23 Burst results for "Middlebury"

North Korea Expands Uranium Enrichment Plant

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

North Korea Expands Uranium Enrichment Plant

"Photos show North Korea is expanding a uranium enrichment plant recent satellite images show the north is building up a uranium enrichment plant at its main Yongbyon nuclear complex analyst Jeffrey Lewis and two of experts at Middlebury institute of International Studies in Monterey CA in a report the expansion probably indicates that the north plans to increase its production of weapons grade uranium at the site by as much as twenty five percent the assessment comes off to the north recently raised tensions by performing its first missile tests in six months I made it long dormant nuclear disarmament diplomacy with the U. S. I'm Charles the last month

Yongbyon Nuclear Complex Middlebury Institute Of Intern Jeffrey Lewis North Korea Monterey Charles
"middlebury" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:58 min | 4 months ago

"middlebury" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"As a big san francisco giants fan. I was looking forward to playing the nats and listening to you complain about the bullpen. He certainly enjoyed it somehow. Wander swear oh pitched a scoreless inning. In the nats pitching proved to be surprisingly good. It wasn't the horrific based running by victor rollerblades that proved to be the highlight of the series. It was instead the extended shot on the national fox broadcasts of the wall of fame with my family gathered around the television. I was able to pause the game and show them your name on the wall. Hey so only the goalie. I felt a strange sense of pride as we gaze at your name. That's what he means by hoff asked my thirteen year old daughter. She does listen to the show. Even if it's against her will does a show have a lifeguard. I'm certified. I'd be happy to serve as the official lifeguard of the show. I'd even save solicit. We are looking for for some swimming lessons for a certain four year. Old yes we are. Car linden in middlebury vermont. Middlebury is is ness khaki territory right there j. term amy went there and we went to middlebury. Josh went to middlebury michael's problems with glassware. Finding the right wine glass at his inlaws struck a chord in college. I was invited to meet the parents of my girlfriend. At the time. I grew up in lewiston maine. She grew up in manhattan. Her parents had a small dinner party in my honor. Three adult couples and the two of us. The only beverage serve was wine. I decline the wine is. I was only twenty our playing basketball in the college team and we had training rules between courses. They brought out small glasses of water. Which i was glad to see. I drank mine right down to my astonishment. The other guests daintily dip their fingers to these water glasses. Yes i drank finger bowl. I'd never seen a finger bowl in lewiston maine. They also had days in their bathroom and other concept entirely new to me. But that's another story. That college girlfriend is not the woman whom i'm being related by marriage. Neither of them but the finger bowl foe pot is not the reason. Don't drink from that bubbler. Just so great. Anna walsh in georgetown kentucky. We are currently on the homeward portion of a.

nats victor rollerblades middlebury san francisco giants hoff lewiston Middlebury vermont maine swimming amy Josh manhattan michael basketball Anna walsh georgetown kentucky
"middlebury" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"America's listening to Fox News. Lucky three. W Y PC Mobile news on the level off the go, she says. She's have enough. It's cloudy and 48 degrees downtown. I'm Donny Burgess. Here's what's trending at 10 02. Resigning over the restrictions. Kurt Darling reports on why one state lawmaker his upset with Governor Eric Holcomb state. Rep. Christie stuntman represents Middlebury in northern Indiana. She's resigning come December 14th because she feels the governor was wrong to impose covert restrictions in Indiana without any input from state lawmakers. Her family now owns Amish acres in Nappanee, and she says restrictions have been so bad for their new business. She has to focus all of her attention on that, she says Holcomb's decisions have created instability for businesses throughout the state. Kirk Darling 93 w Y VC Mobile news. It's an experience says that restaurant owners who have heated igloos and storage pods to keep outdoor seating alive as the colder winter months move in. We got lights and a little heater in there and Play board games or cards against humanity or whatever you know, we've got it ready to go and just kind of hang out and do your thing. You're a little bubble. Just I think a pretty workable system for avoiding the virus and still being able to go out for dinner. Aaron Hansen, owner of Ellison Brewing, and Neil Warner, owner of Strange Bird Talking with with with Wish TV, Both businesses let six people inside an igloo or pod. Which is based on the county's coronavirus guidelines. The state of Indiana certified its votes for the election Tuesday, Rob Connor reports on the voter turnout for the state secretary of State County, Lawson said 65% of Indiana's registered voters cast a ballot, which turns out to be just over three million Hoosiers at a 4.7 million registered voters. It's still higher than the turnout in 2016 AIM 2012 when it was 58% in Marion County. The voter turnout this year was 59%. But Hamilton County had the highest turnout in the state with 75% casting a ballot. Rob content 93 WBC Mobile news two notebooks belonging to Charles Darwin, the co originator of the theory of evolution. Have apparently been stolen, according the cameras. University staff at the University library say the notebooks have not been seen in 20 years. Police are now investigating the two notebooks are estimated to be worth millions of dollars. I'm Donny Burgess on the level on the go and on Twitter at 93. W I, b. C and w ivy si dot com But no right now get a five port jug of Napa, full synthetic motor oil and a platinum filter for just 22 98 there an iconic duo like salt and pepper. Ah hammered a nail or the holidays and awkward hugs. Can't get one.

Indiana Donny Burgess Eric Holcomb Fox News State County state secretary Kurt Darling Kirk Darling Hamilton County Nappanee America Marion County WBC Mobile Twitter Middlebury Rep. Christie Aaron Hansen Rob Connor Charles Darwin Napa
"middlebury" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on KCRW

"At Middlebury College, and he's the founder of the Climate Action Group. 3 50 dot or GE. This is the New Yorker radio hour stick around. This is a test of the emergency alert system. And by indeed committed to helping businesses find candidates with the right skills for critical roles so managers can focus on hiring the person who is a good fit. Learn more at indeed dot com slash credit. This is a test of the emergency alert system in an actual emergency. The traditional two tone CBS alert signal would have been heard, followed by official safety instructions. This concludes our weekly test of the emergency alert system on 89.9 W. Casual music fan knows.

Satellite photos show construction at Iran nuclear site

War Room

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Satellite photos show construction at Iran nuclear site

"Has began construction at its Natanz nuclear facility. That's after the head of the U. S nuclear agency acknowledged Tehran's building an underground advanced centrifuge assembly plant. After its last one exploded in a reported sabotage attack last summer. Since August. The satellite photos show Iran has built a new war re graded road to the south of Natanz toward what analysts believe is a former firing range for security forces at the enrichment facility. Analysts from the James Martin Center for Non Proliferation Studies at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies say they believe the site is undergoing excavation. Keith

James Martin Center For Non Pr Middlebury Institute Of Intern Keith Natanz Tehran Iran U. S
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So. This is a good easily, I see another you know I think we could easily see million celebratory generally without jobs without major impact. So and this is something. I think we have seen so far thinking with the covid nineteen crisis where we stand at the moment I, think the market still not fully in my view. Or interpret the default risk that still has to be translated into I want to. Ask You about that. So they're there to. To views on that one has been fed pumps liquidity into the market stock markets go up. But I've seen some people that say shouldn't really have any sect. Neither neither on the long end of the interest rate on the stock market. they you come down on. That is really upset liquidity-driven, even the stock. Market. I think. So in the sense that in the market senses that there is backup. For even to the point where we have, you know where we're seeing you know private equity. Being backed. Were bailed out and back though by Central Bank. So I think what you do give the signal in terms of your again, you coming back to the risk allocation mechanisms or capital. Allocation mechanism is that you do give you feel that there is some support being given by Central Bank by your soul market maker and you continue your being sustained in that your capital allegation process Ryan there's no no signal the given. Okay. Now. We need to change and that's. kind of that's these perverse out of three while we is absolutely needed in times of crisis. There are some very, very deep perverse outcomes you know as a result of qe and you only have to look at the fact that you have right now you have realestate market, which is unacceptable for a millennials. millennials. Because he had so much liquidity injected went either into the stock market or went to delete a state and as a nod come, you have real estate prices which are said, non accessible for the majority of millennials you have also as a result of of you know.

Ryan millennials.
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"So you do have a coin note that Stanford's cash, right. But now what we have already with with a digital currency is is actually the currency that's not actually account based or that's not actually ornette actually can be provided by virtual tokens. So that's kind of to to kind of essential elements to to to digital. So so just a lot of implications wait if if digital currency becomes standard. In the future. it has implications for dollar just you know not base that macroeconomics could could change way. I think it's it has a very, very major of impacts in the sense that I think I wanna come back on the. For Commercial Bank to print money by the extent of credit by now, if a central bank is joining the Party of credit extension by using issuing digital currency. It is actually a cleaning for part of the Pie this currently being owned by by the commercial banks. So there is this kind of calibration of market share between the commercial banks and the Central Bank, but you know I won't also to To use this as an opportunity for two different things. So I think right now with the decline in the dollar and you know the rise low prices is current here experiencing a lot of talk about you know, the the reserve currency status Brady's dollar and one of the elements. Again, I think this short-term short-term elements to be considered in the long term. So in the short term I, think you know these. Risks may be over or exaggerated, but in the long term I think what you could do with a digital currency were central bank issued digital currency is. Speak to the appeal of population at large. So you could incorporate one of those elements solution to climate change and a solution to, for example. Financial inclusion so that a lot of people that don't have a bank account. So right now, you can actually with description of a digital. Currency could actually extend that to a part of the population that you or curly not reach the. Removed intermediary in some Sunday yes. Correct. Yeah. I. Think you definitely I think this whole thing this is what I come back in my first point is going to be a whole debate being is you know what's going to be the bank's Position Commercial Banks Position?.

ornette Stanford Brady
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It cannot be country by country I know that some countries scab carbon tax, but it is not useful unless unless the entire system. Implemented trade. What you're suggesting is rather meeting for market mechanism to kick in worldwide. Why don't we take it out the biggest player in the market in this case, the Fed. and and create some some level of discipline into the market. And again. So This does the court here? I like for Milton Friedman. So only a crisis, no actual procedure will produce real change. So when that crisis occurs the actions that are taken depend on the ID. So this is also a bit of you know my my idea to share some of those ideas on the platform on the force platform but wanted to come back on. There are elements where. With. Where we have to start thinking. So we con- denied we can be proud of our footprint in two thousand twenty. So we have the six headed as I mentioned at the beginning we have six headed in a crisis. So what are some of the ideas that we could embrace I think one of the notions is to? Introduce the notion of what I would call the carrying economy rewarding economy healing economy because we are in pain, you know whether it's our economy as a nation as individuals we need healing we need caring absolutely and so So there are some notions in there I think that we. Could incorporate in in a sense so that you know given our stresses that we can see in our daily in our daily lives know especially in the realm of climate change. So there is an element whereby essential banking in this case, the Fed could issue rewards right in rewards in a sense that you could Be provided with an incentive to start in regenerating part of your economy. So let's take an example so. Now, you have a private initiative in its company, a start up company skuld regenerative network. So Regan, Network and. They are providing incentives to farmers who are you working the soil of their lamps and so the top sweat by working top Ciller delancey by moving away from synthetic fertilizers which are contributing to the overall heating up of our earth you know they are giving an incentive to enlarge to magnify the secrets, the sequestration or the the the carbon potential of the farmers land. So that could be that's an enormous benefit you know for us to society, but also for the Fed in future years having, it could prevent having to intervene as I had referred to through quantitative easing, having to print money in order to pay outs a people suffering from climate. Closed the calamities. So you could give right now all kinds of incentives. To make sure that these efforts are being Being know initiated the same for. Working on on wetlands restoration it's you know this. It could add to flood defences as we've seen last year with the Mississippi flooding we had major disruption in supply chain. These are things as a human race we see a civilization we see we can so there's solution out there if we actually you know again start to think outside the box an start to be about what those challenges are and how we actually provide the right incentives for people to reallocate resources and capital to those beneficial kind of yet. I want to quickly touch on frank one of your other of Forbes article the Fed and digital currencies. What's possible? So Most Watson digital currency Yes. So additional currency is actually a currency for which it's not tangible..

Fed Fed. Milton Friedman Ciller delancey Regan frank Mississippi
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"D- compensation for the insurance is because they have an insufficient capital. So now it's on the burden of the Central Bank to fall back on this mechanism of quantitative, easing to stimulus to pay for you know the people at suffered from the climate calamities but that's That's a common good, right. So we all have a stake into. The value of the underlying currency, the more regular debate, the more we're GONNA full back on the quantitative easing policies, the Wiki base, our currency, the more I think you know we we end up or we potentially ended up with a depreciated currency potentially creating inflation. If we go back to the Nineteen Thirties in the republic Germany says a potential link up to and a section interest from central bank. Both from a monetary policy perspective but more importantly from supervisory perspective to make sure that adequate. Discount rates are applied into the assessment of corporates, and especially when you lend money, you know in the case of banks because that's you know we have to be very careful here. So it's the central bank is actually you know the Supervisory Authority are the banks. So. supervisory authorities offense which are supervising commercial banks and indicates of these additional investors more. So you would have element whereby fed it conjunction were. Collaborating. With the SEC would actually impose this kind of you know changing in in fact. I like that idea. Frankly let me let me see. If I understand that so. Y-. A tiny zero. The market is not going to price in. Either the cost of them mental degradation right into into securities debt and equity included. but because fantasy. Is increasingly a major player in the market. where it is qualitative easing open market operations discount window interesting setting. What you're suggesting is that as a major player in the market. Fed. Could impose something on the market in such a way that the market prices will ultimately not a time equal to zero, but at a future time building that cost. Correct I. Think you know what we see with the Fed the Fed is now the market Nacre to Seoul market maker and Ham for treasuries, mortgage backed securities, and already for a very large extent you know for corporate bonds that's that's already getting. So especially when we coped corporate bonds dangerous replied, they could apply that methodology so when they purchase. The The acid from institutional holder de set that takes into account that carbon footprint the heavy past to be honest beauty by.

Fed Supervisory Authority Nineteen Thirties Seoul Germany SEC
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Trying to establish a relationship between against some the risk free. And a relation to volatility to overall the market returns. The correlation with with the from owns. Owns that comes or generates of capital. Now, again, what we have in that function we make fooled. Abstraction of the finality costs. So what we could do is we could add it as a function. Again of our observations are readings stood the co two VPN or to the finite carbon reserve. That we have So this is the The four hundred twenty tonnes that we currently have as a reserve carbohydrates. And then we can say, okay, this is going to add let's say four to five percent and again you know we could undertake more precise. Research to to calibrate the exact level, and then we can actually consider rebates as a result of the rankings in this universe of the foreign corporations. For the best performing, you could actually take away the full you know carbon margin that would be applied to fort, much sent, and so for the people that are you know heavy At which have very heavy carbon footprint, you would leave or they would not be able to date any of that cost. So what you would do as a result of this calibration methodology or change in that methodology is that you would leave a higher cost of capital for those companies that don't undertake any incentive to reduce their carbon footprint, and as a result, you know you would increase the hurler rate or discount rate. So it's a way it's a the proportion of allergies is a wage decarbonised. The discount rate that is applied. You know in fairness opinions at the moment, it's an emmy transactions in private equity transactions. So we all use a spray, the opinions based on the discount rate. Now a which you know it's emanating from the Cadillac pricing mythology, but we are not taking into account that carbon footprint. So this is a solution you know straightforward. Easy to to apprehend comprehend into to. So And that's one way by starting to recognize and reconsider the allocation of your capitalism function of people's carbon footprint and our observations of Co two PM in the atmosphere as well as the remaining. Carbon s you to reserve set at about four hundred. Yes Sort of talked out late requirements regarding disclosures..

emmy
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Providers warned. So if shareholders are looking for tactical for turns. The, the intermediate will allocate capital according to the shareholders wishes right, and so often be back to appoint that. Unless unless we have systemic change. Meaning everybody in the in the market capital Seeker capital provider. want to internalize this cost that everybody knows exist but has perverse incentive not internalize it. I do know the intermediary will have any. Any. Impact on it. Well. I think there's a couple of things there I think that I would like to absorb. So I WANNA come back on the Central Bank but let's first back on the fact that there is no willingness or no willingness to internalize these externalities of carbon footprint. So I think right now what we are seeing, we have enormous disclosure projects are underway. So we have carbon disclosure project, we have the T. safety. So this is a an acronym. Very weird acronym you know as a result of the g twenty top. Twenty nations in the world which have appointed Michael Bloomberg to start off this DC of D. and T. of these stands for. Climate stress tests related climate financial disclosures. So now, every single listed company under the G. Twenty, all apply for each of the g twenty nations heft to take a several scenarios under which climate change. Are Different tests are sort scenarist. And they have to assess the impact on their balance sheet on the supply chain on the customers and on unaccompanied himself silt right so I, think. They have to start allocating or building sufficient solvents, your cap though to withstand those crisis girls. Now, that's an element That's one the. So the TC of D is want. So you have already mentioned you know the The carpentier closure project, and so there is this over arching initiative to push every single company to come forward with Miss Closures. Right so with with what we have so now you can actually build or starting to build a universe of best in class kind of performance in the overall universe of corporations. So this is the Unilever's. The. Apples of this world or not BOTs. So now you can see now you can establish this universe and distribution of best in class. What you could come up with is also you say, okay, hate now you and let's go back to equity. We have any which I detail in the article. So it could not be half a methodology that dating from the sixties. you know for which? The the people that came up with with so it was Markovitz who Who received the Nobel Prize in the ninety s and you know for a? Else's invitation. So it's Innocents is..

G. Twenty Michael Bloomberg Nobel Prize Unilever Markovitz carpentier Miss Closures
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You know I think that we can work on it's going to take some time. And then the the deck itself correct me for. My perspective is is more for financial issue. So but I think about these three items debt. disease. And, climate change. Now a calm provoke things you see that. Yes, but they are interconnected. So I think I would agree with you that climate change is a absolutely accent I. think it saying existential threat to our ecosystem in our wellbeing and everything else that we can actually deploy from there on right so but there is a the whole thing is also. Climate change is also it's an element of man-made intervention. And so now you can get back to my four generations and I said about the reading of we only had is enduring fifty three hundred. To reading and today, it's an accessible born and ten. So, this is all as a result of. Some elements that have taken place that allow this to happen. So this is as a result, we have an excessively soclean. House gas in in in the atmosphere, which is creating the increase in in temperature right? So this is where we seeing these outcomes of climate change talent at referenced in California or indefinitely. Highs temperature up to date on record. So but. There is this connection to that, right so an. and. Again, I would concur with you the climate changes absolutely the overarching kind of element of of concern right Sir to tackle. Yeah. The problem with climate change as you know is that you can see it. So. So policy makers fully horizon fortieth decision horizons. you know this is not in the top of their DAPO FAIRA FOCUS right. it's something they can deal with four years later at least from their perspective. and so be will keep pushing it in four year increments down the down the road. And at some point at intervention reached a point that intervention is not really feasible. Correct I. Think you know there is, of course, there's an element of denial or not. You know a willingness to recognize you know the challenge the challenge hand but so there is but it's also again where I come back I think where we have some mechanisms embedded. Into our financial connie into his financial markets so Maybe let's I. Think some some elements that are one focus song in in in that regard. So you mentioned on the fact that we We only have three companies for renewable energy in the S&P five hundred today by so this is a you know out come as it is. So again, given that that debt crisis situation. So but I I, want to come back in again into perspective in. The sense that we do have A lot of money has been created since the since we have the nineteen seventy-one Bretton Woods. Of the breakdown of our financial of sorry. Not The financial system, the Gulf Stafford, and so before up until between forty five as a result of the signing of the Brennan And nineteen seventy one at the break of that agreement we had before the Atti- you. Between the amount of money that was outstanding and you know a finite amount of gold. Now with the tensions that arose especially the budget. Attentions that arose as a result of financing of the Vietnam War that. Link had to be. Broken up in had to be released so. Yes let's go into your your paper. So more to adopt the natural capital, what does the future cold? So you have some some ideas there. So natural capital can be defined as a Woodstock's natural assets beach include..

Woodstock Bretton Woods California Brennan Gulf Stafford
"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

But Why Live: Bats

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:30 min | 1 year ago

But Why Live: Bats

"One of the ways to help bats is to learn more about them and care about them and find out how you can make sure the bats in your area are staying safe and healthy. So let's talk about bats now with Berry Gins Linger very is a bat advocate. And he and his wife. Maureen founded the Vermont Bat Center where they help educate people about bats and also they rescue bats. The last time I talked to bury he had some bats hibernating in special hibernation area in his house that he and Maureen have set up very. It's nice to talk with you again. Thank you so what were you doing today? Because we're talking to you here. Live on the radio at one but I understand. You've actually been driving around the state already to deliver a bat to travel downstate to somewhere else. That's right I left early this morning and drove down to Middlebury Carry hand picked up the bat for me and drove it from there. All the way down to Dorset There were actually three bets in this group and all three have now been successfully released back into the wild. Why did you have them to begin with? I had them because they came out of their hibernation cave way too soon right in the middle of winter when it was snowy and freezing cold and there were no bugs to eat so the biologists that were checking their hibernation area found them and brought them up from Dorset all the way up to us at the bat center in Milton. And so you keep these bats safe for the rest of the winter as long as they should be hibernating that's corrected and this particular group stayed together through the winter. We kept them healthy and fat feeding them. Delicious meal worms and When it got to be Spring and the bucks started coming out we said okay. It's now time to turn them loose back where they came from so to turn them loose back where they came from. They had to go all the way back down to dorset so very before we get to our callers and emails and we have a lot. So we're going to get through as many questions as we can. Let's establish some information so that we know a little bit about bats as we have this conversation. What are bats they fly? But they're not birds they fly and they are not birds. They are the only flying mammals they're mammals just like dogs and cats and humans. We are all mammals and bats are in that group of mammals but they can fly and I can't no. I wish I could too. But but being a mammal means they have for or hair they they have their babies drink milk. They give birth to live baby so all true about bats. All that is true about bets. No additives no eggs. They don't lay eggs If you can think of a bat doing all the same things that we humans to Except they can fly. That is so cool. I'm and how many different kinds of bats are there in the world. Well in the whole world there are about one thousand four hundred different kinds of bats but up here in Vermont. We only have nine keys only nine. Can you name them all? We have little Brown Bat. The Big Brown bat the northern long eared small footed the tri-colored the hoary bat the Red Bat and the silver haired Bat and Indiana Bat. Then the that's way forgotten. Yeah but see. That was the only one I could remember. So we've got nine the two of us there we go. Let's go to one of our calls. Here's Max who's calling in from Elmore Vermont. High go right ahead. What's your question for? Berry last back. I'm that bride good question very wide. Some suck blood. That is a very good question. That's actually don't suck blood on find an animal. That has an injury. Now keep in mind. There are no blood sucking or blood. Drinking bats anywhere except a little area in South America so all the bats that we have up here in Vermont. Don't drink blood. But when they do they look for an animal. That is injured. That might have a little bit of blood on it or they might sneak up on us a chicken that sleeping in a tree and make a tiny little nip in their foot so that a little drop of blood comes out and then they lick it up but they don't actually suck the blood. Well that's good to know and coroner from Boston also wanted to know that question but we have other questions about what bats eat. So you've just said Berry that some bats Do Drink Blood Benjamin in Massachusetts wants to know. Do all bats eat fruit? All bats do not eat fruit in fact there are about two hundred and fifty different fru of oars fruit eating bats but there are over seven hundred insect eating bats so there are way more bats that eat insects than there. Are those that eat fruit? Are there any meat eating bats? There are meeting bets? We call them carnivores and they eat things like mice and frogs and lizards things that they are able to catch the obviously. They couldn't catch a big huge thing. Like a Moose. 'cause they're way too big but they can catch small animals and lizards in little frogs. So those are the carnivores and there are others that drink the nectar from flowers. Well that's important. Isn't it very because we often think of honeybees? I when we think about pollinators. Maybe some people picture hummingbirds bees all bats also very important as pollinators. They are very important Here in the United States we do have some pollinating bats and if you think of Pictures that you've seen of out West in the desert and you see these great beautiful cactus growing out in the desert. Those are growing there. Because the bats pollinate those cactus flowers to make new CACTUS and they've been doing that for millions of

Vermont Bat Center Brown Bat Indiana Bat Vermont Berry Maureen Dorset United States Elmore Vermont South America Milton MAX Massachusetts Boston
"middlebury" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"middlebury" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Wheel drive traffic on the threes it's four twenty three and we begin out west on the pike the westbound side him over it we have a two car crash with a car fire all lanes are closed that's by route one forty six in Middlebury all lanes are taken you're jammed up when state police are trying to work on getting a detour going for you now eastbound on the pike work crews by the native service pods are clearing out shortly route two west same deal usually work crews in place but they'll be gone soon that's by route one eleven Harvard route nine into ninety are in good shape ninety three southbound that the leverage circle to the o'neill tunnel need double lane closure is being picked up now the operative to government center Callahan total re opened as is the leverage circle ramp to ninety three south airport tunnel Ted Williams tunnel in east and west that's being cleared next right now that just be living rights summering Callahan okay as are the River Road in the Tobin bridge south of the city no trouble in the expressway ten minutes between their Neil Tyler Braintree split ninety three south bound the work crew by route twenty four in Randolph is gone the ramp to route twenty four has been reopened route three forty minutes became Braintree in the Sagamore bridge ninety five half hour from cans of the Rhode Island line northern town ninety three north leveling taken by the fells way that's going to stay there all day and it's not an issue at this point four ninety five south you reducing speed for work after route one nineteen in Littleton one twenty fifteen minutes between ninety three in the pike route one revered one twenty eight in twenty minutes this report sponsored by Peter dogs who used to be trapped in crates from nine to five every day are now enjoying more quality time with their guardians let's keep that.

o'neill tunnel Callahan Tobin bridge Neil Tyler Braintree Randolph Littleton Middlebury Harvard Ted Williams Sagamore bridge Rhode Island Peter
North Korea Seen Expanding Rocket Launch Facility It Once Promised To Dismantle

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

North Korea Seen Expanding Rocket Launch Facility It Once Promised To Dismantle

"Satellite imagery shared exclusively with NPR shows that North Korea appears to be expanding a key rocket launch facility NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports it's a facility the north once pledged to dismantle the images taken by the commercial company planet are of the so Hey satellite launching station in twenty eighteen north Korean leader Kim jong-un's promised to dismantle that facility if a deal could be reached with the U. S. but following the breakdown of diplomacy the north resumed activities that so Hey creating tests of missile engines Dave Schmirler senior analyst with the Middlebury institute says the new images show roads popping up in a previously abandoned part of so Hey it's a site that hasn't seen a lot of physical construction activity in a long time Schmirler believes the roads are probably a precursor to still more construction but the ultimate purpose of the

NPR North Korea Geoff Brumfiel Kim Jong-Un Senior Analyst Middlebury Institute Dave Schmirler
"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Former athlete at Middlebury College is not the first athlete who played contact sports who took his own life he is also not the first twenty something to struggle with mental health problems but his story illustrates the challenges parents face as they decide whether to let their sons and daughters play contact sports as well as deciphering conflicting messages from scientists in sports leagues about head trauma an in depth look at concussions from Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports Nancy set this up this story about Matthew Benedict who played it basically all contact sports growing up top football hockey lacrosse in out there at Middlebury College and he and I'm in July he committed provided some topic I mean people are building where he was working and his parents well he didn't bring would not able to be had the only thing that and they think that it was the culmination of hit that he took over his ears and playing contact sports and when he died he was only twenty six next week China twenty thought about that what I thought was interesting in your story too and I guess perhaps disappointing from a medical standpoint is that C. T. easy can only be diagnosed during an op during autopsy yeah and that is one of the things you know there's there still is no much about the heat that we don't know on you know most researchers will say that there is a link between yeah EP exactly what the lingo they're still trying to find out and part of that is going to be finding a wedding diagnosed and researchers think that they're getting closer right there so much and until we have that we can't answer all the questions like if somebody what wrong genetic like an alcoholic drug drug use if there is any accelerate the progression of the disease there's there's still a lot that we need to find out and getting a leather bag it can get pretty much all of those questions boy it's disappointing to I guess that there's still a stigma attached to this as I guess the the as the Benedicts found out right yeah map you wrote a very personal stake a couple days after he graduated from Middlebury he had been struggling with mental health issues is your speed at which the title game one he had to really hard to get and they believe that he had post concussion syndrome as a result right he wrote the fact they and just really they were very openly and very honestly talk about the issues that it had been a failure is in talk about a couple of times that you need but whether they were officially need to reply to pump the water just you know whatever wise you would open about it and while some people crave comport there are other people who were saying you should be writing like that you know whether it's because of the school one as a gesture to the school could've been doing wanted to adopt Michael how or just not you know me and put it out there because it's become players might yet and after that you really withdrew that he you know he he he had to have struggled with mental illness so that people would die if you didn't know him well you wouldn't know that anything was wrong with anti armor columnist at USA today sports she's written a powerful piece entitled concussions and contact sports what these parents learned from their son's death what struck me too was would seem like a sudden change in personality for Mr Benedict was at the age of twenty one right we came home one Christmas break anybody but normally the life of the the Christmas spirit was completely removed yeah and his parents are very very very much that he would would drop in the family his mom said that often times you go upstairs room and she get out of bed and she could that wasn't her son and he told her that he had been in a funk for more than a month so it it can balance the rapidly and they work mightily to get help but you know unfortunately that is better than it could get me in and how we are bringing it in the right I think we're gonna have to work like that for the parents of Mr Benedict I I don't want to say their messages or guess what their messages that it might be like don't play contact sports of what they say I I'm just to hold it in they both say that if they had to do it over and their their boys would not have played sports what how that contact sports at the age that they did you know they started playing when they are sick content in your call okay and it's not just football that's that's one of the really big tech way to restore you it is not just a product that people need to be concerned about but also to the Benedict want to remove the stigma especially among young people that they know that they are free to if they are struggling that they are free to go and seek help or that they will approach somebody that they will feel that they need to hide the gray issues that they're having and and that they can go and talk to somebody is Nancy Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend coming up next.

Middlebury College
"middlebury" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"middlebury" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"So former athlete at Middlebury College is not the first athlete who played contact sports who took his own life he is also not the first twenty something to struggle with mental health problems but his story illustrates the challenges parents face as they decide whether to let their sons and daughters play contact sports as well as deciphering conflicting messages from scientists in sports leagues about head trauma an in depth look at concussions from Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports Nancy set this up this story about Matthew Benedict who played basically all contact sports growing up top football hockey lacrosse in out there at Middlebury College and he and I'm in July he committed provided on top of having to call our building where he was working and his parents well he didn't bring would not able to be had the card we think that and they think that it was the culmination of hit that he took over in here is a plane contact sport and when he died you would only twenty six six week China twenty thousand but that what I thought was interesting in your story too and I guess perhaps disappointing from a medical standpoint is that C. T. eat can only be diagnosed during an op during autopsy yeah and that is one of the things you know there's there still is no much about the heat that we don't know on that you know most researchers will say that there is a link between our MCP exactly what the windows they're still trying to find out and part of that is going to be finding a wedding diagnosed and researchers think that they're getting closer right there are some out there yet and until we have that we can't answer all the questions like if somebody what wrong genetics play can alcohol and drug drug use if there is any accelerate the progression of the disease there's there's still a lot that we need to find out and getting a living diagnostics it can be pretty much all of those questions why is disappointing to I guess that there's still a stigma attached to this as I guess the the as the Benedicts found out right yeah map you wrote a very personal stake a couple days after he graduated from Middlebury and he had been struggling with mental health issues is your speed at which I don't game one he had to really hard to get and they believe that he had post concussion syndrome as a result right he wrote that that they and just really they were very openly and very honestly talk about the issues that he had if you want to be a failure is in me talk about a couple of times that you need but whether they were officially need to reply to come so order to you know whatever wise you would open about it and welcome people Corey from quiet there are other people who were saying man you should be writing like that you know whether it's the creek local school all or nothing just before could've been doing wanted to adopt Michael how or just not you know me in addition put out there because the teacher employers might yet while right after that you really withdrew that he you know he he he had to have struggled with mental illness so that people would die if you didn't know him well you wouldn't know that anything was wrong with anti armor columnist at USA today sports she's written a powerful piece entitled concussions and contact sports what these parents learned from their son's death what struck me too was what seem like a sudden change in personality for Mr Benedict was at the age of twenty one right we came home one Christmas break anybody but normally the life of the the Christmas spirit was completely removed yeah and his parents are very very very much that he would would drop in the family it mom said that often times you go upstairs room and she just getting out of bed and she could that wasn't her son and he told her that he had been in a funk for more than a month so it it could ballot to rapidly and they work mightily to get help they you know unfortunately that is better than insidious disease and we are bringing it into the light I think we're gonna have to work like that for the parents of Mr Benedict I I don't want to see their messages or guess what their messages that it might be like don't play contact sports of what they say I am in the market just to follow you they both say that if they had to do it over and there they were boys would not have played sports with how my contact sports at the age of but they did you know they started playing when they were six and seven your call okay and it's not just football that's that's one of the really big takeaways from the story is that it is not just a product that people need to be concerned about but also to the Benedict want to remove the stigma especially among young people that they know that they are free to if they are struggling that they are free to go and seek help or that they will approach somebody that they will feel that they need to hide the gray issues that they're having and and that they can go and talk to somebody is Nancy Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend coming up next the number one stressor.

Middlebury College
"middlebury" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"middlebury" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Former athlete at Middlebury College is not the first athlete who played contact sports who took his own life he is also not the first twenty something to struggle with mental health problems but his story illustrates the challenges parents face as they decide whether to let their sons and daughters play contact sports as well as deciphering conflicting messages from scientists in sports leagues about head trauma an in depth look at concussions from Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports Nancy set this up this is a story about Matthew Benedict who played it basically all contact sports growing up top football hockey lacrosse in out there at Middlebury College and he and I'm in July he committed provided on top of having to call our building where he was working and his parents well he would bring would not able to be happy we pretty hot at and they think that it was the culmination of hit that he took over his ears and playing contact sports and when he died he would only twenty six six week China twenty thousand perfect what I thought was interesting in your story too and I guess perhaps disappointing from a medical standpoint is that C. T. eat can only be diagnosed during an op during autopsy yeah and that is one of the things you know there's there still is so much about the heat that we don't know on that you know most researchers will say that there is a link between our MCP exactly what the windows they're still trying to find out and part of that is going to be finding a leading diagnosed and researchers think that they're getting closer right they're still not there yet and until we have that we can't answer all the questions like if somebody predispose what wrong genetics play can alcohol and drug drug use if there is any salary the progression of the disease there's there's still a lot that we need to find out and getting a leather bag it can get pretty much all of those questions boy it's disappointing to I guess that there's still a stigma attached to this as I guess the the as the Benedicts found out right yeah map you wrote a very personal aspect a couple days after he graduated from Middlebury and he had been struggling with mental health issues is your speed at which won the title game one he had to really hard to get and they believe that he had post concussion syndrome as a result right he wrote that that they enjoy really they were very openly and very honestly talked about the issue that it had been a failure is when we talk about a couple of times that you need but whether they were especially need to reply to come so order to you know whatever wise you would open about it and while some people crave comport there are other people who were saying man you should be writing like that you know whether it's because of the school or does he just knew the school could then doing wanted to adopt Michael how or just not definition put it out there because it's become players might yet and after that he really withdrew that he you know he he he had to have struggled with mental illness so that people would die if you didn't know him well you wouldn't know that anything was wrong speak with Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports she's written a powerful piece entitled concussions and contact sports what these parents learned from their son's death what struck me too was would seem like a sudden change in personality for Mr Benedict was at the age of twenty one right we came home one Christmas break anybody but normally the life of the the Christmas spirit was completely removed yeah and his parents are very very very much that he would would drop in the family his mom said that oftentimes you go upstairs room and she kept getting out of bed and she could that wasn't her son and he told her that he had been in a funk for more than a month so it is a valid to rapidly and they work mightily to get help but you know unfortunately that it this is an insidious disease and that's how we start bringing it into the light I think we're gonna have stories like that for the parents of Mr Benedict I I don't want to say their messages or guess what their messages that it might be like don't play contact sports of what they say I am in the market just to follow you they both say that if they had to do it over and there they were boys would not have played sports what how that contact sports at the end of the day that you know they started playing when they left the content in your call okay and it's not just football that's that's one of the really the big takeaway to your story is that it is not just a product that people need to be concerned about but also to the benediction want to remove the stigma especially among young people that they know that they are free to if they are struggling that they are ready to go and seek help or that they will approach somebody that they will feel that they need to hide the great issues that they're having and and that they can go and talk to somebody is Nancy Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend coming up next the number one stressor.

Middlebury College
"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Former athlete at Middlebury College is not the first athlete who played contact sports who took his own life he is also not the first twenty something to struggle with mental health problems but his story illustrates the challenges parents face as they decide whether to let their sons and daughters play contact sports as well as deciphering conflicting messages from scientists in sports leagues about head trauma an in depth look at concussions from Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports Nancy set this up this story about Matthew Benedict who played it basically all contact sports growing up top football hockey lacrosse in out there at Middlebury College and he and I'm in July he committed provided on top of having to call our building where he was working and his parents well he didn't bring would not able to be had the only thing that and they think that it was the culmination of hit that he took over here's a plane contact sport and when he died he would only twenty six next week China twenty thought about that what I thought was interesting in your story too and I guess perhaps disappointing from a medical standpoint is that C. T. easy can only be diagnosed during an op during autopsy yeah and that is one of the things you know there's there still is no much about the heat that we don't know on that you know most researchers will say that there is a link between yeah EP exactly what the lingo they're still trying to find out and part of that is going to be finding a wedding diagnosed and researchers think that they're getting closer right there so much and until we have that we can't answer all the questions like if somebody what wrong genetics play can alcohol and drug drug use if there is any accelerate the progression of the disease there's there's still a lot that we need to find out and getting a leather bag it can get pretty much all of those questions why is disappointing to I guess that there's still a stigma attached to this as I guess the the as the Benedicts found out right yeah map you wrote a very personal stake a couple days after he graduated from Middlebury he had been traveling with my health issues is your speed at which I don't game one he had to really hard to get and they believe that he had post concussion syndrome as a result right he wrote the fact they and just really they were very openly and very honestly talked about the issue that it had been a failure is in need talk about a couple of times that you need but whether they were officially need to work out of town or just you know whatever it was you he was open about it and it will fall from people Corey from quiet there are other people who were saying you should be writing like that you know whether it's because of the school board I think just the school could've been doing wanted to attract Michael how or just not the technician put it out there because it's become players might yet well and after that you really withdrew that he you know he he he had to have struggled with mental illness so that people would die if you didn't know him well you wouldn't know that anything was wrong speak with Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports she's written a powerful piece entitled concussions and contact sports what these parents learned from their son's death what struck me too was what seem like a sudden change in personality for Mr Benedict was at the age of twenty one right we came home one Christmas break anyway but normally the life of the the Christmas spirit was completely removed yeah and his parents are very very very much that he would would drop in the family his mom said that she go upstairs room and she he can get out of bed and she could that wasn't her son and he told her that he had been in a funk for more than a month so it it can ballot to rapidly and they work mightily to get help they you know unfortunately that is better than intellect Indian and that's how we start bringing it into the light I think we're gonna have to work like that for the parents of Mr Benedict I I don't want to say their messages or guess what their messages that it might be like don't play contact sports of what they say I am not going to hold it in they both say that if they had to do it over and their their boys would not have played sports what how much contact sports at the age of but they did you know they started playing when they were second seven your call okay and it's not just football that's that's one of the really big tech way to restore it that it is not just a product that people need to be concerned about but also to the Benedict want to remove the stigma especially among young people that they know that they are free to if they are struggling that they are ready to go and seek help or that they will approach somebody that they will feel that they need to hide the gray issues that they're having and and that they can go and talk to somebody is Nancy Nancy armor columnist at USA today sports twelve minutes now after the hour on this weekend coming up next the number one stressor.

Middlebury College
How Virtual Reality Can Help People Better Understand Climate Change

Morning Edition

02:09 min | 2 years ago

How Virtual Reality Can Help People Better Understand Climate Change

"How do you show people and convince them of a future that has never been that's one of the biggest challenges facing climate scientists and communities trying to convey the magnitude of the coming environmental change and here's Nathan rod has the story of a climate scientist who is using technology to try and drive it home near the back wall of a crowded south east Baltimore auditorium Monica Wimberley settles into a metal chair and slips a bulky gray had said over her eyes the two sides knows does not bring in front of him yeah it's a virtual reality headset the kind that you usually see at Best Buy not a community meeting and the menu here helping her is Julie on Khalil click anywhere on the screen yeah Khalil is a climate researcher and teaches at Middlebury institute of International Studies he's also the guy who helped create the virtual reality program that Wimberley is about to experience if you feel a little dizzy just close our eyes and take it all in all come help okay this is nine Wimberley is getting an immersive Google earth like view of the park in our neighborhood as it looks today it's a low lying industrial area close to the port shoreline baseball diamonds a senior center her view is like a birds hovering just off the coast looking inlet but this program also shows a future then it tells me the slide this old and as soon as I can go a future with rising seas all my grown what is right there Wimberley is now seeing what could happen here as he levels rise here's Kahneman row you Galloway senior and Michelle Gregory seeing the same the water is coming news as well take out a lot a lot of war under water the senior center is partly underwater housings underwater

Nathan Rod Scientist Monica Wimberley Best Buy Khalil Researcher Wimberley Michelle Gregory Baltimore Middlebury Institute Of Intern Galloway
"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"middlebury" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Got an update for you. All from the campus free speech wars where there are good guys and bad guys. The conservatives are the good, guys. The left wing maniacs try to shut down speech. They don't like those are the bad guys. And we have a very interesting. Very interesting case study here of just what goes on at Middlebury college these days up in Vermont. I think that'll berries in Vermont. I forget where yeah, it's in Vermont. It's a small liberal arts college. It's very similar to where I went to school. Amherst, college Amherst, is obviously better. But yeah, that's right. Middlebury alumni, take. But here's what happened back in twenty seventeen. There was a speech by Charles Murray, who is very anti-trump and is somebody who is a, a real academic with, with three credit for a whole bunch of different published a whole bunch of different books. He's published, but he's the author of the bell curve, which drove liberals completely insane. Because it walks you through the data on, I q, and there is one chapter because I've actually read the book there's one chapter that deals with the distribution in the aggregate of IQ across different races, and that forever has made Charles Murray, someone that the left loves to hate even though he's a I've had him on the show before. He's a very reasonable and intelligent, fellow and is not in any way racist. I believe he's actually married to in Asian woman. He's not racist, and that's all just a smear, but he went to speak at Middlebury back in two thousand seventeen we talked about this a fair amount here in the freedom hot and not only did they try to shut down the left try to shut down his speech with the zoo noises, and the, the horns and all the usual tactics of the heckler's veto, but they even injured a female professor named Alison stagger. I mean they, they actually hurt her. She was trying to escort him out of the building. I mean this, this was like. Bob, and there was there was violence. They assaulted people. They assaulted invited guests at Middlebury and nobody was expelled. I if I were in charge in that school. I would wanna list of names of every person that made physical contact or threaten physical contact with invited speaker and I would say pack your crap you are gone. This is a private university private college. You have no right to be here you're out, but they don't do that anymore. They don't enforce consequences against leftist, and Saturday on these campuses, because they invite leftist insanity in many ways, they teach leftist insanity. Well, there's a there's another Middlebury speech case came up here and this involves resort llegado, who is a polish member of the European parliament quite a resort. That's a cool name. So this guy's a member of the European parliament, you think that he should be an individual that people want to college campus up in bravado would want to hear from oh, but what's the problem, he is critical of multiculturalism and gay marriage? Oh, no. That's not. You're not allowed to think that anymore. The left says, remember? Not even clear if he opposes these things. He just has criticism of them and the students signed a petition that claim that he built his career off of homophobic, Zena phobic, racist and misogynistic discourse, and they call the political science department at Middlebury college to get rid of his sponsored speech, and they said they're going to demonstrate of course, you know, our streets. Beta meals unite against speech. And in this case, though, there was a kind of underground, free speech movement that popped up on campus. So risk guard from Poland was told that he should show up and there were, there was one professor, and this is after they sent out the usual because of security and safety risks. We're going to cancel the event. So they're just caving to the mob, caving to the heckler's veto. I mean, Middlebury should be ashamed of itself, or shamed of itself for this, but nonetheless, they, they like a lot of these schools that, you know, I used to get invited to go speak a Milena mater when I worked the CIA, and I can say very little now I have a ton to say a lot to share with those kids they have. No, they have never invited me back no interest in having back to campus whatsoever. It's my own school school that, you know, cost, my family a fortune to send me to won't even invite me back to speak. No interest, good, a bunch of punks. But this professor Matthew Dickinson credit to him for believing in free speech and free discourse, he said that he would bring Mr. look good. Co this polish a member of the European parliament on campus and allow him to get his lecture in the professors, political science class as long as they all voted. Yes. In a secret ballot well to the credit of the students. The nine students in this class. This is the big selling point for a liberal arts colleges of the classes, are very small all nine of the students voted. Yes. Okay. So then other students kind of heard about this. Word of mouth and a full forty five students asked to be able to come and in this political science class here from this professor, so he I'm sorry to hear from this member of European parliament because this professor invited him and professor Dickinson had the following to say, I've never been more proud in my thirty years of teaching. Than to watch these students engage with the speaker push back on him. Engage. With him. It was a marvelous example of how free speech facilitates learning professor Dickinson, went on during the days of communist totalitarianism scholars from the west travel to eastern bloc nations to give underground, lectures and seminars on Wednesday. Mr. Likud, co returned the favor. Isn't that fascinating? That. Now we've reached a point after the fall of the iron curtain, the destruction of the Berlin Wall. Now, we are in a circumstance where it is. In fact, former Soviets or former Soviet states that are sending people to speak in underground lectures, on our own campuses, and our own universities because that's how hostile the campus has become so hostile colleges have become to free speech. So this was a victory in a sense for free speech at Middlebury, although a small one, and it certainly is an example of exactly what I talked about on the show, which is that these students, they're being robbed of the education, they're paying so much for it is being the they're stealing it from themselves, and the administrators that are allowing it or aiding and abetting that theft. College is supposed to be about learning learning is the exchange of ideas, including ideas, you may not necessarily agree with, or like anyone who disagrees with that is an opponent of free thought free expression and education itself. College campuses have become an embarrassment in this regard. But perhaps these underground conservative movements some of them are above ground to will gather.

Middlebury professor Middlebury college European parliament Vermont Charles Murray Berlin Wall Amherst Poland professor Dickinson Bob CIA Matthew Dickinson Alison stagger Mr. Likud Dickinson Milena abetting
The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:55 min | 3 years ago

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

"The US has begun production of a new nuclear weapon supporters of the weapons they it's needed to counter Russia, but critics worry it's taking America back to a time when nuclear weapons were more likely to be used NPR's, Jeff Brumfield has more. It wasn't that long ago with the military had plans to use nuclear weapons all over the place July nineteen sixty two these troops were the first hour army's history to engage in tactical exercise supported by live nuclear firepower. That's our KYW footage from the Nevada. Desert. Hundreds of troops rehearsed to the tech. But before they went in they fired a tiny nuclear weapon at a simulated enemy position it detonated perfectly releasing its lethal radiation back, then that was how some thought nuclear war would look nukes small enough to knock out just a couple of city blocks used together with conventional weapons like tanks and troops. Of course, that's not what happened radiation and other factors may nuclear weapons of bad fit for the battlefield, and as the US's conventional strength through battlefield nuclear weapons became less important and the end of the Cold War, the United States said well that was kind of stupid. Why did we have all the? Stuff. Let's get rid of it. Matthew crane is at the Atlantic Council. He also worked on nuclear strategy in the Pentagon, the US dismantled nearly all of its battlefield nuclear weapons. But Russia took a different path. It has kept thousands of battlefield nukes in storage. So today Russia has nuclear landmines nuclear torpedoes, nuclear depth charges nuclear artillery, nuclear short range missiles, and the Trump administration believes Russia would be tempted to use some of these weapons in conflict. If that happened chronic says, the US wouldn't be able to responding kind though only nukes it has left are big weapons designed to fight an apocalyptic nuclear war. So the administration has begun converting an existing larger warhead into a new smaller low-yield weapon. More like the old battlefield nukes. What the low yield nuclear weapons do say, no actually we have a range of options. If you use a low you'll nuke. Earlier weapon we can respond with one two or three of our own. I mean, well, it's insane. That's Jeffrey Lewis a scholar at the Middlebury institute of international studies, who's not a fan of battlefield nukes. The Trump administration's new warheads sits on the same missile that now carries a much more powerful nuclear weapon. So if the US did use it for some reason, all the Russians are going to see is that a missile that only carries nuclear warheads is heading toward Russia and Russian policy as Flannery. Putin has said many times is not to wait for it to land. In other words, Russia could unleash an attack on the US just to be safe or go ole occur is with the International Crisis Group. She says just the existence of smaller US weapons could cost the Russians to take battlefield nukes out of storage. They think wow, we need to deter that. No way are conventional weapons deter that. We have to emphasize the nuclear capability, she says that could end. Up countering the vastly superior conventional forces of the US, they're throwing away advantage. The Trump administration says several of these new smaller weapons will be ready to enter service later this year, but the administration's long-term plans for more battlefield nukes. Face a bigger obstacle. Newly elected Democrats have vowed to block them. Jeff Brumfield NPR news, Washington. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Russia United States Trump Administration Jeff Brumfield NPR Comcast Putin Nevada Matthew Crane Jeffrey Lewis America Atlantic Council Middlebury Institute Of Intern International Crisis Group Pentagon Flannery Washington