can use at home to.

migraines bo ten years
"migraines" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Surgical is breast are breast implants interested and bow both houses a very popular procedure five million people have it done across the country every year and you know we've talked about a lot of dangerous procedures on your show you know this morning and actually believe it or not is not necessarily one of them you know there are some people who do have concerns there are studies that show that boathouse injected into the face you you may get the tiniest amounts actually show up in your spinal cord fluid there's never been any studies showing that that can actually cause a danger although it does concern me when i think of spinal fluid technically as long as you're not getting market boat talks they're not injecting incredible amounts even though it is the most powerful toxins in the universe that we know of when we injected in the ways we do it appears to be actually very safe what about botox use to fight my migraines that's something that's fda approved now and there are health insurance companies will actually pay for that so if you've got any listeners and you've got history of migraines have get these frequent headaches you j there are neurologist who are injecting bo talks all the various tiny muscles around your scalp and it can really help with migraines that's amazing now there's some there's some fat reducing treatments have you heard about silken lightbulb so this is a very interesting new treatment that is the first at home fda cleared fat reduction treatment so their lasers that we use called low light lasers and i was wondering first doctors his show it on national tv gosh it was probably almost ten years ago and it was a product called is around and it literally looked like doctor octopus it had a number of different lasers that would target the body and it's called a cold laser where like a laser pointer laser you can't feel it you know it doesn't burn your anything and somehow what happens with these lasers as they caused the fat cells to open up and to basically regurgitate their contents and if you exercise if you drink a lot of water this fat can then be cleared from the body now so can life oh is the first one that's a low light laser therapy you can use at home to.

migraines bo ten years
"migraines" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

WRFR-LP Rockland

11:47 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

"Migraines no john i thought diane wrong in the oh and do in the sun and you were something to see i know what i liked and i liked what i saw and i said to my son a lovely morning remark you were quick to agree you wanna to walk and i not in my head is i.

diane
"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"The head of been down my desk with ice packs on my back of my neck and my boss comes over and just sends me home and from a professional point of view that look good him i'm disabled and it it hurts and i have to get things done quicker than everybody else have to get things done more quickly because i know in the next hour or two on might have a migraine and so luckily i've been able to mitigate that with sometimes working from home and some times i've just had to request whether it's fm fmla that is the family medical leave act in racked to take a couple of days off from work so i can recover cause a really bad migraine can knock me out for two to three sometimes five days and so that's that's hard on my employer it's hard on me financially so all those things have have a lot of things to do with that but that's fine my thing monkey migraines how do they affect your body image do they have an impact on on the way you view your body because in a way i know personally with my migraines i feel like my body's betrayed me and i'm not gonna say that that affects whether i see myself as skinny fat beautiful or not but i hate the vessel i'm in some days i do know when i'm in the middle of a migraine i feel like just a complete and i'm a big man anyway i you know i've been a big boy off and on throughout my life and mostly because physical activity causes heat causes the problems with migraines so it's it's a bad recur sive issue there but yeah it it does make me feel like i'm not a sexy like i am not a sexual being all i have is this brain that is trying to crush me and it pulls me out of having sex it pulls me out of being sexual being and you know i fought for many years i said this is going on almost thirty five years.

migraine thirty five years five days
"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Because the way they come on you feel them start then you have whatever or which is a visual migraine go blind and i do often you can have a loss of words and not be able to speak properly and so that is really frustrating especially for somebody who talks for a living and then there's also sensitivity to light sensitivity to sound sensitivity to touch all these things start up and then the migraine will sometimes start after that i wanna take a minute and and just you know point out that migraines are different for every person i know i personally have migraines and they weren't diagnosed when i was a kid until i was well into my belt hood and then based on my own symptoms the doctors retro diagnosed me if you are out there and you have children who have odd behaviors they might complain about it feels like a stabbing in there i or headaches and you just don't believe them think about it a little bit and and talk to them because children do not have the same symptoms that dulce do frequently monkeys a special case his or some of the most extreme migraines but i know personally i had sharp minute stabbing pains that would go away in about thirty seconds all the way through my childhood and it wasn't until i was an adult and i had a full blown different kind of my grant it they diagnosed it i was having cluster migraines all the way through childhood so they're pretty debilitated monkey or as an adult they're gonna pull room start of the road because i've gone blowing that's scary when you're driving down the road you realize you're not seeing half the road anymore so i mean there are a lot of treatments out there there's a lot of things happening i watch a lot of medical pages for migraine i actually have in alert setup so that if i knew study comes out you know about it so many of you out there who suffered from my grains may have been on the medication train up.

migraines headaches thirty seconds
"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Welcome to the bbc nuggets show recording four may two thousand eighteen this is your last night because of the month for a month on sex and disability and just to throw you a curveball i'm the madam and i'm your host for today just making it a little different mostly i'm the host today because we're going to be talking with monkey monkey as you know as a host is a wonderful and crazy creature but he also has his own journey through disability and accessibility issues rebounding around almost every aspect of his life so monkey we all know you as the cuddly adorable crazy ass monkey yeah but can you talk to us a little bit about your journey i'm solutely i have been plagued he's the way i like to call it because it's been a very hard thing in my life with migraines and they started breaking in when i was ten ten years old and my very first one i had blindness i had body numbness on psalm one half of my body and then the migraine came in that just crushed the my little ten year old brain and my father he was so scared he was asking me what type of drugs i was doing needless to say i wasn't doing any drug drugs that i could tell that ten years old but it did messed me up and from there all the way through my young adulthood my teenage years i had to battle out of school you know mistakes at school i shouldn't say bow out at miss days in school not go to special events have to leave things early it does affect every aspect of my life like you said all the way up until you know this year and it it hurts people understand what would a headache is migraine is different affect in the brain and it really triggers office something different i used to like an m two mini strokes.

headache bbc migraine ten ten years ten years ten year
"migraines" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on WTVN

"Approach germany veteran and i d came c to new moved york american and veterans um helps set up more a practice than a million veterans and in life he changing was ways very involved every max year grissom when jet he health was a were a support young medical more student victories for he veterans suffered from migraines and t a vorg and he i mean really debilitating todd migraines ant abc and he news tried everything to get rid of them and couldn't and so finally he started experimenting with his diet and this is long before anyone was doing anything like this and one of the things that was successful for him is that he landed upon an all natural diet that's at that time consisted mainly of apples just raw apples and uh he noticed that that was one of the things that uh that cured his mike rates so he developed this a diet and this sort of methods of of of natural healing trust through very specific combinations of fruits and vegetables and ultimately juicing organic fruits and vegetables because obviously they were they were pure and cleaner of course back in his day and age you didn't have to worry quite so much as we do today about organic versus nonorganic but um uh so what's he um uh he one of his patience was suffering from migraines and he also had a very bad skin tuberculosis very bad skin rashes and uh that were chronic and that wouldn't go away so he gave he p prescribed be the diet of the apples for the um uh migraines and found out that not only get his migraines go away but so did his skin to per kilo sus so he.

grissom migraines germany
"migraines" Discussed on Healthy Lifestyle Show

Healthy Lifestyle Show

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"migraines" Discussed on Healthy Lifestyle Show

"And one year after that i was so thick that i ended up having sell everything andrew hall with my parents because of his or ali i had to give up everything i went from having a six of a job i edge horses raise srs otter we were of or hours away our my family and i just slowly poisoning progressed progressively got worse and worse than to the point where i just pushes the parents i after the loop diagnosis i was really lucky to new woman who had the best and told me that the natural way was ready to go in for me it was really hard to change that thinking because i had a warrior degree in biomedicine i was trained that way i was apothecary scientifically so making a switch to natural healing which is not evidence as rid in the medical profession was really a big shift early but i'm really glad i saw all the x mackie she was taking i had also have migraines on the seven and with with on antidepressants in reach jeans and i tried so hard to get off those drugs it was actually the reason why i didn't pursue medical school was because i eat applications what knee the fact that they couldn't get off of that so after the lat lucas diagnosis i started to really change my diets earned when it didn't work out the way i wanted to get better and the worse giants would a work for a little while or they wouldn't work at all i ask myself the question why is it at some people are able to eat with a lot enough feel rain so that sent me on a new coptic or path on looking for the roof of my elusive in because there was more than when there was the we business jones migraines ashington on lupus is basically a diagnosis of his taking bunches of dems labour watt so the joint being chee are the butterfly rashed as having a lot of issues with my heart time so i was on this mission find out of my organiser the wi i wasn't able to eat food people could.

wi andrew hall ali lucas one year